National Child Care Hotline and Web Site; Comment Request, 12105-12107 [2016-05085]

Download as PDF 12105 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 45 / Tuesday, March 8, 2016 / Notices due child and spousal support by intercepting certain Federal payments, including Federal tax refunds, of parents who have been ordered to pay support and are delinquent. The Federal Offset programs consist of a cooperative effort among the Department of the Treasury’s Bureau of the Fiscal Service, the Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE), and State child support agencies. The Passport Denial program reports noncustodial parents who owe child and spousal support above a threshold to the Department of State, which will then deny passports. On an ongoing basis, State child support agencies submit names, Social Security numbers, and the amount(s) of past-due child and spousal support of noncustodial parents who are delinquent in making payments to OCSE. Federal laws authorize information collection activities pertaining to the Federal Offset and Passport Denial programs and require State child support agencies to submit information pertaining to past-due support that meets specific criteria and to comply with Annual Certification Letter requirements: (1) 42 U.S.C. 652(b), 42 U.S.C. 664, and 26 U.S.C. 6402(c), for the offset of the Federal tax refund of the noncustodial parent; (2) 31 U.S.C. 3701 et seq. and 31 U.S.C. 3716(h), for the offset of the Federal payments other than Federal tax refunds of the noncustodial parent; and (3) 42 U.S.C. 654(31) and 42 U.S.C. 652(k), to Department of State for the denial, revocation, restriction, or limitation of the passport of the noncustodial parent. Respondents: State IV–D Agencies. ANNUAL BURDEN ESTIMATES Number of responses per respondent Number of respondents Instrument Average burden hours per response Total burden hours 54 54 54 54 173 52 52 52 1 280.65 .3 .46 .135 .4 0.01 842.40 1,291.68 379.08 21.60 485.52 Total .......................................................................................................... asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Input Record .................................................................................................... Output Record ................................................................................................. Payment File .................................................................................................... Certification Letter ............................................................................................ CSP FCE Processing screens ......................................................................... ........................ ........................ ........................ 3,020.28 Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 3,020 hours. Additional Information: Copies of the proposed collection may be obtained by writing to the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 330 C Street SW., Washington, DC 20201. Attention Reports Clearance Officer. All requests should be identified by the title of the information collection. Email address: infocollection@acf.hhs.gov. OMB Comment: OMB is required to make a decision concerning the collection of information between 30 and 60 days after publication of this document in the Federal Register. Therefore, a comment is best assured of having its full effect if OMB receives it within 30 days of publication. Written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collection should be sent directly to the following: Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project, Email: OIRA_ SUBMISSION@OMB.EOP.GOV, Attn: Desk Officer for the Administration for Children and Families. Robert Sargis, Reports Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. 2016–05077 Filed 3–7–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4184–01–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:02 Mar 07, 2016 Jkt 238001 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families National Child Care Hotline and Web Site; Comment Request Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). AGENCY: ACTION: Notice. As authorized by section 658L(b) of the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act (42 U.S.C. 9858j(b)), as amended by the CCDBG Act of 2014 (Pub. L. 113–186), the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is developing a National toll-free hotline and Web site for child care. We are interested in comments that describe effective design features and easy-to-use functions for a national Web site that will link to new and existing state and local Web sites. The Web site will disseminate easy-tounderstand information about Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) funded child care providers for parents of eligible children, the general public, and providers. The new national hotline will link to new and existing CCDF Lead Agency hotlines where users can report possible health and safety violations or instances of child abuse and neglect in CCDF-eligible provider settings. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00041 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 ACF previously asked for comments and suggestions related to the national Web site for consumer education, submission of complaints and related provisions in the CCDBG Act in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (80 FR 80465, Dec. 24, 2015, available online at https://federalregister.gov/a/201531883). If you have already commented on this regulatory process, there is no need to duplicate your comments. However, if your comments are more closely related to the design, functionality, or other considerations of the national Web site or hotline, we invite your additional comments here. DATES: The deadline for receipt of comments is midnight, April 7, 2016. ADDRESSES: Submit comments to NHWcomment@acf.hhs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The CCDBG Act of 2014 Two of the CCDBG Act’s purposes are ‘‘to promote parental choice to empower working parents to make their own decisions regarding the child care services that best suits their family’s needs’’ and ‘‘to encourage States to provide consumer education information to help parents make informed choices about child care services and to promote involvement by parents and family members in the development of their children in child care settings’’ (42 U.S.C. 9857(b)(1) & (3)). Subpart D of the proposed E:\FR\FM\08MRN1.SGM 08MRN1 12106 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 45 / Tuesday, March 8, 2016 / Notices regulations describes parental rights and responsibilities and provisions related to parental choice, including requirements that Lead Agencies maintain a record of parental complaints and consumer education activities conducted by Lead Agencies to increase parental awareness of the range of child care options available to them. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Lead Agency Consumer Education Web site ACF has proposed amending paragraph (a) of § 98.33 to require Lead Agencies ‘‘to collect and disseminate consumer education information to parents of eligible children, the general public, and providers through a consumer-friendly and easily accessible Web site’’ (80 FR 80569–70) Consistent with new requirements enacted by the CCDBG Act of 2014, the proposed regulations would require state Web sites to, at a minimum, include five components: (1) Lead Agency policies and procedures, (2) provider-specific information, (3) aggregate number of deaths, serious injuries, and instances of substantiated child abuse in child care settings each year, (4) referral to local child care resource and referral organizations, and (5) directions on how parents can contact the Lead Agency, or its designee, and other programs to better understand information on the Web site. The reauthorized CCDBG Act also requires the Secretary to operate, either directly or through the use of grants or contracts, a national Web site and a national toll free hotline. Both the national Web site and hotline must have the capacity to help families in every state and community in the nation. National Consumer Education Web site While the primary responsibility to operate a parental complaint hotline and a consumer education Web site remains with Lead Agencies, the CCDBG Act also requires the Secretary to operate a national Web site for consumer education and submission of complaints (42 U.S.C. 9858j(b)). The statute requires several components be included in the national Web site, including many of the same requirements of the Lead Agency consumer education Web sites. We propose to incorporate all requirements of the national Web site into the requirements of the Lead Agency consumer education Web site, including the localized list of child care providers searchable by zip code proposed at § 98.33(a)(2)(i) (80 FR 80570). The statute allows for the national Web site to provide the information either VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:02 Mar 07, 2016 Jkt 238001 ‘‘directly or through linkages to State databases’’ (42 U.S.C. 9858j(b)(2)(b)). It is not feasible or practical for HHS to recreate databases many states have already created. Therefore, we are proposing to require Lead Agencies to include these components in their databases and Web sites to which we plan to link the national Web site. ACF intends to design a national Web site that will respond to the CCDBG Act requirements and will connect to state, territory, and local systems, if available, provide an additional entry point to Lead Agency Web sites for families seeking information, and make that information available in multiple languages. The national Web site will not create a national database or duplicate Lead Agency systems already in place. The national Web site will be hosted by ‘childcare.gov’ and refer users to local child care providers 24 hours a day. The Web site will provide easy-tounderstand child care consumer education and referral services and enable a child care consumer to enter a zip code and obtain a referral to local child care providers within a specified search radius. The national Web site will provide to consumers, directly or through linkages to state databases, at a minimum: a localized list of all eligible child care providers, differentiating between licensed and license-exempt providers; any provider-specific information from a Quality Rating and Improvement System or information about other quality indicators, any other providerspecific information about compliance with licensing and health and safety requirements to the extent the information is publicly available and to the extent practicable; referrals to local resource and referral organizations from which consumers can find more information about child care providers; and state information about child care subsidy programs and other financial supports available to families. National Hotline The primary purpose of the parental complaint hotline is to provide parents with an easy way to submit complaints about unmet health and safety regulations or child abuse and neglect by a child care provider or their staff. The design for a national parental complaint hotline will also respond to the CCDBG Act requirements, be toll free, and connect to a Lead Agency single point of contact as an additional option for parents and the public. While not intended as a child care referral call center, the national hotline will provide links to applicable state information. It PO 00000 Frm 00042 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 will not serve as a federal investigatory system. The value of parental complaint hotlines is illustrated by the longstanding national hotline established for the Department of Defense (DOD) military child care program. The Military Child Care Act of 1989 (Pub. L. 101–189) required the creation of a national 24-hour, toll-free hotline that allows parents to submit complaints about military child care centers anonymously. DOD has found the hotline to be an important tool in engaging parents in child care. In addition, complaints received through the hotline have helped DOD identify problematic child care programs. (Campbell, N., Appelbaum, J., Martinson, K., Be All That We Can Be: Lessons from the Military for Improving Our Nation’s Child Care System, National Women’s Law Center, 2000). Request for Comments ACF recognizes the diversity of existing systems and processes, information technology (IT) systems’ capacity, investments, and limited resources (time, people, funding) available to Lead Agencies and their partners. We are not only interested in comments that describe effective and easy-to-use design features for a national parent complaint hotline and a national consumer education Web site, but also in how the design of both can help Lead Agencies as they adapt their systems to implement federal guidance. We welcome all comments and suggestions around the functions and features for both the national Web site and the national parent complaint hotline and encourage your input around the following: National Consumer Complaint Hotline • The national parent complaint hotline will be available for parents and providers who want to report health and safety violations or child abuse in CCDBG-eligible child care. What will parents and