Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, and California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA, 4652-4654 [2016-01603]

Download as PDF asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 4652 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices the historic cemetery on California Department of Parks and Recreation property. Collections were accessioned at UCLA as they returned from the field. The village dates from A.D. 550–1805. Excavations included the village’s historic cemetery, and while all items identified as being associated with a particular burial were included in a separate Notice of Inventory Completion, excavators further identified objects recovered from the cemetery in general. In consultation with descendent communities, all items from the cemetery were requested for repatriation and are included as unassociated funerary objects. The unassociated funerary objects are 191 lumps, plugs, and fragments, 30 bags of asphaltum fragments many with basketry, wood, and fabric impressions, 698 pieces and 19 bags of unmodified animal bone, 14 pieces of worked bone, 1 ceramic fragment, 7 bags of charcoal, 1 bag of clay fragments with basketry impression, 1 adobe fragment, 3 glass bottle fragments, 1 worked glass piece, 1 cordage fragment, 24 whole and fragmented unmodified shells, 214 worked shell objects, 3 asphaltum plugged shell dishes, 2 steatite pendants, 1 elbow pipe, 1 soil sample bag, 6,524 individual stone, shell, and glass beads, 72 pieces of ochre, 10 bags and 9 wood fragments, 26 metal objects, 4 bullet shells, 1 bag of iron fragments, 1 column sample bag, 6 soapstone comals, 94 stone bowl fragments, 3 tarring pebbles, 414 chipped stone flakes and tools, 36 ground stone tools, and 63 stone fragments. The sites detailed in this notice have been identified through tribal consultation to be within the traditional territory of the Chumash people. These locations are consistent with ethnographic and historic documentation of the Chumash people. The Chumash territory, anthropologically defined first on the basis of linguistic similarities, and subsequently on broadly shared material and cultural traits, reaches from San Luis Obispo to Malibu on the coast, inland to the western edge of the San Joaquin Valley, to the edge of the San Fernando Valley, and includes the four Northern Channel Islands. At the southern and southeastern boundaries of the territory there is evidence of the physical co-existence of Chumash, Tataviam, and Gabrielino/Tongva languages and beliefs systems. At the northern boundary of the territory there is evidence of the physical co-existence of Chumash and Salinan groups. The sites in this notice are located in northwestern Los Angeles County and fall within the geographical area VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 identified as Chumash. Some tribal consultants state that these areas were the responsibility of regional leaders, who were themselves organized into a pan-regional association of both political power and ceremonial knowledge. Further, these indigenous areas are identified by some tribal consultants to be relational with clans or associations of traditional practitioners of specific kinds of indigenous medicinal and ceremonial practices. Some tribal consultants identified these clans as existing in the pre-contact period and identified some clans as also existing in the present day. Other tribal consultants do not recognize present-day geographical divisions to be related to clans of traditional practitioners. However, they do state that Chumash, Tataviam, and Gabrielino/Tongva territories were and are occupied by socially distinct, yet interrelated, groups which have been characterized by anthropologists. Ethnographic evidence suggests that the social and political organization of the pre-contact Channel Islands were primarily at the village level, with a hereditary chief, in addition to many other specialists who wielded power. The unassociated funerary objects described in this notice are consistent with those of groups ancestral to the present-day Chumash, Tataviam, and Gabrielino/Tongva. The material cultures of earlier groups living in the geographical areas mentioned in this notice are characterized by archeologists as having passed through stages over the past 10,000 years. Many local archeologists assert that the changes in the material culture reflect evolving ecological adaptations and related changes in social organization of the same populations and do not represent population displacements or movements. The same range of artifact types and materials were used from the early pre-contact period until historic times. Tribal consultants explicitly state that population mixing, which did occur on a small scale, would not alter the continuity of the shared group identities of people associated with specific locales. Based on this evidence, continuity through time can be traced for all sites listed in this notice with present-day Chumash people, specifically the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 8,477 cultural items described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Leslie Hartzell, Ph.D., NAGPRA Coordinator, Cultural Resources Division Chief, California State Parks, P.O. Box 942896, Sacramento, CA 94296–0001, telephone (916) 653–9946, email leslie.hartzell@parks.ca.gov, by February 26, 2016. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, may proceed. The California Department of Parks and Recreation is responsible for notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, that this notice has been published. Dated: December 21, 2015. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–01597 Filed 1–26–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–20022; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, and California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. Determinations Made by the California Department of Parks and Recreation AGENCY: Officials of the California Department of Parks and Recreation have determined that: SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 ACTION: The Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and the California Department E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices of Transportation have completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the California Department of Transportation. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the California Department of Transportation at the address in this notice by February 26, 2016. ADDRESSES: Tina Biorn, California Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271– 0001, telephone (916) 653–0013, email tina.biorn@dot.ca.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the physical custody of the Fowler Museum at UCLA and under the control of the California Department of Transportation. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Los Angeles County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Fowler Museum at UCLA professional staff in VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 consultation with representatives of Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California; San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation); and the following nonfederally recognized Indian groups: ˜ Fernandeno Tataviam Band of Mission Indians; Gabrielino/Tongva Indians of California Tribe; Gabrielino/Tongva Nation; Gabrieleno/Tongva Tribal Council; San Gabriel Band of Mission Indians; Ti’at Society; and the Traditional Council of Pimu. History and Description of the Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects In 1945, 1963, 1967, and 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from Big Tujunga Wash (CA–LAN–167) in Los Angeles County, CA. The site was excavated in 1963 by Jay Ruby of the UCLA Archaeological Survey. The excavation was carried out as a salvage project after a dragline digging operation for a sewer line exposed and damaged one burial within the highway right-ofway. The human remains from this burial were recovered at that time. Subsequent review of the collection also identified fragmentary remains from midden contexts. A second burial, excavated from the site sometime between 1945–1951, by Edwin Walker of the Southwest Museum, was included along with the 1963 collection under Accession Number 501 and is included here. In all, a minimum of four adults, an infant, and a juvenile are represented. Sex was unable to be determined for any of the human remains. Nelson N. Leonard led a second project during the summers of 1967 and 1968 as mitigation for the building of the Foothill Freeway over the site. From the 1967–68 project, a juvenile human molar was identified. Ruby dated the site to A.D. 435 to 1800. No known individuals were identified. The 14 associated funerary objects are animal bones recovered in proximity to the burial recovered in 1945. In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from the Hammack Street site in Los Angeles County, CA (CA–LAN– 194). The site was excavated by Chester King of the University of California Davis Anthropology Department for the California Department of Transportation. The project was designed for mitigation of impacts to the site from freeway construction for the Marina Freeway. The collection was curated at UCLA after analysis. Site CA– PO 00000 Frm 00046 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 4653 LAN–194 dates to the historic period based on the artifact analyses. The human remains consists of three human bone removed from midden contexts representing at least three individuals. No age or sex could be determined due to their fragmentary nature. No known individuals were identified. Collection documentation does not indicate any burials or associated funerary objects. The sites detailed in this notice have been identified through tribal consultation to be within the traditional territory of the Tataviam/Fernandeno and Tongva/Gabrielino people. These locations are consistent with ethnographic and historic documentation of the Tataviam/ Fernandeno and Tongva/Gabrielino people. Linguistic and ethnohistoric evidence shows that these Takic-speaking peoples moved into the San Fernando Valley and greater Los Angeles area by at least 3000 B.C. These groups have a common heritage, but began to diverge after arrival. Analysis of historical records from missions in the Greater Los Angeles area shows that at the time of mission recruitment, in the 18th and 19th centuries, the occupants of the area were descended from the populations living in the area since 3000 B.C. The associated funerary objects described in this notice are consistent with those of groups ancestral to the present-day Tataviam/Fernandeno and Tongva/Gabrielino people. The material cultures of earlier groups living in the geographical areas mentioned in this notice are characterized by archeologists as having passed through stages over the past 5,000 years. Many local archeologists assert that the changes in the material culture reflect evolving ecological adaptations and related changes in social organization of the same populations and do not represent population displacements or movements. The same range of artifact types and materials were used from the early pre-contact period until historic times. Tribal consultants explicitly state that population mixing, which did occur on a small scale, would not