Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, and California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA, 4646-4648 [2016-01594]

Download as PDF 4646 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices mask reads: ‘‘Broken Nose, Seneca Nation, Snapping Turtle Clan, Six Nations Reservation—Ontario.’’ The mask is carved wood with a black face with a red mouth, with a hole on one side (right side, facing out), and a pointed chin. The mask face has holes in the nose and metal eye inlays surrounding center eyeholes. The face is framed with yellow hair, and there are carved lines on the face. On March 11, 2003, Binghamton University hosted a consultation meeting for federally recognized tribes to review NAGPRA summaries as part of the process of determining cultural affiliation. A group of traditional representatives from the Cayuga Nation; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); and the Tuscarora Nation, met privately after the open consultation. In January of 2013, letters were sent to Seneca representatives asking for comments or claims on the mask. On September 22, 2015, Scott Abrams, Acting Director of the Seneca Nation of Indians Tribal Historic Preservation Officer contacted Binghamton University and formally requested repatriation of the Seneca mask. Binghamton University asked other Seneca representatives if they agreed. No comments were received. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by Binghamton University Officials of Binghamton University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the one cultural item described above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object and the Seneca Nation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred object should contact Nina M. Versaggi, Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY 13902– 6000, telephone (607) 777–4786, before February 26, 2016. Repatriation of the sacred object to the Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York) Tribal Historic VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 Preservation Office may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Binghamton University is responsible for notifying the Cayuga Nation; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe (previously listed as the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York); Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as the Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as the Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); and Tuscarora Nation that this notice has been published. Dated: December 28, 2015. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–01591 Filed 1–26–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–20020; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, and California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and the California Department of Transportation have completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the California Department of Transportation. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00039 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the California Department of Transportation at the address in this notice by February 26, 2016. ADDRESSES: Tina Biorn, California Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271– 0001, telephone (916) 653–0013, email tina.biorn@dot.ca.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the physical custody of the Fowler Museum at UCLA and under the control of the California Department of Transportation. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. DATES: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Fowler Museum at UCLA professional staff in consultation with representatives of Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, and the following nonfederally recognized Indian groups: Barbareno Chumash Council; Barbareno/Ventureno Band of Mission Indians; Coastal Band of the Chumash ˜ Nation; Fernandeno Tataviam Band of Mission Indians; Gabrielino/Tongva Indians of California Tribe; Gabrielino/ Tongva Nation; Gabrieleno/Tongva Tribal Council; Northern Chumash Tribe; San Gabriel Band of Mission Indians; Ti’at Society; and the Traditional Council of Pimu. History and Description of the Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects In 1966 and 1967, human remains representing at minimum, 108 individuals were removed from Xucu E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices (CA–SBA–1) in Santa Barbara County, CA. Excavations were undertaken by a UCLA field course directed by Patrick Finnerty for the State Division of Highways prior to construction of Highway 101. This work continued in 1967, in addition to excavations led by Gary Stickel within an adjacent cemetery. Both sets of collections were curated upon completion of analysis as provided in the permits. Not all of the 1966 burials were curated at UCLA, and their current location is unknown. Radiocarbon dates have occupation from 5500 B.C. through Spanish contact periods. In 1966, formal burials and fragmentary human remains were discovered and removed for curation. The total minimum number of individuals represented are 28, identified as 16 adults (1 male, 1 female, and 14 unidentified), 2 sub-adults, 2 juvenile, and 3 infants. Another 5 individuals were too fragmentary to identify age or sex. In 1967, 43 burials were formally identified, however several where left in-situ after recording them. In addition, fragmentary human remains were recovered. In total, a minimum number of 80 individuals can be identified as 60 adults, 3 sub-adults, 12 juveniles, 3 infants, and 2 perinatal. In addition 21 were identifiable as male and 11 as female. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified for the burials found in 1966. The 726 associated funerary objects excavated in 1967 included 19 pieces and 1 bag of asphaltum fragments; 20 pieces of worked bone; 189 pieces and 3 bags of unmodified animal bone; 1 piece of charcoal; 12 pieces of hematite; 14 pieces of limonite; 1 fragment of a paper candlewick; 2 bags of soil samples; 1 wood fragment; 123 pieces and 2 bags of unmodified shell; 2 asphaltum plugged abalone shells; 22 shell beads; 7 bowl/mortar fragments; 167 groundstone tools and fragments; 139 chipped stone tools and flakes; and 1 steatite pipe. In 1969–1970, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Kasil (CA–SBA–87) in Santa Barbara County, CA. Excavations by G. James West occurred at the request of the Division of Highways as a salvage project undertaken prior to highway construction on Highway 101. Collections were accessioned at UCLA as they returned from the field. The village dates from A.D. 300 to 1500. Human remains consist of a single burial representing an adult male. The burial was disturbed when a bulldozer cut a trench on the upper terrace. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 Further investigation of the trench failed to show the exact burial location. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. From 1961 to 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed from Rincon Point (CA–SBA–119) in Santa Barbara County, CA. Excavations in 1961 and 1962 were led by Patrick Finnerty while still in high school. Most of the human remains and artifacts have not been located, however at least some of three burials and objects have been found and curated at the Fowler Museum at UCLA. In 1963, excavations were directed by Keith Johnson with the UCLA Archaeological Survey preliminary as a salvage excavation due to the re-location of U.S. Highway 101 which would pass through the site. The collection was curated at UCLA upon completion of the field work. The site dates from 1735 to 1320 B.C. The human remains consist of a single burial with a minimum of two individuals: A sub-adult male and an adult, sex unknown. The three relocated burials represent a minimum of three individuals, one adult male, one juvenile, and one adult with undetermined sex. No known individuals were identified. The 16 associated funerary objects include 8 sandstone mortar fragments from a 1962 burial and 2 shell fragments, 1 bone hairpin, 3 biface, 1 unmodified animal bone, and 1 serpentine pendant from a 1963 burial. In 1968 and 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 individuals were removed from Pitas Point (CA–VEN–27) in Ventura County, CA. Excavations were conducted by a University of California Archaeological Survey crew under the direction of Chester King. The excavation was part of a salvage project for the realignment of Highway 101, and took place on land owned by Caltrans. This collection was curated at UCLA after analysis was complete. Analysis of the artifacts places the site occupation to A.D. 1000– 1550. Three formal burials and fragmentary human remains recovered from midden contexts include 13 adults (2 male, 1 female, and 10 unidentified), 1 juvenile, and 1 infant. One fragmentary remain could not be aged or sex determined. No known individuals were identified. The 50 associated funerary objects include 2 bags and 6 pieces of unmodified animal bone, 2 worked bone fragments, 1 bag of charcoal, 6 bags of asphaltum, 1 bag and 2 individual tarring pebbles, 5 bags of unmodified shell, 1 shell fishhook fragment, 1 shell bead fragment, 21 PO 00000 Frm 00040 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 4647 chipped stone flakes and tools, 1 fire cracked rock, and 1 pestle. The sites detailed in this notice have been identified through tribal consultation to be within the traditional territory of the Chumash people. These locations are consistent with ethnographic and historic documentation of the Chumash people. The Chumash territory, anthropologically defined first on the basis of linguistic similarities, and subsequently on broadly shared material and cultural traits, reaches from San Luis Obispo to Malibu on the coast, inland to the western edge of the San Joaquin Valley, to the edge of the San Fernando Valley, and includes the four Northern Channel Islands. At the southern and southeastern boundaries of the territory there is evidence of the physical co-existence of Chumash, Tataviam, and Gabrielino/Tongva languages and beliefs systems. At the northern boundary of the territory there is evidence of the physical co-existence of Chumash and Salinan groups. The sites in this notice are located in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties and fall within the geographical area identified as Chumash. Some tribal consultants state that these areas were the responsibility of regional leaders, who were themselves organized into a pan-regional association of both political power and ceremonial knowledge. Further, these indigenous areas are identified by some tribal consultants to be relational with clans or associations of traditional practitioners of specific kinds of indigenous medicinal and ceremonial practices. Some tribal consultants identified these clans as existing in the pre-contact period and identified some clans as also existing in the present day. Other tribal consultants do not recognize present-day geographical divisions to be related to clans of traditional practitioners. However, they do state that Chumash, Tataviam, and Gabrielino/Tongva territories were and are occupied by socially distinct, yet interrelated, groups which have been characterized by anthropologists. Ethnographic evidence suggests that the social and political organization of the pre-contact Channel Islands were primarily at the village level, with a hereditary chief, in addition to many other specialists who wielded power. The associated funerary objects described in this notice are consistent with