providers need to make the hotline easy to find and use? • What protocols should be included for use with a national hotline to make sure that local, state, or territory authorities follow up on any complaints reported to the national parent complaint hotline? • What types of information will help states and territories increase their ability to receive and share data with a national hotline? • When thinking about the implementation of a parent complaint hotline, what barriers, challenges, and concerns come to mind related to current state policy and laws that might E:\FR\FM\08MRN1.SGM 08MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 45 / Tuesday, March 8, 2016 / Notices impact the ability of state and territory agencies and a national hotline to share information with each other? National Consumer Education and Referral Web site • The CCDBG Act of 2014 and proposed rules list the types of information that must be made available for parents and providers on a state, territory, and national Web site. What will parents and providers need to make this information useful when searching for high-quality early childhood services? In particular, what Web site design features will deliver information that is accurate and easy to find and understand, so that parents can easily find high-quality services that meet their needs? Are there any priorities? • Providers may use the national Web site as a way to increase visibility of their programs and services. What kinds of information should providers be able to include that would help both themselves and parents? • A primary tenant of the national Web site will be to link to Web sites, services, and data that state and territory lead agencies make available. To remove any overlap of services, what national Web site design options will support these efforts? • When it comes to data availability, what national Web site supports will help existing state and local systems to participate in the national Web site? For example: would state and local systems benefit from guidance on how to develop effective web services, data governance, application programming interfaces (API), or creating standards for collection of data? • With a focus on provider quality information and availability of data, what information or technical assistance will state and territories need to make this information available online? • What technologies and strategies can be used to overcome barriers, challenges, and concerns regarding potential design models of a national Web site? Dated: March 2, 2016. Linda K. Smith, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES [FR Doc. 2016–05085 Filed 3–7–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4184–43–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:02 Mar 07, 2016 Jkt 238001 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Public Comment Request Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In compliance with section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has submitted an Information Collection Request (ICR) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Comments submitted during the first public review of this ICR will be provided to OMB. OMB will accept further comments from the public during the review and approval period. DATES: Comments on this ICR should be received no later than April 7, 2016. ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, including the Information Collection Request Title, to the desk officer for HRSA, either by email to OIRA_ submission@omb.eop.gov, or by fax to 202–395–5806. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request a copy of the clearance requests submitted to OMB for review, email the HRSA Information Collection Clearance Officer at paperwork@hrsa.gov, or call (301) 443–1984. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Information Collection Request Title: Telehealth Resource Center Performance Measurement Tool. OMB No. 0915– 0361—Revision Abstract: To ensure the best use of public funds and to meet the Government Performance Review Act requirements, the Federal Office of Rural Health’s Office for the Advancement of Telehealth (OAT) in collaboration with the Telehealth Resource Centers (TRCs) created a set of performance measures that grantees can use to evaluate the technical assistance services provided by the TRCs. Grantee goals are to customize the provision of telehealth technical assistance across the country. The TRCs provide technical SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 12107 assistance to health care organizations, health care networks, and health care providers in the implementation of costeffective telehealth programs to serve rural and medically underserved areas and populations. Need and Proposed Use of the Information: The revised measures will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the technical assistance. The tool will also be used to address GPRA requirements and to report to Congress the value added from the TRC Grant Program; justification for budget request; measure performance relative to the mission of OAT/HRSA, as well as individual goals and objectives of the program; identify topics of interest for future special studies; identify changes in healthcare needs within rural communities, allowing programs to shift focus in order to meet those needs; and collect uniform consistent data and provide guidance to grantees. Likely Respondents: The likely respondents will be telehealth associations, telehealth providers, rural health providers, clinicians that deliver services via telehealth, technical assistance providers, research organizations, and academic medical centers. Burden Statement: Burden in this context means the time expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, disclose or provide the information requested. This includes the time needed to review instructions; to develop, acquire, install and utilize technology and systems for the purpose of collecting, validating and verifying information, processing and maintaining information, and disclosing and providing information; to train personnel and to be able to respond to a collection of information; to search data sources; to complete and review the collection of information; and to transmit or otherwise disclose the information. The total annual burden hours estimated for this ICR are summarized in the table below. E:\FR\FM\08MRN1.SGM 08MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 45 (Tuesday, March 8, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 12105-12107]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-05085]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Administration for Children and Families


