Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks, 78959-78967 [2015-30584]

Download as PDF 78959 Rules and Regulations Federal Register Vol. 80, No. 243 Friday, December 18, 2015 This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed to and codified in the Code of Federal Regulations, which is published under 50 titles pursuant to 44 U.S.C. 1510. The Code of Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each week. FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 12 CFR Part 201 [Regulation A; Docket No. R–1476] RIN 7100–AE08 Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The Board is adopting amendments to Regulation A (Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks) to implement the emergency lending authorities provided under the 3rd undesignated paragraph of section 13 of the Federal Reserve Act (the FRA) as amended by sections 1101 and 1103 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the Dodd-Frank Act). These provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act require the Board, in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, to establish by regulation policies and procedures with respect to emergency lending under section 13(3) of the FRA. DATES: Effective January 1, 2016. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurie S. Schaffer, Associate General Counsel (202) 452–2272, Sophia H. Allison, Special Counsel (202) 452– 3565, or Jay R. Schwarz, Senior Counsel (202) 452–2970, Legal Division. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 20th Street and Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20551. For the hearing impaired only, Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) users may contact (202) 263– 4869. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES SUMMARY: I. Introduction On December 23, 2013, the Board invited public comment on proposed amendments to Regulation A VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 17, 2015 Jkt 238001 (Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks) to implement sections 1101 and 1103 of the Dodd-Frank Act (Pub. L. 111–203, 124 Stat. 1376).1 The purpose of the proposed amendments was to implement the Dodd-Frank Act revisions to the Board’s emergency lending authority in section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act that limit the use of this authority to the provision of liquidity through broadly-based facilities for solvent firms in a time of crisis. After careful review and consideration of the comments, the final rule adopted by the Board includes a number of changes and additional limitations to address concerns raised by commenters. Prior to the enactment of the DoddFrank Act, section 13(3) provided that the Board may authorize a Federal Reserve Bank to extend credit to any individual, partnership, or corporation subject to four principal conditions. These conditions required that (1) credit be extended only in unusual and exigent circumstances; (2) credit be extended only if the Board authorizes the lending by the affirmative vote of at least five of its members; 2 (3) the lending Federal Reserve Bank obtain evidence before extending the credit that the borrower is unable to secure adequate credit from other banking institutions; and (4) the extension of credit be indorsed or otherwise secured to the satisfaction of the Federal Reserve Bank. This statutory authority to extend emergency credit to any person in unusual and exigent circumstances was enacted by Congress in 1932 to enable the Federal Reserve, as the nation’s central bank, to provide liquidity in times of financial stress.3 Effective on July 21, 2010, the DoddFrank Act (Pub. L. 111–203, 124 Stat. 1376) amended section 13(3) to limit this emergency lending authority to broad-based programs and facilities that relieve liquidity pressures in financial markets. To accomplish this, the DoddFrank Act amended section 13(3) to remove the general authority to lend to an individual, partnership, or corporation and to replace that general 1 79 FR 615 (January 6, 2014). lesser number of votes is required in certain emergency situations where at least five members of the Board are unavailable or not in service. 12 U.S.C. 248(r). 3 See H.R. Rep. No. 1777, at 19, 20 (1932) (Conf. Rep.); S. Rep. No. 102–167, at 202 (1991) (Conf. Rep.). authority with the limited authority to extend emergency credit only to participants in a program or facility with broad-based eligibility designed for the purpose of providing liquidity to the financial system.4 In addition, the amendments to section 13(3) provide that a program or facility that is structured to remove assets from the balance sheet of a single and specific company, or that is established for the purpose of assisting a single and specific company avoid bankruptcy or resolution under a Federal or State insolvency proceeding would not be considered a program or facility with broad-based eligibility.5 The DoddFrank Act also prohibits lending under section 13(3) to insolvent borrowers, and requires that the Board establish policies and procedures that assign a value to all collateral for an emergency loan and that are designed to ensure that the collateral is sufficient to protect taxpayers from losses. Moreover, section 13(3) was amended to provide that a program or facility may not be established without the prior approval of the Secretary of the Treasury. The Dodd-Frank Act also imposed certain publication and congressional reporting requirements regarding lending under section 13(3). The draft rule proposed by the Board for public comment adopted all of the requirements and much of the specific statutory language contained in the Dodd-Frank Act amendments to section 13(3). The Board received fewer than a dozen comments on the proposed rule from financial institutions, policy institutions, individuals, and members of Congress. While commenters generally expressed support for the proposed rule, most commenters recommended revisions to the proposed rule. Among the suggestions made by the commenters are that the rule: • Provide a more specific definition of what it means for a program or facility to be ‘‘broad-based’’; • adopt a broader definition of insolvency for purposes of the prohibition on lending to insolvent borrowers; 2A PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 4 Public Law 13–203, Sec. 1101(a)(2): 124 STAT 2113(amending section 13 of the Federal Reserve Act, 12 U.S.C. 343). 5 Public Law 13–203, Sec. 1101(a)(6): 124 STAT 2113(amending section 13 of the Federal Reserve Act, 12 U.S.C. 343). E:\FR\FM\18DER1.SGM 18DER1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES 78960 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 243 / Friday, December 18, 2015 / Rules and Regulations • clarify that solvent firms may not borrow for the purpose of passing the proceeds of emergency loans on to insolvent firms; • specify that emergency loans would only be made at a penalty rate that exceeds the market rate for such loans; • include a specific timeline for evaluating whether an emergency lending program or facility should be terminated; • limit the classes of collateral that can be accepted for emergency loans and require that the collateral be independently appraised; and • require the Board to seek a joint resolution of Congress prior to granting an emergency loan. The final rule adopts all of the limitations and revisions required by the Dodd-Frank Act. In addition, in response to the comments, the Board has revised the final rule in a number of significant ways. In particular, as discussed below, the Board modified the final rule to: • Further limit the definition of a broad-based program by including, in addition to the proposed requirement that the program be designed to provide liquidity to an identifiable market or sector of the financial system and not be for the purpose of assisting a specific firm to avoid bankruptcy or other resolution, a requirement that at least five persons be eligible to participate in the facility and a requirement that the facility not be designed to assist any number of identified firms to avoid bankruptcy or resolution; • Expand the definition of insolvency to include potential borrowers that are generally not paying their undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 days preceding borrowing from the program, and potential borrowers that are otherwise determined by the Board or the lending Federal Reserve Bank to be insolvent, in addition to the proposal to identify as insolvent any person in a resolution or bankruptcy proceeding; • Provide that loans may not be made to companies that are borrowing for the purpose of lending to insolvent companies; • Specify that emergency loans must be extended at a penalty rate; • Provide that the Board will make public and report to Congress a description of the market or sector of the financial system to which a program or facility with broad-based eligibility is intended to provide liquidity; • Provide that the Board will review each program or facility at least every six months and that each program or facility will terminate within one year from the date of its first extension of credit or its latest renewal date unless VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 17, 2015 Jkt 238001 the Board determines, by a vote of at least five members of the Board 6 and with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, to renew the program or facility; and, • Clarify that, if a company or its representative is found to have made a knowing material misrepresentation regarding its solvency in obtaining emergency credit, the credit plus all applicable interest, fees, and penalties will become immediately due and payable, and the Federal Reserve will refer the matter to the relevant law enforcement authorities for appropriate action. II. Section by Section Summary of Final Rule A. Section 201.4(d)—Emergency Credit for Others 1. Authorization To Extend Credit Section 201.4(d)(1) of the final rule provides that, in unusual and exigent circumstances, the Board may, upon the affirmative vote of not less than five of its members,7 authorize any Federal Reserve Bank to extend credit under section 13(3) of the FRA through a program or facility with broad-based eligibility. This requirement mirrors the statutory requirement and is unchanged from the proposed rule. Conditions governing when a program or facility has broad-based eligibility are discussed below. In addition, section 201.4(d)(1) provides that any credit extended under section 13(3) of the FRA is subject to such other conditions as the Board may determine. These could include conditions that govern the timing of, collateral supporting, duration of, consideration for, terms of, counterparties to, and other conditions governing the extension of credit. 2. Approval of the Secretary of the Treasury Section 201.4(d)(2) of the final rule provides that a program or facility under section 13(3) of the FRA may not be established without the prior approval of the Secretary of the Treasury. This condition implements a requirement of the Dodd-Frank Act.8 One commenter suggested that, in addition to this approval, the Board should seek a joint resolution of 6 A lesser number of votes is required in certain emergency situations where at least five members of the Board are unavailable or not in service. 12 U.S.C. 248(r). 7 The rule permits the Board to authorize lending under the rule by a vote of fewer than five members in certain emergency situations permitted by statute where at least five members of the Board are not available or not in service. 12 U.S.C. 248(r). 8 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(B)(iv). PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Congress in connection with the establishment of a program or facility. While Congress in the Dodd-Frank Act imposed a similar requirement as a condition of certain emergency actions by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), Congress did not adopt this requirement in connection with emergency lending under section 13(3) of the FRA. Instead, Congress established a number of other specific procedural requirements for emergency lending in section 1101 of the DoddFrank Act, including the requirement that the Secretary of the Treasury approve the establishment of a program or facility. The final rule does not adopt a requirement that Congress ratify a lending program or facility. It is the exclusive prerogative of Congress to determine when and on what matters it will act. However, to further Congressional oversight of emergency lending facilities, the Board’s final rule establishes a process by which the Board will promptly provide written notice to Congress of any emergency program or facility established under section 13(3) of the FRA. 3. Disclosure of Justification and Terms Section 201.4(d)(3) of the final rule requires that the Board make publicly available, as soon as is reasonably practicable, and no later than 7 days after the Board authorizes the program or facility, a description of the program or facility, the unusual and exigent circumstances that exist, the intended effect of the program or facility, and the terms and conditions for participation in the program or facility. The final rule also provides that, within the same 7day period, this information will be provided by the Board to the Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs of the U.S. Senate and the Committee on Financial Services of the U.S. House of Representatives. Some commenters suggested that the Board provide additional clarity regarding the scope of the market that must be eligible for a facility to have ‘‘broad-based eligibility.’’ While this is addressed below, as part of its response to this comment, the Board amended section 201.4(d)(3) of the final rule to require that the Board publicly disclose the market or sector of the financial system to which the program or facility is intended to provide liquidity. The Board added this disclosure requirement to help provide transparency regarding the broad-based nature of a program or facility at the time it is created. E:\FR\FM\18DER1.SGM 18DER1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 243 / Friday, December 18, 2015 / Rules and Regulations asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES 4. Definition of Broad-Based Eligibility The Dodd-Frank Act limits emergency lending under section 13(3) of the FRA to lending conducted through a program or facility ‘‘with broad-based eligibility.’’ 9 The draft implementing rule as originally proposed would have implemented this restriction in the Dodd-Frank Act by incorporating the language contained in the Dodd-Frank Act prohibiting lending for the purpose of removing assets from the balance sheet of ‘‘a single and specific company,’’ assisting ‘‘a single and specific company’’ to avoid bankruptcy, resolution under Title II of the DoddFrank Act, or any other Federal or State insolvency proceeding, or aiding a failing financial company.10 Several commenters expressed concern that the reference in the proposed rule to ‘‘a single and specific company’’ could allow the Board to circumvent the limits imposed by the Dodd-Frank Act by grouping two or more bankrupt or failing firms in a program or facility. Some of these commenters suggested that the Board specify the number of eligible participants that would be required for a program or facility to have broadbased eligibility. One legislative proposal would provide that a program or facility is not broad-based unless at least five persons are eligible to participate in the program or facility. The Board believes that the requirement that a program or facility have ‘‘broad-based eligibility’’ cannot be avoided by grouping two or more failing or bankrupt firms into a single facility. Thus, section 201.4(d)(4) of the final rule has been modified to make clear that an emergency program or facility has broad-based eligibility under the final rule only if three conditions are met. First, the program or facility must be designed for the purpose of providing liquidity to an identifiable market or sector of the financial system. Second, the program or facility must not be designed for the purpose of assisting one or more specific companies to avoid bankruptcy or other resolution, including by removing assets from the balance sheet of the company or companies. The original proposal would have adopted the language in the Dodd-Frank Act that a program not be designed for the purpose of assisting ‘‘a single and specific company’’ avoid bankruptcy or resolution. The final rule has been changed to provide that a program or facility may not be designed to assist ‘‘one or more’’ specific 9 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(A). 