Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review, 1949-1951 [2016-00562]

Download as PDF 1949 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 9 / Thursday, January 14, 2016 / Notices The firm’s Method 1 score is the sum of its weighted systemic indicator scores. The GSIB surcharge for the firm is then the higher of the GSIB surcharge determined under Method 1 and a second method that weights size, interconnectedness, cross-jurisdictional activity, complexity, and reliance on wholesale funding (instead of substitutability).2 The aggregate global indicator amounts used in the score calculation under Method 1 are based on data collected by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS). The BCBS amounts are determined based on the sum of the systemic indicator scores of the 75 largest U.S. and foreign banking organizations as measured by the BCBS, and any other banking organization that the BCBS includes in its sample total for that year. The BCBS publicly releases these values in euros each year. To account for changes in currency values, the GSIB surcharge rule indicates that the Board will publish the aggregate global indicator amounts each year in U.S. dollars.3 The aggregate global indicator amounts for purposes of the Method 1 score calculation under the GSIB surcharge rule for 2015, which were calculated as part of the end-2014 GSIB assessment, are: AGGREGATE GLOBAL INDICATOR AMOUNTS IN U.S. DOLLARS (USD) FOR 2015 Aggregate global indicator amount in USD (end-2014 assessment) Category Systemic indicator Size ................................................... Interconnectedness ........................... Total exposures .......................................................................................... Intra-financial system assets ...................................................................... Intra-financial system liabilities .................................................................. Securities outstanding ................................................................................ Payments activity ....................................................................................... Assets under custody ................................................................................. Underwritten transactions in debt and equity markets .............................. Notional amount of over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives ............................ Trading and available-for-sale (AFS) securities ........................................ Level 3 assets ............................................................................................ Cross-jurisdictional claims .......................................................................... Cross-jurisdictional liabilities ...................................................................... Substitutability/financial institution infrastructure. Complexity ........................................ Cross-jurisdictional activity ............... Authority: 12 U.S.C. 248(a), 321–338a, 481–486, 1462a, 1467a, 1818, 1828, 1831n, 1831o, 1831p–l, 1831w, 1835, 1844(b), 1851, 3904, 3906–3909, 4808, 5365, 5368, 5371. By order of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, January 11, 2016. Robert deV. Frierson, Secretary of the Board. [FR Doc. 2016–00589 Filed 1–13–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6210–01–P FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies The companies listed in this notice have applied to the Board for approval, pursuant to the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1841 et seq.) (BHC Act), Regulation Y (12 CFR part 225), and all other applicable statutes and regulations to become a bank holding company and/or to acquire the assets or the ownership of, control of, or the power to vote shares of a bank or bank holding company and all of the banks and nonbanking companies owned by the bank holding company, including the companies listed below. The applications listed below, as well as other related filings required by the Board, are available for immediate 2 The second method (Method 2) uses similar inputs to those used in Method 1, but replaces the substitutability category with a measure of a firm’s VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:39 Jan 13, 2016 Jkt 238001 inspection at the Federal Reserve Bank indicated. The applications will also be available for inspection at the offices of the Board of Governors. Interested persons may express their views in writing on the standards enumerated in the BHC Act (12 U.S.C. 1842(c)). If the proposal also involves the acquisition of a nonbanking company, the review also includes whether the acquisition of the nonbanking company complies with the standards in section 4 of the BHC Act (12 U.S.C. 1843). Unless otherwise noted, nonbanking activities will be conducted throughout the United States. Unless otherwise noted, comments regarding each of these applications must be received at the Reserve Bank indicated or the offices of the Board of Governors not later than February 8, 2016. A. Federal Reserve Bank of Boston (Prabal Chakrabarti, Senior Vice President) 600 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02210–2204, or BOS.SRC.Applications.Comments@ bos.frb.org: 1. Spencer MHC, and Spencer MidTier Holding Company, both in Spencer, Massachusetts; to merge with Green Valley Bancorp, MHC, and Green Valley Bancorp, Inc., and thereby indirectly acquire voting shares of Southbridge use of short-term wholesale funding. In addition, Method 2 is calibrated differently from Method 1. PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 89,657,702,623,292 9,553,265,287,432 10,766,503,932,080 14,829,559,920,658 2,588,833,244,898,340 141,055,159,810,929 6,457,421,866,621 773,613,780,418,221 3,983,442,843,602 799,000,645,785 20,924,671,362,004 19,029,188,523,805 Savings Bank, all in Southbridge, Massachusetts. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, January 11, 2016. Michael J. Lewandowski, Associate Secretary of the Board. [FR Doc. 2016–00599 Filed 1–13–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6210–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–16–15BM] Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has submitted the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The notice for the proposed information collection is published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected agencies concerning the proposed collection of 3 12 CFR 217.404(b)(1)(i)(B); 80 FR 49082, 49086– 87 (August 14, 2015). E:\FR\FM\14JAN1.SGM 14JAN1 1950 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 9 / Thursday, January 14, 2016 / Notices information are encouraged. Your comments should address any of the following: (a) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) Evaluate the accuracy of the agencies estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses; and (e) Assess information collection costs. To request additional information on the proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, call (404) 639–7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Written comments and/or suggestions regarding the items contained in this notice should be directed to the Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. Proposed Project Assessing the Impact of Organizational and Personal Antecedents on Proactive Health/Safety Decision Making—New—National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description NIOSH, under Public Law 91–596, Sections 20 and 22 (Section 20–22, Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1977) has the responsibility to conduct research relating to innovative methods, techniques, and approaches dealing with occupational safety and health problems. This research relates to the interplay of personal, organizational, and cultural influences on risk-taking and proactive decision-making behaviors among mine workers. The antecedents, or characteristics, that impact these behaviors are not well understood in mining. Understanding the degree to which antecedents influence decisions can inform the focus of future health and safety management interventions. NIOSH proposes a project that seeks to empirically understand the following: What are the most important organizational antecedent characteristics needed to support worker health and safety (H&S) performance behaviors in the mining industry? What are the most important personal antecedent characteristics needed to support worker health and safety (H&S) performance behaviors in the mining industry? To answer the above questions, NIOSH researchers developed a psychometrically supported survey. Researchers identified seven worker perception-based ‘organizational values’ and four ‘personal characteristics’ that are presumed to be important in fostering H&S knowledge, motivation, proactive behaviors, and safety outcomes. Because these emergent, worker perception-based constructs have a theoretical and empirical history, psychometrically tested items exist for each of them. NIOSH researchers will administer this survey at mine sites to as many participating mine workers as possible to answer the research questions. Upon data collection and analysis NIOSH researchers will revalidate each scale to ensure that measurement is valid. A quantitative approach, via a short survey, allows for prioritization, based on statistical significance, of the antecedents that have the most critical influence on proactive behaviors. Data collection will take place with approximately 1800 mine workers over three years. The respondents targeted for this study include any active mine worker at a mine site, both surface and underground. All participants will be between the ages of 18 and 75, currently employed, and living in the United States. Participation will require no more than 20 minutes of workers’ time (5 minutes for consent and 15 minutes for the survey). There is no cost to respondents other than their time. Upon collection of the data, it will be used to answer what organizational/ personal characteristics have the biggest impact on proactive and compliant health and safety behaviors. Dominance and relative weights analysis will be used as the data analysis method to statistically rank order the importance of predictors in numerous regression contexts. Safety proactive and safety compliance will serve as the dependent variables in these regression analyses, with the organizational and personal characteristics as independent variables. Findings will be used to improve the safety and health organizational values and focus of mine organizations, as executed through their health and safety management system for mitigating health and safety risks at their mine site. Specifically, if organizations are lacking in values that are of high importance among employees, site leadership knows where to focus new, innovative methods, techniques, and approaches to dealing with their occupational safety and health problems. Finally, the data can be directly compared to data from other mine organizations that administered the same standardized methods to provide broader context for areas in which the mining industry can focus more attention if trying to encourage safer work behavior. An estimated sample of up to 1,800 mine employees will be collected from various mining operations which have agreed to participate. In order to reach a sample of 1,800, researchers will try to secure participation from approximately twenty-one mine operations. It is estimated that it will take about 5 minutes to recruit a particular mine and 5 minutes to consent the individual workers. The amount of time to complete the survey data collection instrument is about 15 minutes. There is no cost to respondents other than there time. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of respondents Type of respondent Form name Safety/health Mine Operator ........................... Mine Worker .................................................... Mine Worker .................................................... Mine Recruitment Script ................................. Individual Miner Recruitment Script ............... Survey ............................................................ VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:39 Jan 13, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\14JAN1.SGM 7 600 600 14JAN1 Number of responses per respondent 1 1 1 Average burden per response (in hours) 5/60 5/60 15/60 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 9 / Thursday, January 14, 2016 / Notices Leroy A. Richardson, Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [FR Doc. 2016–00562 Filed 1–13–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4163–18–P Proposed Project Prevent Hepatitis Transmission among Persons Who Inject Drugs— New—National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–16–15ARG] mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has submitted the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The notice for the proposed information collection is published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected agencies concerning the proposed collection of information are encouraged. Your comments should address any of the following: (a) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) Evaluate the accuracy of the agencies estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses; and (e) Assess information collection costs. To request additional information on the proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, call (404) 639–7570 or VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:39 Jan 13, 2016 Jkt 238001 send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Direct written comments and/or suggestions regarding the items contained in this notice to the Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. Background and Brief Description Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common chronic blood borne infection in the United States; approximately three million persons are chronically infected. Identifying and reaching persons at risk for HCV infection is critical to prevent transmission and treat and cure if infected. CDC monitors the national incidence of acute hepatitis C through passive surveillance of acute, symptomatic cases of laboratory confirmed hepatitis C cases. Since 2006, surveillance data have shown a trend toward reemergence of HCV infection mainly among young persons who inject drugs (PWID) in nonurban counties. Of the cases reported in 2013 with information on risk factors 62% indicated injection drug use as the primary risk for acute hepatitis C. The prevention of HCV infection among PWIDs requires an integrated approach including harm reduction interventions, substance abuse treatment, and prevention of other blood borne infections, and care and treatment of HCV infection. The purpose of the proposed study is to address the high prevalence of HCV infection by developing and implementing an integrated approach for detection, prevention, care and treatment of infection among persons aged 18–30 years who reside in nonurban counties. Awardees will develop and implement a comprehensive strategy to enroll young non-urban PWID, collect epidemiological information, test for viral hepatitis and HIV infection and provide linkage to primary care services, prevention PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 1951 interventions, and treatment for substance abuse and HCV infection. In addition to providing HCV testing, participants will be offered testing for the presence of co-infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HIV. Adherence to prevention services and retention in care will be assessed through follow up interviews. Furthermore, re-infection with HCV will be evaluated through follow-up blood tests. The project will recruit an estimated total of 995 young PWIDs to enroll 895 PWIDs. The participants will be recruited from settings where young PWIDs obtain access to care and treatment services. Recruitment will be direct and in-person by partnering with local harm reduction sites. Recruiters will enroll subjects across recruitment sites primarily through drug treatment programs and syringe exchange programs, as well as persons referred to these sites as a result of referral from other programs and respondent driven sampling. Those who consent to participate will be administered an eligibility interview questionnaire by trained field staff. If found eligible, the participant will take an intervieweradministered survey that includes information on initiation of drug use, injection practices, HCV, HBV and HIV infection status, access to prevention and medical care, desire to receive and barriers to receiving HCV treatment, and missed opportunities for hepatitis prevention. Participants will receive counselling regarding adherence to medical and/or drug treatment services and prevention services. Participants will be interviewed for a maximum of 5 times within any 12-month interval during the course of the study: consent and interview at enrollment/baseline for an estimated 60 minutes, and 30-minute follow-up interviews every 3 months thereafter. Participants will be interviewed throughout the study during the 3-year project. However, most of the recruitment will be spread over first two years to allow for one year follow up period of the later recruits. Participation in interviews and responses to all study questions are totally voluntary and there is no cost to respondents other than their time. The annualized burden to participants is 974 hours. E:\FR\FM\14JAN1.SGM 14JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 9 (Thursday, January 14, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 1949-1951]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-00562]


