Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 4662-4670 [2016-01592]

Download as PDF 4662 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices Dated: December 21, 2015. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. National Recreation Area, Boulder City, NV. The human remains were removed from site X:8:7, Yuma County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the Superintendent, Lake Mead National Recreation Area. [FR Doc. 2016–01600 Filed 1–26–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–19978; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Boulder City, NV National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Lake Mead National Recreation Area has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to Lake Mead National Recreation Area. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Lake Mead National Recreation Area at the address in this notice by February 26, 2016. ADDRESSES: Lizette Richardson, Superintendent, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, 601 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, NV 89005, telephone (702) 293–8920, email lizette_richardson@ nps.gov. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Lake Mead SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Lake Mead National Recreation Area professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains In March 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site X:8:7 on private land in Yuma County, AZ. National Park Service archeologist Albert H. Schroeder collected the fragmentary cremation with the permission of the landowner during an archeological survey of the Lower Colorado River. Three artifacts—two three-quarter groove, double-bitted polished axes and one small triangular obsidian point—may also have been removed, but their location is unknown. The cremation has been in the possession of Lake Mead National Recreation Area since its removal. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Mr. Schroeder’s 1952 report identified the cremation as a prehistoric Native American individual of unspecified gender, likely Hohokam. All available lines of evidence support the archeological identification of the remains as Hohokam. The Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona are known to be descendants of the Hohokam people. During consultation, representatives from each of these tribes stated that their oral traditions show cultural affiliation with the Hohokam. The ethnographic, archeological, and historical evidence supports that affiliation. PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Determinations Made by Lake Mead National Recreation Area Officials of Lake Mead National Recreation Area have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Lizette Richardson, Superintendent, Lake Mead National Recreation Area, 601 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, NV 89005, telephone (702) 293–8920, email lizette_ richardson@nps.gov, by February 26, 2016. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed. Lake Mead National Recreation Area is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: December 10, 2015. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–01589 Filed 1–26–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–20016; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Fowler Museum at UCLA. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Fowler Museum at UCLA at the address in this notice by February 26, 2016. ADDRESSES: Wendy G. Teeter, Ph.D., Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095–1549, telephone (310) 825–1864, email wteeter@ arts.ucla.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Fowler Museum at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Ventura, and Los Angeles Counties, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Fowler Museum at UCLA professional staff in consultation with representatives of Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, and the following nonfederally recognized Indian groups: Barbareno Chumash Council; Barbareno/Ventureno Band of Mission Indians; Coastal Band of the Chumash ˜ Nation; Fernandeno Tataviam Band of Mission Indians; Gabrielino/Tongva Indians of California Tribe; Gabrielino/ Tongva Nation; Gabrieleno/Tongva Tribal Council; Northern Chumash VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 Tribe; San Gabriel Band of Mission Indians; Ti’at Society; and the Traditional Council of Pimu. History and Description of the Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from the Lower Tank Site (CA– LAN–2) near Topanga, Los Angeles County, CA, where Keith Johnson led a UCLA field school course on privately owned land. The Lower Tank Site is estimated to date between 1000 and 0 B.C., based on radiocarbon dating. After analysis, the collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1961. Three formal burials were identified and consist of two adults and a juvenile. One adult could be further identified as male. No known individuals were identified. The seven associated funerary objects include five unmodified faunal bones, one metate, and one mano. In 1967, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from the Puerco Site (CA– LAN–19) near Malibu, Los Angeles, CA, where James West lead a UCLA field course on privately-owned land as part of the University of California (UC) Archaeological Survey in preparation for proposed freeway work. The Puerco Site is estimated to date between 600 B.C. and A.D. 1769, based on the presence of artifact types in the collection. After analysis, the collection was accessioned in 1977. Fragmentary human remains represent four adult individuals of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from CA–LAN–45 near Topanga, Los Angeles County, CA, where Keith Johnson lead a UCLA field course on privately-owned land. The site, CA–LAN–45, dates to between A.D. 1250 and 1769, based on the artifact types in the collection. After analysis, the collection was accessioned in the fall of 1963. Fragmentary human remains represent a minimum of two adult individuals. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. At an unknown date between 1900 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Sequit Creek Indian Mound (CA–LAN–52) in Los Angeles County, CA. The human remains were received at an unknown date by the UCLA Biology Department as part of the Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection PO 00000 Frm 00056 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 4663 and were subsequently transferred to the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology and Zooarchaeology Lab in August 1995, and then to Fowler Museum in September 1995 to be inventoried for NAGPRA compliance. Being that there is little to no original documentation for the human remains, they have been attributed to CA–LAN–52 because they are labeled with location information, and the site is known to have been heavily looted since at least the late 1800s. The human remains are estimated to date to A.D. 610 +/¥100, based on radiocarbon dating. The fragmentary human remains represent two adult individuals, sex unknown, and one infant individual. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. Sometime before 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from CA– LAN–95 in San Fernando, Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations were undertaken by USC students after the human remains of a Native American individual were found to be eroding from private property. At an unknown date, the collection was received by the Hancock Foundation, who subsequently donated the collection to UCLA sometime around 1950. Very little information accompanied the collection to the Fowler Museum, but the human remains were determined to be Native American based on osteological analysis. Fragmentary human remains represent a juvenile between four and six years of age. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is an unmodified faunal bone fragment. Sometime before 1972, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Encinal Canyon (CA–LAN–114) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. The human remains are thought to have been excavated by John Beaton and were accessioned in 1972. Although the site has been excavated several times, no specific age for the site has been determined other than prehistoric. Fragmentary human remains represent one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. Sometime before 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Pacific Coast Highway (CA–LAN–133, formerly CA–LAN–190), in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. The collection was received by UCLA in 1952 from Mr. Gonzales, who had excavated the burial on private property. The human remains E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 4664 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices of an adult male were determined to be Native American based on osteological analysis. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1978 and 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 individuals were removed from Stunt Ranch (CA–LAN–153) in Los Angeles County, CA. Clement Meighan led two field courses with the cooperation of the Jennings Engineering Company, who was developing the property before the land was acquired by UCLA. Clement Meighan dated the site to between A.D. 1250 and 1769, based on the presence of diagnostic artifact types. During excavations, six formal burials were identified in addition to fragmentary human remains. The human remains could be further identified as representing five adult and one infant of unknown sex. At least three individuals were cremated, and two others were too fragmentary to identify either age or sex. No known individuals were identified. The 80 associated funerary objects are 6 pieces and 1 bag of unmodified animal bone, 60 unmodified shell fragments, 12 stone fragments, and 1 obsidian biface. In 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from the Santa Maria Site (CA– LAN–162) in Topanga Canyon, Los Angeles County, CA. At the request of the Montevideo Country Club, excavations were conducted throughout 1987 by Dr. Brian Dillon and assistant Justin Hyland for compliance with proposed development of the site. The collection was accessioned in April 1997. The site age is estimated to span from between 600 B.C. and A.D. 1769. Fragmentary human remains from Burials 1 and 2 represent two adult individuals of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. Between 1950 and 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 27 individuals were removed from the Zuma Creek Site (CA–LAN–174) in Los Angeles County, CA. The site was first excavated in 1950 by Stuart Peck. It was excavated again in 1952 and 1957 by Clement Meighan as part of a UCLA field school. From these excavations, human remains from seventeen burials were accessioned in 1957. Later salvage excavations were conducted at the site during 1968 and 1969 by Sally MacFadyen and Jinny McKenzie, as well as by Thomas King and the UC Archaeological Survey crew. Human remains from five burials deriving from these excavations were accessioned by UCLA in 1969, after analysis was completed. The site produced a VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 radiocarbon date of 3000 B.C. ± 200 years. The first set of excavations included human remains of 13 adults (6 female, 4 male, and 3 indeterminate), 4 juveniles, and 2 infants. The second set of excavations included six adults (2 female, 1 male, and 3 indeterminate), a juvenile, and an infant. No known individuals were identified. From both sets of excavations, the 178 associated funerary objects are 14 stone fragments, 5 cobbles, 32 groundstone artifacts, 65 flaked stone artifacts, 16 pieces and 3 bags of unmodified shell, 23 pieces and 1 bag of unmodified animal bone, 2 worked bone artifacts, 2 glass fragments, 3 ochre fragments, 5 worked shell artifacts, 1 bag of soil, 5 asphaltum fragments, and 1 bag of asphaltum with basketry impressions. In 1967, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Russell Valley (CA–LAN– 186), in Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations were conducted by Chester King during a salvage operation of this Late Period site (A.D. 700–1500). Fragmentary human remains were identified from midden contexts representing at least one individual of unknown age or sex. The collection was accessioned in 1967. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Pacific Coast Highway (CA–LAN–195) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. The human remains had been exposed during construction and were disinterred by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Office, Malibu Substation. UCLA received the human remains in 1951. Based on osteological analysis the human remains were identified as an adult female and an adult individual of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. A single unmodified sea mammal bone was recovered and is assumed to be an associated funerary object. Between March and June 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, 129 individuals were removed from Trancas Canyon Cemetery (CA–LAN–197) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA, by the UC Archaeology Survey under the direction of John Beaton and aided by the Malibu Archaeological Society. The excavations took place on land owned by the Reco Land Company as a salvage project due to erosion and the construction of a shopping center. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1978. Radiocarbon dating produced from the cemetery estimate the site age to 370 B.C. ± 58 years but continues through PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Spanish contact. Human remains from these excavations were further identified to age and sex, when possible, including 78 adults (32 male, 21 female, and 25 indeterminate), 4 sub-adults, 28 juveniles, and 14 infants were identified. Another five individuals were too fragmentary to determine age or sex. No known individuals. The 718 associated funerary objects include: 28 pieces and 1 bag of asphaltum fragments, 87 pieces and 1 bag of unmodified animal bone, 27 worked bone fragments, 1 charcoal fragment, 50 pieces and 1 bag of flaked stone artifacts, 4 copper fragments, 15 pieces and 1 bag of ochre fragments, 11 groundstone pieces, 84 shell beads, 182 pieces and 1 bag of unmodified shell, 206 pieces and 4 bags of cobbles/ pebbles, and 14 stone fragments. In 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed from Zuma Creek, also known as Zuma Creek ‘‘G’’ (CA–LAN–201, LAN–19) near Point Dume in Los Angeles County, CA. The collection was excavated by Clement W. Meighan as a UCLA research project. The estimated age of the site was not determined. The human remains were from a known prehistoric site and determined to be Native American based on osteological analysis. Fragmentary human remains from Burial A–13 represents one adult female individual, one adult possible female individual, one juvenile individual of unknown sex, and two adult individual of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1962 and 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 45 individuals were removed from Paradise Cove (CA–LAN–222) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. The first set of excavations was undertaken by a Pasadena City College field school, supervised by Richard H. Brooks, in the spring of 1962. During this time excavations were also undertaken jointly with a Santa Monica City College and UCLA field course supervised by Jack Smith. These collections were accessioned by UCLA after receiving them from Richard H. Brooks of the Department of Anthropology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 1987. In 1963, excavations continued with the joint Santa Monica City College and UCLA Anthropology field school course directed by Chester King and Jack Smith. The resulting collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1964. The estimated age of the site based on radiocarbon dating is 2350 B.C. ± 80 years. Fragmentary human remains recovered from midden contexts in 1962 E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices represent a minimum of 10 individuals: 6 adults, a juvenile, and 3 individuals of unknown age or sex. From the 1963 excavations, human remains were recovered from 8 burials and from midden contexts. These human remains represent a minimum of 35 individuals: 17 adults (2 male, 2 female, and 13 indeterminate), 1 sub-adult, 8 juveniles, 3 infants, and 6 individuals whose age and sex could not be determined. No known individuals were identified. The 39 associated funerary objects were recovered from the second set of excavations and include: 6 unmodified animal bones, 3 worked bones, 2 limestone cobble unifaces, 3 chert scrapers, 1 limestone hammerstone, 1 sandstone metate fragment, 12 asphaltum basketry impression fragments, 3 manos, 1 quartz crystal fragment, 1 quartzite chopper, 1 sandstone mortar fragment, 4 shell fragments, and 1 wood handle fragment. From 1961 through 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 13 individuals were removed from Century Ranch (CA–LAN–225) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. The site was excavated by UCLA student volunteers under the direction of Jayne Harbinger. The site was also excavated in 1963 by a Santa Monica City College class under the direction of Chester King and Thomas Blackburn. The excavations took place on land that was then owned by the Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation and is now part of Malibu Creek State Park. Human remains were recovered from burial and midden contexts. Burial contexts included 9 adults (2 of which are possibly male), an infant, and one individual of unknown age and sex. Fragmentary human remains from midden contexts represent two individuals of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 60 associated funerary objects are 14 stone fragments, 10 flaked-stone tools, 20 ground stone artifacts, 12 cobble artifacts, and 4 unmodified faunal bone pieces. In 1960 and 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, 53 individuals were removed from Century Ranch (CA–LAN–227), in Malibu Canyon, Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations were conducted by Thomas Blackburn and Ernest Chandonet with UCLA archeology students. The excavations were conducted on land owned by Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, now part of Malibu Creek State Park. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1961. The site is estimated to date to the Late Period, with a radiocarbon date of circa A.D. 1530. The burials include a minimum of 53 individuals that were further VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 identified as 23 adults (10 males, 2 females, and 11 indeterminate), 1 subadult, 13 juveniles, 15 infants, and 1 individual too fragmented to determine age or sex. No known individuals were identified. The 821 associated funerary objects include 678 shell beads, 19 shell pendants, 7 worked bone artifacts, 7 flaked-stone artifacts, 3 groundstone artifacts, 91 asphaltum fragments with basketry impressions, 7 shell dishes, one ochre fragment, and 8 unmodified shell fragments. In 1966, 1967, and 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 906 individuals were removed from Medea Creek village and cemetery (CA–LAN– 243) in Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations were conducted in 1966–1967, in the cemetery area by UC Archaeological Survey volunteers and a UCLA field course directed by Linda B. King and Linda Hasten. In 1969, the Medea Creek village area was excavated by a crew of volunteers under the direction of Clay A. Singer. Both efforts were part of a volunteer salvage project prior to the site’s destruction. The collections were accessioned by UCLA in 1969. The estimated age of the site is Late Period/ Historic (A.D. 1500–1785). Human remains from the 1969 excavations represent two adult individuals of unknown sex. Human remains from 1966–1967 excavations of the cemetery represent a minimum number of 904 individuals from 467 burials. All human remains from these burials were assessed for age, sex, pathology, and completeness. To summarize, a total of 524 adults (88 male, 86 female, and 350 indeterminate), 217 juveniles, 97 infants, and 9 prenatal were identified, and the human remains of 59 individuals were too fragmentary to identify by age or sex. No known individuals were identified. The 23,922 associated funerary objects include: 213 pieces and 8 bags of unmodified faunal remains and artifacts, 925 pieces and 2 bags of shell unmodified fragments and artifacts, 414 pieces and 7 bags of asphaltum fragments, 21,243 shell, glass, and stone beads, 78 flaked-stone artifacts, 62 ground stone artifacts, 179 pieces and 4 bags of organic materials, 2 metal artifacts, 435 pieces and 3 bags of stone fragments, 321 cobble and pebble artifacts, 7 fragments and 1 bag of charcoal, 17 bags of soil, and 1 glass pendant. In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 102 individuals were removed when Alex Apostolides directed a salvage project at the Mullholland Site (CA–LAN–246) before the construction of housing and to offset the pervasive vandalism that was PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 4665 occurring at the time. Dating of the site is to the Late Period (A.D. 1200–1500). The collection was accessioned by UCLA in November 1978. Eighteen formal burials were included in the collection, but fragmentary human remains were also identified from midden contexts that result in a minimum number of 102 individuals being represented. The human remains were further identified as 56 adults (11 males, 6 females, and 39 indeterminate), 27 juveniles, 14 infants, and 5 individuals too fragmentary to identify further. No known individuals were identified. The 2,640 associated funerary objects include: 27 flaked-stone artifacts, 8 groundstone artifacts, 1 carved clay fragment, 13 pieces of worked bone, 1 ceramic sherd, 30 charcoal fragments, 4 ochre fragments, 1 pecked pebble, 2,321 shell beads and ornaments, 16 unmodified shell fragments, 10 soapstone ornaments, 203 pieces and 3 bags of unmodified animal bone, and 2 bags of soil samples. In 1964, 1971–1972, and 1973–1975, human remains representing, at minimum, 247 individuals were removed from Humaliwu (CA–LAN– 264) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. UCLA conducted several field seasons under the direction of Clement Meighan on private property. Excavations also took place on land controlled by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, but that is filed under a separate inventory. Collections were accessioned by UCLA as they returned from the field under Accession numbers 505 (1964 excavations) and 573 (1971–75 excavations). The village dates from A.D. 550–1805. Three formal burials were identified during the 1964 excavations, and additional fragmentary human remains were recovered from midden contexts. There are a minimum of 27 individuals identified as 19 adults (one male, two female, and 16 indeterminate), one sub-adult, four juveniles, one infant, and two perinatal. Excavations in the 1970s uncovered 83 formal burials, and with the addition of fragmentary human remains recovered from midden contexts, a minimum number of 220 individuals were identified. Of this total, identification was possible for 110 adults (34 male, 34 female, and 42 indeterminate), 13 subadults, 36 juvenile, 36 infants, 13 neonatal individuals, and 10 perinatal individuals. Two individuals were too fragmentary to determine age or sex. No known individuals were identified. The 15,917 associated funerary objects include: 7 bone awl fragments, 21 worked bone fragments, 1 bone barb, 2 bone pin fragments, 7 bone tube beads, E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 4666 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices 1 bone wedge, 1 bone whistle, 2 red stone ear spools, 1 pipe, 1,869 pieces and 39 bags of unmodified animal bones, 13 bags of soil samples, 3 pieces and 1 bag of metal items, 4 pieces of ochre, 5 charcoal fragments, 7 quartz crystals, 1 fluorite crystal, 158 Megathura (limpet) rings, 3 fishhook fragments, 1 glass fragment, 4 perforated shells, 3 inlayed abalone shells, 13,040 shell beads, 54 pieces and 10 bags of unmodified shell fragments, 42 effigies, 4 stone tube beads, 30 stone beads, 1 bead blank, 3 stone pendants, 24 cobbles, 20 stone cores, 480 flaked-stone tools and debitage, 18 ground stone tools, 1 tarring pebble, 8 asphaltum fragments, 1 wood fragment, and 24 pieces and 3 bags of stone fragments. Between 1961 and 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed from Sweetwater Mesa (CA–LAN–267) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations on private property took place under the direction of Chester King, Tom Blackburn, and Earnest Chadonet as part of the UC Archaeological Survey, along with UCLA students and members of the Archaeological Research Association. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1963. The site is estimated to date to 4920–4360 B.C. Fragmentary human remains recovered from midden contexts represent a minimum of four adults and a juvenile individual of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Tobillo (CA–LAN–311) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. The site was excavated as part of the Malibu Wastewater Project under the direction of Brian Dillon on private property. The collection was given to UCLA on April 24, 1997. The site is estimated to date to the Late Period (A.D. 700–1769) and Historic (after A.D. 1769) time periods. Fragmentary human remains represent an individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Topanga Canyon Area (CA–LAN–330) in Los Angeles County, CA. This site was excavated by Clement Meighan with UCLA field school students inside a Late Period (A.D. 700– 1769) rock shelter on privately owned land. The collection was accessioned by UCLA between 1966 and 1969. Fragmentary human remains represent a juvenile individual of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 associated funerary objects were identified. In 1967, human remains representing, at minimum, 10 individuals were removed from San Nicholas Canyon Site (CA–LAN–352, formerly CA–LAN–27) in Triunfo Pass, Los Angeles County, CA. The collection resulted from excavations by James West and a crew of volunteers, testing a portion of the site on private land that was in the right-of-way for the proposed Coast Freeway, US 101A. The collection was received at UCLA in 1967. The site is estimated to date to 5550–2050 B.C., through radiocarbon dating. Although burials were uncovered at the site, the site had been heavily disturbed, and thus human remains were also found in midden contexts. Human remains from a minimum of 5 adults were identified (1 female and 4 indeterminate), two juveniles, and three other individuals too fragmentary to identify further. No known individuals were identified. The 28 associated funerary objects include: 2 cobble tools, 2 flaked-stone tools, 6 unmodified animal bones, 9 ground stone artifacts, a worked sandstone disk, 4 shell artifacts, a wood fragment, and 3 bags of soil. In 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Highland Cave (CA– LAN–388) in Los Angeles County, CA. This site was excavated as a salvage project conducted by Grif Coleman and the UCLA Archaeological Survey for research purposes on private property in front of development activities. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1977. The site is estimated to date to A.D. 1500–1800 based on artifact types. Human remains from one formal burial represent an adult female. No known individuals were identified. One bag of unmodified animal bones was identified as an associated funerary object. In 1977 and 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Horse Flats (LAN–474B), also referred to as Porter Ranch, Los Angeles County, CA. John Romani as part of Northridge Archaeology Research Center (contract #VS–175) was hired to conduct testing in preparation for development in the spring and fall of 1977. Salvage excavation was completed in 1978 by Clay A. Singer, and the resulting collection was submitted to UCLA for curation in May 1979. The site is estimated to date to 3000 B.C. to A.D. 1800, based on radiocarbon dating and diagnostic artifacts. Fragmentary human remains represent an adult of unknown sex and an additional individual of unknown age or sex. No known individuals were identified. No PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 associated funerary objects were identified. In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Saddle Rock Ranch (CA– LAN–717) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. This site was excavated by a UCLA field school directed by Brian Dillon on the privately owned ranch. The collection was partially received for curation at UCLA in September of 1984, with additional materials arriving later in April 1997. The site is estimated to date from the Early Period to Historic, circa 4500 B.C. to A.D. 1785. Human remains from Burial 1 represent an adult male and an adult individual of unknown sex. Additional fragmentary human remains represent one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 23 associated funerary objects include 1 incised siltstone fragment, 1 stone flake, and 21 unworked animal bones. In 1980, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Cazador Site, also known as Three Springs Valley (CA– LAN–807) in Westlake Village, Los Angeles County, CA. This site was excavated by a UCLA archeology field course directed by Brian Dillon. Excavations occurred on land privately owned by the Pacifica Corporation. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in March of 1985. The site is estimated to date to the Late Period, after A.D. 1000– 1769. Human remains from Burial 1 represent one adult individual of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, 44 individuals were removed from Century Ranch (CA– LAN–840) in Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations at the site were a joint fieldschool project between UCLA (directed by Clement Meighan) and California State University at Northridge (directed by Lou Tartaglia) on land owned by the Hunter family. Each university had a portion of the collection until Kathy Pedrick gathered the CSUN materials in 1978 to incorporate into one collection for analysis and curation. Susan Hector accessioned the UCLA collection August 1977. The area was likely a cemetery featuring both inhumations and cremations, and as such, fragmentary human remains were found in almost every unit. Twelve formal burials were identified by the excavators, but they acknowledged that potential overlapping existed. Of the 44 human individuals identified, 26 are adults (one male, one female, and 24 indeterminate), 6 are juveniles, 4 are infants, and 1 is a perinatal individual. E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices Seven additional individuals were cremations where age and sex could not be determined. No known individuals were identified. The 493 associated funerary objects include: 284 pieces of unmodified animal bones, 9 worked bone artifacts, 3 bags and 4 fragments of charcoal, 34 pieces of chipped-stone tools and flakes, 7 pieces of ochre, 7 wood fragments, 57 pieces of unmodified shell, and 85 pieces and 3 bags of ground stone fragments and tools. In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Agoura Hills (CA–LAN– 972) in Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations were undertaken by Ancient Enterprises under C. William Clewlow in 1978 on private land being developed for housing. The site is estimated to date from the Late Period to Historic (A.D. 700–1769). The collection arrived at UCLA for curation in 1978. All fragmentary human remains were pulled from midden contexts and represent two adult individuals of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. At some unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Hansen Dam in Los Angeles County, CA. A memo indicated that UCLA loaned human remains from a prehistoric site in the Hansen Dam area to the City of Los Angeles Park Rangers in the 1960s and that they were returned in 1981, but no further information about this loan could be found. The human remains were identified by osteological analysis as an adult male of Native American ancestry. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from a mile South of Carpentaria (CA–SBA–1) in Santa Barbara County, CA, by unknown individuals and given to Loye Miller of the UCLA Biology Department between 1900 and 1950, and accessioned within the Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection. After NAGPRA was enacted, all Native American remains under UCLA’s control were transferred to the Fowler Museum for inventory and compliance purposes. The Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection transferred these human remains and several others to the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, Zooarchaeology Lab in August 1995, and then to the Archaeology Collections Facility of the Fowler Museum at UCLA on September 18, 1995. The site dates from the Early to Late Periods (5000 B.C. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 to A.D. 1769). The fragmentary human remains represent one juvenile individual. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual was found eroding from the shoreline at the south end of Santa Cruz Island in Santa Barbara County, CA, on land likely belonging to the Nature Conservancy. They were donated to UCLA in 1984, and represent one adult male individual. No date was assigned, but an osteologist determined the human remains to be of Native American ancestry. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1985, 1992, and 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from Shawa Village (CA–SCRI–192) on Santa Cruz Island in Santa Barbara County, CA, on land belonging to the Nature Conservancy. Excavations by Jeanne Arnold took place on Santa Cruz in the summers of 1990–1992 and 1994–1997. All collections were curated at UCLA after completion of the field analysis. The site dates from the Late Period (A.D. 700–1769) through Historic contact. Extremely fragmentary human remains were identified from midden contexts and represent 1 infant and 2 adult individuals. One additional individual could not be distinguished by age. None of the human remains could be identified by sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Christy Ranch (CA–SCRI– 236) on Santa Cruz Island in Santa Barbara County, CA, with permission of the private land owner. Excavations by Jeanne Arnold took place on Santa Cruz in the summers of 1990–1992 and 1994– 1997. All collections were curated at UCLA upon completion of the field analysis. Radiocarbon dates from site indicate at least intermittent occupation from as early as 2485 B.C. into the Late Period. Human teeth were identified from midden contexts and represent a minimum number of two individuals, of which one could be identified as an adult. One could not be further distinguished by age. None of the human remains could be identified by sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from Xaxas Village (CA–SCRI– 240) on Santa Cruz Island in Santa Barbara County, CA, on land belonging PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 4667 to the Nature Conservancy. Excavations by Jeanne Arnold took place on Santa Cruz in the summers of 1990–1992 and 1994–1997. All collections were curated at UCLA upon completion of the field analysis. Radiocarbon dates obtained from site CA–SCRI–240 indicate it was occupied between 2480 B.C. and A.D. 1425. Its presence in mission documents also indicates that it was occupied into the Historic Period. Fragmentary human remains (many of them teeth) were identified from midden contexts and represent 2 neonatal and 4 infant individuals. One could not be further distinguished by age. None of the human remains could be identified to sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from CA–SLO–267/268 in San Luis Obispo County, CA. Excavations were conducted by Ronald P. Sekkel of UCLA on land owned by the Hearst Corporation. The site dates to the Late Period (A.D. 1200–1500). The human remains consist of one formal burial and fragmentary human remains representing a minimum of 2 individuals, an adult male and a juvenile individual. No known individuals were identified. The 10 burial associated objects consist of one animal bone, one shell fragment, and 8 chert flakes that were pulled from the burial matrix. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from San Miguel Island (CA–SMI–xxx) in Santa Barbara County, CA, from private ranching land, likely in the 1920s, by unknown individuals and given to Loye Miller of the UCLA Biology Department and accessioned within the Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection. After NAGPRA was enacted, all Native American remains under UCLA’s control were transferred to the Fowler Museum for inventory and compliance purposes. The Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection transferred these human remains and several others to the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, Zooarchaeology Lab in August 1995, and then to the Archaeology Collections Facility of the Fowler Museum at UCLA on September 18, 1995. No date was assigned, but an osteologist determined the human remains to be of Native American ancestry. The fragmentary human remains represent two individuals of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 4668 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices In December 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Little Sycamore Canyon Site (CA–VEN–1) in Ventura County, CA, by A.W. Schmuck, H.T. Cartio, and W.A. Starrett, who collected these human remains from a shellmound at the mouth of Little Sycamore Canyon. According to the accession records, these human remains were received by the UCLA Biology Department through Loye Miller on September 13, 1956. After NAGPRA was enacted, all Native American remains under UCLA’s control were transferred to the Fowler Museum for inventory and compliance purposes. The Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection transferred these human remains and several others to the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, Zooarchaeology Lab in August 1995, and then to the Archaeology Collections Facility of the Fowler Museum at UCLA on September 18, 1995. Later excavators dated the site to the Early Period (5000– 600 B.C.). The fragmentary human remains represent an adult male. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1959 and 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 individuals were removed from Little Sycamore Canyon Site (CA–VEN–1) in Ventura County, CA. The collection was donated by David L. Jennings, Chair of the Earth Sciences Department, Los Angeles City College. Field school excavations conducted by Dr. Jerry Jordan, Jr., led to recovery of the collection, but no final report was ever compiled and no field documentation could be found with the collection. The original catalog listed six burials along with fragmentary human remains from midden contexts that included 10 adults (of which 4 were identified as male), two juveniles, and four individuals of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In the spring of 1964, human remains representing, at minimum, 34 individuals were removed from the Deer Creek Site (CA–VEN–7 and CA–VEN– 10) in Ventura County, CA. This site was excavated by a UCLA field school course directed by Clement Meighan and Gene Sterud on private property as ongoing construction was impacting both sites. The excavation was conducted primarily at CA–VEN–7, however, additional excavations occurred at nearby CA–VEN–10. They are likely loci of the same village site along with VEN–2, 6, and 205 and grouped together for NAGPRA as such. The collection was received by UCLA in VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 1964. A single radiocarbon date and artifact types recovered indicate the site was occupied as early as A.D. 1 until after A.D. 1000. Human remains from seven formal burials as well as fragmentary human remains from midden contexts were identified from the collection and represent 17 adults (2 male, 4 female, and 11 indeterminate), 9 juveniles (1 male), 5 infants, and 2 perinatal individuals. Another individual was too fragmentary to determine age or sex. No known individuals were identified. Associated funerary objects were only recovered from the formal burials at VEN–7. The 55 associated funerary objects include: 1 shell bead, 3 ground stone artifacts, 1 projectile point, 30 pieces and 3 bags of unmodified faunal bone, 6 pebbles, 9 shell fragments, and 2 wood fragments. In 1955, 1958, and 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, 35 individuals were removed from Simo’mo (CA–VEN–24 aka VEN–26) in Ventura County, CA. The first set of excavations was undertaken by UCLA field courses supervised by Clement Meighan in 1955, and by David M. Pendergast in 1958. A second set of excavations were conducted by a UCLA field course taught by M.B. McKusick on private land in 1959. The excavation materials were all accessioned by UCLA by 1959. The estimated age of the site is A.D. 300–1100. While a report by Meighan discusses finding two formal burials, neither were accessioned by UCLA. Their current location is unknown. A single drawing was found referencing work done in 1958 under David Pendergast. It includes information about Burials 9–13 and states that they are located at San Fernando Valley State College along with their artifacts (although some of the artifacts are included on UCLA’s catalog and are present). While no formal burials were found, fragmentary human remains were identified within the faunal bone from the 1956 and 1958 excavations. In addition, faunal remains returned from UCSB included two sets of proveniences that could not be traced to UCLA excavations, which also included fragmentary human remains. Accession 117 includes 15 adults, 5 juveniles, 6 infants, 2 perinatal, and 1 individual that was too fragmentary to determine age or sex. The identified burial associated items are from burials not currently at UCLA and are therefore not included on this notice. Accession 219 consists of two excavated burials and fragmentary human remains representing a minimum number of six individuals (4 adults and 2 juveniles). No known individuals were identified. PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 There are 22 unmodified animal bones removed from the burials and identified as associated funerary objects. Between 1966 and 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from La Robleda (CA–VEN–39) at Medea Creek in Ventura County, CA. This collection resulted from excavations carried out by a UCLA field school course on land owned by the Metropolitan Development Corporation under the direction of James N. Hill and Michael Glassow to test different excavation strategies. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1971. The site is estimated to date from 815 B.C. to A.D. 1890. Fragmentary human remains represent two adults and two juvenile individuals of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1960 and 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were removed from Soule Park Site (CA–VEN–61) in Ventura County, CA. The site was excavated by Margaret Susia and a UC Archaeological Survey crew during a salvage project, after being granted permission by the Ventura County of Public Works. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1961. The site is estimated to date to between A.D. 1 and 1500. Fragmentary human remains represent six adults and three juveniles of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1964, 1965, and 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Potrero Valley (CA–VEN–70) in Ventura County, CA. The site was excavated by Nelson N. Leonard and the UCLA Archaeological Survey from December 1964 through May 1965, and by Clay Singer in 1977, on land owned by the Janss Corporation. The collections were accessioned by UCLA after each excavation. The site is estimated to date to the Late Period (A.D. 700–1769). Fragmentary human remains represent two adult individuals of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Little Sycamore Canyon (CA–VEN–86) in Ventura County, CA. Bob Gibson directed excavations in the summer and fall of 1971 for the UC Archaeological Survey on private property and under contract with CEDAM International. The contract gave ownership of the collection to UCLA, and the collection was received in E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices August 1971. The site dates to the Late Period (A.D. 700–1769). The human remains from Burial 1 represent an adult female and an individual of unknown age or sex. No known individuals were identified. The 87 associated funerary objects include: 1 shell bead, 2 worked bone fragments, 2 ground stone artifacts, 42 flaked-stone artifacts, 5 pieces and 4 bags of unmodified faunal bones, 19 unmodified shell fragments, 10 pieces and 1 bag of stone fragments, and 1 cobble. In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from CA–VEN–122 in Oak Park, Ventura County, CA. The collection derives from excavations conducted by a UCLA field class under the direction of C. William Clewlow, Jr., and supervised by Marilyn Beaudry. The site is located on land owned by the Metropolitan Development Corporation. The collection was curated at UCLA in August 1978. This site dates to A.D. 700–1785. A formal burial was designated at the site and left in situ at the request of the Native American monitors. However, additional fragmentary human remains were identified from midden contexts that represent two adults, sex unknown, and another individual represented by an incisor. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1965–1966, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were removed from CA– VEN–138 in Ventura County, CA, by students from Mira Monte Elementary School, under the direction of their teacher Dr. John Hook during the school year. The collection from this Late Period (A.D. 700–1769) through Historic contact site was donated to UCLA in 1985 by the elementary school. Fragmentary human remains removed from the site include a minimum of 9 individuals: One adult male; one adult, sex unknown; one juvenile, sex unknown; and six other extremely incomplete individuals, age and sex unknown. No known individuals were identified. The collection of 101 associated funerary objects consists of 4 ground stone artifacts, 35 worked stone fragments, 40 unmodified shell fragments, 19 pieces of unmodified animal bones, 1 charcoal fragment, 1 ceramic fragment, and 1 metal knife. In 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed from Big Sycamore Rock Shelters (CA–VEN–195) in Ventura County, CA. The site was excavated under the direction of Robert Gibson with a UC Archaeological Survey crew on private property. This site dates to VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 the Late Period, circa A.D. 1500. Fragmentary human remains represent two incomplete adult individuals of unknown sex, and six individuals of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In the summer of 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from the Running Springs Ranch Site (CA–VEN– 261) in Ventura County, CA. This collection derives from a boundary test conducted by C. William Clewlow and Allen Pastron. The site is estimated to date to A.D. 800–1800. Human remains from Burial 1 represent a sub-adult female individual. In addition fragmentary human remains represent three adult individuals, sex unknown. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are a shell fragment and a stone flake. In 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Conejo Valley (CA–VEN– 272) in Thousand Oaks, Ventura County, CA. The site was discovered by a crew of archeologists from the UCLA Archaeological Survey in 1972, and reevaluated in 1976 by Pamela Ivie and David Whitley as part of an environmental impact report on the MGM Ranch. The Late Period site (A.D. 700–1769) was excavated in August of 1977, by a UCLA research team on MGM property. Fragmentary human remains were recovered from a midden context representing one individual of unknown age or sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In the fall of 1976 and the summer of 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, 12 individuals were removed from Oak Park (CA–VEN–294) in Ventura County, CA. Salvage excavations were conducted on land owned by the Metropolitan Development Corporation and directed by Robert Lopez and C. William Clewlow with the UCLA Archaeological Survey. The site dates to between 48 B.C. and A.D. 1400. Human remains were recovered from five burials as well as midden contexts. They include 6 adults, sex unknown; 3 juveniles, sex unknown; 2 infants, sex unknown; and 1 individual of unknown sex and age. No known individuals were identified. The 697 associated funerary objects are 9 worked bones, 1 shell pendant fragment, 106 unmodified animal bones, 44 unmodified shell fragments, 52 flaked stone artifacts, 1 metal ball, 466 shell beads, 5 serpentine beads, 1 stone PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 4669 pestle, 5 cobble tools, 3 bags of soil samples, and 4 stone fragments. In 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from CA–VEN–340 in Ventura County, CA. Nelson N. Leonard led salvage excavations after the Late Period site (A.D. 700–1769) was heavily impacted by construction in the 1970s leaving only a portion of the deposit intact. The collection arrived at UCLA soon after excavations, between 1975 and 1976. Fragmentary human remains represent a minimum of one adult individual, sex unknown. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. Sometime in 1976 or 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed from Ferndale Ranch (CA–VEN–404) in Ventura County, CA. Excavations were conducted in 1976 by the UC Archaeological Survey in conjunction with the University of Santa Clara, directed by C.W. Clewlow, Jr., in advance of site development. During the course of excavations, burials were found but left in situ at the request of the Candelaria Indian Tribal Council. There were also two short periods of field excavations again in 1977 by Dr. C. Moser. The excavations were closed at the request of the Candelaria Indian Council as more burials were encountered, and they were reinterred. Construction damaged part of the Late Period (A.D. 700–1769) through Historic contact cemetery after excavations were concluded. A summary report states that the location of the Moser 1977 work is currently unknown and not included in this collection. The collection in the possession and control of the Fowler Museum presumably derives from after the 1977 excavations and comprises 6 burials including 5 adults (2 of which are identified as female), a juvenile, an infant of unknown sex, and an individual of unknown age or sex. No known individuals were identified. The 111 associated funerary objects consist of 8 pieces and 4 bags of unmodified faunal bones, 6 pebbles, 1 organic fragment, 1 bone tool, 2 bags of flakes, 49 pieces and 1 bag of stone fragments, 15 pieces and 2 bags of unmodified shell, 20 beads, and 2 ceramic fragments. In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Medea Creek (CA–VEN– 542) in Oak Park, Thousand Oaks, Ventura County, CA. The collection was excavated by researchers from the UCLA Archaeological Survey under the direction of Dr. C. William Clewlow, Jr., on land owned by the Metropolitan E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 4670 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 27, 2016 / Notices Development Corporation. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in July 1978. This site was dated to the Late Period (A.D. 700–1769). Fragmentary human remains represent one juvenile individual of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Newbury Park (CA–VEN– 544) in Ventura County, CA. The collection is from excavations on Grace Properties by Brian Dillon in the summer of 1982. There was no documentation provided when the human remains were received at UCLA in 1985. The site is dated to the Early Millingstone Period (circa 600–0 B.C.). Fragmentary human remains represent one adult individual of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Lindero Canyon (CA– VEN–606) in Ventura County, CA. Collections from the site derive from survey and excavation during the North Ranch Inland Chumash research project led by Dr. William Clewlow, Jr. The second investigation was conducted the same year under the direction of Holly Love and Rheta Resnick. Excavations took place on land privately owned by the Prudential Insurance Company. The collections were curated at UCLA in 1979. The site has been dated to the Late Period, A.D. 1300–1650. Fragmentary human remains represent one adult individual of unknown sex and two infants of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified. The sites detailed in this notice have been identified through consultation to be within the traditional territory of the Chumash people. These locations are consistent with ethnographic and historic documentation of the Chumash people. The Chumash territory, anthropologically defined first on the basis of linguistic similarities, and subsequently on broadly shared material and cultural traits, reaches from San Luis Obispo to Malibu on the coast, inland to the western edge of the San Joaquin Valley, to the edge of the San Fernando Valley, and includes the four Northern Channel Islands. The sites in this notice are located in northwestern Los Angeles, Ventura, southwestern San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara counties and fall within the geographical area identified as Chumash. Some tribal VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:41 Jan 26, 2016 Jkt 238001 consultants state that these areas were the responsibility of regional leaders, who were themselves organized into a pan-regional association of both political power and ceremonial knowledge. Further, these indigenous areas are identified by some tribal consultants to be relational with clans or associations of traditional practitioners of specific kinds of indigenous medicinal and ceremonial practices. Some tribal consultants identified these clans as existing in the pre-contact period and identified some clans as also existing in the present day. Other tribal consultants do not recognize present-day geographical divisions to be related to clans of traditional practitioners. However, they do state that Chumash, Tataviam, and Gabrielino/Tongva territories were and are occupied by socially distinct, yet interrelated, groups which have been characterized by anthropologists. Ethnographic evidence suggests that the social and political organization of the pre-contact Channel Islands were primarily at the village level, with a hereditary chief, in addition to many other specialists who wielded power. The associated funerary objects described in this notice are consistent with those of groups ancestral to the present-day Chumash people. The material cultures of earlier groups living in the geographical areas mentioned in this notice are characterized by archeologists as having passed through stages over the past 10,000 years. Many local archeologists assert that the changes in the material culture reflect evolving ecological adaptations and related changes in social organization of the same populations and do not represent population displacements or movements. The same range of artifact types and materials were used from the early pre-contact period until historic times. Tribal consultants explicitly state that population mixing, which did occur on a small scale, would not alter the continuity of the shared group identities of people associated with specific locales. Based on this evidence, continuity through time can be traced for all sites listed in this notice with present-day Chumash people, specifically the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Determinations Made by the Fowler Museum at UCLA Officials of the Fowler Museum at UCLA have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 1,802 PO 00000 Frm 00063 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 46,015 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Wendy G. Teeter, Ph.D., Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095–1549, telephone (310) 825–1864, email wteeter@ arts.ucla.edu, by February 26, 2016. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, may proceed. The Fowler Museum is responsible for notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, that this notice has been published. Dated: December 21, 2015. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2016–01592 Filed 1–26–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of Comments; Relating to the Public Interest U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Diaper Disposal Systems and Components Thereof, Including Diaper Refill Cassettes, DN 3115; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public interest issues SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\27JAN1.SGM 27JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 17 (Wednesday, January 27, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 4662-4670]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-01592]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-20016; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at the University 
of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles 
(UCLA) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated 
funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or 
Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary 
objects and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. 
Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian

[[Page 4663]]

organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request to the Fowler Museum at UCLA. 
If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal 
descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the Fowler Museum at UCLA at the address in 
this notice by February 26, 2016.

ADDRESSES: Wendy G. Teeter, Ph.D., Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, 
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549, telephone (310) 825-1864, email 
wteeter@arts.ucla.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Fowler Museum at 
UCLA, Los Angeles, CA. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Ventura, and 
Los Angeles Counties, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Fowler 
Museum at UCLA professional staff in consultation with representatives 
of Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California, and the following nonfederally recognized 
Indian groups: Barbareno Chumash Council; Barbareno/Ventureno Band of 
Mission Indians; Coastal Band of the Chumash Nation; Fernande[ntilde]o 
Tataviam Band of Mission Indians; Gabrielino/Tongva Indians of 
California Tribe; Gabrielino/Tongva Nation; Gabrieleno/Tongva Tribal 
Council; Northern Chumash Tribe; San Gabriel Band of Mission Indians; 
Ti'at Society; and the Traditional Council of Pimu.

History and Description of the Human Remains and Associated Funerary 
Objects

    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from the Lower Tank Site (CA-LAN-2) near Topanga, Los 
Angeles County, CA, where Keith Johnson led a UCLA field school course 
on privately owned land. The Lower Tank Site is estimated to date 
between 1000 and 0 B.C., based on radiocarbon dating. After analysis, 
the collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1961. Three formal burials 
were identified and consist of two adults and a juvenile. One adult 
could be further identified as male. No known individuals were 
identified. The seven associated funerary objects include five 
unmodified faunal bones, one metate, and one mano.
    In 1967, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals 
were removed from the Puerco Site (CA-LAN-19) near Malibu, Los Angeles, 
CA, where James West lead a UCLA field course on privately-owned land 
as part of the University of California (UC) Archaeological Survey in 
preparation for proposed freeway work. The Puerco Site is estimated to 
date between 600 B.C. and A.D. 1769, based on the presence of artifact 
types in the collection. After analysis, the collection was accessioned 
in 1977. Fragmentary human remains represent four adult individuals of 
unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects were identified.
    In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from CA-LAN-45 near Topanga, Los Angeles County, CA, where 
Keith Johnson lead a UCLA field course on privately-owned land. The 
site, CA-LAN-45, dates to between A.D. 1250 and 1769, based on the 
artifact types in the collection. After analysis, the collection was 
accessioned in the fall of 1963. Fragmentary human remains represent a 
minimum of two adult individuals. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects were identified.
    At an unknown date between 1900 and 1950, human remains 
representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Sequit 
Creek Indian Mound (CA-LAN-52) in Los Angeles County, CA. The human 
remains were received at an unknown date by the UCLA Biology Department 
as part of the Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection and were subsequently 
transferred to the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology and Zooarchaeology 
Lab in August 1995, and then to Fowler Museum in September 1995 to be 
inventoried for NAGPRA compliance. Being that there is little to no 
original documentation for the human remains, they have been attributed 
to CA-LAN-52 because they are labeled with location information, and 
the site is known to have been heavily looted since at least the late 
1800s. The human remains are estimated to date to A.D. 610 +/-100, 
based on radiocarbon dating. The fragmentary human remains represent 
two adult individuals, sex unknown, and one infant individual. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
identified.
    Sometime before 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from CA-LAN-95 in San Fernando, Los Angeles 
County, CA. Excavations were undertaken by USC students after the human 
remains of a Native American individual were found to be eroding from 
private property. At an unknown date, the collection was received by 
the Hancock Foundation, who subsequently donated the collection to UCLA 
sometime around 1950. Very little information accompanied the 
collection to the Fowler Museum, but the human remains were determined 
to be Native American based on osteological analysis. Fragmentary human 
remains represent a juvenile between four and six years of age. No 
known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object 
is an unmodified faunal bone fragment.
    Sometime before 1972, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Encinal Canyon (CA-LAN-114) in Malibu, Los 
Angeles County, CA. The human remains are thought to have been 
excavated by John Beaton and were accessioned in 1972. Although the 
site has been excavated several times, no specific age for the site has 
been determined other than prehistoric. Fragmentary human remains 
represent one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified.
    Sometime before 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Pacific Coast Highway (CA-LAN-133, 
formerly CA-LAN-190), in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. The collection 
was received by UCLA in 1952 from Mr. Gonzales, who had excavated the 
burial on private property. The human remains

[[Page 4664]]

of an adult male were determined to be Native American based on 
osteological analysis. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1978 and 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 
individuals were removed from Stunt Ranch (CA-LAN-153) in Los Angeles 
County, CA. Clement Meighan led two field courses with the cooperation 
of the Jennings Engineering Company, who was developing the property 
before the land was acquired by UCLA. Clement Meighan dated the site to 
between A.D. 1250 and 1769, based on the presence of diagnostic 
artifact types. During excavations, six formal burials were identified 
in addition to fragmentary human remains. The human remains could be 
further identified as representing five adult and one infant of unknown 
sex. At least three individuals were cremated, and two others were too 
fragmentary to identify either age or sex. No known individuals were 
identified. The 80 associated funerary objects are 6 pieces and 1 bag 
of unmodified animal bone, 60 unmodified shell fragments, 12 stone 
fragments, and 1 obsidian biface.
    In 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from the Santa Maria Site (CA-LAN-162) in Topanga Canyon, 
Los Angeles County, CA. At the request of the Montevideo Country Club, 
excavations were conducted throughout 1987 by Dr. Brian Dillon and 
assistant Justin Hyland for compliance with proposed development of the 
site. The collection was accessioned in April 1997. The site age is 
estimated to span from between 600 B.C. and A.D. 1769. Fragmentary 
human remains from Burials 1 and 2 represent two adult individuals of 
unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects were identified.
    Between 1950 and 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 27 
individuals were removed from the Zuma Creek Site (CA-LAN-174) in Los 
Angeles County, CA. The site was first excavated in 1950 by Stuart 
Peck. It was excavated again in 1952 and 1957 by Clement Meighan as 
part of a UCLA field school. From these excavations, human remains from 
seventeen burials were accessioned in 1957. Later salvage excavations 
were conducted at the site during 1968 and 1969 by Sally MacFadyen and 
Jinny McKenzie, as well as by Thomas King and the UC Archaeological 
Survey crew. Human remains from five burials deriving from these 
excavations were accessioned by UCLA in 1969, after analysis was 
completed. The site produced a radiocarbon date of 3000 B.C.  200 years. The first set of excavations included human remains 
of 13 adults (6 female, 4 male, and 3 indeterminate), 4 juveniles, and 
2 infants. The second set of excavations included six adults (2 female, 
1 male, and 3 indeterminate), a juvenile, and an infant. No known 
individuals were identified. From both sets of excavations, the 178 
associated funerary objects are 14 stone fragments, 5 cobbles, 32 
groundstone artifacts, 65 flaked stone artifacts, 16 pieces and 3 bags 
of unmodified shell, 23 pieces and 1 bag of unmodified animal bone, 2 
worked bone artifacts, 2 glass fragments, 3 ochre fragments, 5 worked 
shell artifacts, 1 bag of soil, 5 asphaltum fragments, and 1 bag of 
asphaltum with basketry impressions.
    In 1967, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Russell Valley (CA-LAN-186), in Thousand Oaks, Los 
Angeles County, CA. Excavations were conducted by Chester King during a 
salvage operation of this Late Period site (A.D. 700-1500). Fragmentary 
human remains were identified from midden contexts representing at 
least one individual of unknown age or sex. The collection was 
accessioned in 1967. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from Pacific Coast Highway (CA-LAN-195) in Malibu, Los 
Angeles County, CA. The human remains had been exposed during 
construction and were disinterred by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's 
Office, Malibu Sub-station. UCLA received the human remains in 1951. 
Based on osteological analysis the human remains were identified as an 
adult female and an adult individual of unknown sex. No known 
individuals were identified. A single unmodified sea mammal bone was 
recovered and is assumed to be an associated funerary object.
    Between March and June 1968, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 129 individuals were removed from Trancas Canyon Cemetery (CA-
LAN-197) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA, by the UC Archaeology 
Survey under the direction of John Beaton and aided by the Malibu 
Archaeological Society. The excavations took place on land owned by the 
Reco Land Company as a salvage project due to erosion and the 
construction of a shopping center. The collection was accessioned by 
UCLA in 1978. Radiocarbon dating produced from the cemetery estimate 
the site age to 370 B.C.  58 years but continues through 
Spanish contact. Human remains from these excavations were further 
identified to age and sex, when possible, including 78 adults (32 male, 
21 female, and 25 indeterminate), 4 sub-adults, 28 juveniles, and 14 
infants were identified. Another five individuals were too fragmentary 
to determine age or sex. No known individuals. The 718 associated 
funerary objects include: 28 pieces and 1 bag of asphaltum fragments, 
87 pieces and 1 bag of unmodified animal bone, 27 worked bone 
fragments, 1 charcoal fragment, 50 pieces and 1 bag of flaked stone 
artifacts, 4 copper fragments, 15 pieces and 1 bag of ochre fragments, 
11 groundstone pieces, 84 shell beads, 182 pieces and 1 bag of 
unmodified shell, 206 pieces and 4 bags of cobbles/pebbles, and 14 
stone fragments.
    In 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals 
were removed from Zuma Creek, also known as Zuma Creek ``G'' (CA-LAN-
201, LAN-19) near Point Dume in Los Angeles County, CA. The collection 
was excavated by Clement W. Meighan as a UCLA research project. The 
estimated age of the site was not determined. The human remains were 
from a known prehistoric site and determined to be Native American 
based on osteological analysis. Fragmentary human remains from Burial 
A-13 represents one adult female individual, one adult possible female 
individual, one juvenile individual of unknown sex, and two adult 
individual of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1962 and 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 45 
individuals were removed from Paradise Cove (CA-LAN-222) in Malibu, Los 
Angeles County, CA. The first set of excavations was undertaken by a 
Pasadena City College field school, supervised by Richard H. Brooks, in 
the spring of 1962. During this time excavations were also undertaken 
jointly with a Santa Monica City College and UCLA field course 
supervised by Jack Smith. These collections were accessioned by UCLA 
after receiving them from Richard H. Brooks of the Department of 
Anthropology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 1987. In 1963, 
excavations continued with the joint Santa Monica City College and UCLA 
Anthropology field school course directed by Chester King and Jack 
Smith. The resulting collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1964. The 
estimated age of the site based on radiocarbon dating is 2350 B.C. 
 80 years. Fragmentary human remains recovered from midden 
contexts in 1962

[[Page 4665]]