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(B)(iii). 10 See VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 17, 2015 Jkt 238001 companies to avoid bankruptcy or resolution. This change is intended to accent that a program or facility would not qualify as a broad-based program or facility if it is designed for the purpose of assisting any number of specific persons or entities to avoid resolution. A program or facility that is designed to remove assets from a single and specific firm’s balance sheet to help the firm avoid bankruptcy or resolution such as was done with regard to Bear Stearns would not be permissible. Third, the final rule provides that a program or facility would not be considered broad-based if fewer than five persons are eligible to participate in the program or facility. In this context, eligibility would be determined by qualification under all the terms and conditions established for participation in the program or facility. Together, these limitations are designed to ensure that emergency credit programs and facilities are established only to fulfill the central bank’s role as lender of last resort to the financial system and not as a lender to troubled firms seeking to avoid resolution or failure. For example, this approach would permit the Federal Reserve to establish programs or facilities like the Term Asset-backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF), which provided several thousand loans that provided liquidity to fund several billion dollars of student loans, car loans, small business loans and other loans in the securitization market; the Commercial Paper Funding Facility (CPFF), which was a program with broad-based eligibility designed to provide liquidity to the commercial paper market; the Asset-backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF) and the Money Market Investor Funding Facility (MMIFF), which were programs with broad-based eligibility designed to provide liquidity to the money market fund sector; and the Primary Dealer Credit Facility (PDCF), which provided liquidity to all primary dealers in support of trading in the U.S. Government securities market. However, these restrictions would not permit emergency lending to remove assets from a failing firm as was done in the case of the emergency loan to Bear Stearns, or to provide credit to prevent a firm from entering bankruptcy as was done in the case of the emergency credit facility established for AIG. Importantly, the final rule would not authorize a program or facility that sought to evade these limitations by grouping multiple failing or insolvent firms in a single program or facility. Thus, the revisions in the final rule would not permit the PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 78961 Federal Reserve to extend emergency credit in a case like the Bear Stearns or AIG situation simply by establishing a single program or facility for the purpose of providing credit to both Bear Stearns and AIG, or any other number of specific failing or insolvent firms.11 The Board is adopting section 201.4(d)(4)(iv) as proposed. That section authorizes the Board to determine the type of mechanism or vehicle used to extend credit, so long as the facility is broad-based. For example, liquidity facilities may extend credit directly to participants in those facilities in some cases, or through a special purpose vehicle in other cases. In any case, the extensions of credit would be subject to all of the requirements related to the provision of liquidity under section 13(3) of the FRA. 5. Definition of Insolvency As noted above, section 1101 of the Dodd-Frank Act requires the Board to ‘‘establish procedures to prohibit borrowing from programs and facilities by borrowers that are insolvent.’’ Section 1101 also provides that a borrower ‘‘shall be considered insolvent’’ if the borrower ‘‘is in bankruptcy, resolution under Title II of [the Dodd-Frank Act], or any other Federal or State insolvency proceeding.’’ 12 Some commenters suggested that section 1101 does not preclude the Board from identifying other situations where a person or entity has not yet entered into formal proceedings but nevertheless should be deemed to be insolvent and encouraged the Board to extend the definition of insolvency to apply to these circumstances. As an initial matter, the final rule adopts the insolvency constraint as provided in the Dodd-Frank Act. Section 201.4(d)(5) provides that a Federal Reserve Bank may not extend credit through a program or facility established under section 13(3) of the FRA to any person or entity that is in bankruptcy, resolution under Title II of the Dodd-Frank Act, or any other Federal or State insolvency proceeding. In response to these comments, the Board has amended the final rule to acknowledge that there may be situations that are not identified 11 While the final rule requires that at least five persons be eligible to participate in a program or facility, that requirement is in addition to the restriction on establishing a program or facility for the purpose of providing credit to prevent the failure or resolution of any number of specific failing or insolvent persons, and would not allow a program or facility designed for the purpose of preventing the resolution or failure of more than five persons. 12 124 Stat. 1376 at 2113–15. E:\FR\FM\18DER1.SGM 18DER1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES 78962 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 243 / Friday, December 18, 2015 / Rules and Regulations explicitly in the statute where the Board may determine that an entity is insolvent. In particular, the final rule provides that a person or entity is insolvent if the person or entity is generally not paying its undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 days preceding the date of borrowing under the program or facility. The final rule also provides that the Board or Federal Reserve Bank may determine, based on recent audited financial statements or other relevant documentation, that an entity is otherwise insolvent. Section 201.4(d)(5) of the final rule requires the Board or the lending Federal Reserve Bank, prior to extending credit, to obtain evidence that the person or entity is not insolvent. As provided by the Dodd-Frank Act, the final rule provides that the Board and a Federal Reserve Bank may rely on a written certification from the person, the chief executive officer of the entity or another authorized officer of the entity, at the time the person or entity initially borrows under a program or facility, that the person or entity is not in bankruptcy or in a resolution or other insolvency proceeding. The Board has broadened this part of the final rule to require that the certification also state that the potential borrower has not failed to generally pay its undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 days preceding the date of borrowing. The statute specifically permits the Board to rely on a certification to establish solvency. Use of a certification is particularly important in the context of programs and facilities with broadbased eligibility because these programs and facilities have the potential to involve numerous borrowers seeking credit in unusual periods of severe illiquidity. A binding certification aids in quickly and effectively making liquidity available on safe and reasonable terms in these difficult economic circumstances. The final rule contains a number of provisions designed to ensure the continued accuracy of the certification. First, the final rule provides that a person or entity that submits a written certification must immediately notify the lending Federal Reserve Bank if the information in the certification changes. Section 201.4(d)(5)(vi) of the final rule also provides that a participant that is or has become insolvent would be prohibited from receiving any new extension of credit under the program or facility. Moreover, to improve the reliability of a certification, the final rule provides that, if a participant or a person has provided a certification under section VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 17, 2015 Jkt 238001 201.4(d)(5) or (8) that includes a knowing material misrepresentation, all emergency credit extended to the borrower immediately becomes due and payable, and the Federal Reserve will promptly refer the matter to appropriate law enforcement authorities for action under applicable criminal and civil law. Some commenters expressed concern that third-party conduits would be used to evade any insolvency restrictions in the rule by passing borrowed funds on to an entity that is insolvent. Section 201.4(d)(5)(i) of the final rule provides that a Federal Reserve Bank may not extend credit through a program or facility to any person that is borrowing for the purpose of lending the proceeds of the loan to an insolvent entity. Another commenter suggested that the final rule clarify whether conservatorships are eligible to participate in broad-based facilities. Section 13(3) as amended by the DoddFrank Act prohibits lending to an insolvent borrower or to aid a failing firm. As a general matter, conservators are appointed to conserve a failing company’s assets.13 Accordingly, a conservatorship and a company in conservatorship would not be eligible to borrow from a program or facility established under section 13(3) of the FRA. 6. Indorsement or Other Security Prior to the Dodd-Frank Act, section 13(3) provided that any extension of credit under that section must be ‘‘indorsed or otherwise secured to the satisfaction of the Federal Reserve bank.’’ 14 The Dodd-Frank Act retained this provision of the original statute and added two further requirements. First, the Dodd-Frank Act directs the Board to adopt policies and procedures ‘‘designed to ensure . . . that the security for emergency loans is sufficient to protect taxpayers from losses.’’ 15 Second, the Dodd-Frank Act requires that the Board’s policies and procedures ‘‘require that a Federal Reserve bank assign, consistent with sound risk management practices and to ensure protection for the taxpayer, a lendable value to all collateral for a loan executed’’ under section 13(3) of the FRA.16 Protecting taxpayers from losses as a result of emergency lending has always been an important concern for the Board, and the Board notes that the extensions of credit under the emergency lending programs it 13 See 12 U.S.C. 1821(c)(5). 12 U.S.C. 343, 47 Stat. 715. 15 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(B)(1). 16 Id. 14 See PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 authorized during the recent financial crisis were all repaid in full with interest. The proposed rule incorporated the new statutory requirements from the Dodd-Frank Act into Regulation A. Some commenters argued that the Board should limit the types of collateral the Federal Reserve Banks may accept in support of an emergency credit. Several commenters argued that the Federal Reserve should establish haircuts for collateral accepted by programs and facilities that extend emergency credit. The final rule continues to emphasize the importance of ensuring that the security for emergency loans is sufficient to protect taxpayers from losses. As proposed and as adopted in the final rule, section 201.4(d)(6) provides that all credit extended under emergency lending programs and facilities must be indorsed or otherwise secured to the satisfaction of the lending Federal Reserve Bank. The final rule also requires the Federal Reserve Bank, no later than at the time the credit is initially extended, to assign a lendable value to all collateral for the program or facility, consistent with sound risk management practices and to ensure protection for the taxpayer. The Federal Reserve Banks have long assigned a lendable value to collateral at the time credit is extended. Much of the collateral accepted as security for emergency lending has a readily available market value. In connection with assigning a lendable value to other collateral, Reserve Banks readily take into account independent appraisals of the collateral that may be available. In all cases, the Reserve Bank applies appropriate discounts or ‘‘haircuts’’ to the value of the collateral. The haircuts applied to collateral are described in the Federal Reserve Discount Window & Payment System Risk Collateral Margins Table and the Federal Reserve Collateral Guidelines, available on the Federal Reserve Discount Window & Payment System Risk Web site.17 The Federal Reserve Banks also consider the financial strength of the borrower, the presence of any indorsement, and other factors, in determining whether the credit is satisfactorily secured. The Board believes that these provisions allow the Federal Reserve to impose collateral and other requirements to protect the taxpayer from loss and address the statutory requirement for policies and procedures that are designed to ensure protection for the taxpayer. 17 http://www.frbdiscountwindow.org/index.cfm. E:\FR\FM\18DER1.SGM 18DER1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 243 / Friday, December 18, 2015 / Rules and Regulations 7. Penalty Rate Section 13(3) of the FRA has always provided that emergency credit extended under that section shall be at rates established in accordance with the provisions of section 14(d) of the FRA. Commenters suggested that the Board amend the proposed rule to require that extensions of emergency credit be subject to a penalty rate of interest. The practice of the Federal Reserve in extending emergency credit has been to set the relevant interest rate at a penalty rate designed to encourage borrowers to repay emergency credit as quickly as possible once the unusual and exigent circumstances that justify the program or facility have receded and financial conditions have normalized. This approach has also ensured that the taxpayer is compensated by a higher interest rate than would be charged during normal times for the increased risk taken in extending emergency credit. Indeed, while the Federal Reserve adopted different rates for the various broad-based facilities that it established during the recent financial crisis, in each case, the rate set for the facility exceeded the rate for comparable instruments during normal times. As a result of this practice, emergency broadbased credit facilities established by the Federal Reserve under section 13(3) terminated and wound down as economic conditions normalized. In keeping with this practice, section 201.4(d)(7) of the final rule provides that a penalty rate will be imposed on emergency extensions of credit. Because the appropriate interest rate depends on a number of factors, such as the duration of the credit, the collateral requirements, and the other terms and conditions for the credit, it is not feasible to establish a single penalty rate for all emergency facilities or to set penalty rates in advance of designing the facility. Consequently, the final rule provides that the interest rate for credit extended under section 13(3) must be at a level that is a premium to the market rate in normal circumstances, affords liquidity in unusual and exigent circumstances, and encourages repayment and discourages use of the program as unusual and exigent circumstances normalize. Section 201.4(d)(7)(iii) of the final rule sets forth a non-exhaustive list of factors that the Board will take into account when establishing the penalty rate. These factors include the condition of the affected markets and the financial system generally, the historical rate of interest for loans of comparable terms and maturity during normal times, the purpose of the program or facility, the VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 17, 2015 Jkt 238001 risk of repayment, the collateral supporting the credit, the duration, terms and amount of the credit, and other factors relevant to ensuring the taxpayer is appropriately compensated for the risks associated with the emergency credit. The final rule also explains that the rate on emergency credit under section 13(3) may be set by auction or other method consistent with section 14(d) of the FRA. Such an auction could be structured with a minimum stop out rate to ensure that the resulting rate would satisfy the requirements of a penalty rate. 8. Evidence Regarding Unavailability of Adequate Credit Accommodation Section 13(3) has always required that a Federal Reserve Bank, prior to extending credit to any participant in a program or facility under that section, obtain evidence that such participant is unable to secure adequate credit accommodations from other banking institutions. The proposed rule incorporated this requirement and provided that this evidence may include evidence based on economic conditions in the market or markets addressed by the program or facility or evidence obtained from other sources, including facility or market participants and certifications from borrowers. In response to comments, the Board has amended the final rule to add as relevant evidence a certification from the participant that it is unable to secure adequate credit accommodations from other banking institutions. 