Request for Information (RFI) for Updated Critical Materials Strategy, 7087-7089 [2016-02676]

Download as PDF 7087 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 27 / Wednesday, February 10, 2016 / Notices laws’’ and ‘‘provide information on emerging practices in the consumer financial products or services industry, including regional trends, concerns, and other relevant information.’’ (b) To carry out the Board’s purpose, the scope of its activities shall include providing information, analysis, and recommendations to the Bureau. The Board will generally serve as a vehicle for market intelligence and expertise for the Bureau. Its objectives will include identifying and assessing the impact on consumers and other market participants of new, emerging, and changing products, practices, or services. (c) The Board will also be available to advise and consult with the Director and the Bureau on other matters related to the Bureau’s functions under the Dodd-Frank Act. II. Agenda The Consumer Advisory Board will discuss the Bureau’s strategic outlook 2016–2017 and Financial Well-Being. Persons who need a reasonable accommodation to participate should contact CFPB_504Request@cfpb.gov, 202–435–9EEO, 1–855–233–0362, or 202–435–9742 (TTY) at least ten business days prior to the meeting or event to request assistance. The request must identify the date, time, location, and title of the meeting or event, the nature of the assistance requested, and contact information for the requester. CFPB will strive to provide, but cannot guarantee that accommodation will be provided for late requests. Individuals who wish to attend the Consumer Advisory Board meeting must RSVP to cfpb_cabandcouncilsevents@ cfpb.gov by noon, February 25, 2016. Members of the public must RSVP by the due date and must include ‘‘CAB’’ in the subject line of the RSVP. III. Availability The Board’s agenda will be made available to the public on February 10, 2016, via consumerfinance.gov. Individuals should express in their RSVP if they require a paper copy of the agenda. A recording and transcript of this meeting will be available after the meeting on the CFPB’s Web site consumerfinance.gov. Dated: February 5, 2016. Christopher D’Angelo, Chief of Staff, Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. [FR Doc. 2016–02717 Filed 2–9–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4810–AM–P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Request for Information (RFI) for Updated Critical Materials Strategy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Request for Information (RFI). AGENCY: In 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed and issued a Critical Materials Strategy report addressing the role of rare earth and other materials in energy technologies and processes. An update and additional analyses were completed the following year. In order to update the 2010 and 2011 analyses, DOE is seeking information from stakeholders on rare earth elements and other materials used in an array of energy technologies, as well as key materials used in the manufacturing of energy technologies that do not necessarily appear in the final product. DATES: Written comments and information are requested no later than 5:00 p.m. ET, on April 11, 2016. ADDRESSES: Interested persons are encouraged to submit comments, which must be submitted electronically to materialstrategy@hq.doe.gov. Instructions: Electronic responses must be provided as attachments to an email. It is recommended that attachments with file sizes exceeding 25MB be compressed (i.e., zipped) to ensure message delivery. Respondents are requested to provide the following information at the start of their response to this RFI: Company/Institution name; Company/Institution contact; Contact’s address, phone number, and email address. Please identify your answers by responding to a specific question or SUMMARY: topic if possible. Any information obtained as a result of this RFI is intended to be used by the Government on a non-attribution basis for planning and strategy development. DOE will not respond to individual submissions or publish publicly a compendium of responses, except as required by applicable law. A response to this RFI will not be viewed as a binding commitment to develop or pursue the project or ideas discussed. DOE will not pay for information provided under this RFI. This RFI is not accepting applications for financial assistance or financial incentives. DOE has no obligation to respond to those who submit comments, and/or give any feedback on any decision made based on the responses received. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information may be sent to materialstrategy@hq.doe.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Purpose The purpose of this RFI is to solicit feedback from industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders on issues related to the demand, supply, use, and costs of rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. DOE is specifically interested in information on the materials and technologies in the following table, as well as other materials of interest identified by the respondents to this request that are used in energy technologies: Materials of Interest • Rare earth elements (e.g., cerium, dysprosium, europium, gadolinium, lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium, samarium, scandium, terbium, ytterbium, and yttrium) • Platinum group metals (e.g., iridium, palladium, platinum, rhodium, and ruthenium) • Antimony, bismuth, cadmium, cobalt, gallium, germanium, hafnium, helium, indium, lithium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, rhenium, selenium, silicon, tantalum, tellurium, tungsten, vanadium, and zirconium Technologies and Components of Interest asabaliauskas on DSK9F6TC42PROD with NOTICES2 Technologies Types Solar photovoltaics ........................................................... Concentrated solar power ................................................ .......................................................................................... Trough system ................................................................. Power tower system ........................................................ Wind turbines ................................................................... Natural gas generators ..................................................... Direct drive ....................................................................... .......................................................................................... Hydropower ...................................................................... .......................................................................................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Feb 09, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\10FEN1.SGM Components 10FEN1 Thin film. Mirrors. Molten salts. Dish engine system. Permanent magnets. Superalloys. Coatings. Magnetic materials. Permanent magnets. 