represent a minimum of 10 individuals: 6 adults, a juvenile, and 3 
individuals of unknown age or sex. From the 1963 excavations, human 
remains were recovered from 8 burials and from midden contexts. These 
human remains represent a minimum of 35 individuals: 17 adults (2 male, 
2 female, and 13 indeterminate), 1 sub-adult, 8 juveniles, 3 infants, 
and 6 individuals whose age and sex could not be determined. No known 
individuals were identified. The 39 associated funerary objects were 
recovered from the second set of excavations and include: 6 unmodified 
animal bones, 3 worked bones, 2 limestone cobble unifaces, 3 chert 
scrapers, 1 limestone hammerstone, 1 sandstone metate fragment, 12 
asphaltum basketry impression fragments, 3 manos, 1 quartz crystal 
fragment, 1 quartzite chopper, 1 sandstone mortar fragment, 4 shell 
fragments, and 1 wood handle fragment.
    From 1961 through 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 13 
individuals were removed from Century Ranch (CA-LAN-225) in Malibu, Los 
Angeles County, CA. The site was excavated by UCLA student volunteers 
under the direction of Jayne Harbinger. The site was also excavated in 
1963 by a Santa Monica City College class under the direction of 
Chester King and Thomas Blackburn. The excavations took place on land 
that was then owned by the Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation and 
is now part of Malibu Creek State Park. Human remains were recovered 
from burial and midden contexts. Burial contexts included 9 adults (2 
of which are possibly male), an infant, and one individual of unknown 
age and sex. Fragmentary human remains from midden contexts represent 
two individuals of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were 
identified. The 60 associated funerary objects are 14 stone fragments, 
10 flaked-stone tools, 20 ground stone artifacts, 12 cobble artifacts, 
and 4 unmodified faunal bone pieces.
    In 1960 and 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, 53 
individuals were removed from Century Ranch (CA-LAN-227), in Malibu 
Canyon, Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations were conducted by Thomas 
Blackburn and Ernest Chandonet with UCLA archeology students. The 
excavations were conducted on land owned by Twentieth Century-Fox Film 
Corporation, now part of Malibu Creek State Park. The collection was 
accessioned by UCLA in 1961. The site is estimated to date to the Late 
Period, with a radiocarbon date of circa A.D. 1530. The burials include 
a minimum of 53 individuals that were further identified as 23 adults 
(10 males, 2 females, and 11 indeterminate), 1 sub-adult, 13 juveniles, 
15 infants, and 1 individual too fragmented to determine age or sex. No 
known individuals were identified. The 821 associated funerary objects 
include 678 shell beads, 19 shell pendants, 7 worked bone artifacts, 7 
flaked-stone artifacts, 3 groundstone artifacts, 91 asphaltum fragments 
with basketry impressions, 7 shell dishes, one ochre fragment, and 8 
unmodified shell fragments.
    In 1966, 1967, and 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, 
906 individuals were removed from Medea Creek village and cemetery (CA-
LAN-243) in Thousand Oaks, Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations were 
conducted in 1966-1967, in the cemetery area by UC Archaeological 
Survey volunteers and a UCLA field course directed by Linda B. King and 
Linda Hasten. In 1969, the Medea Creek village area was excavated by a 
crew of volunteers under the direction of Clay A. Singer. Both efforts 
were part of a volunteer salvage project prior to the site's 
destruction. The collections were accessioned by UCLA in 1969. The 
estimated age of the site is Late Period/Historic (A.D. 1500-1785). 
Human remains from the 1969 excavations represent two adult individuals 
of unknown sex. Human remains from 1966-1967 excavations of the 
cemetery represent a minimum number of 904 individuals from 467 
burials. All human remains from these burials were assessed for age, 
sex, pathology, and completeness. To summarize, a total of 524 adults 
(88 male, 86 female, and 350 indeterminate), 217 juveniles, 97 infants, 
and 9 prenatal were identified, and the human remains of 59 individuals 
were too fragmentary to identify by age or sex. No known individuals 
were identified. The 23,922 associated funerary objects include: 213 
pieces and 8 bags of unmodified faunal remains and artifacts, 925 
pieces and 2 bags of shell unmodified fragments and artifacts, 414 
pieces and 7 bags of asphaltum fragments, 21,243 shell, glass, and 
stone beads, 78 flaked-stone artifacts, 62 ground stone artifacts, 179 
pieces and 4 bags of organic materials, 2 metal artifacts, 435 pieces 
and 3 bags of stone fragments, 321 cobble and pebble artifacts, 7 
fragments and 1 bag of charcoal, 17 bags of soil, and 1 glass pendant.
    In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, 102 individuals 
were removed when Alex Apostolides directed a salvage project at the 
Mullholland Site (CA-LAN-246) before the construction of housing and to 
offset the pervasive vandalism that was occurring at the time. Dating 
of the site is to the Late Period (A.D. 1200-1500). The collection was 
accessioned by UCLA in November 1978. Eighteen formal burials were 
included in the collection, but fragmentary human remains were also 
identified from midden contexts that result in a minimum number of 102 
individuals being represented. The human remains were further 
identified as 56 adults (11 males, 6 females, and 39 indeterminate), 27 
juveniles, 14 infants, and 5 individuals too fragmentary to identify 
further. No known individuals were identified. The 2,640 associated 
funerary objects include: 27 flaked-stone artifacts, 8 groundstone 
artifacts, 1 carved clay fragment, 13 pieces of worked bone, 1 ceramic 
sherd, 30 charcoal fragments, 4 ochre fragments, 1 pecked pebble, 2,321 
shell beads and ornaments, 16 unmodified shell fragments, 10 soapstone 
ornaments, 203 pieces and 3 bags of unmodified animal bone, and 2 bags 
of soil samples.
    In 1964, 1971-1972, and 1973-1975, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 247 individuals were removed from Humaliwu (CA-LAN-264) in 
Malibu, Los Angeles County, CA. UCLA conducted several field seasons 
under the direction of Clement Meighan on private property. Excavations 
also took place on land controlled by the California Department of 
Parks and Recreation, but that is filed under a separate inventory. 
Collections were accessioned by UCLA as they returned from the field 
under Accession numbers 505 (1964 excavations) and 573 (1971-75 
excavations). The village dates from A.D. 550-1805. Three formal 
burials were identified during the 1964 excavations, and additional 
fragmentary human remains were recovered from midden contexts. There 
are a minimum of 27 individuals identified as 19 adults (one male, two 
female, and 16 indeterminate), one sub-adult, four juveniles, one 
infant, and two perinatal. Excavations in the 1970s uncovered 83 formal 
burials, and with the addition of fragmentary human remains recovered 
from midden contexts, a minimum number of 220 individuals were 
identified. Of this total, identification was possible for 110 adults 
(34 male, 34 female, and 42 indeterminate), 13 sub-adults, 36 juvenile, 
36 infants, 13 neonatal individuals, and 10 perinatal individuals. Two 
individuals were too fragmentary to determine age or sex. No known 
individuals were identified. The 15,917 associated funerary objects 
include: 7 bone awl fragments, 21 worked bone fragments, 1 bone barb, 2 
bone pin fragments, 7 bone tube beads,

[[Page 4666]]

1 bone wedge, 1 bone whistle, 2 red stone ear spools, 1 pipe, 1,869 
pieces and 39 bags of unmodified animal bones, 13 bags of soil samples, 
3 pieces and 1 bag of metal items, 4 pieces of ochre, 5 charcoal 
fragments, 7 quartz crystals, 1 fluorite crystal, 158 Megathura 
(limpet) rings, 3 fishhook fragments, 1 glass fragment, 4 perforated 
shells, 3 inlayed abalone shells, 13,040 shell beads, 54 pieces and 10 
bags of unmodified shell fragments, 42 effigies, 4 stone tube beads, 30 
stone beads, 1 bead blank, 3 stone pendants, 24 cobbles, 20 stone 
cores, 480 flaked-stone tools and debitage, 18 ground stone tools, 1 
tarring pebble, 8 asphaltum fragments, 1 wood fragment, and 24 pieces 
and 3 bags of stone fragments.
    Between 1961 and 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals were removed from Sweetwater Mesa (CA-LAN-267) in Malibu, 
Los Angeles County, CA. Excavations on private property took place 
under the direction of Chester King, Tom Blackburn, and Earnest 
Chadonet as part of the UC Archaeological Survey, along with UCLA 
students and members of the Archaeological Research Association. The 
collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1963. The site is estimated to 
date to 4920-4360 B.C. Fragmentary human remains recovered from midden 
contexts represent a minimum of four adults and a juvenile individual 
of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects were identified.
    In 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Tobillo (CA-LAN-311) in Malibu, Los Angeles County, 
CA. The site was excavated as part of the Malibu Wastewater Project 
under the direction of Brian Dillon on private property. The collection 
was given to UCLA on April 24, 1997. The site is estimated to date to 
the Late Period (A.D. 700-1769) and Historic (after A.D. 1769) time 
periods. Fragmentary human remains represent an individual of unknown 
age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects were identified.
    In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from the Topanga Canyon Area (CA-LAN-330) in Los Angeles 
County, CA. This site was excavated by Clement Meighan with UCLA field 
school students inside a Late Period (A.D. 700-1769) rock shelter on 
privately owned land. The collection was accessioned by UCLA between 
1966 and 1969. Fragmentary human remains represent a juvenile 
individual of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1967, human remains representing, at minimum, 10 individuals 
were removed from San Nicholas Canyon Site (CA-LAN-352, formerly CA-
LAN-27) in Triunfo Pass, Los Angeles County, CA. The collection 
resulted from excavations by James West and a crew of volunteers, 
testing a portion of the site on private land that was in the right-of-
way for the proposed Coast Freeway, US 101A. The collection was 
received at UCLA in 1967. The site is estimated to date to 5550-2050 
B.C., through radiocarbon dating. Although burials were uncovered at 
the site, the site had been heavily disturbed, and thus human remains 
were also found in midden contexts. Human remains from a minimum of 5 
adults were identified (1 female and 4 indeterminate), two juveniles, 
and three other individuals too fragmentary to identify further. No 
known individuals were identified. The 28 associated funerary objects 
include: 2 cobble tools, 2 flaked-stone tools, 6 unmodified animal 
bones, 9 ground stone artifacts, a worked sandstone disk, 4 shell 
artifacts, a wood fragment, and 3 bags of soil.
    In 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Highland Cave (CA-LAN-388) in Los Angeles County, CA. 
This site was excavated as a salvage project conducted by Grif Coleman 
and the UCLA Archaeological Survey for research purposes on private 
property in front of development activities. The collection was 
accessioned by UCLA in 1977. The site is estimated to date to A.D. 
1500-1800 based on artifact types. Human remains from one formal burial 
represent an adult female. No known individuals were identified. One 
bag of unmodified animal bones was identified as an associated funerary 
object.
    In 1977 and 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from Horse Flats (LAN-474B), also referred to 
as Porter Ranch, Los Angeles County, CA. John Romani as part of 
Northridge Archaeology Research Center (contract #VS-175) was hired to 
conduct testing in preparation for development in the spring and fall 
of 1977. Salvage excavation was completed in 1978 by Clay A. Singer, 
and the resulting collection was submitted to UCLA for curation in May 
1979. The site is estimated to date to 3000 B.C. to A.D. 1800, based on 
radiocarbon dating and diagnostic artifacts. Fragmentary human remains 
represent an adult of unknown sex and an additional individual of 
unknown age or sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects were identified.
    In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from Saddle Rock Ranch (CA-LAN-717) in Malibu, Los Angeles 
County, CA. This site was excavated by a UCLA field school directed by 
Brian Dillon on the privately owned ranch. The collection was partially 
received for curation at UCLA in September of 1984, with additional 
materials arriving later in April 1997. The site is estimated to date 
from the Early Period to Historic, circa 4500 B.C. to A.D. 1785. Human 
remains from Burial 1 represent an adult male and an adult individual 
of unknown sex. Additional fragmentary human remains represent one 
individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were 
identified. The 23 associated funerary objects include 1 incised 
siltstone fragment, 1 stone flake, and 21 unworked animal bones.
    In 1980, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from the Cazador Site, also known as Three Springs Valley 
(CA-LAN-807) in Westlake Village, Los Angeles County, CA. This site was 
excavated by a UCLA archeology field course directed by Brian Dillon. 
Excavations occurred on land privately owned by the Pacifica 
Corporation. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in March of 1985. 
The site is estimated to date to the Late Period, after A.D. 1000-1769. 
Human remains from Burial 1 represent one adult individual of unknown 
sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects were identified.
    In 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, 44 individuals 
were removed from Century Ranch (CA-LAN-840) in Los Angeles County, CA. 
Excavations at the site were a joint field-school project between UCLA 
(directed by Clement Meighan) and California State University at 
Northridge (directed by Lou Tartaglia) on land owned by the Hunter 
family. Each university had a portion of the collection until Kathy 
Pedrick gathered the CSUN materials in 1978 to incorporate into one 
collection for analysis and curation. Susan Hector accessioned the UCLA 
collection August 1977. The area was likely a cemetery featuring both 
inhumations and cremations, and as such, fragmentary human remains were 
found in almost every unit. Twelve formal burials were identified by 
the excavators, but they acknowledged that potential overlapping 
existed. Of the 44 human individuals identified, 26 are adults (one 
male, one female, and 24 indeterminate), 6 are juveniles, 4 are 
infants, and 1 is a perinatal individual.