National Child Care Hotline and Web Site; Comment Request

AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Department of 
Health and Human Services (HHS).

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: As authorized by section 658L(b) of the Child Care and 
Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act (42 U.S.C. 9858j(b)), as amended by 
the CCDBG Act of 2014 (Pub. L. 113-186), the Administration for 
Children and Families (ACF) is developing a National toll-free hotline 
and Web site for child care. We are interested in comments that 
describe effective design features and easy-to-use functions for a 
national Web site that will link to new and existing state and local 
Web sites. The Web site will disseminate easy-to-understand information 
about Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) funded child care 
providers for parents of eligible children, the general public, and 
providers. The new national hotline will link to new and existing CCDF 
Lead Agency hotlines where users can report possible health and safety 
violations or instances of child abuse and neglect in CCDF-eligible 
provider settings.
    ACF previously asked for comments and suggestions related to the 
national Web site for consumer education, submission of complaints and 
related provisions in the CCDBG Act in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 
(80 FR 80465, Dec. 24, 2015, available online at https://federalregister.gov/a/2015-31883). If you have already commented on 
this regulatory process, there is no need to duplicate your comments. 
However, if your comments are more closely related to the design, 
functionality, or other considerations of the national Web site or 
hotline, we invite your additional comments here.

DATES: The deadline for receipt of comments is midnight, April 7, 2016.

ADDRESSES: Submit comments to NHWcomment@acf.hhs.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

The CCDBG Act of 2014

    Two of the CCDBG Act's purposes are ``to promote parental choice to 
empower working parents to make their own decisions regarding the child 
care services that best suits their family's needs'' and ``to encourage 
States to provide consumer education information to help parents make 
informed choices about child care services and to promote involvement 
by parents and family members in the development of their children in 
child care settings'' (42 U.S.C. 9857(b)(1) & (3)). Subpart D of the 
proposed

[[Page 12106]]

regulations describes parental rights and responsibilities and 
provisions related to parental choice, including requirements that Lead 
Agencies maintain a record of parental complaints and consumer 
education activities conducted by Lead Agencies to increase parental 
awareness of the range of child care options available to them.

Lead Agency Consumer Education Web site

    ACF has proposed amending paragraph (a) of Sec.  98.33 to require 
Lead Agencies ``to collect and disseminate consumer education 
information to parents of eligible children, the general public, and 
providers through a consumer-friendly and easily accessible Web site'' 
(80 FR 80569-70) Consistent with new requirements enacted by the CCDBG 
Act of 2014, the proposed regulations would require state Web sites to, 
at a minimum, include five components: (1) Lead Agency policies and 
procedures, (2) provider-specific information, (3) aggregate number of 
deaths, serious injuries, and instances of substantiated child abuse in 
child care settings each year, (4) referral to local child care 
resource and referral organizations, and (5) directions on how parents 
can contact the Lead Agency, or its designee, and other programs to 
better understand information on the Web site.
    The reauthorized CCDBG Act also requires the Secretary to operate, 
either directly or through the use of grants or contracts, a national 
Web site and a national toll free hotline. Both the national Web site 
and hotline must have the capacity to help families in every state and 
community in the nation.

National Consumer Education Web site

    While the primary responsibility to operate a parental complaint 
hotline and a consumer education Web site remains with Lead Agencies, 
the CCDBG Act also requires the Secretary to operate a national Web 
site for consumer education and submission of complaints (42 U.S.C. 
9858j(b)). The statute requires several components be included in the 
national Web site, including many of the same requirements of the Lead 
Agency consumer education Web sites. We propose to incorporate all 
requirements of the national Web site into the requirements of the Lead 
Agency consumer education Web site, including the localized list of 
child care providers searchable by zip code proposed at Sec.  
98.33(a)(2)(i) (80 FR 80570). The statute allows for the national Web 
site to provide the information either ``directly or through linkages 
to State databases'' (42 U.S.C. 9858j(b)(2)(b)). It is not feasible or 
practical for HHS to recreate databases many states have already 
created. Therefore, we are proposing to require Lead Agencies to 
include these components in their databases and Web sites to which we 
plan to link the national Web site.
    ACF intends to design a national Web site that will respond to the 
CCDBG Act requirements and will connect to state, territory, and local 
systems, if available, provide an additional entry point to Lead Agency 
Web sites for families seeking information, and make that information 
available in multiple languages. The national Web site will not create 
a national database or duplicate Lead Agency systems already in place.
    The national Web site will be hosted by `childcare.gov' and refer 
users to local child care providers 24 hours a day. The Web site will 
provide easy-to-understand child care consumer education and referral 
services and enable a child care consumer to enter a zip code and 
obtain a referral to local child care providers within a specified 
search radius.
    The national Web site will provide to consumers, directly or 
through linkages to state databases, at a minimum: a localized list of 
all eligible child care providers, differentiating between licensed and 
license-exempt providers; any provider-specific information from a 
Quality Rating and Improvement System or information about other 
quality indicators, any other provider-specific information about 
compliance with licensing and health and safety requirements to the 
extent the information is publicly available and to the extent 
practicable; referrals to local resource and referral organizations 
from which consumers can find more information about child care 
providers; and state information about child care subsidy programs and 
other financial supports available to families.

National Hotline

    The primary purpose of the parental complaint hotline is to provide 
parents with an easy way to submit complaints about unmet health and 
safety regulations or child abuse and neglect by a child care provider 
or their staff.
    The design for a national parental complaint hotline will also 
respond to the CCDBG Act requirements, be toll free, and connect to a 
Lead Agency single point of contact as an additional option for parents 
and the public. While not intended as a child care referral call 
center, the national hotline will provide links to applicable state 
information. It will not serve as a federal investigatory system.
    The value of parental complaint hotlines is illustrated by the 
longstanding national hotline established for the Department of Defense 
(DOD) military child care program. The Military Child Care Act of 1989 
(Pub. L. 101-189) required the creation of a national 24-hour, toll-
free hotline that allows parents to submit complaints about military 
child care centers anonymously. DOD has found the hotline to be an 
important tool in engaging parents in child care. In addition, 
complaints received through the hotline have helped DOD identify 
problematic child care programs. (Campbell, N., Appelbaum, J., 
Martinson, K., Be All That We Can Be: Lessons from the Military for 
Improving Our Nation's Child Care System, National Women's Law Center, 
2000).

Request for Comments

    ACF recognizes the diversity of existing systems and processes, 
information technology (IT) systems' capacity, investments, and limited 
resources (time, people, funding) available to Lead Agencies and their 
partners. We are not only interested in comments that describe 
effective and easy-to-use design features for a national parent 
complaint hotline and a national consumer education Web site, but also 
in how the design of both can help Lead Agencies as they adapt their 
systems to implement federal guidance. We welcome all comments and 
suggestions around the functions and features for both the national Web 
site and the national parent complaint hotline and encourage your input 
around the following:

National Consumer Complaint Hotline

     The national parent complaint hotline will be available 
for parents and providers who want to report health and safety 
violations or child abuse in CCDBG-eligible child care. What will 
parents and providers need to make the hotline easy to find and use?
     What protocols should be included for use with a national 
hotline to make sure that local, state, or territory authorities follow 
up on any complaints reported to the national parent complaint hotline?
     What types of information will help states and territories 
increase their ability to receive and share data with a national 
hotline?
     When thinking about the implementation of a parent 
complaint hotline, what barriers, challenges, and concerns come to mind 
related to current state policy and laws that might

[[Page 12107]]

impact the ability of state and territory agencies and a national 
hotline to share information with each other?

National Consumer Education and Referral Web site

     The CCDBG Act of 2014 and proposed rules list the types of 
information that must be made available for parents and providers on a 
state, territory, and national Web site. What will parents and 
providers need to make this information useful when searching for high-
quality early childhood services? In particular, what Web site design 
features will deliver information that is accurate and easy to find and 
understand, so that parents can easily find high-quality services that 
meet their needs? Are there any priorities?
     Providers may use the national Web site as a way to 
increase visibility of their programs and services. What kinds of 
information should providers be able to include that would help both 
themselves and parents?
     A primary tenant of the national Web site will be to link 
to Web sites, services, and data that state and territory lead agencies 
make available. To remove any overlap of services, what national Web 
site design options will support these efforts?
     When it comes to data availability, what national Web site 
supports will help existing state and local systems to participate in 
the national Web site? For example: would state and local systems 
benefit from guidance on how to develop effective web services, data 
governance, application programming interfaces (API), or creating 
standards for collection of data?
     With a focus on provider quality information and 
availability of data, what information or technical assistance will 
state and territories need to make this information available online?
     What technologies and strategies can be used to overcome 
barriers, challenges, and concerns regarding potential design models of 
a national Web site?

    Dated: March 2, 2016.
Linda K. Smith,
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development, 
Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and 
Human Services.
[FR Doc. 2016-05085 Filed 3-7-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4184-43-P