7088 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 27 / Wednesday, February 10, 2016 / Notices Technologies Types Nuclear ............................................................................. .......................................................................................... Vehicles (in all vehicle classes) ....................................... Battery electric ................................................................. Plug-in hybrid electric ...................................................... Hybrid ............................................................................... Fuel cells .......................................................................... Lighting ............................................................................. LEDs ................................................................................ Fluorescents (CFLs, LFLs). Other solid-state lighting. .......................................................................................... Solid oxide ....................................................................... Solid acid ......................................................................... Phosphoric acid molten carbonate .................................. Polymer electrolyte membrane ........................................ Grid storage ...................................................................... Stationary fuel cells & hydrogen electrolysis ................... DOE is interested in receiving information on the following issues: asabaliauskas on DSK9F6TC42PROD with NOTICES2 Category 1: Technology and Component Material Intensity For the following questions, please express material intensity in terms of quantity per unit, such as weight percentage per magnet of a given size, content per unit of generation or storage capacity, weight content per lamp, content per vehicle type, weight requirement per industrial process output, or other appropriate metric or industry standard. • For the energy technologies and components of interest listed above, what is the current and anticipated materials requirement over the next 15 years? • What is the level of purity required? • How much material is lost during use (i.e., dissipative losses)? • What are the quantities of material loss in manufacturing currently and how might that change over the next 15 years as the technology develops? • For the energy technologies and components of interest listed above, what are the quantities of material used in manufacturing them that do not appear in the final product (e.g., materials used in sputtering targets, as manufacturing equipment, as catalysts, etc.)? Category 2: Market Projections • For the energy technologies and components of interest listed above, what is the current and projected global market demand over the next 15 years and how does it vary by region? What are the key uncertainties that may significantly affect these projections? • What is the anticipated average lifespan for the energy technologies of interest and how frequently do the components need to be replaced? How might these lifespans and replacement frequencies evolve as the technology develops? • For the energy technologies of interest listed above, are the materials and/or components easily substitutable or do they require product and/or manufacturing process re-designs? VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Feb 09, 2016 Jkt 238001 • If known, what are the most appropriate currently viable substitutes for these technologies or components? Are additional substitutes anticipated within the next 15 years? • What are the leading concerns regarding using the identified substitute material(s) (e.g., lower performance, higher costs, product or process redesigns, capital requirements, inadequate supply, difficulty of use, etc.)? • Do you use or expect to use significantly increasing quantities of the materials listed above for non-energy technologies? Please explain. • Do prices, price volatility and/or basic availability affect your decision to use the materials of interest? Category 3: Energy Technology Transitions and Emerging Technologies • How do you anticipate technology transitions (e.g., fluorescent lights to LEDs) will affect material availability over the next 15 years? Please share any insight or recommendations with respect to technology transitions. • How do you expect the emergence of new energy or energy efficiency technologies (e.g., fuel cells) to affect material demand over the next 15 years? • What timescales or delays in production and utilization can affect the ability to plan for deployment of new energy technologies? Category 4: Primary Production and Material Processing • Do you anticipate additional production of the materials of interest coming online in the next 5 years? • What technical, economic, or regulatory factors lead to barriers or delays in bringing on new production or increasing current production? • What are the emerging processes or approaches (physical, chemical, or biological) to separation and processing these materials? Can they be scaled? What are the barriers to deploying these emerging processes? PO 00000 Frm 00025 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Components Control rods. Cooling fluids. Control absorbers or neutron shielding materials. Fuel rod cladding. Fuel assembly grid plates. Alloys. Permanent magnets. Batteries. Catalytic converters. Lightweighting (platform, frame, engine cradle, etc.). Phosphors. Batteries. Catalysts. Cathode. Anode. Electrolytes. • Do prices, price volatility and/or basic availability affect your decision to produce the materials of interest? Category 5: Supply Chains • For the technologies and components of interest listed, what are the process stages within the supply chain, and where geographically does each occur? What are the factors that affect where a component is manufactured? • How vertically integrated are the supply chains in different countries? Does this matter? Why? • How concentrated or diversified are the suppliers and consumers of the materials, components, or technologies? • How much material inventory is typically stockpiled across the stages of the supply chain? How long is it stockpiled for? Given a supply disruption, how long would the inventory last? • For the technologies and components of interest listed, what are the lead times at each stage of their supply chain? Category 6: Recycling Opportunities • What quantities of critical materials are currently being recycled from industrial and post-consumer sources and what quantities could potentially be recycled on what timeframe? • What are the technological barriers to recycling materials? • What recycling process innovations would increase recycling technical and economic viability? • How could design for recyclability improve the level of recycling? • How are current technological trends of the specific material, component, or technology of interest (e.g., miniaturization, increased complexity) likely to affect its recyclability? • What types of policies would impact recycling? • Are there synergies between industries (e.g., using cadmium telluride from semiconductor recycling for solar cells)? E:\FR\FM\10FEN1.SGM 10FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 27 / Wednesday, February 10, 2016 / Notices Category 7: Impacts of Wide-Scale Electrification (7) why disclosure of the information would be contrary to the public interest. We are also interested in the potential material implications of wide-scale electrification (industry, transportation, etc.). • What components are needed and for what purpose to accomplish wide-scale electrification (both in the electricity infrastructure and end use applications) and what quantities will be required in what timeframe? • What materials of interest are required for these components? Jonathan Pershing, Principal Deputy Director for Energy Policy and Systems Analysis. Category 8: Additional Information • Are there other materials that DOE should analyze (beyond the materials of interest) that may be of concern due to increasing demand for energy technologies and/or supply risk? Please explain and provide material content by component and energy technology. • Are there other technologies or components that DOE should analyze (beyond the technologies of interest)? Please explain. • Is there additional information, not requested above, that you believe DOE should consider in updating the Critical Materials Strategy? If so, please provide here. asabaliauskas on DSK9F6TC42PROD with NOTICES2 II. Confidential Business Information Pursuant to 10 CFR 1004.11, any person submitting information that he or she believes to be confidential and exempt by law from public disclosure should submit via email two well marked copies: one copy of the document marked ‘‘confidential’’ including all the information believed to be confidential, and one copy of the document marked ‘‘non-confidential’’ with the information believed to be confidential deleted. DOE will make its own determination about the confidential status of the information and treat it according to its determination. Factors of interest to DOE when evaluating requests to treat submitted information as confidential include: (1) A description of the items; (2) whether and why such items are customarily treated as confidential within the industry; (3) whether the information is generally known by or available from other sources; (4) whether the information has previously been made available to others without obligation concerning its confidentiality; (5) an explanation of the competitive injury to the submitting person that would result from public disclosure; (6) when such information might lose its confidential character due to the passage of time; and VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Feb 09, 2016 Jkt 238001 [FR Doc. 2016–02676 Filed 2–9–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6450–01–P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Combined Notice of Filings #1 Take notice that the Commission received the following electric rate filings: Docket Numbers: ER14–2875–003. Applicants: UNS Electric, Inc. Description: Compliance filing: Amended Formula Rate Protocols Compliance Filing to be effective 11/14/ 2014. Filed Date: 2/4/16. Accession Number: 20160204–5072. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/25/16. Docket Numbers: ER15–2331–001. Applicants: PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. Description: Compliance filing: BGE submits revisions to Attach. H–2A re: Sept 30 Order citation & formatting to be effective 10/1/2015. Filed Date: 2/3/16. Accession Number: 20160203–5146. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/24/16. Docket Numbers: ER16–56–001. Applicants: Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc. Description: Compliance filing: 2016– 02–03_Hurdle Rate Removal Compliance Filing to be effective 2/1/ 2016. Filed Date: 2/3/16. Accession Number: 20160203–5197. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/24/16. Docket Numbers: ER16–270–002. Applicants: Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc. Description: Tariff Amendment: 2016–02–03_SA 2863 2nd Amendment to ATC Construction Management Agreement to be effective 10/30/2015. Filed Date: 2/3/16. Accession Number: 20160203–5201. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/24/16. Docket Numbers: ER16–883–000. Applicants: Bishop Hill Energy LLC. Description: § 205(d) Rate Filing: Amended and Restated Assignment, CoTenancy, and Shared Facilities Agreement to be effective 4/4/2016. Filed Date: 2/3/16. Accession Number: 20160203–5221. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/24/16. PO 00000 Frm 00026 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 7089 Docket Numbers: ER16–884–000. Applicants: Roosevelt Wind Project, LLC, Milo Wind Project, LLC. Description: § 205(d) Rate Filing: Roosevelt-Milo Cotenancy and Common Facilities Agreement & Notice Waiver Request to be effective 12/18/2015. Filed Date: 2/3/16. Accession Number: 20160203–5235. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/24/16. Docket Numbers: ER16–885–000. Applicants: Entergy Louisiana, LLC, Entergy New Orleans, Inc., Entergy Arkansas, Inc. Description: § 205(d) Rate Filing: Union Power Station Joint Operating Agreement to be effective 12/31/9998. Filed Date: 2/3/16. Accession Number: 20160203–5239. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/24/16. Docket Numbers: ER16–886–000. Applicants: Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc. Description: § 205(d) Rate Filing: 2016–02–03_SA 2677 GRE–NSP 1st Rev GIA (J278) to be effective 2/4/2016. Filed Date: 2/3/16. Accession Number: 20160203–5241. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/24/16. Docket Numbers: ER16–887–000. Applicants: Milo Wind Project, LLC. Description: § 205(d) Rate Filing: Milo Certificate of Concurrence to RooseveltMilo CFA and Notice Waiver Request to be effective 12/18/2015. Filed Date: 2/3/16. Accession Number: 20160203–5245. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/24/16. Docket Numbers: ER16–888–000. Applicants: Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc., Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Division of MDU Resources Inc. Description: § 205(d) Rate Filing: 2016–02–04_MDU Attachment O—30.9 Filing to be effective 4/4/2016. Filed Date: 2/4/16. Accession Number: 20160204–5040. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/25/16. Docket Numbers: ER16–889–000. Applicants: Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc. Description: § 205(d) Rate Filing: 2016–02–04_SA 2718 Termination of Duke Energy Indiana-Duke Energy J333/ J334 GIA to be effective 4/16/2016. Filed Date: 2/4/16. Accession Number: 20160204–5110. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/25/16. Docket Numbers: ER16–890–000. Applicants: Summer Solar LLC. Description: Baseline eTariff Filing: Summer Solar LLC MBR Tariff to be effective 3/4/2016. Filed Date: 2/4/16. Accession Number: 20160204–5120. Comments Due: 5 p.m. ET 2/25/16. E:\FR\FM\10FEN1.SGM 10FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 27 (Wednesday, February 10, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 7087-7089]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-02676]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY


Request for Information (RFI) for Updated Critical Materials 
Strategy

AGENCY: Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis, Department of 
Energy.

ACTION: Notice of Request for Information (RFI).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed and 
issued a Critical Materials Strategy report addressing the role of rare 
earth and other materials in energy technologies and processes. An 
update and additional analyses were completed the following year. In 
order to update the 2010 and 2011 analyses, DOE is seeking information 
from stakeholders on rare earth elements and other materials used in an 
array of energy technologies, as well as key materials used in the 
manufacturing of energy technologies that do not necessarily appear in 
the final product.

DATES: Written comments and information are requested no later than 
5:00 p.m. ET, on April 11, 2016.

ADDRESSES: Interested persons are encouraged to submit comments, which 
must be submitted electronically to materialstrategy@hq.doe.gov.
    Instructions: Electronic responses must be provided as attachments 
to an email. It is recommended that attachments with file sizes 
exceeding 25MB be compressed (i.e., zipped) to ensure message delivery. 
Respondents are requested to provide the following information at the 
start of their response to this RFI: Company/Institution name; Company/
Institution contact; Contact's address, phone number, and email 
address.
    Please identify your answers by responding to a specific question 
or topic if possible. Any information obtained as a result of this RFI 
is intended to be used by the Government on a non-attribution basis for 
planning and strategy development. DOE will not respond to individual 
submissions or publish publicly a compendium of responses, except as 
required by applicable law. A response to this RFI will not be viewed 
as a binding commitment to develop or pursue the project or ideas 
discussed. DOE will not pay for information provided under this RFI. 
This RFI is not accepting applications for financial assistance or 
financial incentives. DOE has no obligation to respond to those who 
submit comments, and/or give any feedback on any decision made based on 
the responses received.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information 
may be sent to materialstrategy@hq.doe.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Purpose