9. Termination of Program or Facility The Dodd-Frank Act requires that the Board’s policies and procedures with respect to section 13(3) extensions of credit be designed to ensure that any such program is terminated in a timely and orderly fashion.18 In order to address this requirement, the proposed rule would have required the Board periodically to review the existence of unusual and exigent circumstances; the extent of usage of the program or facility; the extent to which the continuing authorization of the program or facility facilitates restoring or sustaining confidence in financial markets; economic and market conditions; the functioning of financial markets; the ongoing need for the liquidity support provided by such program or facility; and such other factors as the Board may deem to be appropriate. Some commenters suggested that a specific time period for review be adopted. The Board has amended the draft proposal to adopt this suggestion. Section 201.4(d)(9)(i) of the final rule provides that a program or facility will terminate no later than one year after the date of the first extension of credit under the program or facility. The rule allows the Board to renew the program or facility if it finds, by a vote of five members,19 that unusual and exigent circumstances continue to exist, and the Secretary of the Treasury has approved the renewal. Each renewal may extend the program or facility for not more than one year. The final rule requires the Board promptly to report publicly and to the relevant congressional committees any renewal of a program or facility under section 13(3). The final rule has been amended to provide that the Board will, not less frequently than every six months, review whether each emergency lending program or facility should be terminated. The final rule provides that the Board may terminate an emergency lending program or facility at any time, and will terminate an emergency program or facility upon finding that conditions no longer warrant continuation of the program or facility. The final rule retains the provisions of the proposed rule providing factors for the Board to consider in conducting this review, with some additional modifications. Specifically, the final rule provides that the Board will consider such factors as the continued existence of unusual and exigent circumstances; the extent of usage of the program or facility; the extent to which the continuing authorization of the program or facility facilitates restoring or sustaining confidence in the identified financial markets; the ongoing need for the liquidity support provided by such program or facility; and other appropriate factors. One commenter suggested that the final rule include procedures for the orderly unwinding of a program or facility, including how the Board will cover any associated losses. The Board expects, as it has with past facilities, to evaluate the appropriate methods for an orderly unwinding of any emergency credit facility at the time the facility is unwound. 10. Reporting Requirements The Dodd-Frank Act contains detailed reporting requirements with respect to section 13(3) extensions of credit.20 The proposed rule set forth the statutory requirements as enacted, and no comments were received on those 19 See 12 U.S.C. 248(r). Act Sections 1101(a)(6) and 20 Dodd-Frank 18 Dodd-Frank PO 00000 Frm 00005 Act Section 1101(a)(6). Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 78963 1103(b). E:\FR\FM\18DER1.SGM 18DER1 78964 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 243 / Friday, December 18, 2015 / Rules and Regulations provisions of the proposed rule. Therefore, the Board is adopting these provisions as proposed. The final rule provides that the Board will comply with 12 U.S.C. 248(s) and 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(C) pursuant to their terms. 11. No Obligation To Extend Credit Section 201.4(d)(11) of the proposed rule provided that Federal Reserve Banks have no obligation to extend credit to any particular person or entity through an emergency lending program or facility. This provision mirrors the provision applicable to lending to depository institutions set forth in section 201.3(b) of Regulation A. No comments were received on this provision, and the Board is adopting it as proposed. 12. Participation in Programs and Facilities and Vendor Selection The final rule reflects existing legal requirements that participation in any program or facility under section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act will not be limited or conditioned on the basis of any legally prohibited basis, such as the race, religion, color, gender, national origin, age or disability of the borrower. Moreover, in accordance with existing law, the selection of third-party vendors used in the design, marketing or implementation of any program or facility under this subsection will be without regard to the race, religion, color, gender, national origin, age or disability of the vendor or any principal shareholder of the vendor, and, to the extent possible and consistent with law, will involve a process designed to support equal opportunity and diversity. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES 13. Short-Term Emergency Credit Secured Solely by United States or Agency Obligations Section 201.4(d)(13) of the proposed rule retained, but relocated, a provision in current Regulation A that authorizes a Federal Reserve Bank to extend credit under section 13(13) of the FRA if the collateral used to secure the credit consists solely of obligations of, or obligations fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the United States or an agency of the United States. Section 201.4(d)(13) of the final rule retains the provision that extensions of credit under this section be at a rate above the highest rate in effect for advances to depository institutions. As set forth in section 13(13) of the FRA, section 201.4(d)(13) of the final rule also provides that credit extended under this provision may not be extended for a term exceeding 90 days. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 17, 2015 Jkt 238001 One commenter suggested that section 201.4(d)(13) should be revised to limit the number of times a loan issued pursuant to its provisions may be rolled over. However, the commenter did not provide a suggested limit on roll overs and acknowledged that there would need to be exceptions made to any limit imposed. Instead of imposing such a limit, the Board will rely on its ability to assess whether unusual and exigent circumstances continue to exist at the time that the loan is renewed in order to appropriately limit roll overs of such loans. Therefore, the Board is retaining section 201.4(d)(13) as written. B. Section 201.3(b)—No Obligation To Make Advances or Discounts Section 201.3(b) of the final rule reflects a technical change to conform the language of that section with the language of section 201.4(d)(11) of the final rule. III. Administrative Law Matters A. Regulatory Flexibility Act The Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) (RFA) requires an agency either to provide an initial regulatory flexibility analysis with a proposed rule for which a general notice of proposed rulemaking is required or to certify that the proposed rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. The Board solicited public comment on the rule in a notice of proposed rulemaking. The Board did not receive any comments regarding burden to small banking organizations. In accordance with section 1101 and 1103 of the Dodd-Frank Act, the Board is amending Regulation A (12 CFR part 201 et seq.) to establish policies and procedures for emergency lending under section 13(3) of the FRA. The reasons and justification for the final rule are described in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. The Board does not believe that the final rule duplicates, overlaps, or conflicts with any other Federal rules. Under regulations issued by the Small Business Administration (‘‘SBA’’), a ‘‘small entity’’ includes those firms within the ‘‘Finance and Insurance’’ sector with asset sizes that vary from $75.5 million or less in assets to $550 million or less in assets. The Board believes that the Finance and Insurance sector constitutes a reasonable universe of firms for these purposes because such firms generally engage in activities that are financial in nature and the vast majority of emergency loans under section 13(3) during the recent financial crisis were extended to such firms. PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 As discussed in the SUPPLEMENTARY the final rule would apply to any participant in an emergency lending program or facility with broadbased eligibility. To the extent that small entities are participants in these programs or facilities, they would be receiving extensions of emergency credit from Federal Reserve Banks. It is not possible to ascertain at this time the number of small entities that might participate in these programs and facilities were they to be authorized, or what requirements would be imposed on them if they do so. At a minimum, it is likely that participants would be required to pay interest on credit extended to them and to keep records of the use of proceeds of such extensions of credit. However, the positive economic impact of receiving such a credit is likely to substantially outweigh any economic burden of participating in the program or facility. In light of the foregoing, the Board does not believe that the final rule would have a significant negative economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. INFORMATION, B. Paperwork Reduction Act Analysis Certain provisions of the final rule contain ‘‘collection of information’’ requirements within the meaning of the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501–3521). In accordance with the requirements of the PRA, the Board may not conduct or sponsor, and the respondent is not required to respond to, an information collection unless it displays a currently valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number. The OMB control number for the Board is 7100– NEW. The Board reviewed the final rule under the authority delegated to the Board by OMB. The final rule contains requirements subject to the PRA. The reporting requirements are found in section 201.4(d)(5)(iv)(A). The Board indicated in the proposed rule that the reporting requirements associated with the Regulation A would be minimal and no PRA burden was taken. The Board received no comments on this aspect of the proposal. However, based on the comments received for clarifying the proposed rule to prohibit solvent firms from passing the proceeds of emergency loans on to insolvent firms and adopting a broader definition of insolvency, the Board will take reporting burden for this section. The Board has a continuing interest in the public’s opinions of collections of information. At any time, comments regarding the burden estimate, or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for E:\FR\FM\18DER1.SGM 18DER1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 243 / Friday, December 18, 2015 / Rules and Regulations reducing the burden, may be sent to: Secretary, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 20th and C Streets NW., Washington, DC 20551. A copy of the comments may also be submitted to the OMB desk officer (1) by mail to U.S. Office of Management and Budget, 725 17th Street NW., 10235, Washington, DC 20503; (2) by facsimile to 202–395–6974; or (3) by email to: oira_submission@omb.eop.gov, Attention, Federal Reserve Board Agency Desk Officer. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES Proposed Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Reporting Requirements Associated with Regulation A (Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks). Frequency of Response: Eventgenerated. Affected Public: Businesses, individuals or other persons. Respondents: Any participant in a program or facility with broad-based eligibility. Abstract: Sections 1101 and 1103 of the Dodd-Frank Act amend the emergency lending authorities provided in section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act. The amendments require the Board, in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, to establish by regulation policies and procedures with respect to such emergency lending. The purpose of the amendments to Regulation A in this final rule is to implement the DoddFrank Act revisions to the Board’s emergency lending authority in section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act that limit the use of this authority to the provision of liquidity through broadlybased facilities for solvent firms in a time of crisis. Reporting Requirements Section 201.4(d)(5)(iv)(A) provides that a Federal Reserve Bank may rely on a written certification from the person or from the chief executive officer or other authorized officer of the entity, at the time the person or entity initially borrows under the program or facility, that the person or entity is not in bankruptcy, resolution under Title II of Public Law 111–203 (12 U.S.C. 5381 et seq.) or any other Federal or State insolvency proceeding, and has not failed to generally pay its undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 days preceding the date of borrowing under the program or facility, and is not borrowing for the purpose of lending the proceeds of the loan to a person or entity that is insolvent. Estimated Burden per Response: 5 hours. Number of Respondents: 10 (The Federal Reserve is not currently aware VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 17, 2015 Jkt 238001 of any respondents, but for purposes of the PRA we will assume 10. If or when we receive any certifications we intend to update this data upon the next renewal of the information collection). Total Estimated Annual Burden: 50 hours. C. Invitation for Comments on Use of Plain Language Section 722 of the Gramm-Leach Bliley Act of 1999 requires the Federal banking agencies to use plain language in all proposed and final rules published after January 1, 2000.21 The Board received no comments on these matters and believes that the final rule is written plainly and clearly. List of Subjects in 12 CFR Part 201 Banks, Banking, Federal Reserve System, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Authority and Issuance For the reasons set forth in the preamble, the Board amends 12 CFR part 201 (Regulation A) as follows: PART 201—EXTENSIONS OF CREDIT BY FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS (REGULATION A) 1. The authority citation for part 201 is revised to read as follows: ■ Authority: 12 U.S.C. 248(i)–(j) and (s), 343 et seq., 347a, 347b, 347c, 348 et seq., 357, 374, 374a, and 461. 