Designation of an Enhanced Driver's License and Identity Document Issued by the State of Minnesota as a Travel Document Under the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, 40077-40079 [2015-17043]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 133 / Monday, July 13, 2015 / Notices agreement entered between the Secretary of Homeland Security and the tribe. The Secretary of Homeland Security will announce, by publication of a notice in the Federal Register, documents designated under this paragraph. A list of the documents designated under this paragraph will also be made available to the public. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES A ‘‘United States qualifying tribal entity’’ is defined as a ‘‘tribe, band, or other group of Native Americans formally recognized by the United States Government which agrees to meet WHTI document standards.’’ 2 Native American tribal cards are also referenced in 8 CFR 235.1(b) which lists the documents U.S. citizens may use to establish identity and citizenship when entering the United States. See 8 CFR 235.1(b)(7). The Secretary has delegated to the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) the authority to designate certain documents as acceptable border crossing documents for persons arriving in the United States by land or sea from within the Western Hemisphere, including certain United States Native American tribal cards. See DHS Delegation Number 7105 (Revision 00), dated January 16, 2009. for the purpose of establishing identity and citizenship when entering the United States by land or sea from contiguous territory or adjacent islands. Such designation will be announced by publication of a notice in the Federal Register. More information about WHTIcompliant documents is available at www.cbp.gov/travel. Tribal Card Program The WHTI land and sea final rule allowed U.S. federally recognized Native American tribes to work with CBP to enter into agreements to develop tribal ID cards that can be designated as acceptable to establish identity and citizenship when entering the United States at land and sea ports of entry from contiguous territory or adjacent islands. CBP has been working with various U.S. federally recognized Native American tribes to facilitate the development of such cards.3 As part of the process, CBP will enter into one or more agreements with a U.S. federally recognized tribe that specify the requirements for developing and issuing WHTI-compliant tribal cards, including a testing and auditing process to ensure that the cards are produced and issued in accordance with the terms of the agreements. After production of the cards in accordance with the specified requirements, and successful testing and auditing by CBP of the cards and program, the Secretary of Homeland Security or the Commissioner of CBP may designate the tribal card as an acceptable WHTI-compliant document Seneca Nation of Indians WHTICompliant Tribal Card Program The Seneca Nation of Indians (Seneca Nation) has voluntarily established a program to develop a WHTI-compliant tribal card that denotes identity and U.S. or Canadian citizenship. On November 10, 2009, CBP and the Seneca Nation signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to develop, issue, test, and evaluate tribal cards to be used for border crossing purposes. Pursuant to this MOA, the cards are issued to members of the Seneca Nation who can establish identity, tribal membership, and U.S. or Canadian citizenship. The cards incorporate physical security features acceptable to CBP as well as facilitative technology allowing for electronic validation of identity, citizenship, and tribal membership by CBP. In 2013, CBP and the Seneca Nation entered into two related agreements, a January 15, 2013 service level agreement and an April 15, 2013 security agreement. The former memorializes the technical specifications for the production, issuance and use of the card, and the latter addresses confidentiality and information sharing. CBP has tested the cards developed by the Seneca Nation pursuant to the above agreements and has performed an audit of the tribe’s card program. On the basis of these tests and audit, CBP has determined that the cards meet the requirements of section 7209 of the IRTPA and are acceptable documents to denote identity and citizenship for purposes of entering the United States at land and sea ports of entry from contiguous territory or adjacent islands. CBP’s continued acceptance of the tribal card as a WHTI-compliant document is conditional on compliance with the MOA and all related agreements. Acceptance and use of the WHTIcompliant tribal card is voluntary for tribe members. If an individual is denied a WHTI-compliant tribal card, he or she may still apply for a passport or other WHTI-compliant document. 2 See 8 CFR 212.0. This definition applies to 8 CFR 212.1 and 235.1. 3 The Native American tribal cards qualifying to be a WHTI-compliant document for border crossing purposes are commonly referred to as ‘‘Enhanced Tribal Cards’’ or ‘‘ETCs.’’ Designation This notice announces that the Commissioner of CBP designates the tribal card issued by the Seneca Nation in accordance with the MOA and all VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:27 Jul 10, 2015 Jkt 235001 PO 00000 Frm 00086 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 40077 related agreements between the tribe and CBP as an acceptable WHTIcompliant document pursuant to section 7209 of the IRTPA and 8 CFR 235.1(e). In accordance with these provisions, the approved card, if valid and lawfully obtained, may be used to denote identity and U.S. or Canadian citizenship of Seneca Nation members for the purposes of entering the United States from contiguous territory or adjacent islands at land and sea ports of entry.4 Dated: July 7, 2015. R. Gil Kerlikowske, Commissioner. [FR Doc. 2015–17039 Filed 7–10–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–14–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP Dec. 15–10] Designation of an Enhanced Driver’s License and Identity Document Issued by the State of Minnesota as a Travel Document Under the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: This notice announces that the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection is designating enhanced driver’s licenses and identity documents issued by the State of Minnesota as acceptable documents for purposes of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative. These documents may be used to denote identity and citizenship of U.S. citizens entering the United States from within the Western Hemisphere at land and sea ports of entry. DATES: This designation is effective July 13, 2015. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Arthur A. E. Pitts, Director, Traveler Policies Division, Admissibility and SUMMARY: 4 The Native American Tribal Card issued by the Seneca Nation of Indians may not, by itself, be used by Canadian citizen tribal members to establish that they meet the requirements of section 289 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) [8 U.S.C. 1359]. INA § 289 provides that nothing in this title shall be construed to affect the right of American Indians born in Canada to pass the borders of the United States, but such right shall extend only to persons who possess at least 50 per centum of blood of the American Indian race. While the tribal card may be used to establish a card holder’s identity for purposes of INA § 289, it cannot, by itself, serve as evidence of the card holder’s Canadian birth or that he or she possesses at least 50% American Indian blood, as required by INA § 289. E:\FR\FM\13JYN1.SGM 13JYN1 40078 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 133 / Monday, July 13, 2015 / Notices Passenger Programs, Office of Field Operations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, via email at arthur.a.pitts@ cbp.dhs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative Section 7209 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (IRTPA), Public Law 108–458, as amended, required the Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretary), in consultation with the Secretary of State, to develop and implement a plan to require U.S. citizens and individuals for whom documentation requirements have previously been waived under section 212(d)(4)(B) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(4)(B)) to present a passport or other document or combination of documents as the Secretary deems sufficient to denote identity and citizenship for all travel into the United States. See 8 U.S.C. 1185 note. On April 3, 2008, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of State promulgated a joint final rule, effective on June 1, 2009, that implemented the plan known as the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) at U.S. land and sea ports of entry. See 73 FR 18384 (the WHTI land and sea final rule). It amended various sections of title 8 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), including 8 CFR 212.0, 212.1, and 235.1. The WHTI land and sea final rule specifies the documents that U.S. citizens and nonimmigrant aliens from Canada, Bermuda, and Mexico are required to present when entering the United States at land and sea ports of entry from within the Western Hemisphere (which includes contiguous territories and adjacent islands of the United States). Under the WHTI land and sea final rule, one type of citizenship and identity document that U.S. citizens may present upon entry to the United States is an enhanced driver’s license or identification document1 (EDL) designated as an acceptable document to denote identity and citizenship by the Secretary pursuant to section 7209 of IRTPA, as amended. Section 235.1(d) of title 8 of the Code of Federal 1 The enhanced driver’s license or identification document may be in one of two forms, as decided by the issuing authority, provided that the document (card) denotes identity and citizenship and meets technical requirements: (1) An enhanced driver’s license or (2) an enhanced identity card. The designation ‘‘EDL’’ covers both documents. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:27 Jul 10, 2015 Jkt 235001 Regulations, as amended by the WHTI land and sea final rule, states: Upon designation by the Secretary of Homeland Security of an enhanced driver’s license as an acceptable document to denote identity and citizenship for purposes of entering the United States, U.S. citizens and Canadians may be permitted to present these documents in lieu of a passport upon entering or seeking admission to the United States according to the terms of the agreements entered between the Secretary of Homeland Security and the entity. The Secretary of Homeland Security will announce, by publication of a notice in the Federal Register, documents designated under this paragraph. A list of designated documents will also be made available to the public. The Secretary has delegated to the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) the authority to designate certain documents as acceptable border crossing documents for persons arriving in the United States by land or sea from within the Western Hemisphere, including state-specific EDLs. See DHS Delegation Number 7105 (Revision 00), dated January 16, 2009. EDL Programs DHS is committed to working with the various States of the Union and the Government of Canada to facilitate the development of State and provinceissued EDLs as travel documents that denote identity and citizenship as required under section 7209 of IRTPA, as amended. As part of the process, CBP will enter into one or more agreements with a State that specifies the requirements for developing and issuing WHTI-compliant EDLs, including a testing and auditing process to ensure that the cards are produced and issued in accordance with the terms of the agreements. After production of the cards in accordance with the specified requirements, and successful testing and auditing by CBP of the cards and program, the Secretary of DHS or the Commissioner of CBP may designate the EDL as an acceptable WHTI-compliant document for the purpose of establishing identity and citizenship when entering the United States by land or sea from contiguous territory or adjacent islands. Such designation will be announced by publication of a notice in the Federal Register. More information about WHTI-compliant documents is available at www.cbp.gov/ travel. Minnesota EDLs The State of Minnesota (Minnesota) has established a voluntary program to develop EDLs that would denote identity and citizenship. On October 1, PO 00000 Frm 00087 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 2012, CBP and Minnesota entered into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to develop, issue, test, and evaluate an enhanced driver’s license and identification card with facilitative technology to be used for border crossing purposes. On November 21, 2012, CBP approved the plan outlining the business process for the implementation of the Minnesota EDL program. Under the terms of the MOA and business plan, Minnesota will only issue EDLs to U.S. citizens. EDLs also may be issued as photo identification cards to non-drivers. The cards are to incorporate physical security features acceptable to CBP as well as facilitative technology allowing for electronic validation of identity and citizenship. Subsequently, CBP and Minnesota entered into two related agreements, a December 11, 2012 service level agreement and an April 15, 2013 security agreement. The former memorializes the technical specifications for the production, issuance and use of the card, and the latter addresses confidentiality and information sharing. CBP has tested the cards developed by Minnesota pursuant to the above agreements and has performed an audit of Minnesota’s EDL program. On the basis of these tests and audit, CBP has determined that the cards meet the requirements of section 7209 of IRTPA and are acceptable documents to denote identity and citizenship for purposes of entering the United States at land and sea ports of entry from contiguous territory or adjacent islands. CBP’s continued acceptance of the Minnesota EDL as a WHTI-compliant document is conditional on compliance with the MOA and all related agreements. Acceptance and use of the WHTIcompliant EDL is voluntary. If an individual is denied a WHTI-compliant EDL, he or she may still apply for a passport or other WHTI-compliant document. Designation This notice announces that the Commissioner of CBP designates the EDL issued by Minnesota in accordance with the MOA and all related agreements between Minnesota and CBP as an acceptable document to denote identity and citizenship pursuant to section 7209 of IRTPA and 8 CFR 235.1(d). Therefore, pursuant to 8 CFR 235.1(d), U.S. citizen holders of Minnesota EDLs may present these EDLs as an alternative to a passport upon entering the United States at all land and sea ports of entry when coming from contiguous territory and E:\FR\FM\13JYN1.SGM 13JYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 133 / Monday, July 13, 2015 / Notices adjacent islands from within the Western Hemisphere. Dated: July 7, 2015. R. Gil Kerlikowske, Commissioner. [FR Doc. 2015–17043 Filed 7–10–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–14–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Concerning Remote Location Filing Entry Procedures in the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) and the Use of the Document Image System for the Submission of Invoices and the Use of eBonds for the Transmission of Single Transaction Bonds U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. AGENCY: This document announces U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP’s) plan to conduct a National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) test concerning entries filed using remote location (RLF) filing procedures. The test expands the entry types eligible for RLF procedures and the port locations where RLF entries may be filed; requires the electronic transmission of invoices using the Document Image System (DIS); and requires that single transaction bonds be transmitted using eBond for RLF entries requiring a single transaction bond. This test applies only to entries ‘‘certified for cargo release from summary’’ filed through the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE). Remote location filing is a special entry procedure which allows importers of record and brokers with a national permit to file an entry electronically from a remote location other than where the goods are being entered. This test is in furtherance of key CBP modernization initiatives and the development of ACE. CBP is transitioning all entry types