    The purpose of this RFI is to solicit feedback from industry, 
academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other 
stakeholders on issues related to the demand, supply, use, and costs of 
rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. DOE is 
specifically interested in information on the materials and 
technologies in the following table, as well as other materials of 
interest identified by the respondents to this request that are used in 
energy technologies:

Materials of Interest

 Rare earth elements (e.g., cerium, dysprosium, europium, 
gadolinium, lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium, samarium, scandium, 
terbium, ytterbium, and yttrium)
 Platinum group metals (e.g., iridium, palladium, platinum, 
rhodium, and ruthenium)
 Antimony, bismuth, cadmium, cobalt, gallium, germanium, 
hafnium, helium, indium, lithium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, 
nickel, rhenium, selenium, silicon, tantalum, tellurium, tungsten, 
vanadium, and zirconium

Technologies and Components of Interest

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Technologies                          Types                             Components
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Solar photovoltaics....................  ..........................  Thin film.
Concentrated solar power...............  Trough system.............  Mirrors.
                                         Power tower system........  Molten salts.
                                                                     Dish engine system.
Wind turbines..........................  Direct drive..............  Permanent magnets.
Natural gas generators.................  ..........................  Superalloys.
                                                                     Coatings.
                                                                     Magnetic materials.
Hydropower.............................  ..........................  Permanent magnets.

[[Page 7088]]

 
Nuclear................................  ..........................  Control rods.
                                                                     Cooling fluids.
                                                                     Control absorbers or neutron shielding
                                                                      materials.
                                                                     Fuel rod cladding.
                                                                     Fuel assembly grid plates.
                                                                     Alloys.
Vehicles (in all vehicle classes)......  Battery electric..........  Permanent magnets.
                                         Plug-in hybrid electric...  Batteries.
                                         Hybrid....................  Catalytic converters.
                                         Fuel cells................  Lightweighting (platform, frame, engine
                                                                      cradle, etc.).
Lighting...............................  LEDs......................  Phosphors.
                                         Fluorescents (CFLs, LFLs).
                                         Other solid-state lighting
Grid storage...........................  ..........................  Batteries.
Stationary fuel cells & hydrogen         Solid oxide...............  Catalysts.
 electrolysis.                           Solid acid................  Cathode.
                                         Phosphoric acid molten      Anode.
                                          carbonate.
                                         Polymer electrolyte         Electrolytes.
                                          membrane.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    DOE is interested in receiving information on the following 
issues:

Category 1: Technology and Component Material Intensity

    For the following questions, please express material intensity 
in terms of quantity per unit, such as weight percentage per magnet 
of a given size, content per unit of generation or storage capacity, 
weight content per lamp, content per vehicle type, weight 
requirement per industrial process output, or other appropriate 
metric or industry standard.
     For the energy technologies and components of interest 
listed above, what is the current and anticipated materials 
requirement over the next 15 years?
     What is the level of purity required?
     How much material is lost during use (i.e., dissipative 
losses)?
     What are the quantities of material loss in 
manufacturing currently and how might that change over the next 15 
years as the technology develops?
     For the energy technologies and components of interest 
listed above, what are the quantities of material used in 
manufacturing them that do not appear in the final product (e.g., 
materials used in sputtering targets, as manufacturing equipment, as 
catalysts, etc.)?

Category 2: Market Projections

     For the energy technologies and components of interest 
listed above, what is the current and projected global market demand 
over the next 15 years and how does it vary by region? What are the 
key uncertainties that may significantly affect these projections?
     What is the anticipated average lifespan for the energy 
technologies of interest and how frequently do the components need 
to be replaced? How might these lifespans and replacement 
frequencies evolve as the technology develops?
     For the energy technologies of interest listed above, 
are the materials and/or components easily substitutable or do they 
require product and/or manufacturing process re-designs?
     If known, what are the most appropriate currently 
viable substitutes for these technologies or components? Are 
additional substitutes anticipated within the next 15 years?
     What are the leading concerns regarding using the 
identified substitute material(s) (e.g., lower performance, higher 
costs, product or process redesigns, capital requirements, 
inadequate supply, difficulty of use, etc.)?
     Do you use or expect to use significantly increasing 
quantities of the materials listed above for non-energy 
technologies? Please explain.
     Do prices, price volatility and/or basic availability 
affect your decision to use the materials of interest?