2. Section 201.3 paragraph (b) is revised to read as follows: ■ § 201.3 Extensions of credit generally. * * * * * (b) No obligation to make advances or discounts. This section does not entitle any person or entity to obtain any credit or any increase, renewal or extension of maturity of any credit from a Federal Reserve Bank. * * * * * § 201.109 [Amended] 3. In § 201.109, redesignate footnotes 4 through 6 as footnotes 6 through 8. ■ § 201.108 [Amended] 4. In § 201.108, redesignate footnotes 2 and 3 as footnotes 4 and 5. ■ § 201.51 [Amended] 5. In § 201.51, redesignate footnote 1 as footnote 3. ■ 6. Section 201.4 paragraph (d) is revised to read as follows: ■ § 201.4 * * 21 12 PO 00000 Availability and terms of credit. * * Fmt 4700 (d) Emergency credit for others—(1) Authorization to extend credit. In unusual and exigent circumstances, the Board, by the affirmative vote of not less than five members,1 may authorize any Federal Reserve Bank, subject to such conditions and during such periods as the Board may determine, to extend credit to any participant in a program or facility with broad-based eligibility established and operated in accordance with this paragraph (d). (2) Approval of the Secretary of the Treasury. A program or facility may not be established under this paragraph (d) without obtaining the prior approval of the Secretary of the Treasury. (3) Disclosure of justification and terms. As soon as is reasonably practicable, and no later than 7 days after a program or facility is authorized under this paragraph (d), the Board and the authorized Federal Reserve Bank or Federal Reserve Banks, as appropriate, will make publicly available a description of the program or facility, a description of the market or sector of the financial system to which the program or facility is intended to provide liquidity, a description of the unusual and exigent circumstances that exist, the intended effect of the program or facility, and the terms and conditions for participation in the program or facility. In addition, within the same 7-day period, the Board will provide a copy of this information to the Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs of the U.S. Senate and the Committee on Financial Services of the U.S. House of Representatives. (4) Broad-based eligibility. (i) A program or facility established under this paragraph (d) must have broadbased eligibility in accordance with terms established by the Board. (ii) For purposes of this paragraph (d), a program or facility has broad-based eligibility only if the program or facility is designed to provide liquidity to an identifiable market or sector of the financial system; (iii) A program or facility will not be considered to have broad-based eligibility for purposes of this paragraph (d) if: (A) The program or facility is designed for the purpose of assisting one or more specific companies avoid bankruptcy, resolution under Title II of Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Pub. L. 111– 203, 12 U.S.C. 5381 et seq.), or any other Federal or State insolvency proceeding, including by removing assets from the * 1 Unless fewer are authorized pursuant to section 11(r) of the Federal Reserve Act. 12 U.S.C. 248(r). U.S.C. 4809. Frm 00007 78965 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\18DER1.SGM 18DER1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES 78966 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 243 / Friday, December 18, 2015 / Rules and Regulations balance sheet of one or more such company; (B) The program or facility is designed for the purpose of aiding one or more failing financial companies; or (C) Fewer than five persons or entities would be eligible to participate in the program or facility. (iv) A Federal Reserve Bank may extend credit through a program or facility with broad-based eligibility established under this paragraph (d) through such mechanism or vehicle as the Board determines would facilitate the extension of such credit. (5) Insolvency. (i) A Federal Reserve Bank may not extend credit through a program or facility established under this paragraph (d) to any person or entity that is insolvent or to any person or entity that is borrowing for the purpose of lending the proceeds of the loan to a person or entity that is insolvent. (ii) Before extending credit through a program or facility established under this paragraph (d) to any person or entity, the Federal Reserve Bank must obtain evidence that the person or entity is not insolvent. (iii) A person or entity is ‘‘insolvent’’ for purposes of this paragraph (d) if: (A) The person or entity is in bankruptcy, resolution under Title II of Public Law 111–203 (12 U.S.C. 5381 et seq.) or any other Federal or State insolvency proceeding; (B) The person or entity is generally not paying its undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 days preceding the date of borrowing under the program or facility; or (C) The Board or Federal Reserve Bank otherwise determines that the person or entity is insolvent. (iv) For purposes of meeting the requirements of this paragraph (d)(5), the Board or Federal Reserve Bank, as relevant, may rely on: (A) A written certification from the person or from the chief executive officer or other authorized officer of the entity, at the time the person or entity initially borrows under the program or facility, that the person or entity is not in bankruptcy, resolution under Title II of Public Law 111–203 (12 U.S.C. 5381 et seq.) or any other Federal or State insolvency proceeding, and has not failed to generally pay its undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 days preceding the date of borrowing under the program or facility; (B) Recent audited financial statements of the person or entity; or (C) Other information that the Board or the Federal Reserve Bank may determine to be relevant. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 17, 2015 Jkt 238001 (v) A person or officer (or successor of either) that submits a written certification under this subparagraph must immediately notify the lending Federal Reserve Bank if the information in the certification changes. (vi) Upon a finding by the Board or a Federal Reserve Bank that a participant, including a participant that has provided a certification under this paragraph (d)(5), is or has become insolvent, that participant is not eligible for any new extension of credit from a program or facility established under this paragraph (d) until such time as the Board or a Federal Reserve Bank determines that such participant is no longer insolvent. (vii) If a participant or person has provided a certification under this paragraph (d)(5) or paragraph (d)(8)(ii) of this section that includes a knowing material misrepresentation in the certification, all extensions of credit made pursuant to this paragraph (d) that are outstanding to the relevant participant shall become immediately due and payable, and all accrued interest, fees and penalties shall become immediately due and payable. The Board or the lending Federal Reserve Bank will also refer the matter to the relevant law enforcement authorities for investigation and action in accordance with applicable criminal and civil law. (6) Indorsement or other security. (i) All credit extended under a program or facility established under this paragraph (d) must be indorsed or otherwise secured, in each case, to the satisfaction of the lending Federal Reserve Bank. (ii) In determining whether an extension of credit under any program or facility established under this paragraph (d) is secured to its satisfaction, a Federal Reserve Bank must, prior to or at the time the credit is initially extended, assign a lendable value to all collateral for the program or facility, consistent with sound risk management practices and to ensure protection for the taxpayer. (7) Penalty rate and fees. (i) The Board will determine the interest rate to be charged on any credit extended through a program or facility established under this section in accordance with this paragraph (d) and the provisions of section 14, subdivision (d) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 357). The Board may determine the interest rate by auction or such other method as the Board determines in accordance with section 14, subdivision (d) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 357). (ii) The interest rate established for credit extended through a program or facility established under this section will be set at a penalty level that: PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 (A) Is a premium to the market rate in normal circumstances; (B) Affords liquidity in unusual and exigent circumstances; and (C) Encourages repayment of the credit and discourages use of the program or facility as the unusual and exigent circumstances that motivated the program or facility recede and economic conditions normalize. (iii) In determining the rate, the Board will consider the condition of affected markets and the financial system generally, the historical rate of interest for loans of comparable terms and maturity during normal times, the purpose of the program or facility, the risk of repayment, the collateral supporting the credit, the duration, terms and amount of the credit, and any other factor that the Board determines to be relevant to ensuring that the taxpayer is appropriately compensated for the risks associated with the credit extended under the program or facility and the purposes of this paragraph (d) are fulfilled. (iv) In addition to the rate established and charged under this paragraph (d)(7), the Board may require the payment of any fees, penalties, charges or other consideration the Board determines to be appropriate to protect and appropriately compensate the taxpayer for the risks associated with the credit extended under the program or facility. (8) Evidence regarding unavailability of adequate credit accommodation. (i) Each lending Federal Reserve Bank must obtain evidence that, under the prevailing circumstances, participants in a program or facility established under this paragraph (d) are unable to secure adequate credit accommodations from other banking institutions. (ii) Evidence required under this paragraph (d)(8) may be based on economic conditions in the market or markets intended to be addressed by the program or facility, a written certification from the person or from the chief executive officer or other authorized officer of the entity at the time the person or entity initially borrows under the program or facility, or other evidence from participants or other sources. (9) Termination of program or facility. (i) A program or facility established under this paragraph (d) shall cease extending new credit no later than one year after the date of the first extension of credit under the program or facility or the date of any extension of the program or facility by the Board under paragraph (d)(9)(ii) of this section. (ii) A program or facility may be renewed upon the vote of not less than E:\FR\FM\18DER1.SGM 18DER1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 243 / Friday, December 18, 2015 / Rules and Regulations five members of the Board 2 that unusual and exigent circumstances continue to exist and the program or facility continues to appropriately provide liquidity to the financial system, and the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury. (iii) The Board shall make the disclosures required under paragraph (d)(3) of this section to the public and the relevant congressional committees no later than 7 days after renewing a program or facility under this paragraph (d)(9). (iv) The Board may at any time terminate a program or facility established under this paragraph (d). To ensure that the program or facility under this paragraph (d) is terminated in a timely and orderly fashion, the Board will periodically review, no less frequently than once every 6 months, the existence of unusual and exigent circumstances, the extent of usage of the program or facility, the extent to which the continuing authorization of the program or facility facilitates restoring or sustaining confidence in the identified financial markets, the ongoing need for the liquidity support provided by such program or facility, and such other factors as the Board may deem to be appropriate. The Board will terminate lending under a program or facility promptly upon finding that conditions no longer warrant the continuation of the program or facility or that continuation of the program or facility is no longer appropriate. (v) A program or facility that has been terminated will cease extending new credit and will collect existing loans pursuant to the applicable terms and conditions. (10) Reporting requirements. The Board will comply with the reporting requirements of 12 U.S.C. 248(s) and 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(C) pursuant to their terms. (11) No obligation to extend credit. This paragraph (d) does not entitle any person or entity to obtain any credit or any increase, renewal or extension of maturity of any credit from a Federal Reserve Bank. (12) Participation in programs and facilities and vendor selection. (i) Participation in any program or facility under this paragraph (d) shall not be limited or conditioned on the basis of any legally prohibited basis, such as the race, religion, color, gender, national origin, age or disability of the borrower. (ii) The selection of any third-party vendor used in the design, marketing or implementation of any program or facility under this paragraph (d) shall be without regard to the race, religion, color, gender, national origin, age or disability of the vendor or any principal shareholder of the vendor, and, to the extent possible and consistent with law, shall involve a process designed to support equal opportunity and diversity. (13) Short-term emergency credit secured solely by United States or agency obligations. In unusual and exigent circumstances and after consultation with the Board, a Federal Reserve Bank may extend credit under section 13(13) of the Federal Reserve Act if the collateral used to secure such credit consists solely of obligations of, or obligations fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the United States or an agency thereof. Prior to extending credit under this paragraph (d)(13), the Federal Reserve Bank must obtain evidence that credit is not available from other sources and failure to obtain such credit would adversely affect the economy. Credit extended under this paragraph (d)(13) may not be extended for a term exceeding 90 days, must be extended at a rate above the highest rate in effect for advances to depository institutions as determined in accordance with section 14(d) of the Federal Reserve Act, and is subject to such limitations and conditions as provided by the Board. * * * * * By order of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, November 30, 2015. Robert deV. Frierson, Secretary of the Board. [FR Doc. 2015–30584 Filed 12–17–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 17:22 Dec 17, 2015 Jkt 238001 SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 120 Business Loans CFR Correction In Title 13 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 1, 2015, on page 307, in § 120.802, in the definition of Priority CDC, remove the first instance of ‘‘504’’ and add ‘‘504’’ before the word ‘‘program’’. [FR Doc. 2015–31739 Filed 12–17–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 1505–01–D SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 136 Enforcement of Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in Programs or Activities Conducted by the Small Business Administration CFR Correction In Title 13 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 1, 2015, on pages 658 and 659, in § 136.170, remove ‘‘Director, OEEOC’’ each time it appears in paragraphs (h)(1) and (j)(1) and (2) and add, in its place, ‘‘AA/EEOCCR’’. ■ [FR Doc. 2015–31740 Filed 12–17–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 1505–01–D SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 140 Debt Collection CFR Correction In Title 13 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 1, 2015, on page 665, in § 140.11, in paragraph (i)(3)(ii), remove the term ‘‘the SBA’’ and add ‘‘the Agency’’ in its place. 13 CFR Part 105 [FR Doc. 2015–31745 Filed 12–17–15; 8:45 am] Standards of Conduct and Employee Restrictions and Responsibilities BILLING CODE 1505–01–D CFR Correction DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION In Title 13 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 1, 2015, on page 34, in § 105.401, in paragraph (b)(3), remove ‘‘Director of Human Resources’’ and add in its place ‘‘Chief Human Capital Officer’’. Federal Aviation Administration [FR Doc. 2015–31738 Filed 12–17–15; 8:45 am] 14 CFR Part 71 [Docket No. FAA–2015–1139; Airspace Docket No. 15–AWP–4] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Los Angeles, CA BILLING CODE 1505–01–D Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: 2 Unless fewer are authorized pursuant to section 11(r) of the Federal Reserve Act. 12 U.S.C. 248(r). VerDate Sep<11>2014 78967 PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\18DER1.SGM 18DER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 243 (Friday, December 18, 2015)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 78959-78967]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2015-30584]