to ACE from the legacy Automated Commercial System (ACS). This test checks the viability, reliability and functionality associated with filing invoices using DIS; submitting single transaction bonds using eBond for RLF entries submitted in ACE; and expanding the entry types eligible for RLF procedures and port locations. This notice invites public comment concerning the test program; provides asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:27 Jul 10, 2015 Jkt 235001 legal authority for the test; explains the purpose of the test; provides test participant responsibilities; identifies the regulations that will be waived under the test; provides eligibility criteria for participation in the test; explains the application process; and establishes the duration of the test. This notice also explains the repercussions and appeals process for misconduct under the test. DATES: The initial phase of the RLF test will begin on August 12, 2015. This test will continue until concluded by way of an announcement in the Federal Register. Comments will be accepted through the duration of the test. ADDRESSES: Comments concerning this notice and any aspect of this test may be submitted at any time during the test via email to Josephine Baiamonte, ACE Business Office (ABO), Office of International Trade at josephine.baiamonte@cbp.dhs.gov. In the subject line of your email, please indicate, ‘‘Comment on RLF Test FRN’’. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical questions related to the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) or Automated Broker Interface (ABI) transmissions, contact your assigned client representative. Interested parties without an assigned client representative should direct their questions to Steven Zaccaro at steven.j.zaccaro@cbp.dhs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) was established in Subtitle B of Title VI—Customs Modernization (Customs Modernization Act), in the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act, Pub. L. 103–182, 107 Stat. 2057 (19 U.S.C. 1411). Through NCAP, the initial thrust of customs modernization was on trade compliance and the development of the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE), the planned successor to the Automated Commercial System (ACS). The ability to meet these objectives depends on successfully modernizing CBP’s business functions and the information technology that supports those functions. CBP’s modernization efforts are accomplished through phased releases of ACE component functionality designed to introduce a new capacity or to replace a specific legacy ACS function. Each release will begin with a test and will end with mandatory compliance with the new ACE feature, thus retiring the legacy ACS function. Each release builds on previous releases and sets the foundation for subsequent releases. PO 00000 Frm 00088 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 40079 For the convenience of the public, a chronological listing of Federal Register publications detailing ACE test developments is set forth below in Section XII, entitled, ‘‘Development of ACE Prototypes.’’ The procedures and criteria related to participation in the prior ACE tests remain in effect unless otherwise explicitly changed by this or subsequent notices published in the Federal Register. II. Authorization for the Test The Customs Modernization provisions provide the Commissioner of CBP with authority to conduct limited test programs or procedures designed to evaluate planned components of the NCAP. The test described in this notice is authorized pursuant to § 101.9(b) of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR 101.9(b)), which provides for the testing of NCAP programs or procedures. See Treasury Decision (T.D.) 95–21. III. Remote Location Filing (RLF) Remote location filing is a planned component of the NCAP, authorized by section 411 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended by section 631 of the Customs Modernization Act. See 19 U.S.C. 1411(a)(2)(B). After years of testing RLF entry procedures, CBP published a final rule in the Federal Register that implemented RLF as a special entry procedure. See 74 FR 69015 (December 30, 2009). These regulations, codified at 19 CFR part 143, subpart E, authorize importers of record and brokers with a national permit to file an entry electronically from a remote location other than where the goods are being entered. Under CBP regulations, only certain entry types may be filed using RLF procedures and these entries must be filed at a RLF-operational CBP location. A current listing of RLF eligible entry types may be found at the following link: http://www.cbp.gov/ trade/entry-summary/remote-locationfiling/eligibility. A current list of RLFoperational CBP locations may be found at the following link: http:// www.cbp.gov/document/guidance/rlfoperational-location-points-contact. At this time, the entry types that may be filed using RLF procedures for parties not participating in this test are 01 entries (formal consumption entries), 03 entries (formal consumption entries subject to antidumping or countervailing duties), and 11 entries (informal entries). Interested parties should check the CBP links referenced above for changes to the entry types authorized for RLF procedures and changes to the RLF operational CBP locations. E:\FR\FM\13JYN1.SGM 13JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 133 (Monday, July 13, 2015)]
[Notices]
[Pages 40077-40079]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2015-17043]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

[CBP Dec. 15-10]


Designation of an Enhanced Driver's License and Identity Document 
Issued by the State of Minnesota as a Travel Document Under the Western 
Hemisphere Travel Initiative

AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This notice announces that the Commissioner of U.S. Customs 
and Border Protection is designating enhanced driver's licenses and 
identity documents issued by the State of Minnesota as acceptable 
documents for purposes of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative. 
These documents may be used to denote identity and citizenship of U.S. 
citizens entering the United States from within the Western Hemisphere 
at land and sea ports of entry.

DATES: This designation is effective July 13, 2015.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Arthur A. E. Pitts, Director, Traveler 
Policies Division, Admissibility and

[[Page 40078]]

Passenger Programs, Office of Field Operations, U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection, via email at arthur.a.pitts@cbp.dhs.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative

    Section 7209 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention 
Act of 2004 (IRTPA), Public Law 108-458, as amended, required the 
Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretary), in consultation with the 
Secretary of State, to develop and implement a plan to require U.S. 
citizens and individuals for whom documentation requirements have 
previously been waived under section 212(d)(4)(B) of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(4)(B)) to present a passport or 
other document or combination of documents as the Secretary deems 
sufficient to denote identity and citizenship for all travel into the 
United States. See 8 U.S.C. 1185 note. On April 3, 2008, the Department 
of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of State promulgated a 
joint final rule, effective on June 1, 2009, that implemented the plan 
known as the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) at U.S. land 
and sea ports of entry. See 73 FR 18384 (the WHTI land and sea final 
rule). It amended various sections of title 8 of the Code of Federal 
Regulations (CFR), including 8 CFR 212.0, 212.1, and 235.1. The WHTI 
land and sea final rule specifies the documents that U.S. citizens and 
nonimmigrant aliens from Canada, Bermuda, and Mexico are required to 
present when entering the United States at land and sea ports of entry 
from within the Western Hemisphere (which includes contiguous 
territories and adjacent islands of the United States).
    Under the WHTI land and sea final rule, one type of citizenship and 
identity document that U.S. citizens may present upon entry to the 
United States is an enhanced driver's license or identification 
document\1\ (EDL) designated as an acceptable document to denote 
identity and citizenship by the Secretary pursuant to section 7209 of 
IRTPA, as amended. Section 235.1(d) of title 8 of the Code of Federal 
Regulations, as amended by the WHTI land and sea final rule, states:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ The enhanced driver's license or identification document may 
be in one of two forms, as decided by the issuing authority, 
provided that the document (card) denotes identity and citizenship 
and meets technical requirements: (1) An enhanced driver's license 
or (2) an enhanced identity card. The designation ``EDL'' covers 
both documents.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upon designation by the Secretary of Homeland Security of an 
enhanced driver's license as an acceptable document to denote 
identity and citizenship for purposes of entering the United States, 
U.S. citizens and Canadians may be permitted to present these 
documents in lieu of a passport upon entering or seeking admission 
to the United States according to the terms of the agreements 
entered between the Secretary of Homeland Security and the entity. 
The Secretary of Homeland Security will announce, by publication of 
a notice in the Federal Register, documents designated under this 
paragraph. A list of designated documents will also be made 
available to the public.

    The Secretary has delegated to the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection (CBP) the authority to designate certain documents as 
acceptable border crossing documents for persons arriving in the United 
States by land or sea from within the Western Hemisphere, including 
state-specific EDLs. See DHS Delegation Number 7105 (Revision 00), 
dated January 16, 2009.

EDL Programs

    DHS is committed to working with the various States of the Union 
and the Government of Canada to facilitate the development of State and 
province-issued EDLs as travel documents that denote identity and 
citizenship as required under section 7209 of IRTPA, as amended. As 
part of the process, CBP will enter into one or more agreements with a 
State that specifies the requirements for developing and issuing WHTI-
compliant EDLs, including a testing and auditing process to ensure that 
the cards are produced and issued in accordance with the terms of the 
agreements.
    After production of the cards in accordance with the specified 
requirements, and successful testing and auditing by CBP of the cards 
and program, the Secretary of DHS or the Commissioner of CBP may 
designate the EDL as an acceptable WHTI-compliant document for the 
purpose of establishing identity and citizenship when entering the 
United States by land or sea from contiguous territory or adjacent 
islands. Such designation will be announced by publication of a notice 
in the Federal Register. More information about WHTI-compliant 
documents is available at www.cbp.gov/travel.

Minnesota EDLs

    The State of Minnesota (Minnesota) has established a voluntary 
program to develop EDLs that would denote identity and citizenship. On 
October 1, 2012, CBP and Minnesota entered into a Memorandum of 
Agreement (MOA) to develop, issue, test, and evaluate an enhanced 
driver's license and identification card with facilitative technology 
to be used for border crossing purposes. On November 21, 2012, CBP 
approved the plan outlining the business process for the implementation 
of the Minnesota EDL program. Under the terms of the MOA and business 
plan, Minnesota will only issue EDLs to U.S. citizens. EDLs also may be 
issued as photo identification cards to non-drivers. The cards are to 
incorporate physical security features acceptable to CBP as well as 
facilitative technology allowing for electronic validation of identity 
and citizenship.
    Subsequently, CBP and Minnesota entered into two related 
agreements, a December 11, 2012 service level agreement and an April 
15, 2013 security agreement. The former memorializes the technical 
specifications for the production, issuance and use of the card, and 
the latter addresses confidentiality and information sharing.
    CBP has tested the cards developed by Minnesota pursuant to the 
above agreements and has performed an audit of Minnesota's EDL program. 
On the basis of these tests and audit, CBP has determined that the 
cards meet the requirements of section 7209 of IRTPA and are acceptable 
documents to denote identity and citizenship for purposes of entering 
the United States at land and sea ports of entry from contiguous 
territory or adjacent islands. CBP's continued acceptance of the 
Minnesota EDL as a WHTI-compliant document is conditional on compliance 
with the MOA and all related agreements.
    Acceptance and use of the WHTI-compliant EDL is voluntary. If an 
individual is denied a WHTI-compliant EDL, he or she may still apply 
for a passport or other WHTI-compliant document.

Designation

    This notice announces that the Commissioner of CBP designates the 
EDL issued by Minnesota in accordance with the MOA and all related 
agreements between Minnesota and CBP as an acceptable document to 
denote identity and citizenship pursuant to section 7209 of IRTPA and 8 
CFR 235.1(d). Therefore, pursuant to 8 CFR 235.1(d), U.S. citizen 
holders of Minnesota EDLs may present these EDLs as an alternative to a 
passport upon entering the United States at all land and sea ports of 
entry when coming from contiguous territory and

[[Page 40079]]

adjacent islands from within the Western Hemisphere.

    Dated: July 7, 2015.
R. Gil Kerlikowske,
Commissioner.
[FR Doc. 2015-17043 Filed 7-10-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 9111-14-P