alter the continuity of the shared group identities of people associated with specific locales. Based on this evidence, continuity through time can be traced for all sites listed in this notice with present-day Tataviam/Fernandeno and Tongva/Gabrielino people. However, the Tataviam/Fernandeno and Tongva/ Gabrielino people currently lack federal recognition within a single unified tribe. At the time of the excavation and removal of these human remains and associated funerary objects, the land from which the human remains and E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 4654 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices associated funerary objects were removed was not the tribal land of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization. In 2014 and 2015, the Fowler Museum at UCLA consulted with Indian tribes who are recognized as aboriginal to the area from which these Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed. None of these Indian tribes agreed to accept control of the human remains and associated funerary objects. In October 2015, the Fowler Museum at UCLA and California Department of Transportation agreed to transfer control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation). asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the California Department of Transportation Officials of the California Department of Transportation have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 10 individuals of Native American ancestry based on metric and non-metric analysis. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 14 items described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(2)(i), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects may be to San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation). Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Tina Biorn, California Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271– 0001, telephone (916) 653–0013; email tina.biorn@dot.ca.gov, by February 26, 2016. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the San VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation), may proceed. The California Department of Transportation is responsible for notifying the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation), that this notice has been published. Dated: December 21, 2015. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–01603 Filed 1–26–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–19979; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District, Charleston, SC; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District has corrected an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on March 16, 2015. This notice corrects the number of associated funerary objects. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Charleston District at the address in this notice by February 26, 2016. ADDRESSES: Mr. Alan Shirey, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District, ATTN: CESAC–PM–PL, 69A Hagood Avenue, Charleston, SC 29403–5107, telephone (843) 329–8166, email alan.d.shirey@usace.army.mil. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the correction of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Charleston District of the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. The human remains SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00047 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 and associated funerary objects were removed from Berkeley County, SC. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the number of associated funerary objects published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register (80 FR 13614, March 16, 2015). Additional boxes of material that contained associated funerary objects were identified by the repository after the original inventory. These items were inventoried in March 2015, after the publication of the initial Notice. Transfer of control of the items in this correction notice has not occurred. Correction In the Federal Register (80 FR 13615, March 16, 2015), column 1, sentence 6, under the heading ‘‘History and Description of the Remains,’’ is corrected by substituting the following sentence: The 113,227 associated funerary objects are 3 beads, 323 ceramic sherds, 350 concretions, 106,771 faunal fragments, 60 fossils (shell and coral), 2,281 lithic flakes (orthoquartzite, chert, and quartz), 23 lithic tool fragments, 29 lots of faunal fragments, 95 lots of screened material, 99 soil samples, 228 lots of processed flotation. 4 lots of phytolith samples, 25 organics (wood, seeds, and snail shell), 1 piece of groundstone, 2,569 pieces of miscellaneous stone/pebbles, 97 pieces of charcoal, 1 glass fragment, 10 shell fragments, and 258 pieces of ochre (red and yellow). In the Federal Register (80 FR 13615, March 16, 2015), column 2, bullet 3, is corrected by substituting the following sentence: Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A) the 113,227 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Mr. Alan Shirey, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District, ATTN: CESAC–PM–PL, 69A Hagood Avenue, Charleston, SC 29403– E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 17 (Wednesday, January 27, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 4652-4654]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-01603]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-20022; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at the University 
of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, and California Department 
of Transportation, Sacramento, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles 
(UCLA) and the California Department

