Special Conditions: Cirrus Aircraft Corporation, SF50; Auto Throttle., 50808-50810 [2015-20756]

Download as PDF 50808 § 1238.3 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 162 / Friday, August 21, 2015 / Proposed Rules Annual stress test. (a) * * * (1) Shall complete an annual stress test of itself based on its data as of December 31 of the preceding calendar year; * * * * * (b) Scenarios provided by FHFA. In conducting its annual stress tests under this section, each regulated entity must use scenarios provided by FHFA, which shall be generally consistent with and comparable to those established by the FRB, that reflect a minimum of three sets of economic and financial conditions, including a baseline, adverse, and severely adverse scenario. Not later than 30 days after the FRB publishes its scenarios, FHFA will issue to all regulated entities a description of the baseline, adverse, and severely adverse scenarios that each regulated entity shall use to conduct its annual stress tests under this part. * * * * * ■ 3. Amend § 1238.5 by revising paragraph (a) to read as follows: § 1238.5 Required report to FHFA and the FRB of stress test results and related information. (a) Report required for stress tests. On or before May 20 of each year, the Enterprises must report the results of the stress tests required under § 1238.3 to FHFA, and to the FRB, in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section; and on or before August 31 of each year, the Banks must report the results of the stress tests required under § 1238.3 to FHFA, and to the FRB, in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section; * * * * * ■ 4. Amend § 1238.7 by revising paragraph (a) to read as follows: rmajette on DSK7SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS § 1238.7 Publication of results by regulated entities. (a) Public disclosure of results required for stress tests of regulated entities. The Enterprises must disclose publicly a summary of the stress test results for the severely adverse scenario not earlier than August 1 and not later than August 15 of each year. Each Bank must disclose publicly a summary of the stress test results for the severely adverse scenario not earlier than November 15 and not later than November 30 of each year. The summary may be published on the regulated entity’s Web site or in any other form that is reasonably accessible to the public; * * * * * VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:06 Aug 20, 2015 Jkt 235001 Dated: August 13, 2015. Melvin L. Watt, Director, Federal Housing Finance Agency. [FR Doc. 2015–20613 Filed 8–20–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8070–01–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 23 [Docket No. FAA–2015–3464; Notice No. 23– 15–04–SC] Special Conditions: Cirrus Aircraft Corporation, SF50; Auto Throttle. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed special conditions. AGENCY: This action proposes special conditions for the Cirrus Aircraft Corporation Model SF50 airplane. This airplane will have a novel or unusual design feature(s) associated with installation of an Auto Throttle System. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These proposed special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards. DATES: Send your comments on or before October 5, 2015. ADDRESSES: Send comments identified by docket number FAA–2015–3464 using any of the following methods: D Federal eRegulations Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov and follow the online instructions for sending your comments electronically. D Mail: Send comments to Docket Operations, M–30, U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Room W12–140, West Building Ground Floor, Washington, DC 20590–0001. D Hand Delivery of Courier: Take comments to Docket Operations in Room W12–140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m., and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. D Fax: Fax comments to Docket Operations at 202–493–2251. Privacy: The FAA will post all comments it receives, without change, to http://regulations.gov, including any personal information the commenter provides. Using the search function of the docket Web site, anyone can find SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 and read the electronic form of all comments received into any FAA docket, including the name of the individual sending the comment (or signing the comment for an association, business, labor union, etc.). DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477–19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov. Docket: Background documents or comments received may be read at http://www.regulations.gov at any time. Follow the online instructions for accessing the docket or go to the Docket Operations in Room W12–140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m., and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeff Pretz, FAA, Regulations and Policy Branch, ACE–111, Small Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 901 Locust; Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone (816) 329– 3239; facsimile (816) 329–4090. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited We invite interested people to take part in this rulemaking by sending written comments, data, or views. The most helpful comments reference a specific portion of the special conditions, explain the reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. We ask that you send us two copies of written comments. We will consider all comments we receive on or before the closing date for comments. We will consider comments filed late if it is possible to do so without incurring expense or delay. We may change these special conditions based on the comments we receive. Background On September 9, 2008, Cirrus Aircraft Corporation applied for a type certificate for their new Model SF50. On December 11, 2012 Cirrus elected to adjust the certification basis of the SF50 to include 14 CFR part 23 through amendment 62. The SF50 is a low-wing, 7-seat (5 adults and 2 children), pressurized, retractable gear, carbon composite airplane with one turbofan engine mounted partially in the upper aft fuselage. It is constructed largely of carbon and fiberglass composite materials. Like other Cirrus products, the SF50 includes a ballistically deployed airframe parachute. The SF50 has a maximum operating altitude of 28,000 feet and the maximum takeoff weight will be at or below 6,000 pounds with a range at economy cruise of roughly 1,000 nautical miles. E:\FR\FM\21AUP1.SGM 21AUP1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 162 / Friday, August 21, 2015 / Proposed Rules rmajette on DSK7SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Current part 23 airworthiness regulations do not contain appropriate safety standards for an Auto Throttle System (ATS) installation; therefore, special conditions are required to establish an acceptable level of safety. Part 25 regulations contain appropriate safety standards for these systems, making the intent for this project to apply the language in § 25.1329 for the auto throttle, while substituting § 23.1309 and § 23.143 in place of the similar part 25 regulations referenced in § 25.1329. In addition, malfunction of the ATS to perform its intended function shall be evaluated per the Loss of Thrust Control (LOTC) criteria established under part 33 for electronic engine controls. An analysis must show that no single failure or malfunction or probable combinations of failures of the ATS will permit the LOTC probability to exceed those established under part 33 for an electronic engine control. ATS utilizes a Garmin ‘‘smart’’ autopilot servo with a physical connection to the throttle quadrant control linkage. The auto throttle may be controlled by the pilot with an optional auto throttle control panel adjacent to the throttle lever. The auto throttle also provides an envelope protection function which does not require installation of the optional control panel. Discussion Type Certification Basis Under the provisions of 14 CFR 21.17, Cirrus must show that the Model SF50 meets the applicable provisions of part 23, as amended by amendments 23–1 through 23–62 thereto. If the Administrator finds that the applicable airworthiness regulations (i.e., 14 CFR part 23) do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for the SF50 because of a novel or unusual design feature, special conditions are prescribed under the provisions of § 21.16. Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which they are issued. Should the type certificate for that model be amended later to include any other model that incorporates the same or similar novel or unusual design feature, the special conditions would also apply to the other model under § 21.101. In addition to the applicable airworthiness regulations and special conditions, the SF50 must comply with the fuel vent and exhaust emission requirements of 14 CFR part 34 and the noise certification requirements of 14 CFR part 36 and the FAA must issue a finding of regulatory adequacy under § 611 of Public Law 92–574, the Noise Control Act of 1972. The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in 14 CFR 11.19, in accordance with § 11.38, and they become part of the type-certification basis under § 21.17(a)(2). Part 23 currently does not sufficiently address auto throttle (also referred to as auto thrust) technology and safety concerns. Therefore, special conditions must be developed and applied to this project to ensure an acceptable level of safety has been obtained. For approval to use the ATS during flight, the SF50 must demonstrate compliance to the intent of the requirements of § 25.1329, applying the appropriate part 23 references to § 23.1309 (to include performing a functional hazard assessment or system safety assessment to determine the applicable Software and Airborne Electronic Hardware assurance levels, and compliance to DO–178C & DO–254, as required) and § 23.143. In addition, a malfunction of the ATS to perform its intended function is an LOTC event, and may result in