========================================================================
Rules and Regulations
                                                Federal Register
________________________________________________________________________

This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents 
having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed 
to and codified in the Code of Federal Regulations, which is published 
under 50 titles pursuant to 44 U.S.C. 1510.

The Code of Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. 
Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each 
week.

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Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 243 / Friday, December 18, 2015 / 
Rules and Regulations

[[Page 78959]]



FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM

12 CFR Part 201

[Regulation A; Docket No. R-1476]
RIN 7100-AE08


Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks

AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: The Board is adopting amendments to Regulation A (Extensions 
of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks) to implement the emergency lending 
authorities provided under the 3rd undesignated paragraph of section 13 
of the Federal Reserve Act (the FRA) as amended by sections 1101 and 
1103 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act 
(the Dodd-Frank Act). These provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act require 
the Board, in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, to 
establish by regulation policies and procedures with respect to 
emergency lending under section 13(3) of the FRA.

DATES: Effective January 1, 2016.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurie S. Schaffer, Associate General 
Counsel (202) 452-2272, Sophia H. Allison, Special Counsel (202) 452-
3565, or Jay R. Schwarz, Senior Counsel (202) 452-2970, Legal Division. 
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 20th Street and 
Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20551. For the hearing impaired 
only, Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) users may contact 
(202) 263-4869.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Introduction

    On December 23, 2013, the Board invited public comment on proposed 
amendments to Regulation A (Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve 
Banks) to implement sections 1101 and 1103 of the Dodd-Frank Act (Pub. 
L. 111-203, 124 Stat. 1376).\1\ The purpose of the proposed amendments 
was to implement the Dodd-Frank Act revisions to the Board's emergency 
lending authority in section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act that 
limit the use of this authority to the provision of liquidity through 
broadly-based facilities for solvent firms in a time of crisis. After 
careful review and consideration of the comments, the final rule 
adopted by the Board includes a number of changes and additional 
limitations to address concerns raised by commenters.
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    \1\ 79 FR 615 (January 6, 2014).
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    Prior to the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act, section 13(3) 
provided that the Board may authorize a Federal Reserve Bank to extend 
credit to any individual, partnership, or corporation subject to four 
principal conditions. These conditions required that (1) credit be 
extended only in unusual and exigent circumstances; (2) credit be 
extended only if the Board authorizes the lending by the affirmative 
vote of at least five of its members; \2\ (3) the lending Federal 
Reserve Bank obtain evidence before extending the credit that the 
borrower is unable to secure adequate credit from other banking 
institutions; and (4) the extension of credit be indorsed or otherwise 
secured to the satisfaction of the Federal Reserve Bank. This statutory 
authority to extend emergency credit to any person in unusual and 
exigent circumstances was enacted by Congress in 1932 to enable the 
Federal Reserve, as the nation's central bank, to provide liquidity in 
times of financial stress.\3\
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    \2\ A lesser number of votes is required in certain emergency 
situations where at least five members of the Board are unavailable 
or not in service. 12 U.S.C. 248(r).
    \3\ See H.R. Rep. No. 1777, at 19, 20 (1932) (Conf. Rep.); S. 
Rep. No. 102-167, at 202 (1991) (Conf. Rep.).
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    Effective on July 21, 2010, the Dodd-Frank Act (Pub. L. 111-203, 
124 Stat. 1376) amended section 13(3) to limit this emergency lending 
authority to broad-based programs and facilities that relieve liquidity 
pressures in financial markets. To accomplish this, the Dodd-Frank Act 
amended section 13(3) to remove the general authority to lend to an 
individual, partnership, or corporation and to replace that general 
authority with the limited authority to extend emergency credit only to 
participants in a program or facility with broad-based eligibility 
designed for the purpose of providing liquidity to the financial 
system.\4\ In addition, the amendments to section 13(3) provide that a 
program or facility that is structured to remove assets from the 
balance sheet of a single and specific company, or that is established 
for the purpose of assisting a single and specific company avoid 
bankruptcy or resolution under a Federal or State insolvency proceeding 
would not be considered a program or facility with broad-based 
eligibility.\5\ The Dodd-Frank Act also prohibits lending under section 
13(3) to insolvent borrowers, and requires that the Board establish 
policies and procedures that assign a value to all collateral for an 
emergency loan and that are designed to ensure that the collateral is 
sufficient to protect taxpayers from losses. Moreover, section 13(3) 
was amended to provide that a program or facility may not be 
established without the prior approval of the Secretary of the 
Treasury. The Dodd-Frank Act also imposed certain publication and 
congressional reporting requirements regarding lending under section 
13(3).
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    \4\ Public Law 13-203, Sec. 1101(a)(2): 124 STAT 2113(amending 
section 13 of the Federal Reserve Act, 12 U.S.C. 343).
    \5\ Public Law 13-203, Sec. 1101(a)(6): 124 STAT 2113(amending 
section 13 of the Federal Reserve Act, 12 U.S.C. 343).
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    The draft rule proposed by the Board for public comment adopted all 
of the requirements and much of the specific statutory language 
contained in the Dodd-Frank Act amendments to section 13(3). The Board 
received fewer than a dozen comments on the proposed rule from 
financial institutions, policy institutions, individuals, and members 
of Congress.
    While commenters generally expressed support for the proposed rule, 
most commenters recommended revisions to the proposed rule. Among the 
suggestions made by the commenters are that the rule:
     Provide a more specific definition of what it means for a 
program or facility to be ``broad-based'';
     adopt a broader definition of insolvency for purposes of 
the prohibition on lending to insolvent borrowers;

[[Page 78960]]

     clarify that solvent firms may not borrow for the purpose 
of passing the proceeds of emergency loans on to insolvent firms;
     specify that emergency loans would only be made at a 
penalty rate that exceeds the market rate for such loans;
     include a specific timeline for evaluating whether an 
emergency lending program or facility should be terminated;
     limit the classes of collateral that can be accepted for 
emergency loans and require that the collateral be independently 
appraised; and
     require the Board to seek a joint resolution of Congress 
prior to granting an emergency loan.
    The final rule adopts all of the limitations and revisions required 
by the Dodd-Frank Act. In addition, in response to the comments, the 
Board has revised the final rule in a number of significant ways. In 
particular, as discussed below, the Board modified the final rule to:
     Further limit the definition of a broad-based program by 
including, in addition to the proposed requirement that the program be 
designed to provide liquidity to an identifiable market or sector of 
the financial system and not be for the purpose of assisting a specific 
firm to avoid bankruptcy or other resolution, a requirement that at 
least five persons be eligible to participate in the facility and a 
requirement that the facility not be designed to assist any number of 
identified firms to avoid bankruptcy or resolution;
     Expand the definition of insolvency to include potential 
borrowers that are generally not paying their undisputed debts as they 
become due during the 90 days preceding borrowing from the program, and 
potential borrowers that are otherwise determined by the Board or the 
lending Federal Reserve Bank to be insolvent, in addition to the 
proposal to identify as insolvent any person in a resolution or 
bankruptcy proceeding;
     Provide that loans may not be made to companies that are 
borrowing for the purpose of lending to insolvent companies;
     Specify that emergency loans must be extended at a penalty 
rate;
     Provide that the Board will make public and report to 
Congress a description of the market or sector of the financial system 
to which a program or facility with broad-based eligibility is intended 
to provide liquidity;
     Provide that the Board will review each program or 
facility at least every six months and that each program or facility 
will terminate within one year from the date of its first extension of 
credit or its latest renewal date unless the Board determines, by a 
vote of at least five members of the Board \6\ and with the approval of 
the Secretary of the Treasury, to renew the program or facility; and,
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \6\ A lesser number of votes is required in certain emergency 
situations where at least five members of the Board are unavailable 
or not in service. 12 U.S.C. 248(r).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Clarify that, if a company or its representative is found 
to have made a knowing material misrepresentation regarding its 
solvency in obtaining emergency credit, the credit plus all applicable 
interest, fees, and penalties will become immediately due and payable, 
and the Federal Reserve will refer the matter to the relevant law 
enforcement authorities for appropriate action.

II. Section by Section Summary of Final Rule

A. Section 201.4(d)--Emergency Credit for Others

1. Authorization To Extend Credit
    Section 201.4(d)(1) of the final rule provides that, in unusual and 
exigent circumstances, the Board may, upon the affirmative vote of not 
less than five of its members,\7\ authorize any Federal Reserve Bank to 
extend credit under section 13(3) of the FRA through a program or 
facility with broad-based eligibility. This requirement mirrors the 
statutory requirement and is unchanged from the proposed rule. 
Conditions governing when a program or facility has broad-based 
eligibility are discussed below.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ The rule permits the Board to authorize lending under the 
rule by a vote of fewer than five members in certain emergency 
situations permitted by statute where at least five members of the 
Board are not available or not in service. 12 U.S.C. 248(r).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, section 201.4(d)(1) provides that any credit extended 
under section 13(3) of the FRA is subject to such other conditions as 
the Board may determine. These could include conditions that govern the 
timing of, collateral supporting, duration of, consideration for, terms 
of, counterparties to, and other conditions governing the extension of 
credit.
2. Approval of the Secretary of the Treasury
    Section 201.4(d)(2) of the final rule provides that a program or 
facility under section 13(3) of the FRA may not be established without 
the prior approval of the Secretary of the Treasury. This condition 
implements a requirement of the Dodd-Frank Act.\8\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \8\ 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(B)(iv).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    One commenter suggested that, in addition to this approval, the 
Board should seek a joint resolution of Congress in connection with the 
establishment of a program or facility. While Congress in the Dodd-
Frank Act imposed a similar requirement as a condition of certain 
emergency actions by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), 
Congress did not adopt this requirement in connection with emergency 
lending under section 13(3) of the FRA. Instead, Congress established a 
number of other specific procedural requirements for emergency lending 
in section 1101 of the Dodd-Frank Act, including the requirement that 
the Secretary of the Treasury approve the establishment of a program or 
facility.
    The final rule does not adopt a requirement that Congress ratify a 
lending program or facility. It is the exclusive prerogative of 
Congress to determine when and on what matters it will act. However, to 
further Congressional oversight of emergency lending facilities, the 
Board's final rule establishes a process by which the Board will 
promptly provide written notice to Congress of any emergency program or 
facility established under section 13(3) of the FRA.
3. Disclosure of Justification and Terms
    Section 201.4(d)(3) of the final rule requires that the Board make 
publicly available, as soon as is reasonably practicable, and no later 
than 7 days after the Board authorizes the program or facility, a 
description of the program or facility, the unusual and exigent 
circumstances that exist, the intended effect of the program or 
facility, and the terms and conditions for participation in the program 
or facility. The final rule also provides that, within the same 7-day 
period, this information will be provided by the Board to the Committee 
on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs of the U.S. Senate and the 
Committee on Financial Services of the U.S. House of Representatives.
    Some commenters suggested that the Board provide additional clarity 
regarding the scope of the market that must be eligible for a facility 
to have ``broad-based eligibility.'' While this is addressed below, as 
part of its response to this comment, the Board amended section 
201.4(d)(3) of the final rule to require that the Board publicly 
disclose the market or sector of the financial system to which the 
program or facility is intended to provide liquidity. The Board added 
this disclosure requirement to help provide transparency regarding the 
broad-based nature of a program or facility at the time it is created.

[[Page 78961]]