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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[30Day-16-15BM]


Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has submitted 
the following information collection request to the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with 
the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The notice for the proposed 
information collection is published to obtain comments from the public 
and affected agencies.
    Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected 
agencies concerning the proposed collection of

[[Page 1950]]

information are encouraged. Your comments should address any of the 
following: (a) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information 
is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, 
including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) 
Evaluate the accuracy of the agencies estimate of the burden of the 
proposed collection of information, including the validity of the 
methodology and assumptions used; (c) Enhance the quality, utility, and 
clarity of the information to be collected; (d) Minimize the burden of 
the collection of information on those who are to respond, including 
through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or 
other technological collection techniques or other forms of information 
technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses; and 
(e) Assess information collection costs.
    To request additional information on the proposed project or to 
obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, call 
(404) 639-7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Written comments and/or 
suggestions regarding the items contained in this notice should be 
directed to the Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and 
Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395-5806. Written 
comments should be received within 30 days of this notice.

Proposed Project

    Assessing the Impact of Organizational and Personal Antecedents on 
Proactive Health/Safety Decision Making--New--National Institute for 
Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC).

Background and Brief Description

    NIOSH, under Public Law 91-596, Sections 20 and 22 (Section 20-22, 
Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1977) has the responsibility to 
conduct research relating to innovative methods, techniques, and 
approaches dealing with occupational safety and health problems.
    This research relates to the interplay of personal, organizational, 
and cultural influences on risk-taking and proactive decision-making 
behaviors among mine workers. The antecedents, or characteristics, that 
impact these behaviors are not well understood in mining. Understanding 
the degree to which antecedents influence decisions can inform the 
focus of future health and safety management interventions.
    NIOSH proposes a project that seeks to empirically understand the 
following: What are the most important organizational antecedent 
characteristics needed to support worker health and safety (H&S) 
performance behaviors in the mining industry?
    What are the most important personal antecedent characteristics 
needed to support worker health and safety (H&S) performance behaviors 
in the mining industry?
    To answer the above questions, NIOSH researchers developed a 
psychometrically supported survey. Researchers identified seven worker 
perception-based `organizational values' and four `personal 
characteristics' that are presumed to be important in fostering H&S 
knowledge, motivation, proactive behaviors, and safety outcomes. 
Because these emergent, worker perception-based constructs have a 
theoretical and empirical history, psychometrically tested items exist 
for each of them.
    NIOSH researchers will administer this survey at mine sites to as 
many participating mine workers as possible to answer the research 
questions. Upon data collection and analysis NIOSH researchers will 
revalidate each scale to ensure that measurement is valid. A 
quantitative approach, via a short survey, allows for prioritization, 
based on statistical significance, of the antecedents that have the 
most critical influence on proactive behaviors. Data collection will 
take place with approximately 1800 mine workers over three years. The 
respondents targeted for this study include any active mine worker at a 
mine site, both surface and underground. All participants will be 
between the ages of 18 and 75, currently employed, and living in the 
United States. Participation will require no more than 20 minutes of 
workers' time (5 minutes for consent and 15 minutes for the survey). 
There is no cost to respondents other than their time.
    Upon collection of the data, it will be used to answer what 
organizational/personal characteristics have the biggest impact on 
proactive and compliant health and safety behaviors. Dominance and 
relative weights analysis will be used as the data analysis method to 
statistically rank order the importance of predictors in numerous 
regression contexts. Safety proactive and safety compliance will serve 
as the dependent variables in these regression analyses, with the 
organizational and personal characteristics as independent variables.
    Findings will be used to improve the safety and health 
organizational values and focus of mine organizations, as executed 
through their health and safety management system for mitigating health 
and safety risks at their mine site. Specifically, if organizations are 
lacking in values that are of high importance among employees, site 
leadership knows where to focus new, innovative methods, techniques, 
and approaches to dealing with their occupational safety and health 
problems. Finally, the data can be directly compared to data from other 
mine organizations that administered the same standardized methods to 
provide broader context for areas in which the mining industry can 
focus more attention if trying to encourage safer work behavior.
    An estimated sample of up to 1,800 mine employees will be collected 
from various mining operations which have agreed to participate. In 
order to reach a sample of 1,800, researchers will try to secure 
participation from approximately twenty-one mine operations. It is 
estimated that it will take about 5 minutes to recruit a particular 
mine and 5 minutes to consent the individual workers. The amount of 
time to complete the survey data collection instrument is about 15 
minutes. There is no cost to respondents other than there time.

                                        Estimated Annualized Burden Hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Number of    Average burden
         Type of respondent                   Form name              Number of     responses per   per response
                                                                    respondents     respondent      (in hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Safety/health Mine Operator........  Mine Recruitment Script....               7               1            5/60
Mine Worker........................  Individual Miner                        600               1            5/60
                                      Recruitment Script.
Mine Worker........................  Survey.....................             600               1           15/60
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



[[Page 1951]]

Leroy A. Richardson,
Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific 
Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the 
Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
[FR Doc. 2016-00562 Filed 1-13-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4163-18-P