a total loss of thrust control, transients, or uncommanded thrust changes. The classification of the failure condition for an LOTC event on a Class II singleengine aircraft is hazardous for aircraft that stall at or below 61 knots. From publication AC 23.1309–1E, based upon failure probability values shown in Figure 2, an LOTC event would have to meet a probability of failure value not to exceed 1X10¥6. In-service data for LOTC in single-engine turbine aircraft shows LOTC events exceed this probability; therefore, part 33 requirements for engine control probabilities will be accepted for the part 23 LOTC requirement. The probabilities of failure for an LOTC event on a turbine engine shall not exceed the following (see AC33.28– 1 and ANE–1993–33.28TLD–R1 for further guidance): 1. Average Events per Million Hours: 10 (1X10¥05 per hour). 2. Maximum Events per Million Hours: 100 (1X10¥04 per hour). Novel or Unusual Design Features The SF50 will incorporate the following novel or unusual design features: An ATS as part of the automatic flight control system. The Note: The maximum events per flight hour are intended for Time Limited Dispatch (TLD) operation where the risk exposure is mitigated by limiting the time in which the aircraft is operated in the degraded condition. VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:06 Aug 20, 2015 Jkt 235001 PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 50809 Applicability As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to the Model SF50. Should Cirrus apply at a later date for a change to the type certificate to include another model incorporating the same novel or unusual design feature, the special conditions would apply to that model as well. Conclusion This action affects only certain novel or unusual design features on one model of airplanes. It is not a rule of general applicability. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 23 Aircraft, Aviation safety, Signs and symbols. Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44702, 44704. The Proposed Special Conditions Accordingly, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes the following special conditions as part of the type certification basis for Cirrus Aircraft Corporation Model SF50 airplanes. 1. Certification of auto throttle system under part 23. (a) Quick disengagement controls for the auto thrust functions must be provided for each pilot. The auto thrust quick disengagement controls must be located on the thrust control levers. Quick disengagement controls must be readily accessible to each pilot while operating the thrust control levers. (b) The effects of a failure of the system to disengage the auto thrust functions when manually commanded by the pilot must be assessed in accordance with the requirements of § 23.1309. (c) Engagement or switching of the flight guidance system, a mode, or a sensor may not cause the auto thrust system to affect a transient response that alters the airplane’s flight path any greater than a minor transient, as defined in paragraph (l)(1) of this section. (d) Under normal conditions, the disengagement of any automatic control function of a flight guidance system may not cause a transient response of the airplane’s flight path any greater than a minor transient. (e) Under rare normal and non-normal conditions, disengagement of any automatic control function of a flight guidance system may not result in a transient any greater than a significant transient, as defined in paragraph (l)(2) of this section. (f) The function and direction of motion of each command reference E:\FR\FM\21AUP1.SGM 21AUP1 rmajette on DSK7SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS 50810 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 162 / Friday, August 21, 2015 / Proposed Rules control, such as heading select or vertical speed, must be plainly indicated on, or adjacent to, each control if necessary to prevent inappropriate use or confusion. (g) Under any condition of flight appropriate to its use, the flight guidance system may not produce hazardous loads on the airplane, nor create hazardous deviations in the flight path. This applies to both fault-free operation and in the event of a malfunction, and assumes that the pilot begins corrective action within a reasonable period of time. (h) When the flight guidance system is in use, a means must be provided to avoid excursions beyond an acceptable margin from the speed range of the normal flight envelope. If the airplane experiences an excursion outside this range, a means must be provided to prevent the flight guidance system from providing guidance or control to an unsafe speed. (i) The flight guidance system functions, controls, indications, and alerts must be designed to minimize flight crew errors and confusion concerning the behavior and operation of the flight guidance system. Means must be provided to indicate the current mode of operation, including any armed modes, transitions, and reversions. Selector switch position is not an acceptable means of indication. The controls and indications must be grouped and presented in a logical and consistent manner. The indications must be visible to each pilot under all expected lighting conditions. (j) Following disengagement of the auto thrust function, a caution (visual and auditory) must be provided to each pilot. (k) During auto thrust operation, it must be possible for the flight crew to move the thrust levers without requiring excessive force. The auto thrust may not create a potential hazard when the flight crew applies an override force to the thrust levers. (l) For purposes of this section, a transient is a disturbance in the control or flight path of the airplane that is not consistent with response to flight crew inputs or environmental conditions. (1) A minor transient would not significantly reduce safety margins and would involve flight crew actions that are well within their capabilities. A minor transient may involve a slight increase in flight crew workload or some physical discomfort to passengers or cabin crew. (2) A significant transient may lead to a significant reduction in safety margins, an increase in flight crew workload, discomfort to the flight crew, VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:06 Aug 20, 2015 Jkt 235001 or physical distress to the passengers or cabin crew, possibly including non-fatal injuries. Significant transients do not require, in order to remain within or recover to the normal flight envelope, any of the following: i. Exceptional piloting skill, alertness, or strength. ii. Forces applied by the pilot which are greater than those specified in § 23.143(c). iii. Accelerations or attitudes in the airplane that might result in further hazard to secured or non-secured occupants. Cirrus must also demonstrate, through tests and analysis, that no single failure or malfunction or probable combinations of failures of the auto thrust system components results in the probability for LOTC, or un-commanded thrust changes and transients that result in an LOTC event, to exceed the following: 1. Average Events per Million Hours: 10 (1X10¥05 per hour) 2. Maximum Events per Million Hours: 100 (1X10¥04 per hour) Note: The term ‘‘probable’’ in the context of ‘‘probable combination of failures’’ does not have the same meaning as used for a safety assessment process. The term ‘‘probable’’ in ‘‘probable combination of failures’’ means ‘‘foreseeable,’’ or those failure conditions anticipated to occur one or more times during the operational life of each airplane. Issued in Kansas City, Missouri, on August 13, 2015. Earl Lawrence, Manger, Small Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2015–20756 Filed 8–20–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2015–3144; Directorate Identifier 2014–NM–110–AD] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Aviation Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). AGENCY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Dassault Aviation Model FALCON 900EX airplanes and FALCON 2000EX airplanes. This proposed AD was SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 prompted by a report of significant fuel leakage at the middle position of the left outboard slat. This proposed AD would require modifying the assembly of the slat extension mechanical stop. We are proposing this AD to prevent failure of the assembly of the slat extension mechanical stop, which if not corrected, could lead to a significant fuel leak and result in an uncontained fire. DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed AD by October 5, 2015. ADDRESSES: You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR 11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Fax: 202–493–2251. • Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M– 30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. • Hand Delivery: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M– 30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Dassault Falcon Jet, P.O. Box 2000, South Hackensack, NJ 07606; telephone 201– 440–6700; Internet http:// www.dassaultfalcon.com. You may view this referenced service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 425–227–1221. Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2015– 3144; or in person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this proposed AD, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The street address for the Docket Operations office (telephone 800–647–5527) is in the ADDRESSES section. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after receipt. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tom Rodriguez, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM–116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA 98057–3356; telephone 425–227–1137; fax 425–227–1149. E:\FR\FM\21AUP1.SGM 21AUP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 162 (Friday, August 21, 2015)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 50808-50810]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2015-20756]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 23

[Docket No. FAA-2015-3464; Notice No. 23-15-04-SC]


Special Conditions: Cirrus Aircraft Corporation, SF50; Auto 
Throttle.

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed special conditions.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This action proposes special conditions for the Cirrus 
Aircraft Corporation Model SF50 airplane. This airplane will have a 
novel or unusual design feature(s) associated with installation of an 
Auto Throttle System. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not 
contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for this design 
feature. These proposed special conditions contain the additional 
safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to 
establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the 
existing airworthiness standards.

DATES: Send your comments on or before October 5, 2015.

ADDRESSES: Send comments identified by docket number FAA-2015-3464 
using any of the following methods:
    [ssquf] Federal eRegulations Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov and follow the online instructions for sending your 
comments electronically.
    [ssquf] Mail: Send comments to Docket Operations, M-30, U.S. 
Department of Transportation (DOT), 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Room 
W12-140, West Building Ground Floor, Washington, DC 20590-0001.
    [ssquf] Hand Delivery of Courier: Take comments to Docket 
Operations in Room W12-140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 
New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m., and 5 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
    [ssquf] Fax: Fax comments to Docket Operations at 202-493-2251.
    Privacy: The FAA will post all comments it receives, without 
change, to http://regulations.gov, including any personal information 
the commenter provides. Using the search function of the docket Web 
site, anyone can find and read the electronic form of all comments 
received into any FAA docket, including the name of the individual 
sending the comment (or signing the comment for an association, 
business, labor union, etc.). DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement can 
be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 
19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov.
    Docket: Background documents or comments received may be read at 
http://www.regulations.gov at any time. Follow the online instructions 
for accessing the docket or go to the Docket Operations in Room W12-140 
of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., 
Washington, DC, between 9 a.m., and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
except Federal holidays.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeff Pretz, FAA, Regulations and 
Policy Branch, ACE-111, Small Airplane Directorate, Aircraft 
Certification Service, 901 Locust; Kansas City, Missouri 64106; 
telephone (816) 329-3239; facsimile (816) 329-4090.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited

    We invite interested people to take part in this rulemaking by 
sending written comments, data, or views. The most helpful comments 
reference a specific portion of the special conditions, explain the 
reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. We ask 
that you send us two copies of written comments.
    We will consider all comments we receive on or before the closing 
date for comments. We will consider comments filed late if it is 
possible to do so without incurring expense or delay. We may change 
these special conditions based on the comments we receive.

Background

    On September 9, 2008, Cirrus Aircraft Corporation applied for a 
type certificate for their new Model SF50. On December 11, 2012 Cirrus 
elected to adjust the certification basis of the SF50 to include 14 CFR 
part 23 through amendment 62. The SF50 is a low-wing, 7-seat (5 adults 
and 2 children), pressurized, retractable gear, carbon composite 
airplane with one turbofan engine mounted partially in the upper aft 
fuselage. It is constructed largely of carbon and fiberglass composite 
materials. Like other Cirrus products, the SF50 includes a 
ballistically deployed airframe parachute. The SF50 has a maximum 
operating altitude of 28,000 feet and the maximum takeoff weight will 
be at or below 6,000 pounds with a range at economy cruise of roughly 
1,000 nautical miles.

[[Page 50809]]

    Current part 23 airworthiness regulations do not contain 
appropriate safety standards for an Auto Throttle System (ATS) 
installation; therefore, special conditions are required to establish 
an acceptable level of safety. Part 25 regulations contain appropriate 
safety standards for these systems, making the intent for this project 
to apply the language in Sec.  25.1329 for the auto throttle, while 
substituting Sec.  23.1309 and Sec.  23.143 in place of the similar 
part 25 regulations referenced in Sec.  25.1329. In addition, 
malfunction of the ATS to perform its intended function shall be 
evaluated per the Loss of Thrust Control (LOTC) criteria established 
under part 33 for electronic engine controls. An analysis must show 
that no single failure or malfunction or probable combinations of 
failures of the ATS will permit the LOTC probability to exceed those 
established under part 33 for an electronic engine control.

Type Certification Basis

    Under the provisions of 14 CFR 21.17, Cirrus must show that the 
Model SF50 meets the applicable provisions of part 23, as amended by 
amendments 23-1 through 23-62 thereto.
    If the Administrator finds that the applicable airworthiness 
regulations (i.e., 14 CFR part 23) do not contain adequate or 
appropriate safety standards for the SF50 because of a novel or unusual 
design feature, special conditions are prescribed under the provisions 
of Sec.  21.16.
    Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which 
they are issued. Should the type certificate for that model be amended 
later to include any other model that incorporates the same or similar 
novel or unusual design feature, the special conditions would also 
apply to the other model under Sec.  21.101.
    In addition to the applicable airworthiness regulations and special 
conditions, the SF50 must comply with the fuel vent and exhaust 
emission requirements of 14 CFR part 34 and the noise certification 
requirements of 14 CFR part 36 and the FAA must issue a finding of 
regulatory adequacy under Sec.  611 of Public Law 92-574, the Noise 
Control Act of 1972.
    The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in 14 CFR 11.19, in 
accordance with Sec.  11.38, and they become part of the type-
certification basis under Sec.  21.17(a)(2).