4. Definition of Broad-Based Eligibility
    The Dodd-Frank Act limits emergency lending under section 13(3) of 
the FRA to lending conducted through a program or facility ``with 
broad-based eligibility.'' \9\ The draft implementing rule as 
originally proposed would have implemented this restriction in the 
Dodd-Frank Act by incorporating the language contained in the Dodd-
Frank Act prohibiting lending for the purpose of removing assets from 
the balance sheet of ``a single and specific company,'' assisting ``a 
single and specific company'' to avoid bankruptcy, resolution under 
Title II of the Dodd-Frank Act, or any other Federal or State 
insolvency proceeding, or aiding a failing financial company.\10\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \9\ 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(A).
    \10\ See 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(B)(iii).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Several commenters expressed concern that the reference in the 
proposed rule to ``a single and specific company'' could allow the 
Board to circumvent the limits imposed by the Dodd-Frank Act by 
grouping two or more bankrupt or failing firms in a program or 
facility. Some of these commenters suggested that the Board specify the 
number of eligible participants that would be required for a program or 
facility to have broad-based eligibility. One legislative proposal 
would provide that a program or facility is not broad-based unless at 
least five persons are eligible to participate in the program or 
facility.
    The Board believes that the requirement that a program or facility 
have ``broad-based eligibility'' cannot be avoided by grouping two or 
more failing or bankrupt firms into a single facility. Thus, section 
201.4(d)(4) of the final rule has been modified to make clear that an 
emergency program or facility has broad-based eligibility under the 
final rule only if three conditions are met. First, the program or 
facility must be designed for the purpose of providing liquidity to an 
identifiable market or sector of the financial system.
    Second, the program or facility must not be designed for the 
purpose of assisting one or more specific companies to avoid bankruptcy 
or other resolution, including by removing assets from the balance 
sheet of the company or companies. The original proposal would have 
adopted the language in the Dodd-Frank Act that a program not be 
designed for the purpose of assisting ``a single and specific company'' 
avoid bankruptcy or resolution. The final rule has been changed to 
provide that a program or facility may not be designed to assist ``one 
or more'' specific companies to avoid bankruptcy or resolution. This 
change is intended to accent that a program or facility would not 
qualify as a broad-based program or facility if it is designed for the 
purpose of assisting any number of specific persons or entities to 
avoid resolution. A program or facility that is designed to remove 
assets from a single and specific firm's balance sheet to help the firm 
avoid bankruptcy or resolution such as was done with regard to Bear 
Stearns would not be permissible.
    Third, the final rule provides that a program or facility would not 
be considered broad-based if fewer than five persons are eligible to 
participate in the program or facility. In this context, eligibility 
would be determined by qualification under all the terms and conditions 
established for participation in the program or facility.
    Together, these limitations are designed to ensure that emergency 
credit programs and facilities are established only to fulfill the 
central bank's role as lender of last resort to the financial system 
and not as a lender to troubled firms seeking to avoid resolution or 
failure. For example, this approach would permit the Federal Reserve to 
establish programs or facilities like the Term Asset-backed Securities 
Loan Facility (TALF), which provided several thousand loans that 
provided liquidity to fund several billion dollars of student loans, 
car loans, small business loans and other loans in the securitization 
market; the Commercial Paper Funding Facility (CPFF), which was a 
program with broad-based eligibility designed to provide liquidity to 
the commercial paper market; the Asset-backed Commercial Paper Money 
Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (AMLF) and the Money Market 
Investor Funding Facility (MMIFF), which were programs with broad-based 
eligibility designed to provide liquidity to the money market fund 
sector; and the Primary Dealer Credit Facility (PDCF), which provided 
liquidity to all primary dealers in support of trading in the U.S. 
Government securities market.
    However, these restrictions would not permit emergency lending to 
remove assets from a failing firm as was done in the case of the 
emergency loan to Bear Stearns, or to provide credit to prevent a firm 
from entering bankruptcy as was done in the case of the emergency 
credit facility established for AIG. Importantly, the final rule would 
not authorize a program or facility that sought to evade these 
limitations by grouping multiple failing or insolvent firms in a single 
program or facility. Thus, the revisions in the final rule would not 
permit the Federal Reserve to extend emergency credit in a case like 
the Bear Stearns or AIG situation simply by establishing a single 
program or facility for the purpose of providing credit to both Bear 
Stearns and AIG, or any other number of specific failing or insolvent 
firms.\11\
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    \11\ While the final rule requires that at least five persons be 
eligible to participate in a program or facility, that requirement 
is in addition to the restriction on establishing a program or 
facility for the purpose of providing credit to prevent the failure 
or resolution of any number of specific failing or insolvent 
persons, and would not allow a program or facility designed for the 
purpose of preventing the resolution or failure of more than five 
persons.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Board is adopting section 201.4(d)(4)(iv) as proposed. That 
section authorizes the Board to determine the type of mechanism or 
vehicle used to extend credit, so long as the facility is broad-based. 
For example, liquidity facilities may extend credit directly to 
participants in those facilities in some cases, or through a special 
purpose vehicle in other cases. In any case, the extensions of credit 
would be subject to all of the requirements related to the provision of 
liquidity under section 13(3) of the FRA.
5. Definition of Insolvency
    As noted above, section 1101 of the Dodd-Frank Act requires the 
Board to ``establish procedures to prohibit borrowing from programs and 
facilities by borrowers that are insolvent.'' Section 1101 also 
provides that a borrower ``shall be considered insolvent'' if the 
borrower ``is in bankruptcy, resolution under Title II of [the Dodd-
Frank Act], or any other Federal or State insolvency proceeding.'' \12\ 
Some commenters suggested that section 1101 does not preclude the Board 
from identifying other situations where a person or entity has not yet 
entered into formal proceedings but nevertheless should be deemed to be 
insolvent and encouraged the Board to extend the definition of 
insolvency to apply to these circumstances.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \12\ 124 Stat. 1376 at 2113-15.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As an initial matter, the final rule adopts the insolvency 
constraint as provided in the Dodd-Frank Act. Section 201.4(d)(5) 
provides that a Federal Reserve Bank may not extend credit through a 
program or facility established under section 13(3) of the FRA to any 
person or entity that is in bankruptcy, resolution under Title II of 
the Dodd-Frank Act, or any other Federal or State insolvency 
proceeding.
    In response to these comments, the Board has amended the final rule 
to acknowledge that there may be situations that are not identified

[[Page 78962]]

explicitly in the statute where the Board may determine that an entity 
is insolvent. In particular, the final rule provides that a person or 
entity is insolvent if the person or entity is generally not paying its 
undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 days preceding the 
date of borrowing under the program or facility. The final rule also 
provides that the Board or Federal Reserve Bank may determine, based on 
recent audited financial statements or other relevant documentation, 
that an entity is otherwise insolvent.
    Section 201.4(d)(5) of the final rule requires the Board or the 
lending Federal Reserve Bank, prior to extending credit, to obtain 
evidence that the person or entity is not insolvent. As provided by the 
Dodd-Frank Act, the final rule provides that the Board and a Federal 
Reserve Bank may rely on a written certification from the person, the 
chief executive officer of the entity or another authorized officer of 
the entity, at the time the person or entity initially borrows under a 
program or facility, that the person or entity is not in bankruptcy or 
in a resolution or other insolvency proceeding. The Board has broadened 
this part of the final rule to require that the certification also 
state that the potential borrower has not failed to generally pay its 
undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 days preceding the 
date of borrowing.
    The statute specifically permits the Board to rely on a 
certification to establish solvency. Use of a certification is 
particularly important in the context of programs and facilities with 
broad-based eligibility because these programs and facilities have the 
potential to involve numerous borrowers seeking credit in unusual 
periods of severe illiquidity. A binding certification aids in quickly 
and effectively making liquidity available on safe and reasonable terms 
in these difficult economic circumstances.
    The final rule contains a number of provisions designed to ensure 
the continued accuracy of the certification. First, the final rule 
provides that a person or entity that submits a written certification 
must immediately notify the lending Federal Reserve Bank if the 
information in the certification changes. Section 201.4(d)(5)(vi) of 
the final rule also provides that a participant that is or has become 
insolvent would be prohibited from receiving any new extension of 
credit under the program or facility.
    Moreover, to improve the reliability of a certification, the final 
rule provides that, if a participant or a person has provided a 
certification under section 201.4(d)(5) or (8) that includes a knowing 
material misrepresentation, all emergency credit extended to the 
borrower immediately becomes due and payable, and the Federal Reserve 
will promptly refer the matter to appropriate law enforcement 
authorities for action under applicable criminal and civil law.
    Some commenters expressed concern that third-party conduits would 
be used to evade any insolvency restrictions in the rule by passing 
borrowed funds on to an entity that is insolvent. Section 
201.4(d)(5)(i) of the final rule provides that a Federal Reserve Bank 
may not extend credit through a program or facility to any person that 
is borrowing for the purpose of lending the proceeds of the loan to an 
insolvent entity.
    Another commenter suggested that the final rule clarify whether 
conservatorships are eligible to participate in broad-based facilities. 
Section 13(3) as amended by the Dodd-Frank Act prohibits lending to an 
insolvent borrower or to aid a failing firm. As a general matter, 
conservators are appointed to conserve a failing company's assets.\13\ 
Accordingly, a conservatorship and a company in conservatorship would 
not be eligible to borrow from a program or facility established under 
section 13(3) of the FRA.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \13\ See 12 U.S.C. 1821(c)(5).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

6. Indorsement or Other Security
    Prior to the Dodd-Frank Act, section 13(3) provided that any 
extension of credit under that section must be ``indorsed or otherwise 
secured to the satisfaction of the Federal Reserve bank.'' \14\ The 
Dodd-Frank Act retained this provision of the original statute and 
added two further requirements. First, the Dodd-Frank Act directs the 
Board to adopt policies and procedures ``designed to ensure . . . that 
the security for emergency loans is sufficient to protect taxpayers 
from losses.'' \15\ Second, the Dodd-Frank Act requires that the 
Board's policies and procedures ``require that a Federal Reserve bank 
assign, consistent with sound risk management practices and to ensure 
protection for the taxpayer, a lendable value to all collateral for a 
loan executed'' under section 13(3) of the FRA.\16\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \14\ See 12 U.S.C. 343, 47 Stat. 715.
    \15\ 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(B)(1).
    \16\ Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Protecting taxpayers from losses as a result of emergency lending 
has always been an important concern for the Board, and the Board notes 
that the extensions of credit under the emergency lending programs it 
authorized during the recent financial crisis were all repaid in full 
with interest. The proposed rule incorporated the new statutory 
requirements from the Dodd-Frank Act into Regulation A.
    Some commenters argued that the Board should limit the types of 
collateral the Federal Reserve Banks may accept in support of an 
emergency credit. Several commenters argued that the Federal Reserve 
should establish haircuts for collateral accepted by programs and 
facilities that extend emergency credit.
    The final rule continues to emphasize the importance of ensuring 
that the security for emergency loans is sufficient to protect 
taxpayers from losses. As proposed and as adopted in the final rule, 
section 201.4(d)(6) provides that all credit extended under emergency 
lending programs and facilities must be indorsed or otherwise secured 
to the satisfaction of the lending Federal Reserve Bank.
    The final rule also requires the Federal Reserve Bank, no later 
than at the time the credit is initially extended, to assign a lendable 
value to all collateral for the program or facility, consistent with 
sound risk management practices and to ensure protection for the 
taxpayer. The Federal Reserve Banks have long assigned a lendable value 
to collateral at the time credit is extended. Much of the collateral 
accepted as security for emergency lending has a readily available 
market value. In connection with assigning a lendable value to other 
collateral, Reserve Banks readily take into account independent 
appraisals of the collateral that may be available. In all cases, the 
Reserve Bank applies appropriate discounts or ``haircuts'' to the value 
of the collateral. The haircuts applied to collateral are described in 
the Federal Reserve Discount Window & Payment System Risk Collateral 
Margins Table and the Federal Reserve Collateral Guidelines, available 
on the Federal Reserve Discount Window & Payment System Risk Web 
site.\17\ The Federal Reserve Banks also consider the financial 
strength of the borrower, the presence of any indorsement, and other 
factors, in determining whether the credit is satisfactorily secured.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \17\ http://www.frbdiscountwindow.org/index.cfm.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Board believes that these provisions allow the Federal Reserve 
to impose collateral and other requirements to protect the taxpayer 
from loss and address the statutory requirement for policies and 
procedures that are designed to ensure protection for the taxpayer.

[[Page 78963]]