[[Page 4667]]

Seven additional individuals were cremations where age and sex could 
not be determined. No known individuals were identified. The 493 
associated funerary objects include: 284 pieces of unmodified animal 
bones, 9 worked bone artifacts, 3 bags and 4 fragments of charcoal, 34 
pieces of chipped-stone tools and flakes, 7 pieces of ochre, 7 wood 
fragments, 57 pieces of unmodified shell, and 85 pieces and 3 bags of 
ground stone fragments and tools.
    In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from Agoura Hills (CA-LAN-972) in Los Angeles County, CA. 
Excavations were undertaken by Ancient Enterprises under C. William 
Clewlow in 1978 on private land being developed for housing. The site 
is estimated to date from the Late Period to Historic (A.D. 700-1769). 
The collection arrived at UCLA for curation in 1978. All fragmentary 
human remains were pulled from midden contexts and represent two adult 
individuals of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects were identified.
    At some unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from the Hansen Dam in Los Angeles County, CA. 
A memo indicated that UCLA loaned human remains from a prehistoric site 
in the Hansen Dam area to the City of Los Angeles Park Rangers in the 
1960s and that they were returned in 1981, but no further information 
about this loan could be found. The human remains were identified by 
osteological analysis as an adult male of Native American ancestry. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
identified.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from a mile South of Carpentaria (CA-SBA-1) in 
Santa Barbara County, CA, by unknown individuals and given to Loye 
Miller of the UCLA Biology Department between 1900 and 1950, and 
accessioned within the Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection. After NAGPRA 
was enacted, all Native American remains under UCLA's control were 
transferred to the Fowler Museum for inventory and compliance purposes. 
The Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection transferred these human remains 
and several others to the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, 
Zooarchaeology Lab in August 1995, and then to the Archaeology 
Collections Facility of the Fowler Museum at UCLA on September 18, 
1995. The site dates from the Early to Late Periods (5000 B.C. to A.D. 
1769). The fragmentary human remains represent one juvenile individual. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
were identified.
    In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual was 
found eroding from the shoreline at the south end of Santa Cruz Island 
in Santa Barbara County, CA, on land likely belonging to the Nature 
Conservancy. They were donated to UCLA in 1984, and represent one adult 
male individual. No date was assigned, but an osteologist determined 
the human remains to be of Native American ancestry. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
identified.
    In 1985, 1992, and 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, 
four individuals were removed from Shawa Village (CA-SCRI-192) on Santa 
Cruz Island in Santa Barbara County, CA, on land belonging to the 
Nature Conservancy. Excavations by Jeanne Arnold took place on Santa 
Cruz in the summers of 1990-1992 and 1994-1997. All collections were 
curated at UCLA after completion of the field analysis. The site dates 
from the Late Period (A.D. 700-1769) through Historic contact. 
Extremely fragmentary human remains were identified from midden 
contexts and represent 1 infant and 2 adult individuals. One additional 
individual could not be distinguished by age. None of the human remains 
could be identified by sex. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from Christy Ranch (CA-SCRI-236) on Santa Cruz Island in 
Santa Barbara County, CA, with permission of the private land owner. 
Excavations by Jeanne Arnold took place on Santa Cruz in the summers of 
1990-1992 and 1994-1997. All collections were curated at UCLA upon 
completion of the field analysis. Radiocarbon dates from site indicate 
at least intermittent occupation from as early as 2485 B.C. into the 
Late Period. Human teeth were identified from midden contexts and 
represent a minimum number of two individuals, of which one could be 
identified as an adult. One could not be further distinguished by age. 
None of the human remains could be identified by sex. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
identified.
    In 1995, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals 
were removed from Xaxas Village (CA-SCRI-240) on Santa Cruz Island in 
Santa Barbara County, CA, on land belonging to the Nature Conservancy. 
Excavations by Jeanne Arnold took place on Santa Cruz in the summers of 
1990-1992 and 1994-1997. All collections were curated at UCLA upon 
completion of the field analysis. Radiocarbon dates obtained from site 
CA-SCRI-240 indicate it was occupied between 2480 B.C. and A.D. 1425. 
Its presence in mission documents also indicates that it was occupied 
into the Historic Period. Fragmentary human remains (many of them 
teeth) were identified from midden contexts and represent 2 neonatal 
and 4 infant individuals. One could not be further distinguished by 
age. None of the human remains could be identified to sex. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
identified.
    In 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from CA-SLO-267/268 in San Luis Obispo County, CA. 
Excavations were conducted by Ronald P. Sekkel of UCLA on land owned by 
the Hearst Corporation. The site dates to the Late Period (A.D. 1200-
1500). The human remains consist of one formal burial and fragmentary 
human remains representing a minimum of 2 individuals, an adult male 
and a juvenile individual. No known individuals were identified. The 10 
burial associated objects consist of one animal bone, one shell 
fragment, and 8 chert flakes that were pulled from the burial matrix.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from San Miguel Island (CA-SMI-xxx) in Santa 
Barbara County, CA, from private ranching land, likely in the 1920s, by 
unknown individuals and given to Loye Miller of the UCLA Biology 
Department and accessioned within the Dickey Bird and Mammal 
Collection. After NAGPRA was enacted, all Native American remains under 
UCLA's control were transferred to the Fowler Museum for inventory and 
compliance purposes. The Dickey Bird and Mammal Collection transferred 
these human remains and several others to the Cotsen Institute of 
Archaeology, Zooarchaeology Lab in August 1995, and then to the 
Archaeology Collections Facility of the Fowler Museum at UCLA on 
September 18, 1995. No date was assigned, but an osteologist determined 
the human remains to be of Native American ancestry. The fragmentary 
human remains represent two individuals of unknown age and sex. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
identified.

[[Page 4668]]

    In December 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Little Sycamore Canyon Site (CA-VEN-1) in 
Ventura County, CA, by A.W. Schmuck, H.T. Cartio, and W.A. Starrett, 
who collected these human remains from a shellmound at the mouth of 
Little Sycamore Canyon. According to the accession records, these human 
remains were received by the UCLA Biology Department through Loye 
Miller on September 13, 1956. After NAGPRA was enacted, all Native 
American remains under UCLA's control were transferred to the Fowler 
Museum for inventory and compliance purposes. The Dickey Bird and 
Mammal Collection transferred these human remains and several others to 
the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, Zooarchaeology Lab in August 1995, 
and then to the Archaeology Collections Facility of the Fowler Museum 
at UCLA on September 18, 1995. Later excavators dated the site to the 
Early Period (5000-600 B.C.). The fragmentary human remains represent 
an adult male. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects were identified.
    In 1959 and 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 
individuals were removed from Little Sycamore Canyon Site (CA-VEN-1) in 
Ventura County, CA. The collection was donated by David L. Jennings, 
Chair of the Earth Sciences Department, Los Angeles City College. Field 
school excavations conducted by Dr. Jerry Jordan, Jr., led to recovery 
of the collection, but no final report was ever compiled and no field 
documentation could be found with the collection. The original catalog 
listed six burials along with fragmentary human remains from midden 
contexts that included 10 adults (of which 4 were identified as male), 
two juveniles, and four individuals of unknown age and sex. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
identified.
    In the spring of 1964, human remains representing, at minimum, 34 
individuals were removed from the Deer Creek Site (CA-VEN-7 and CA-VEN-
10) in Ventura County, CA. This site was excavated by a UCLA field 
school course directed by Clement Meighan and Gene Sterud on private 
property as ongoing construction was impacting both sites. The 
excavation was conducted primarily at CA-VEN-7, however, additional 
excavations occurred at nearby CA-VEN-10. They are likely loci of the 
same village site along with VEN-2, 6, and 205 and grouped together for 
NAGPRA as such. The collection was received by UCLA in 1964. A single 
radiocarbon date and artifact types recovered indicate the site was 
occupied as early as A.D. 1 until after A.D. 1000. Human remains from 
seven formal burials as well as fragmentary human remains from midden 
contexts were identified from the collection and represent 17 adults (2 
male, 4 female, and 11 indeterminate), 9 juveniles (1 male), 5 infants, 
and 2 perinatal individuals. Another individual was too fragmentary to 
determine age or sex. No known individuals were identified. Associated 
funerary objects were only recovered from the formal burials at VEN-7. 
The 55 associated funerary objects include: 1 shell bead, 3 ground 
stone artifacts, 1 projectile point, 30 pieces and 3 bags of unmodified 
faunal bone, 6 pebbles, 9 shell fragments, and 2 wood fragments.
    In 1955, 1958, and 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, 35 
individuals were removed from Simo'mo (CA-VEN-24 aka VEN-26) in Ventura 
County, CA. The first set of excavations was undertaken by UCLA field 
courses supervised by Clement Meighan in 1955, and by David M. 
Pendergast in 1958. A second set of excavations were conducted by a 
UCLA field course taught by M.B. McKusick on private land in 1959. The 
excavation materials were all accessioned by UCLA by 1959. The 
estimated age of the site is A.D. 300-1100. While a report by Meighan 
discusses finding two formal burials, neither were accessioned by UCLA. 
Their current location is unknown. A single drawing was found 
referencing work done in 1958 under David Pendergast. It includes 
information about Burials 9-13 and states that they are located at San 
Fernando Valley State College along with their artifacts (although some 
of the artifacts are included on UCLA's catalog and are present). While 
no formal burials were found, fragmentary human remains were identified 
within the faunal bone from the 1956 and 1958 excavations. In addition, 
faunal remains returned from UCSB included two sets of proveniences 
that could not be traced to UCLA excavations, which also included 
fragmentary human remains. Accession 117 includes 15 adults, 5 
juveniles, 6 infants, 2 perinatal, and 1 individual that was too 
fragmentary to determine age or sex. The identified burial associated 
items are from burials not currently at UCLA and are therefore not 
included on this notice. Accession 219 consists of two excavated 
burials and fragmentary human remains representing a minimum number of 
six individuals (4 adults and 2 juveniles). No known individuals were 
identified. There are 22 unmodified animal bones removed from the 
burials and identified as associated funerary objects.
    Between 1966 and 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were removed from La Robleda (CA-VEN-39) at Medea Creek in 
Ventura County, CA. This collection resulted from excavations carried 
out by a UCLA field school course on land owned by the Metropolitan 
Development Corporation under the direction of James N. Hill and 
Michael Glassow to test different excavation strategies. The collection 
was accessioned by UCLA in 1971. The site is estimated to date from 815 
B.C. to A.D. 1890. Fragmentary human remains represent two adults and 
two juvenile individuals of unknown sex. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1960 and 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, nine 
individuals were removed from Soule Park Site (CA-VEN-61) in Ventura 
County, CA. The site was excavated by Margaret Susia and a UC 
Archaeological Survey crew during a salvage project, after being 
granted permission by the Ventura County of Public Works. The 
collection was accessioned by UCLA in 1961. The site is estimated to 
date to between A.D. 1 and 1500. Fragmentary human remains represent 
six adults and three juveniles of unknown sex. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1964, 1965, and 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, 
two individuals were removed from Potrero Valley (CA-VEN-70) in Ventura 
County, CA. The site was excavated by Nelson N. Leonard and the UCLA 
Archaeological Survey from December 1964 through May 1965, and by Clay 
Singer in 1977, on land owned by the Janss Corporation. The collections 
were accessioned by UCLA after each excavation. The site is estimated 
to date to the Late Period (A.D. 700-1769). Fragmentary human remains 
represent two adult individuals of unknown sex. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from Little Sycamore Canyon (CA-VEN-86) in Ventura County, 
CA. Bob Gibson directed excavations in the summer and fall of 1971 for 
the UC Archaeological Survey on private property and under contract 
with CEDAM International. The contract gave ownership of the collection 
to UCLA, and the collection was received in