[[Page 4653]]

of Transportation have completed an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined 
that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and 
associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request to the California 
Department of Transportation. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to the California Department of Transportation at the 
address in this notice by February 26, 2016.

ADDRESSES: Tina Biorn, California Department of Transportation, P.O. 
Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271-0001, telephone (916) 653-0013, 
email tina.biorn@dot.ca.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects in the physical custody of the Fowler 
Museum at UCLA and under the control of the California Department of 
Transportation. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed from Los Angeles County, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Fowler 
Museum at UCLA professional staff in consultation with representatives 
of Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California; San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California 
(previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of 
the San Manual Reservation); and the following nonfederally recognized 
Indian groups: Fernande[ntilde]o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians; 
Gabrielino/Tongva Indians of California Tribe; Gabrielino/Tongva 
Nation; Gabrieleno/Tongva Tribal Council; San Gabriel Band of Mission 
Indians; Ti'at Society; and the Traditional Council of Pimu.

History and Description of the Human Remains and Associated Funerary 
Objects

    In 1945, 1963, 1967, and 1968, human remains representing, at 
minimum, seven individuals were removed from Big Tujunga Wash (CA-LAN-
167) in Los Angeles County, CA. The site was excavated in 1963 by Jay 
Ruby of the UCLA Archaeological Survey. The excavation was carried out 
as a salvage project after a dragline digging operation for a sewer 
line exposed and damaged one burial within the highway right-of-way. 
The human remains from this burial were recovered at that time. 
Subsequent review of the collection also identified fragmentary remains 
from midden contexts. A second burial, excavated from the site sometime 
between 1945-1951, by Edwin Walker of the Southwest Museum, was 
included along with the 1963 collection under Accession Number 501 and 
is included here. In all, a minimum of four adults, an infant, and a 
juvenile are represented. Sex was unable to be determined for any of 
the human remains. Nelson N. Leonard led a second project during the 
summers of 1967 and 1968 as mitigation for the building of the Foothill 
Freeway over the site. From the 1967-68 project, a juvenile human molar 
was identified. Ruby dated the site to A.D. 435 to 1800. No known 
individuals were identified. The 14 associated funerary objects are 
animal bones recovered in proximity to the burial recovered in 1945.
    In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from the Hammack Street site in Los Angeles County, CA 
(CA-LAN-194). The site was excavated by Chester King of the University 
of California Davis Anthropology Department for the California 
Department of Transportation. The project was designed for mitigation 
of impacts to the site from freeway construction for the Marina 
Freeway. The collection was curated at UCLA after analysis. Site CA-
LAN-194 dates to the historic period based on the artifact analyses. 
The human remains consists of three human bone removed from midden 
contexts representing at least three individuals. No age or sex could 
be determined due to their fragmentary nature. No known individuals 
were identified. Collection documentation does not indicate any burials 
or associated funerary objects.
    The sites detailed in this notice have been identified through 
tribal consultation to be within the traditional territory of the 
Tataviam/Fernandeno and Tongva/Gabrielino people. These locations are 
consistent with ethnographic and historic documentation of the 
Tataviam/Fernandeno and Tongva/Gabrielino people.
    Linguistic and ethnohistoric evidence shows that these Takic-
speaking peoples moved into the San Fernando Valley and greater Los 
Angeles area by at least 3000 B.C. These groups have a common heritage, 
but began to diverge after arrival. Analysis of historical records from 
missions in the Greater Los Angeles area shows that at the time of 
mission recruitment, in the 18th and 19th centuries, the occupants of 
the area were descended from the populations living in the area since 
3000 B.C.
    The associated funerary objects described in this notice are 
consistent with those of groups ancestral to the present-day Tataviam/
Fernandeno and Tongva/Gabrielino people. The material cultures of 
earlier groups living in the geographical areas mentioned in this 
notice are characterized by archeologists as having passed through 
stages over the past 5,000 years. Many local archeologists assert that 
the changes in the material culture reflect evolving ecological 
adaptations and related changes in social organization of the same 
populations and do not represent population displacements or movements. 
The same range of artifact types and materials were used from the early 
pre-contact period until historic times. Tribal consultants explicitly 
state that population mixing, which did occur on a small scale, would 
not alter the continuity of the shared group identities of people 
associated with specific locales. Based on this evidence, continuity 
through time can be traced for all sites listed in this notice with 
present-day Tataviam/Fernandeno and Tongva/Gabrielino people. However, 
the Tataviam/Fernandeno and Tongva/Gabrielino people currently lack 
federal recognition within a single unified tribe.
    At the time of the excavation and removal of these human remains 
and associated funerary objects, the land from which the human remains 
and

[[Page 4654]]

associated funerary objects were removed was not the tribal land of any 
Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization. In 2014 and 2015, the 
Fowler Museum at UCLA consulted with Indian tribes who are recognized 
as aboriginal to the area from which these Native American human 
remains and associated funerary objects were removed. None of these 
Indian tribes agreed to accept control of the human remains and 
associated funerary objects. In October 2015, the Fowler Museum at UCLA 
and California Department of Transportation agreed to transfer control 
of the human remains and associated funerary objects to San Manuel Band 
of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual 
Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation).

Determinations Made by the California Department of Transportation

    Officials of the California Department of Transportation have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 10 individuals of 
Native American ancestry based on metric and non-metric analysis.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 14 items described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Indian tribe.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(2)(i), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects may be to San Manuel Band 
of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual 
Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation).

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Tina 
Biorn, California Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, 
Sacramento, CA 94271-0001, telephone (916) 653-0013; email 
tina.biorn@dot.ca.gov, by February 26, 2016. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the San Manuel Band of 
Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band 
of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation), may proceed.
    The California Department of Transportation is responsible for 
notifying the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California 
(previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of 
the San Manual Reservation), that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 21, 2015.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2016-01603 Filed 1-26-16; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P