7. Penalty Rate
    Section 13(3) of the FRA has always provided that emergency credit 
extended under that section shall be at rates established in accordance 
with the provisions of section 14(d) of the FRA. Commenters suggested 
that the Board amend the proposed rule to require that extensions of 
emergency credit be subject to a penalty rate of interest.
    The practice of the Federal Reserve in extending emergency credit 
has been to set the relevant interest rate at a penalty rate designed 
to encourage borrowers to repay emergency credit as quickly as possible 
once the unusual and exigent circumstances that justify the program or 
facility have receded and financial conditions have normalized. This 
approach has also ensured that the taxpayer is compensated by a higher 
interest rate than would be charged during normal times for the 
increased risk taken in extending emergency credit. Indeed, while the 
Federal Reserve adopted different rates for the various broad-based 
facilities that it established during the recent financial crisis, in 
each case, the rate set for the facility exceeded the rate for 
comparable instruments during normal times. As a result of this 
practice, emergency broad-based credit facilities established by the 
Federal Reserve under section 13(3) terminated and wound down as 
economic conditions normalized.
    In keeping with this practice, section 201.4(d)(7) of the final 
rule provides that a penalty rate will be imposed on emergency 
extensions of credit. Because the appropriate interest rate depends on 
a number of factors, such as the duration of the credit, the collateral 
requirements, and the other terms and conditions for the credit, it is 
not feasible to establish a single penalty rate for all emergency 
facilities or to set penalty rates in advance of designing the 
facility. Consequently, the final rule provides that the interest rate 
for credit extended under section 13(3) must be at a level that is a 
premium to the market rate in normal circumstances, affords liquidity 
in unusual and exigent circumstances, and encourages repayment and 
discourages use of the program as unusual and exigent circumstances 
normalize.
    Section 201.4(d)(7)(iii) of the final rule sets forth a non-
exhaustive list of factors that the Board will take into account when 
establishing the penalty rate. These factors include the condition of 
the affected markets and the financial system generally, the historical 
rate of interest for loans of comparable terms and maturity during 
normal times, the purpose of the program or facility, the risk of 
repayment, the collateral supporting the credit, the duration, terms 
and amount of the credit, and other factors relevant to ensuring the 
taxpayer is appropriately compensated for the risks associated with the 
emergency credit. The final rule also explains that the rate on 
emergency credit under section 13(3) may be set by auction or other 
method consistent with section 14(d) of the FRA. Such an auction could 
be structured with a minimum stop out rate to ensure that the resulting 
rate would satisfy the requirements of a penalty rate.
8. Evidence Regarding Unavailability of Adequate Credit Accommodation
    Section 13(3) has always required that a Federal Reserve Bank, 
prior to extending credit to any participant in a program or facility 
under that section, obtain evidence that such participant is unable to 
secure adequate credit accommodations from other banking institutions. 
The proposed rule incorporated this requirement and provided that this 
evidence may include evidence based on economic conditions in the 
market or markets addressed by the program or facility or evidence 
obtained from other sources, including facility or market participants 
and certifications from borrowers. In response to comments, the Board 
has amended the final rule to add as relevant evidence a certification 
from the participant that it is unable to secure adequate credit 
accommodations from other banking institutions.
9. Termination of Program or Facility
    The Dodd-Frank Act requires that the Board's policies and 
procedures with respect to section 13(3) extensions of credit be 
designed to ensure that any such program is terminated in a timely and 
orderly fashion.\18\ In order to address this requirement, the proposed 
rule would have required the Board periodically to review the existence 
of unusual and exigent circumstances; the extent of usage of the 
program or facility; the extent to which the continuing authorization 
of the program or facility facilitates restoring or sustaining 
confidence in financial markets; economic and market conditions; the 
functioning of financial markets; the ongoing need for the liquidity 
support provided by such program or facility; and such other factors as 
the Board may deem to be appropriate.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \18\ Dodd-Frank Act Section 1101(a)(6).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Some commenters suggested that a specific time period for review be 
adopted. The Board has amended the draft proposal to adopt this 
suggestion. Section 201.4(d)(9)(i) of the final rule provides that a 
program or facility will terminate no later than one year after the 
date of the first extension of credit under the program or facility. 
The rule allows the Board to renew the program or facility if it finds, 
by a vote of five members,\19\ that unusual and exigent circumstances 
continue to exist, and the Secretary of the Treasury has approved the 
renewal. Each renewal may extend the program or facility for not more 
than one year. The final rule requires the Board promptly to report 
publicly and to the relevant congressional committees any renewal of a 
program or facility under section 13(3).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \19\ See 12 U.S.C. 248(r).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The final rule has been amended to provide that the Board will, not 
less frequently than every six months, review whether each emergency 
lending program or facility should be terminated. The final rule 
provides that the Board may terminate an emergency lending program or 
facility at any time, and will terminate an emergency program or 
facility upon finding that conditions no longer warrant continuation of 
the program or facility.
    The final rule retains the provisions of the proposed rule 
providing factors for the Board to consider in conducting this review, 
with some additional modifications. Specifically, the final rule 
provides that the Board will consider such factors as the continued 
existence of unusual and exigent circumstances; the extent of usage of 
the program or facility; the extent to which the continuing 
authorization of the program or facility facilitates restoring or 
sustaining confidence in the identified financial markets; the ongoing 
need for the liquidity support provided by such program or facility; 
and other appropriate factors.
    One commenter suggested that the final rule include procedures for 
the orderly unwinding of a program or facility, including how the Board 
will cover any associated losses. The Board expects, as it has with 
past facilities, to evaluate the appropriate methods for an orderly 
unwinding of any emergency credit facility at the time the facility is 
unwound.
10. Reporting Requirements
    The Dodd-Frank Act contains detailed reporting requirements with 
respect to section 13(3) extensions of credit.\20\ The proposed rule 
set forth the statutory requirements as enacted, and no comments were 
received on those

[[Page 78964]]

provisions of the proposed rule. Therefore, the Board is adopting these 
provisions as proposed. The final rule provides that the Board will 
comply with 12 U.S.C. 248(s) and 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(C) pursuant to their 
terms.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \20\ Dodd-Frank Act Sections 1101(a)(6) and 1103(b).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

11. No Obligation To Extend Credit
    Section 201.4(d)(11) of the proposed rule provided that Federal 
Reserve Banks have no obligation to extend credit to any particular 
person or entity through an emergency lending program or facility. This 
provision mirrors the provision applicable to lending to depository 
institutions set forth in section 201.3(b) of Regulation A. No comments 
were received on this provision, and the Board is adopting it as 
proposed.
12. Participation in Programs and Facilities and Vendor Selection
    The final rule reflects existing legal requirements that 
participation in any program or facility under section 13(3) of the 
Federal Reserve Act will not be limited or conditioned on the basis of 
any legally prohibited basis, such as the race, religion, color, 
gender, national origin, age or disability of the borrower. Moreover, 
in accordance with existing law, the selection of third-party vendors 
used in the design, marketing or implementation of any program or 
facility under this subsection will be without regard to the race, 
religion, color, gender, national origin, age or disability of the 
vendor or any principal shareholder of the vendor, and, to the extent 
possible and consistent with law, will involve a process designed to 
support equal opportunity and diversity.
13. Short-Term Emergency Credit Secured Solely by United States or 
Agency Obligations
    Section 201.4(d)(13) of the proposed rule retained, but relocated, 
a provision in current Regulation A that authorizes a Federal Reserve 
Bank to extend credit under section 13(13) of the FRA if the collateral 
used to secure the credit consists solely of obligations of, or 
obligations fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the 
United States or an agency of the United States. Section 201.4(d)(13) 
of the final rule retains the provision that extensions of credit under 
this section be at a rate above the highest rate in effect for advances 
to depository institutions. As set forth in section 13(13) of the FRA, 
section 201.4(d)(13) of the final rule also provides that credit 
extended under this provision may not be extended for a term exceeding 
90 days.
    One commenter suggested that section 201.4(d)(13) should be revised 
to limit the number of times a loan issued pursuant to its provisions 
may be rolled over. However, the commenter did not provide a suggested 
limit on roll overs and acknowledged that there would need to be 
exceptions made to any limit imposed. Instead of imposing such a limit, 
the Board will rely on its ability to assess whether unusual and 
exigent circumstances continue to exist at the time that the loan is 
renewed in order to appropriately limit roll overs of such loans. 
Therefore, the Board is retaining section 201.4(d)(13) as written.

B. Section 201.3(b)--No Obligation To Make Advances or Discounts

    Section 201.3(b) of the final rule reflects a technical change to 
conform the language of that section with the language of section 
201.4(d)(11) of the final rule.

III. Administrative Law Matters

A. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) (RFA) 
requires an agency either to provide an initial regulatory flexibility 
analysis with a proposed rule for which a general notice of proposed 
rulemaking is required or to certify that the proposed rule will not 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities.
    The Board solicited public comment on the rule in a notice of 
proposed rulemaking. The Board did not receive any comments regarding 
burden to small banking organizations.
    In accordance with section 1101 and 1103 of the Dodd-Frank Act, the 
Board is amending Regulation A (12 CFR part 201 et seq.) to establish 
policies and procedures for emergency lending under section 13(3) of 
the FRA. The reasons and justification for the final rule are described 
in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. The Board does not believe that the 
final rule duplicates, overlaps, or conflicts with any other Federal 
rules. Under regulations issued by the Small Business Administration 
(``SBA''), a ``small entity'' includes those firms within the ``Finance 
and Insurance'' sector with asset sizes that vary from $75.5 million or 
less in assets to $550 million or less in assets. The Board believes 
that the Finance and Insurance sector constitutes a reasonable universe 
of firms for these purposes because such firms generally engage in 
activities that are financial in nature and the vast majority of 
emergency loans under section 13(3) during the recent financial crisis 
were extended to such firms.
    As discussed in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION, the final rule would 
apply to any participant in an emergency lending program or facility 
with broad-based eligibility. To the extent that small entities are 
participants in these programs or facilities, they would be receiving 
extensions of emergency credit from Federal Reserve Banks. It is not 
possible to ascertain at this time the number of small entities that 
might participate in these programs and facilities were they to be 
authorized, or what requirements would be imposed on them if they do 
so. At a minimum, it is likely that participants would be required to 
pay interest on credit extended to them and to keep records of the use 
of proceeds of such extensions of credit. However, the positive 
economic impact of receiving such a credit is likely to substantially 
outweigh any economic burden of participating in the program or 
facility.
    In light of the foregoing, the Board does not believe that the 
final rule would have a significant negative economic impact on a 
substantial number of small entities.

B. Paperwork Reduction Act Analysis

    Certain provisions of the final rule contain ``collection of 
information'' requirements within the meaning of the Paperwork 
Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3521). In accordance with 
the requirements of the PRA, the Board may not conduct or sponsor, and 
the respondent is not required to respond to, an information collection 
unless it displays a currently valid Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB) control number. The OMB control number for the Board is 7100-NEW. 
The Board reviewed the final rule under the authority delegated to the 
Board by OMB. The final rule contains requirements subject to the PRA. 
The reporting requirements are found in section 201.4(d)(5)(iv)(A). The 
Board indicated in the proposed rule that the reporting requirements 
associated with the Regulation A would be minimal and no PRA burden was 
taken. The Board received no comments on this aspect of the proposal. 
However, based on the comments received for clarifying the proposed 
rule to prohibit solvent firms from passing the proceeds of emergency 
loans on to insolvent firms and adopting a broader definition of 
insolvency, the Board will take reporting burden for this section.
    The Board has a continuing interest in the public's opinions of 
collections of information. At any time, comments regarding the burden 
estimate, or any other aspect of this collection of information, 
including suggestions for

[[Page 78965]]

reducing the burden, may be sent to: Secretary, Board of Governors of 
the Federal Reserve System, 20th and C Streets NW., Washington, DC 
20551. A copy of the comments may also be submitted to the OMB desk 
officer (1) by mail to U.S. Office of Management and Budget, 725 17th 
Street NW., 10235, Washington, DC 20503; (2) by facsimile to 202-395-
6974; or (3) by email to: oira_submission@omb.eop.gov, Attention, 
Federal Reserve Board Agency Desk Officer.
Proposed Information Collection
    Title of Information Collection: Reporting Requirements Associated 
with Regulation A (Extensions of Credit by Federal Reserve Banks).
    Frequency of Response: Event-generated.
    Affected Public: Businesses, individuals or other persons.
    Respondents: Any participant in a program or facility with broad-
based eligibility.
    Abstract: Sections 1101 and 1103 of the Dodd-Frank Act amend the 
emergency lending authorities provided in section 13(3) of the Federal 
Reserve Act. The amendments require the Board, in consultation with the 
Secretary of the Treasury, to establish by regulation policies and 
procedures with respect to such emergency lending. The purpose of the 
amendments to Regulation A in this final rule is to implement the Dodd-
Frank Act revisions to the Board's emergency lending authority in 
section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act that limit the use of this 
authority to the provision of liquidity through broadly-based 
facilities for solvent firms in a time of crisis.
Reporting Requirements
    Section 201.4(d)(5)(iv)(A) provides that a Federal Reserve Bank may 
rely on a written certification from the person or from the chief 
executive officer or other authorized officer of the entity, at the 
time the person or entity initially borrows under the program or 
facility, that the person or entity is not in bankruptcy, resolution 
under Title II of Public Law 111-203 (12 U.S.C. 5381 et seq.) or any 
other Federal or State insolvency proceeding, and has not failed to 
generally pay its undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 
days preceding the date of borrowing under the program or facility, and 
is not borrowing for the purpose of lending the proceeds of the loan to 
a person or entity that is insolvent.
    Estimated Burden per Response: 5 hours.
    Number of Respondents: 10 (The Federal Reserve is not currently 
aware of any respondents, but for purposes of the PRA we will assume 
10. If or when we receive any certifications we intend to update this 
data upon the next renewal of the information collection).
    Total Estimated Annual Burden: 50 hours.

C. Invitation for Comments on Use of Plain Language

    Section 722 of the Gramm-Leach Bliley Act of 1999 requires the 
Federal banking agencies to use plain language in all proposed and 
final rules published after January 1, 2000.\21\ The Board received no 
comments on these matters and believes that the final rule is written 
plainly and clearly.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \21\ 12 U.S.C. 4809.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

List of Subjects in 12 CFR Part 201

    Banks, Banking, Federal Reserve System, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements.

Authority and Issuance

    For the reasons set forth in the preamble, the Board amends 12 CFR 
part 201 (Regulation A) as follows:

PART 201--EXTENSIONS OF CREDIT BY FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS (REGULATION 
A)

0
1. The authority citation for part 201 is revised to read as follows:

    Authority: 12 U.S.C. 248(i)-(j) and (s), 343 et seq., 347a, 
347b, 347c, 348 et seq., 357, 374, 374a, and 461.