[[Page 4669]]

August 1971. The site dates to the Late Period (A.D. 700-1769). The 
human remains from Burial 1 represent an adult female and an individual 
of unknown age or sex. No known individuals were identified. The 87 
associated funerary objects include: 1 shell bead, 2 worked bone 
fragments, 2 ground stone artifacts, 42 flaked-stone artifacts, 5 
pieces and 4 bags of unmodified faunal bones, 19 unmodified shell 
fragments, 10 pieces and 1 bag of stone fragments, and 1 cobble.
    In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from CA-VEN-122 in Oak Park, Ventura County, CA. The 
collection derives from excavations conducted by a UCLA field class 
under the direction of C. William Clewlow, Jr., and supervised by 
Marilyn Beaudry. The site is located on land owned by the Metropolitan 
Development Corporation. The collection was curated at UCLA in August 
1978. This site dates to A.D. 700-1785. A formal burial was designated 
at the site and left in situ at the request of the Native American 
monitors. However, additional fragmentary human remains were identified 
from midden contexts that represent two adults, sex unknown, and 
another individual represented by an incisor. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1965-1966, human remains representing, at minimum, nine 
individuals were removed from CA-VEN-138 in Ventura County, CA, by 
students from Mira Monte Elementary School, under the direction of 
their teacher Dr. John Hook during the school year. The collection from 
this Late Period (A.D. 700-1769) through Historic contact site was 
donated to UCLA in 1985 by the elementary school. Fragmentary human 
remains removed from the site include a minimum of 9 individuals: One 
adult male; one adult, sex unknown; one juvenile, sex unknown; and six 
other extremely incomplete individuals, age and sex unknown. No known 
individuals were identified. The collection of 101 associated funerary 
objects consists of 4 ground stone artifacts, 35 worked stone 
fragments, 40 unmodified shell fragments, 19 pieces of unmodified 
animal bones, 1 charcoal fragment, 1 ceramic fragment, and 1 metal 
knife.
    In 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals 
were removed from Big Sycamore Rock Shelters (CA-VEN-195) in Ventura 
County, CA. The site was excavated under the direction of Robert Gibson 
with a UC Archaeological Survey crew on private property. This site 
dates to the Late Period, circa A.D. 1500. Fragmentary human remains 
represent two incomplete adult individuals of unknown sex, and six 
individuals of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects were identified.
    In the summer of 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were removed from the Running Springs Ranch Site (CA-VEN-
261) in Ventura County, CA. This collection derives from a boundary 
test conducted by C. William Clewlow and Allen Pastron. The site is 
estimated to date to A.D. 800-1800. Human remains from Burial 1 
represent a sub-adult female individual. In addition fragmentary human 
remains represent three adult individuals, sex unknown. No known 
individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are a 
shell fragment and a stone flake.
    In 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Conejo Valley (CA-VEN-272) in Thousand Oaks, Ventura 
County, CA. The site was discovered by a crew of archeologists from the 
UCLA Archaeological Survey in 1972, and reevaluated in 1976 by Pamela 
Ivie and David Whitley as part of an environmental impact report on the 
MGM Ranch. The Late Period site (A.D. 700-1769) was excavated in August 
of 1977, by a UCLA research team on MGM property. Fragmentary human 
remains were recovered from a midden context representing one 
individual of unknown age or sex. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects were identified.
    In the fall of 1976 and the summer of 1977, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 12 individuals were removed from Oak Park 
(CA-VEN-294) in Ventura County, CA. Salvage excavations were conducted 
on land owned by the Metropolitan Development Corporation and directed 
by Robert Lopez and C. William Clewlow with the UCLA Archaeological 
Survey. The site dates to between 48 B.C. and A.D. 1400. Human remains 
were recovered from five burials as well as midden contexts. They 
include 6 adults, sex unknown; 3 juveniles, sex unknown; 2 infants, sex 
unknown; and 1 individual of unknown sex and age. No known individuals 
were identified. The 697 associated funerary objects are 9 worked 
bones, 1 shell pendant fragment, 106 unmodified animal bones, 44 
unmodified shell fragments, 52 flaked stone artifacts, 1 metal ball, 
466 shell beads, 5 serpentine beads, 1 stone pestle, 5 cobble tools, 3 
bags of soil samples, and 4 stone fragments.
    In 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from CA-VEN-340 in Ventura County, CA. Nelson N. Leonard 
led salvage excavations after the Late Period site (A.D. 700-1769) was 
heavily impacted by construction in the 1970s leaving only a portion of 
the deposit intact. The collection arrived at UCLA soon after 
excavations, between 1975 and 1976. Fragmentary human remains represent 
a minimum of one adult individual, sex unknown. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified.
    Sometime in 1976 or 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, 
eight individuals were removed from Ferndale Ranch (CA-VEN-404) in 
Ventura County, CA. Excavations were conducted in 1976 by the UC 
Archaeological Survey in conjunction with the University of Santa 
Clara, directed by C.W. Clewlow, Jr., in advance of site development. 
During the course of excavations, burials were found but left in situ 
at the request of the Candelaria Indian Tribal Council. There were also 
two short periods of field excavations again in 1977 by Dr. C. Moser. 
The excavations were closed at the request of the Candelaria Indian 
Council as more burials were encountered, and they were reinterred. 
Construction damaged part of the Late Period (A.D. 700-1769) through 
Historic contact cemetery after excavations were concluded. A summary 
report states that the location of the Moser 1977 work is currently 
unknown and not included in this collection. The collection in the 
possession and control of the Fowler Museum presumably derives from 
after the 1977 excavations and comprises 6 burials including 5 adults 
(2 of which are identified as female), a juvenile, an infant of unknown 
sex, and an individual of unknown age or sex. No known individuals were 
identified. The 111 associated funerary objects consist of 8 pieces and 
4 bags of unmodified faunal bones, 6 pebbles, 1 organic fragment, 1 
bone tool, 2 bags of flakes, 49 pieces and 1 bag of stone fragments, 15 
pieces and 2 bags of unmodified shell, 20 beads, and 2 ceramic 
fragments.
    In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Medea Creek (CA-VEN-542) in Oak Park, Thousand Oaks, 
Ventura County, CA. The collection was excavated by researchers from 
the UCLA Archaeological Survey under the direction of Dr. C. William 
Clewlow, Jr., on land owned by the Metropolitan

[[Page 4670]]

Development Corporation. The collection was accessioned by UCLA in July 
1978. This site was dated to the Late Period (A.D. 700-1769). 
Fragmentary human remains represent one juvenile individual of unknown 
sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects were identified.
    In 1982, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Newbury Park (CA-VEN-544) in Ventura County, CA. The 
collection is from excavations on Grace Properties by Brian Dillon in 
the summer of 1982. There was no documentation provided when the human 
remains were received at UCLA in 1985. The site is dated to the Early 
Millingstone Period (circa 600-0 B.C.). Fragmentary human remains 
represent one adult individual of unknown sex. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects were identified.
    In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from Lindero Canyon (CA-VEN-606) in Ventura County, CA. 
Collections from the site derive from survey and excavation during the 
North Ranch Inland Chumash research project led by Dr. William Clewlow, 
Jr. The second investigation was conducted the same year under the 
direction of Holly Love and Rheta Resnick. Excavations took place on 
land privately owned by the Prudential Insurance Company. The 
collections were curated at UCLA in 1979. The site has been dated to 
the Late Period, A.D. 1300-1650. Fragmentary human remains represent 
one adult individual of unknown sex and two infants of unknown sex. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects were 
identified.
    The sites detailed in this notice have been identified through 
consultation to be within the traditional territory of the Chumash 
people. These locations are consistent with ethnographic and historic 
documentation of the Chumash people.
    The Chumash territory, anthropologically defined first on the basis 
of linguistic similarities, and subsequently on broadly shared material 
and cultural traits, reaches from San Luis Obispo to Malibu on the 
coast, inland to the western edge of the San Joaquin Valley, to the 
edge of the San Fernando Valley, and includes the four Northern Channel 
Islands. The sites in this notice are located in northwestern Los 
Angeles, Ventura, southwestern San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara 
counties and fall within the geographical area identified as Chumash. 
Some tribal consultants state that these areas were the responsibility 
of regional leaders, who were themselves organized into a pan-regional 
association of both political power and ceremonial knowledge. Further, 
these indigenous areas are identified by some tribal consultants to be 
relational with clans or associations of traditional practitioners of 
specific kinds of indigenous medicinal and ceremonial practices. Some 
tribal consultants identified these clans as existing in the pre-
contact period and identified some clans as also existing in the 
present day. Other tribal consultants do not recognize present-day 
geographical divisions to be related to clans of traditional 
practitioners. However, they do state that Chumash, Tataviam, and 
Gabrielino/Tongva territories were and are occupied by socially 
distinct, yet interrelated, groups which have been characterized by 
anthropologists. Ethnographic evidence suggests that the social and 
political organization of the pre-contact Channel Islands were 
primarily at the village level, with a hereditary chief, in addition to 
many other specialists who wielded power.
    The associated funerary objects described in this notice are 
consistent with those of groups ancestral to the present-day Chumash 
people. The material cultures of earlier groups living in the 
geographical areas mentioned in this notice are characterized by 
archeologists as having passed through stages over the past 10,000 
years. Many local archeologists assert that the changes in the material 
culture reflect evolving ecological adaptations and related changes in 
social organization of the same populations and do not represent 
population displacements or movements. The same range of artifact types 
and materials were used from the early pre-contact period until 
historic times. Tribal consultants explicitly state that population 
mixing, which did occur on a small scale, would not alter the 
continuity of the shared group identities of people associated with 
specific locales. Based on this evidence, continuity through time can 
be traced for all sites listed in this notice with present-day Chumash 
people, specifically the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of 
the Santa Ynez Reservation, California.

Determinations Made by the Fowler Museum at UCLA

    Officials of the Fowler Museum at UCLA have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 1,802 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 46,015 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa 
Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, 
California.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Wendy G. Teeter, Ph.D., Fowler Museum at 
UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549, telephone (310) 825-1864, 
email wteeter@arts.ucla.edu, by February 26, 2016. After that date, if 
no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to Santa Ynez Band of 
Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, may 
proceed.
    The Fowler Museum is responsible for notifying the Santa Ynez Band 
of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 21, 2015.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2016-01592 Filed 1-26-16; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P