those of groups ancestral to the present-day Chumash, Tataviam, and Gabrielino/Tongva people. The material cultures of earlier groups living in the geographical areas mentioned in this notice are characterized by archeologists E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 4648 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices as having passed through stages over the past 10,000 years. Many local archeologists assert that the changes in the material culture reflect evolving ecological adaptations and related changes in social organization of the same populations and do not represent population displacements or movements. The same range of artifact types and materials were used from the early pre-contact period until historic times. Tribal consultants explicitly state that population mixing, which did occur on a small scale, would not alter the continuity of the shared group identities of people associated with specific locales. Based on this evidence, continuity through time can be traced for all sites listed in this notice with present-day Chumash people, specifically the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Determinations Made by the California Department of Transportation Officials of the California Department of Transportation have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 130 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 792 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Tina Biorn, California Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271– 0001, telephone (916) 653–0013, email tina.biorn@dot.ca.gov, by February 26, 2016. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, may proceed. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 The California Department of Transportation is responsible for notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, that this notice has been published. Dated: December 21, 2015. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–01594 Filed 1–26–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–20021; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, and California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and California Department of Transportation, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, have determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the California Department of Transportation. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the California Department of Transportation at the address in this notice by February 26, 2016. ADDRESSES: Tina Biorn, California Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271– 0001, telephone (916) 653–0013, email tina.biorn@dot.ca.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00041 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the California Department of Transportation that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items In February 1997, 4,280 burial objects were removed from CA–LAN–2233 in Los Angeles County, CA. The California Department of Transportation initiated an emergency recovery effort of burials in the path of construction to improve State Route 126. An archeologist had previously found a burial on an adjacent private property and notified the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) as construction began. During staff efforts to locate the burial, evidence of additional burials were found. Staff terminated the exploratory effort and came back with a crew consisting of trained osteologists from the Archaeological Research Center, California State University, Sacramento, and Caltrans staff, under the direction of Dr. Georgie Waugh, to recover the burials. In August 1997, six more burials were found during highway construction and additional recovery excavations were conducted by Dr. Phillip Walker and students of University of California (UC) Santa Barbara. Over the course of the project, a total of 45 burials were located and transported to UC Santa Barbara for analysis. All human remains and nonartifactual and artifactual grave associated items identified were reburied as directed by the Most Likely Descendant designated by the California Native American Heritage Commission. Recent consultations resulted in the identification of additional funerary objects because of their proximity to the burials. The unassociated funerary objects are 1 stone core, 1,415 pieces of stone debitage, 3 pieces of modified bone, 2,828 pieces of unmodified faunal bone, 1 soil sample, 6 bags of charcoal samples, and 24 fragments and 2 bags of seed/nut pieces. Two components were identified: An earlier Millingstone adaptation that occurred at least prior to 2000 years ago, and perhaps as early as 3000–4000 years ago, and a later component securely dated to at least E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 17 (Wednesday, January 27, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 4646-4648]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-01594]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-20020; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at the University 
of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, and California Department 
of Transportation, Sacramento, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles 
(UCLA) and the California Department of Transportation have completed 
an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation 
between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-
day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants 
or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request to the California Department of Transportation. If no 
additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, 
Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the California Department of Transportation 
at the address in this notice by February 26, 2016.