Novel or Unusual Design Features

    The SF50 will incorporate the following novel or unusual design 
features: An ATS as part of the automatic flight control system. The 
ATS utilizes a Garmin ``smart'' autopilot servo with a physical 
connection to the throttle quadrant control linkage. The auto throttle 
may be controlled by the pilot with an optional auto throttle control 
panel adjacent to the throttle lever. The auto throttle also provides 
an envelope protection function which does not require installation of 
the optional control panel.

Discussion

    Part 23 currently does not sufficiently address auto throttle (also 
referred to as auto thrust) technology and safety concerns. Therefore, 
special conditions must be developed and applied to this project to 
ensure an acceptable level of safety has been obtained. For approval to 
use the ATS during flight, the SF50 must demonstrate compliance to the 
intent of the requirements of Sec.  25.1329, applying the appropriate 
part 23 references to Sec.  23.1309 (to include performing a functional 
hazard assessment or system safety assessment to determine the 
applicable Software and Airborne Electronic Hardware assurance levels, 
and compliance to DO-178C & DO-254, as required) and Sec.  23.143.
    In addition, a malfunction of the ATS to perform its intended 
function is an LOTC event, and may result in a total loss of thrust 
control, transients, or uncommanded thrust changes. The classification 
of the failure condition for an LOTC event on a Class II single-engine 
aircraft is hazardous for aircraft that stall at or below 61 knots. 
From publication AC 23.1309-1E, based upon failure probability values 
shown in Figure 2, an LOTC event would have to meet a probability of 
failure value not to exceed 1X10-6. In-service data for LOTC 
in single-engine turbine aircraft shows LOTC events exceed this 
probability; therefore, part 33 requirements for engine control 
probabilities will be accepted for the part 23 LOTC requirement.
    The probabilities of failure for an LOTC event on a turbine engine 
shall not exceed the following (see AC33.28-1 and ANE-1993-33.28TLD-R1 
for further guidance):
    1. Average Events per Million Hours: 10 (1X10-05 per 
hour).
    2. Maximum Events per Million Hours: 100 (1X10-04 per 
hour).

    Note:  The maximum events per flight hour are intended for Time 
Limited Dispatch (TLD) operation where the risk exposure is 
mitigated by limiting the time in which the aircraft is operated in 
the degraded condition.

Applicability

    As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to the 
Model SF50. Should Cirrus apply at a later date for a change to the 
type certificate to include another model incorporating the same novel 
or unusual design feature, the special conditions would apply to that 
model as well.

Conclusion

    This action affects only certain novel or unusual design features 
on one model of airplanes. It is not a rule of general applicability.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 23

    Aircraft, Aviation safety, Signs and symbols.

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44702, 44704.

The Proposed Special Conditions

    Accordingly, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes the 
following special conditions as part of the type certification basis 
for Cirrus Aircraft Corporation Model SF50 airplanes.
    1. Certification of auto throttle system under part 23.
    (a) Quick disengagement controls for the auto thrust functions must 
be provided for each pilot. The auto thrust quick disengagement 
controls must be located on the thrust control levers. Quick 
disengagement controls must be readily accessible to each pilot while 
operating the thrust control levers.
    (b) The effects of a failure of the system to disengage the auto 
thrust functions when manually commanded by the pilot must be assessed 
in accordance with the requirements of Sec.  23.1309.
    (c) Engagement or switching of the flight guidance system, a mode, 
or a sensor may not cause the auto thrust system to affect a transient 
response that alters the airplane's flight path any greater than a 
minor transient, as defined in paragraph (l)(1) of this section.
    (d) Under normal conditions, the disengagement of any automatic 
control function of a flight guidance system may not cause a transient 
response of the airplane's flight path any greater than a minor 
transient.
    (e) Under rare normal and non-normal conditions, disengagement of 
any automatic control function of a flight guidance system may not 
result in a transient any greater than a significant transient, as 
defined in paragraph (l)(2) of this section.
    (f) The function and direction of motion of each command reference

[[Page 50810]]

control, such as heading select or vertical speed, must be plainly 
indicated on, or adjacent to, each control if necessary to prevent 
inappropriate use or confusion.
    (g) Under any condition of flight appropriate to its use, the 
flight guidance system may not produce hazardous loads on the airplane, 
nor create hazardous deviations in the flight path. This applies to 
both fault-free operation and in the event of a malfunction, and 
assumes that the pilot begins corrective action within a reasonable 
period of time.
    (h) When the flight guidance system is in use, a means must be 
provided to avoid excursions beyond an acceptable margin from the speed 
range of the normal flight envelope. If the airplane experiences an 
excursion outside this range, a means must be provided to prevent the 
flight guidance system from providing guidance or control to an unsafe 
speed.
    (i) The flight guidance system functions, controls, indications, 
and alerts must be designed to minimize flight crew errors and 
confusion concerning the behavior and operation of the flight guidance 
system. Means must be provided to indicate the current mode of 
operation, including any armed modes, transitions, and reversions. 
Selector switch position is not an acceptable means of indication. The 
controls and indications must be grouped and presented in a logical and 
consistent manner. The indications must be visible to each pilot under 
all expected lighting conditions.
    (j) Following disengagement of the auto thrust function, a caution 
(visual and auditory) must be provided to each pilot.
    (k) During auto thrust operation, it must be possible for the 
flight crew to move the thrust levers without requiring excessive 
force. The auto thrust may not create a potential hazard when the 
flight crew applies an override force to the thrust levers.
    (l) For purposes of this section, a transient is a disturbance in 
the control or flight path of the airplane that is not consistent with 
response to flight crew inputs or environmental conditions.
    (1) A minor transient would not significantly reduce safety margins 
and would involve flight crew actions that are well within their 
capabilities. A minor transient may involve a slight increase in flight 
crew workload or some physical discomfort to passengers or cabin crew.
    (2) A significant transient may lead to a significant reduction in 
safety margins, an increase in flight crew workload, discomfort to the 
flight crew, or physical distress to the passengers or cabin crew, 
possibly including non-fatal injuries. Significant transients do not 
require, in order to remain within or recover to the normal flight 
envelope, any of the following:
    i. Exceptional piloting skill, alertness, or strength.
    ii. Forces applied by the pilot which are greater than those 
specified in Sec.  23.143(c).
    iii. Accelerations or attitudes in the airplane that might result 
in further hazard to secured or non-secured occupants.
    Cirrus must also demonstrate, through tests and analysis, that no 
single failure or malfunction or probable combinations of failures of 
the auto thrust system components results in the probability for LOTC, 
or un-commanded thrust changes and transients that result in an LOTC 
event, to exceed the following:
    1. Average Events per Million Hours: 10 (1X10-05 per 
hour)
    2. Maximum Events per Million Hours: 100 (1X10-04 per 
hour)

    Note: The term ``probable'' in the context of ``probable 
combination of failures'' does not have the same meaning as used for 
a safety assessment process. The term ``probable'' in ``probable 
combination of failures'' means ``foreseeable,'' or those failure 
conditions anticipated to occur one or more times during the 
operational life of each airplane.


    Issued in Kansas City, Missouri, on August 13, 2015.
Earl Lawrence,
Manger, Small Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service.
[FR Doc. 2015-20756 Filed 8-20-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-13-P