Category 3: Energy Technology Transitions and Emerging Technologies

     How do you anticipate technology transitions (e.g., 
fluorescent lights to LEDs) will affect material availability over 
the next 15 years? Please share any insight or recommendations with 
respect to technology transitions.
     How do you expect the emergence of new energy or energy 
efficiency technologies (e.g., fuel cells) to affect material demand 
over the next 15 years?
     What timescales or delays in production and utilization 
can affect the ability to plan for deployment of new energy 
technologies?

Category 4: Primary Production and Material Processing

     Do you anticipate additional production of the 
materials of interest coming online in the next 5 years?
     What technical, economic, or regulatory factors lead to 
barriers or delays in bringing on new production or increasing 
current production?
     What are the emerging processes or approaches 
(physical, chemical, or biological) to separation and processing 
these materials? Can they be scaled? What are the barriers to 
deploying these emerging processes?
     Do prices, price volatility and/or basic availability 
affect your decision to produce the materials of interest?

Category 5: Supply Chains

     For the technologies and components of interest listed, 
what are the process stages within the supply chain, and where 
geographically does each occur? What are the factors that affect 
where a component is manufactured?
     How vertically integrated are the supply chains in 
different countries? Does this matter? Why?
     How concentrated or diversified are the suppliers and 
consumers of the materials, components, or technologies?
     How much material inventory is typically stockpiled 
across the stages of the supply chain? How long is it stockpiled 
for? Given a supply disruption, how long would the inventory last?
     For the technologies and components of interest listed, 
what are the lead times at each stage of their supply chain?

Category 6: Recycling Opportunities

     What quantities of critical materials are currently 
being recycled from industrial and post-consumer sources and what 
quantities could potentially be recycled on what timeframe?
     What are the technological barriers to recycling 
materials?
     What recycling process innovations would increase 
recycling technical and economic viability?
     How could design for recyclability improve the level of 
recycling?
     How are current technological trends of the specific 
material, component, or technology of interest (e.g., 
miniaturization, increased complexity) likely to affect its 
recyclability?
     What types of policies would impact recycling?
     Are there synergies between industries (e.g., using 
cadmium telluride from semiconductor recycling for solar cells)?

[[Page 7089]]

Category 7: Impacts of Wide-Scale Electrification

    We are also interested in the potential material implications of 
wide-scale electrification (industry, transportation, etc.).
     What components are needed and for what purpose to 
accomplish wide-scale electrification (both in the electricity 
infrastructure and end use applications) and what quantities will be 
required in what timeframe?
     What materials of interest are required for these 
components?

Category 8: Additional Information

     Are there other materials that DOE should analyze 
(beyond the materials of interest) that may be of concern due to 
increasing demand for energy technologies and/or supply risk? Please 
explain and provide material content by component and energy 
technology.
     Are there other technologies or components that DOE 
should analyze (beyond the technologies of interest)? Please 
explain.
     Is there additional information, not requested above, 
that you believe DOE should consider in updating the Critical 
Materials Strategy? If so, please provide here.
II. Confidential Business Information
    Pursuant to 10 CFR 1004.11, any person submitting information that 
he or she believes to be confidential and exempt by law from public 
disclosure should submit via email two well marked copies: one copy of 
the document marked ``confidential'' including all the information 
believed to be confidential, and one copy of the document marked ``non-
confidential'' with the information believed to be confidential 
deleted. DOE will make its own determination about the confidential 
status of the information and treat it according to its determination.
    Factors of interest to DOE when evaluating requests to treat 
submitted information as confidential include: (1) A description of the 
items; (2) whether and why such items are customarily treated as 
confidential within the industry; (3) whether the information is 
generally known by or available from other sources; (4) whether the 
information has previously been made available to others without 
obligation concerning its confidentiality; (5) an explanation of the 
competitive injury to the submitting person that would result from 
public disclosure; (6) when such information might lose its 
confidential character due to the passage of time; and (7) why 
disclosure of the information would be contrary to the public interest.

Jonathan Pershing,
Principal Deputy Director for Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.
[FR Doc. 2016-02676 Filed 2-9-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 6450-01-P