ADDRESSES: Tina Biorn, California Department of Transportation, P.O. 
Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271-0001, telephone (916) 653-0013, 
email tina.biorn@dot.ca.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects in the physical custody of the Fowler 
Museum at UCLA and under the control of the California Department of 
Transportation. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed from Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Fowler 
Museum at UCLA professional staff in consultation with representatives 
of Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California, and the following nonfederally recognized 
Indian groups: Barbareno Chumash Council; Barbareno/Ventureno Band of 
Mission Indians; Coastal Band of the Chumash Nation; Fernande[ntilde]o 
Tataviam Band of Mission Indians; Gabrielino/Tongva Indians of 
California Tribe; Gabrielino/Tongva Nation; Gabrieleno/Tongva Tribal 
Council; Northern Chumash Tribe; San Gabriel Band of Mission Indians; 
Ti'at Society; and the Traditional Council of Pimu.

History and Description of the Human Remains and Associated Funerary 
Objects

    In 1966 and 1967, human remains representing at minimum, 108 
individuals were removed from Xucu

[[Page 4647]]

(CA-SBA-1) in Santa Barbara County, CA. Excavations were undertaken by 
a UCLA field course directed by Patrick Finnerty for the State Division 
of Highways prior to construction of Highway 101. This work continued 
in 1967, in addition to excavations led by Gary Stickel within an 
adjacent cemetery. Both sets of collections were curated upon 
completion of analysis as provided in the permits. Not all of the 1966 
burials were curated at UCLA, and their current location is unknown. 
Radiocarbon dates have occupation from 5500 B.C. through Spanish 
contact periods. In 1966, formal burials and fragmentary human remains 
were discovered and removed for curation. The total minimum number of 
individuals represented are 28, identified as 16 adults (1 male, 1 
female, and 14 unidentified), 2 sub-adults, 2 juvenile, and 3 infants. 
Another 5 individuals were too fragmentary to identify age or sex. In 
1967, 43 burials were formally identified, however several where left 
in-situ after recording them. In addition, fragmentary human remains 
were recovered. In total, a minimum number of 80 individuals can be 
identified as 60 adults, 3 sub-adults, 12 juveniles, 3 infants, and 2 
perinatal. In addition 21 were identifiable as male and 11 as female. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
were identified for the burials found in 1966. The 726 associated 
funerary objects excavated in 1967 included 19 pieces and 1 bag of 
asphaltum fragments; 20 pieces of worked bone; 189 pieces and 3 bags of 
unmodified animal bone; 1 piece of charcoal; 12 pieces of hematite; 14 
pieces of limonite; 1 fragment of a paper candlewick; 2 bags of soil 
samples; 1 wood fragment; 123 pieces and 2 bags of unmodified shell; 2 
asphaltum plugged abalone shells; 22 shell beads; 7 bowl/mortar 
fragments; 167 groundstone tools and fragments; 139 chipped stone tools 
and flakes; and 1 steatite pipe.
    In 1969-1970, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Kasil (CA-SBA-87) in Santa Barbara County, 
CA. Excavations by G. James West occurred at the request of the 
Division of Highways as a salvage project undertaken prior to highway 
construction on Highway 101. Collections were accessioned at UCLA as 
they returned from the field. The village dates from A.D. 300 to 1500. 
Human remains consist of a single burial representing an adult male. 
The burial was disturbed when a bulldozer cut a trench on the upper 
terrace. Further investigation of the trench failed to show the exact 
burial location. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects were identified.
    From 1961 to 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals were removed from Rincon Point (CA-SBA-119) in Santa 
Barbara County, CA. Excavations in 1961 and 1962 were led by Patrick 
Finnerty while still in high school. Most of the human remains and 
artifacts have not been located, however at least some of three burials 
and objects have been found and curated at the Fowler Museum at UCLA. 
In 1963, excavations were directed by Keith Johnson with the UCLA 
Archaeological Survey preliminary as a salvage excavation due to the 
re-location of U.S. Highway 101 which would pass through the site. The 
collection was curated at UCLA upon completion of the field work. The 
site dates from 1735 to 1320 B.C. The human remains consist of a single 
burial with a minimum of two individuals: A sub-adult male and an 
adult, sex unknown. The three relocated burials represent a minimum of 
three individuals, one adult male, one juvenile, and one adult with 
undetermined sex. No known individuals were identified. The 16 
associated funerary objects include 8 sandstone mortar fragments from a 
1962 burial and 2 shell fragments, 1 bone hairpin, 3 biface, 1 
unmodified animal bone, and 1 serpentine pendant from a 1963 burial.
    In 1968 and 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 
individuals were removed from Pitas Point (CA-VEN-27) in Ventura 
County, CA. Excavations were conducted by a University of California 
Archaeological Survey crew under the direction of Chester King. The 