0
2. Section 201.3 paragraph (b) is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  201.3  Extensions of credit generally.

* * * * *
    (b) No obligation to make advances or discounts. This section does 
not entitle any person or entity to obtain any credit or any increase, 
renewal or extension of maturity of any credit from a Federal Reserve 
Bank.
* * * * *


Sec.  201.109  [Amended]

0
3. In Sec.  201.109, redesignate footnotes 4 through 6 as footnotes 6 
through 8.


Sec.  201.108  [Amended]

0
4. In Sec.  201.108, redesignate footnotes 2 and 3 as footnotes 4 and 
5.


Sec.  201.51  [Amended]

0
5. In Sec.  201.51, redesignate footnote 1 as footnote 3.
0
6. Section 201.4 paragraph (d) is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  201.4  Availability and terms of credit.

* * * * *
    (d) Emergency credit for others--(1) Authorization to extend 
credit. In unusual and exigent circumstances, the Board, by the 
affirmative vote of not less than five members,\1\ may authorize any 
Federal Reserve Bank, subject to such conditions and during such 
periods as the Board may determine, to extend credit to any participant 
in a program or facility with broad-based eligibility established and 
operated in accordance with this paragraph (d).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ Unless fewer are authorized pursuant to section 11(r) of the 
Federal Reserve Act. 12 U.S.C. 248(r).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (2) Approval of the Secretary of the Treasury. A program or 
facility may not be established under this paragraph (d) without 
obtaining the prior approval of the Secretary of the Treasury.
    (3) Disclosure of justification and terms. As soon as is reasonably 
practicable, and no later than 7 days after a program or facility is 
authorized under this paragraph (d), the Board and the authorized 
Federal Reserve Bank or Federal Reserve Banks, as appropriate, will 
make publicly available a description of the program or facility, a 
description of the market or sector of the financial system to which 
the program or facility is intended to provide liquidity, a description 
of the unusual and exigent circumstances that exist, the intended 
effect of the program or facility, and the terms and conditions for 
participation in the program or facility. In addition, within the same 
7-day period, the Board will provide a copy of this information to the 
Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs of the U.S. Senate and 
the Committee on Financial Services of the U.S. House of 
Representatives.
    (4) Broad-based eligibility. (i) A program or facility established 
under this paragraph (d) must have broad-based eligibility in 
accordance with terms established by the Board.
    (ii) For purposes of this paragraph (d), a program or facility has 
broad-based eligibility only if the program or facility is designed to 
provide liquidity to an identifiable market or sector of the financial 
system;
    (iii) A program or facility will not be considered to have broad-
based eligibility for purposes of this paragraph (d) if:
    (A) The program or facility is designed for the purpose of 
assisting one or more specific companies avoid bankruptcy, resolution 
under Title II of Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection 
Act (Pub. L. 111-203, 12 U.S.C. 5381 et seq.), or any other Federal or 
State insolvency proceeding, including by removing assets from the

[[Page 78966]]

balance sheet of one or more such company;
    (B) The program or facility is designed for the purpose of aiding 
one or more failing financial companies; or
    (C) Fewer than five persons or entities would be eligible to 
participate in the program or facility.
    (iv) A Federal Reserve Bank may extend credit through a program or 
facility with broad-based eligibility established under this paragraph 
(d) through such mechanism or vehicle as the Board determines would 
facilitate the extension of such credit.
    (5) Insolvency. (i) A Federal Reserve Bank may not extend credit 
through a program or facility established under this paragraph (d) to 
any person or entity that is insolvent or to any person or entity that 
is borrowing for the purpose of lending the proceeds of the loan to a 
person or entity that is insolvent.
    (ii) Before extending credit through a program or facility 
established under this paragraph (d) to any person or entity, the 
Federal Reserve Bank must obtain evidence that the person or entity is 
not insolvent.
    (iii) A person or entity is ``insolvent'' for purposes of this 
paragraph (d) if:
    (A) The person or entity is in bankruptcy, resolution under Title 
II of Public Law 111-203 (12 U.S.C. 5381 et seq.) or any other Federal 
or State insolvency proceeding;
    (B) The person or entity is generally not paying its undisputed 
debts as they become due during the 90 days preceding the date of 
borrowing under the program or facility; or
    (C) The Board or Federal Reserve Bank otherwise determines that the 
person or entity is insolvent.
    (iv) For purposes of meeting the requirements of this paragraph 
(d)(5), the Board or Federal Reserve Bank, as relevant, may rely on:
    (A) A written certification from the person or from the chief 
executive officer or other authorized officer of the entity, at the 
time the person or entity initially borrows under the program or 
facility, that the person or entity is not in bankruptcy, resolution 
under Title II of Public Law 111-203 (12 U.S.C. 5381 et seq.) or any 
other Federal or State insolvency proceeding, and has not failed to 
generally pay its undisputed debts as they become due during the 90 
days preceding the date of borrowing under the program or facility;
    (B) Recent audited financial statements of the person or entity; or
    (C) Other information that the Board or the Federal Reserve Bank 
may determine to be relevant.
    (v) A person or officer (or successor of either) that submits a 
written certification under this subparagraph must immediately notify 
the lending Federal Reserve Bank if the information in the 
certification changes.
    (vi) Upon a finding by the Board or a Federal Reserve Bank that a 
participant, including a participant that has provided a certification 
under this paragraph (d)(5), is or has become insolvent, that 
participant is not eligible for any new extension of credit from a 
program or facility established under this paragraph (d) until such 
time as the Board or a Federal Reserve Bank determines that such 
participant is no longer insolvent.
    (vii) If a participant or person has provided a certification under 
this paragraph (d)(5) or paragraph (d)(8)(ii) of this section that 
includes a knowing material misrepresentation in the certification, all 
extensions of credit made pursuant to this paragraph (d) that are 
outstanding to the relevant participant shall become immediately due 
and payable, and all accrued interest, fees and penalties shall become 
immediately due and payable. The Board or the lending Federal Reserve 
Bank will also refer the matter to the relevant law enforcement 
authorities for investigation and action in accordance with applicable 
criminal and civil law.
    (6) Indorsement or other security. (i) All credit extended under a 
program or facility established under this paragraph (d) must be 
indorsed or otherwise secured, in each case, to the satisfaction of the 
lending Federal Reserve Bank.
    (ii) In determining whether an extension of credit under any 
program or facility established under this paragraph (d) is secured to 
its satisfaction, a Federal Reserve Bank must, prior to or at the time 
the credit is initially extended, assign a lendable value to all 
collateral for the program or facility, consistent with sound risk 
management practices and to ensure protection for the taxpayer.
    (7) Penalty rate and fees. (i) The Board will determine the 
interest rate to be charged on any credit extended through a program or 
facility established under this section in accordance with this 
paragraph (d) and the provisions of section 14, subdivision (d) of the 
Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 357). The Board may determine the 
interest rate by auction or such other method as the Board determines 
in accordance with section 14, subdivision (d) of the Federal Reserve 
Act (12 U.S.C. 357).
    (ii) The interest rate established for credit extended through a 
program or facility established under this section will be set at a 
penalty level that:
    (A) Is a premium to the market rate in normal circumstances;
    (B) Affords liquidity in unusual and exigent circumstances; and
    (C) Encourages repayment of the credit and discourages use of the 
program or facility as the unusual and exigent circumstances that 
motivated the program or facility recede and economic conditions 
normalize.
    (iii) In determining the rate, the Board will consider the 
condition of affected markets and the financial system generally, the 
historical rate of interest for loans of comparable terms and maturity 
during normal times, the purpose of the program or facility, the risk 
of repayment, the collateral supporting the credit, the duration, terms 
and amount of the credit, and any other factor that the Board 
determines to be relevant to ensuring that the taxpayer is 
appropriately compensated for the risks associated with the credit 
extended under the program or facility and the purposes of this 
paragraph (d) are fulfilled.
    (iv) In addition to the rate established and charged under this 
paragraph (d)(7), the Board may require the payment of any fees, 
penalties, charges or other consideration the Board determines to be 
appropriate to protect and appropriately compensate the taxpayer for 
the risks associated with the credit extended under the program or 
facility.
    (8) Evidence regarding unavailability of adequate credit 
accommodation. (i) Each lending Federal Reserve Bank must obtain 
evidence that, under the prevailing circumstances, participants in a 
program or facility established under this paragraph (d) are unable to 
secure adequate credit accommodations from other banking institutions.
    (ii) Evidence required under this paragraph (d)(8) may be based on 
economic conditions in the market or markets intended to be addressed 
by the program or facility, a written certification from the person or 
from the chief executive officer or other authorized officer of the 
entity at the time the person or entity initially borrows under the 
program or facility, or other evidence from participants or other 
sources.
    (9) Termination of program or facility. (i) A program or facility 
established under this paragraph (d) shall cease extending new credit 
no later than one year after the date of the first extension of credit 
under the program or facility or the date of any extension of the 
program or facility by the Board under paragraph (d)(9)(ii) of this 
section.
    (ii) A program or facility may be renewed upon the vote of not less 
than

[[Page 78967]]

five members of the Board \2\ that unusual and exigent circumstances 
continue to exist and the program or facility continues to 
appropriately provide liquidity to the financial system, and the 
approval of the Secretary of the Treasury.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ Unless fewer are authorized pursuant to section 11(r) of the 
Federal Reserve Act. 12 U.S.C. 248(r).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (iii) The Board shall make the disclosures required under paragraph 
(d)(3) of this section to the public and the relevant congressional 
committees no later than 7 days after renewing a program or facility 
under this paragraph (d)(9).
    (iv) The Board may at any time terminate a program or facility 
established under this paragraph (d). To ensure that the program or 
facility under this paragraph (d) is terminated in a timely and orderly 
fashion, the Board will periodically review, no less frequently than 
once every 6 months, the existence of unusual and exigent 
circumstances, the extent of usage of the program or facility, the 
extent to which the continuing authorization of the program or facility 
facilitates restoring or sustaining confidence in the identified 
financial markets, the ongoing need for the liquidity support provided 
by such program or facility, and such other factors as the Board may 
deem to be appropriate. The Board will terminate lending under a 
program or facility promptly upon finding that conditions no longer 
warrant the continuation of the program or facility or that 
continuation of the program or facility is no longer appropriate.
    (v) A program or facility that has been terminated will cease 
extending new credit and will collect existing loans pursuant to the 
applicable terms and conditions.
    (10) Reporting requirements. The Board will comply with the 
reporting requirements of 12 U.S.C. 248(s) and 12 U.S.C. 343(3)(C) 
pursuant to their terms.
    (11) No obligation to extend credit. This paragraph (d) does not 
entitle any person or entity to obtain any credit or any increase, 
renewal or extension of maturity of any credit from a Federal Reserve 
Bank.
    (12) Participation in programs and facilities and vendor selection. 
(i) Participation in any program or facility under this paragraph (d) 
shall not be limited or conditioned on the basis of any legally 
prohibited basis, such as the race, religion, color, gender, national 
origin, age or disability of the borrower.
    (ii) The selection of any third-party vendor used in the design, 
marketing or implementation of any program or facility under this 
paragraph (d) shall be without regard to the race, religion, color, 
gender, national origin, age or disability of the vendor or any 
principal shareholder of the vendor, and, to the extent possible and 
consistent with law, shall involve a process designed to support equal 
opportunity and diversity.
    (13) Short-term emergency credit secured solely by United States or 
agency obligations. In unusual and exigent circumstances and after 
consultation with the Board, a Federal Reserve Bank may extend credit 
under section 13(13) of the Federal Reserve Act if the collateral used 
to secure such credit consists solely of obligations of, or obligations 
fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by, the United States or 
an agency thereof. Prior to extending credit under this paragraph 
(d)(13), the Federal Reserve Bank must obtain evidence that credit is 
not available from other sources and failure to obtain such credit 
would adversely affect the economy. Credit extended under this 
paragraph (d)(13) may not be extended for a term exceeding 90 days, 
must be extended at a rate above the highest rate in effect for 
advances to depository institutions as determined in accordance with 
section 14(d) of the Federal Reserve Act, and is subject to such 
limitations and conditions as provided by the Board.
* * * * *

    By order of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve 
System, November 30, 2015.
Robert deV. Frierson,
Secretary of the Board.
[FR Doc. 2015-30584 Filed 12-17-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE P