Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, South Hadley, MA, 8216-8217 [2016-03411]

Download as PDF 8216 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 32 / Thursday, February 18, 2016 / Notices with respect to U.S. endangered or threatened species for scientific purposes or enhancement of propagation or survival. Our regulations implementing section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Act for these permits are found at 50 CFR 17.22 for endangered wildlife species, 50 CFR 17.32 for threatened wildlife species, 50 CFR 17.62 for endangered plant species, and 50 CFR 17.72 for threatened plant species. Applications Available for Review and Comment We invite local, State, and Federal agencies and the public to comment on the following applications. Please refer to the permit number for the application when submitting comments. Documents and other information submitted with these applications are available for review by request from the Program Manager for Restoration and Endangered Species Classification at the address listed in the ADDRESSES section of this notice, subject to the requirements of the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) and the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Permit Number: TE–003483 Applicant: U.S. Geological Survey, Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center, Hawaii National Park, Hawaii. The applicant requests a permit amendment to take (capture, band, mark, measure, weigh, collect blood samples, radio-tag, release, recapture, and search for and monitor nests) Hawaiian gallinule (Gallinula galeata sandvicensis) on the island of Oahu, and to increase the number of radio¯ tagged Hawai‘i ‘akepa (Loxops coccineus) and Hawai‘i creeper (Oreomystis mana) on the island of Hawaii, in conjunction with scientific research, for the purpose of enhancing the species’ survival. The permit currently covers the Laysan duck (Anas ¯ ¯ laysanensis), ‘akiapola‘au (Hemignathus munroi), ‘akeke’e (Loxops caeruleirostris), ‘akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi), puaiohi (Myadestes palmeri), ‘alae ke‘oke‘o or Hawaiian Coot (Fulica alai), ae‘o or Hawaiian Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus knudseni), and ¯ the ‘ope‘ape‘a or Hawaiian hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus semotus). Permit Number: TE–012136 Applicant: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Hillsboro, Oregon. The applicant requests a permit renewal with changes to take (capture, handle, and release) Borax Lake chub (Gila boraxobius) in conjunction with surveys throughout the species’ range in Oregon for the purpose of enhancing its VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:03 Feb 17, 2016 Jkt 238001 survival. The permit currently covers the Lost River sucker (Deltistes luxatus) and the shortnose sucker (Chasmistes brevirostris). Applicant: Washington State University, Vancouver, Washington. The applicant requests a permit amendment to take (survey, capture, mark, and release) Fender’s blue butterfly (Icaricia icarioides fenderi) in conjunction with scientific research in Benton, Lane, Polk, Washington, and Yamhill Counties, Oregon, for the purpose of enhancing its survival. Permit Number: TE–27877B Applicant: Nathan L. Haan, Seattle, Washington. The applicant requests a permit amendment to take (captive rear adults) Taylor’s checkerspot butterflies (Euphydryas editha taylori), in conjunction with scientific research in Thurston County, Washington, for the purpose of enhancing its survival. Public Availability of Comments All comments and materials we receive in response to this request will be available for public inspection, by appointment, during normal business hours at the address listed in the ADDRESSES section. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Authority We provide this notice under section 10 of the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Dated: February 10, 2016. Stephen J. Zylstra, Acting, Regional Director, Pacific Region, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2016–03302 Filed 2–17–16; 8:45 am] PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–20233; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Permit Number: TE–101141 BILLING CODE 4333–15–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, South Hadley, MA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of a sacred object and object of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request to the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum at the address in this notice by March 21, 2016. SUMMARY: Aaron F. Miller, NAGPRA Coordinator, Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, 50 College Street, South Hadley, MA 01075, telephone (413) 538–3394, email afmiller@ mtholyoke.edu. ADDRESSES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the control of the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum that meets the definition of a sacred object and an object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: E:\FR\FM\18FEN1.SGM 18FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 32 / Thursday, February 18, 2016 / Notices History and Description of the Cultural Item In 2014, one cultural item was donated to the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum by the children of J. Donald Detenber, from Westborough, MA. Detenber was a collector and dealer in Native American objects, and it is unclear when and where he acquired the object. Detenber was most active in the 1980s and 1990s and purchased from various dealers and auction houses across the country. The sacred object/ object of cultural patrimony is a woven cotton sash. This type of textile was used primarily by the bride in the traditional Hopi wedding ceremony and can be seen in various photographs from the early 20th century. As part of the ceremony, cotton was collected from various members of the community and woven by a specific group of relatives. Another known use of these sashes is the Powamu Festival, centered on the seasonal planting of beans. One aspect of the ceremonies is the imitation of Katchinas (ancestral spirits). In some cases, men would don the sash to dress as female Katchina spirits or women in general. One such female Katchina is Angwusnasomtaka (Crow Mother), who is often represented with this type of sash. Based on the above definitions and a general knowledge of these objects being used in various types of ceremonies, there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the cultural item and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Officials of the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the one cultural item described above is a specific ceremonial objects needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the one cultural item described above has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object and object of cultural patrimony and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. 19:03 Feb 17, 2016 Jkt 238001 Dated: February 3, 2016. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–03411 Filed 2–17–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–20161; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Department of the Navy, Washington, DC National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Department of Defense, Department of the Navy (DoN) has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the Aleut Corporation, representatives of the Aleut Repatriation Committee, and the Cultural Heritage Director of the Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Association, Inc., as agents for the Native Village of Atka, AK, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and members of the Native Village of Atka. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the DoN. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not SUMMARY: Determinations Made by the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum VerDate Sep<11>2014 Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Aaron F. Miller, NAGPRA Coordinator, Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, 50 College Street, South Hadley, MA 01075, telephone (413) 538–3394, email afmiller@mtholyoke.edu, by March 21, 2016. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the sacred object and object of cultural patrimony to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may proceed. The Mount Holyoke College Art Museum is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona that this notice has been published. PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 8217 identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the DoN at the address in this notice by March 21, 2016. ADDRESSES: Dr. Susan S. Hughes, Archaeologist, Department of the Navy, NAVFAC NW, 1101 Tautog Circle, Silverdale, WA 98315, telephone (360) 396–0083, email susan.s.hughes@ navy.mil. Notice is hereby given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the DoN. The human remains were removed from the island of Attu, AK, in the Aleutian Islands. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the DoN professional staff in consultation with the Aleut Corporation, the Aleut Repatriation Committee, and the Cultural Heritage Director of the Aleutian/Pribilof Islands Association, Inc., as agents for the Native Village of Atka, AK. History and Description of the Remains In 1943, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Attu Island, at the western end of the Aleutian Islands, AK. The human remains, a skull and associated mandible, came into the possession of William J. Madden II, Senior Medical Officer at the U.S. Naval Aerological Station, Attu, where they were used as an aid in the study of human skull anatomy. In a letter dated May 14, 1948, Dr. Madden states that the human remains were recovered by a civilian construction company while engaged in building a Coast Guard Station on Attu. A historic account of the Coast Guard construction of the Western Aleutian island chain (The Coast Guard at War: IV Loran Volume I Section III, Chapter 3) suggests that the skull may have come from an archeological site at Baxter Bay. After the Battle of Attu in the spring of 1943, a U.S.C.G. LORAN Station was E:\FR\FM\18FEN1.SGM 18FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 32 (Thursday, February 18, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 8216-8217]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-03411]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-20233; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Mount Holyoke 
College Art Museum, South Hadley, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has 
determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the 
definition of a sacred object and object of cultural patrimony. Lineal 
descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this 
cultural item should submit a written request to the Mount Holyoke 
College Art Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer 
of control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, Indian 
tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may 
proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim this cultural item should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to the Mount Holyoke College Art 
Museum at the address in this notice by March 21, 2016.

ADDRESSES: Aaron F. Miller, NAGPRA Coordinator, Mount Holyoke College 
Art Museum, 50 College Street, South Hadley, MA 01075, telephone (413) 
538-3394, email afmiller@mtholyoke.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the 
control of the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum that meets the 
definition of a sacred object and an object of cultural patrimony under 
25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

[[Page 8217]]

History and Description of the Cultural Item

    In 2014, one cultural item was donated to the Mount Holyoke College 
Art Museum by the children of J. Donald Detenber, from Westborough, MA. 
Detenber was a collector and dealer in Native American objects, and it 
is unclear when and where he acquired the object. Detenber was most 
active in the 1980s and 1990s and purchased from various dealers and 
auction houses across the country. The sacred object/object of cultural 
patrimony is a woven cotton sash.
    This type of textile was used primarily by the bride in the 
traditional Hopi wedding ceremony and can be seen in various 
photographs from the early 20th century. As part of the ceremony, 
cotton was collected from various members of the community and woven by 
a specific group of relatives. Another known use of these sashes is the 
Powamu Festival, centered on the seasonal planting of beans. One aspect 
of the ceremonies is the imitation of Katchinas (ancestral spirits). In 
some cases, men would don the sash to dress as female Katchina spirits 
or women in general. One such female Katchina is Angwusnasomtaka (Crow 
Mother), who is often represented with this type of sash. Based on the 
above definitions and a general knowledge of these objects being used 
in various types of ceremonies, there is a relationship of shared group 
identity that can be reasonably traced between the cultural item and 
the Hopi Tribe of Arizona.

Determinations Made by the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum

    Officials of the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the one cultural item 
described above is a specific ceremonial objects needed by traditional 
Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional 
Native American religions by their present-day adherents.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the one cultural item 
described above has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural 
importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, 
rather than property owned by an individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred 
object and object of cultural patrimony and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
this cultural item should submit a written request with information in 
support of the claim to Aaron F. Miller, NAGPRA Coordinator, Mount 
Holyoke College Art Museum, 50 College Street, South Hadley, MA 01075, 
telephone (413) 538-3394, email afmiller@mtholyoke.edu, by March 21, 
2016. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, 
transfer of control of the sacred object and object of cultural 
patrimony to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may proceed.
    The Mount Holyoke College Art Museum is responsible for notifying 
the Hopi Tribe of Arizona that this notice has been published.

    Dated: February 3, 2016.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2016-03411 Filed 2-17-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-50-P