excavation was part of a salvage project for the realignment of Highway 
101, and took place on land owned by Caltrans. This collection was 
curated at UCLA after analysis was complete. Analysis of the artifacts 
places the site occupation to A.D. 1000-1550. Three formal burials and 
fragmentary human remains recovered from midden contexts include 13 
adults (2 male, 1 female, and 10 unidentified), 1 juvenile, and 1 
infant. One fragmentary remain could not be aged or sex determined. No 
known individuals were identified. The 50 associated funerary objects 
include 2 bags and 6 pieces of unmodified animal bone, 2 worked bone 
fragments, 1 bag of charcoal, 6 bags of asphaltum, 1 bag and 2 
individual tarring pebbles, 5 bags of unmodified shell, 1 shell 
fishhook fragment, 1 shell bead fragment, 21 chipped stone flakes and 
tools, 1 fire cracked rock, and 1 pestle.
    The sites detailed in this notice have been identified through 
tribal consultation to be within the traditional territory of the 
Chumash people. These locations are consistent with ethnographic and 
historic documentation of the Chumash people.
    The Chumash territory, anthropologically defined first on the basis 
of linguistic similarities, and subsequently on broadly shared material 
and cultural traits, reaches from San Luis Obispo to Malibu on the 
coast, inland to the western edge of the San Joaquin Valley, to the 
edge of the San Fernando Valley, and includes the four Northern Channel 
Islands. At the southern and southeastern boundaries of the territory 
there is evidence of the physical co-existence of Chumash, Tataviam, 
and Gabrielino/Tongva languages and beliefs systems. At the northern 
boundary of the territory there is evidence of the physical co-
existence of Chumash and Salinan groups. The sites in this notice are 
located in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties and fall within the 
geographical area identified as Chumash. Some tribal consultants state 
that these areas were the responsibility of regional leaders, who were 
themselves organized into a pan-regional association of both political 
power and ceremonial knowledge. Further, these indigenous areas are 
identified by some tribal consultants to be relational with clans or 
associations of traditional practitioners of specific kinds of 
indigenous medicinal and ceremonial practices. Some tribal consultants 
identified these clans as existing in the pre-contact period and 
identified some clans as also existing in the present day. Other tribal 
consultants do not recognize present-day geographical divisions to be 
related to clans of traditional practitioners. However, they do state 
that Chumash, Tataviam, and Gabrielino/Tongva territories were and are 
occupied by socially distinct, yet interrelated, groups which have been 
characterized by anthropologists. Ethnographic evidence suggests that 
the social and political organization of the pre-contact Channel 
Islands were primarily at the village level, with a hereditary chief, 
in addition to many other specialists who wielded power.
    The associated funerary objects described in this notice are 
consistent with those of groups ancestral to the present-day Chumash, 
Tataviam, and Gabrielino/Tongva people. The material cultures of 
earlier groups living in the geographical areas mentioned in this 
notice are characterized by archeologists

[[Page 4648]]

as having passed through stages over the past 10,000 years. Many local 
archeologists assert that the changes in the material culture reflect 
evolving ecological adaptations and related changes in social 
organization of the same populations and do not represent population 
displacements or movements. The same range of artifact types and 
materials were used from the early pre-contact period until historic 
times. Tribal consultants explicitly state that population mixing, 
which did occur on a small scale, would not alter the continuity of the 
shared group identities of people associated with specific locales. 
Based on this evidence, continuity through time can be traced for all 
sites listed in this notice with present-day Chumash people, 
specifically the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the 
Santa Ynez Reservation, California.

Determinations Made by the California Department of Transportation

    Officials of the California Department of Transportation have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 130 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 792 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa 
Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, 
California.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Tina Biorn, California Department of 
Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271-0001, 
telephone (916) 653-0013, email tina.biorn@dot.ca.gov, by February 26, 
2016. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California, may proceed.
    The California Department of Transportation is responsible for 
notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa 
Ynez Reservation, California, that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 21, 2015.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2016-01594 Filed 1-26-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-50-P