Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Findings on 31 Petitions, 37568-37579 [2015-16001]

Download as PDF 37568 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules party, noting on the document filed, or on the transmitting letter, that a copy has been so furnished. * * * * * PART 966—RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO ADMINISTRATIVE OFFSETS INITIATED AGAINST FORMER EMPLOYEES OF THE POSTAL SERVICE 4. The authority citation for 39 CFR part 966 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 31 U.S.C. 3716; 39 U.S.C. 204, 401, 2601. 5. In § 966.4, revise paragraph (c), and add a sentence at the beginning of paragraph (d) to read as follows: ■ § 966.4 Petition for a hearing and supplement to petition. * * * * * (c) Within thirty (30) calendar days after the date of receipt of the Accounting Service Center’s decision upon reconsideration, after the expiration of sixty (60) calendar days after a request for reconsideration where a reconsideration determination is not made, or following an administrative offset taken without prior notice and opportunity for reconsideration pursuant to paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the former employee must file a written petition electronically at https://uspsjoe.justware.com/justiceweb, or by mail at Recorder, Judicial Officer Department, United States Postal Service, 2101 Wilson Blvd., Suite 600, Arlington, VA 22201–3078. (d) A sample petition is available through the Judicial Officer Electronic Filing Web site (https:// uspsjoe.justware.com/justiceweb).* * * * * * * * ■ 6. Revise paragraph (a) of § 966.6 to read as follows: § 966.6 Filing, docketing and serving documents; computation of time; representation of parties. (a) Filing. After a petition is filed, all documents required under this part must be filed using the electronic filing system unless the Hearing Official permits otherwise. Documents submitted using the electronic filing system are considered filed as of the date/time (Eastern Time) reflected in the system. Documents mailed to the Recorder are considered filed on the date mailed as evidenced by a United States Postal Service postmark. Filings by any other means are considered filed upon receipt by the Recorder of a complete copy of the filing during normal business hours (Normal Recorder office business hours are between 8:45 a.m. and 4:45 p.m., Eastern Time). If both parties are participating via the electronic filing system, separate service upon the opposing party is not required. Otherwise, documents shall be served personally or by mail on the opposing party, noting on the document filed, or on the transmitting letter, that a copy has been so furnished. * * * * * Stanley F. Mires, Attorney, Federal Compliance. [FR Doc. 2015–16141 Filed 6–30–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7710–12–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 indicating that the petitioned actions may be warranted, we find that one petition does not present substantial information that the petitioned entity may be a listable entity under the Act, and we find that one petition does not present substantial information that the petitioned entity may be a listable entity under the Act and does not present substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted, and we are not initiating status reviews in response to these petitions. We refer to these as ‘‘not-substantial petition findings.’’ Based on our review, we find that 21 petitions present substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned actions may be warranted. Therefore, with the publication of this document, we are initiating a review of the status of each of these species to determine if the petitioned actions are warranted. To ensure that these status reviews are comprehensive, we are requesting scientific and commercial data and other information regarding these species. Based on the status reviews, we will issue 12-month findings on the petitions, which will address whether the petitioned action is warranted, as provided in section 4(b)(3)(B) of the Act. To allow us adequate time to conduct the status reviews, we request that we receive information on or before August 31, 2015. Information submitted electronically using the Federal eRulemaking Portal (see ADDRESSES, below) must be received by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on the closing date. DATES: [4500030115] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Findings on 31 Petitions Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of petition findings and initiation of status reviews. AGENCY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce 90day findings on various petitions to list 30 species and one petition that describes itself as a petition to reclassify one species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Based on our review, we find that eight petitions do not present substantial scientific or commercial information SUMMARY: Not-substantial petition findings: The not-substantial petition findings announced in this document are available on http:// www.regulations.gov under the appropriate docket number (see Table 1, below). Supporting information in preparing these findings is available for public inspection, by appointment, during normal business hours by contacting the appropriate person, as specified under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. ADDRESSES: TABLE 1—NOT-SUBSTANTIAL PETITION FINDINGS tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Species Docket No. Blue Ridge gray-cheeked salamander. Caddo Mountain salamander California giant salamander Colorado checkered whiptail Distinct population segment of North American wild horse. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0042 .. http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0042 FWS–R4–ES–2015–0043 FWS–R8–ES–2015–0044 FWS–R6–ES–2015–0048 FWS–R8–ES–2015–0049 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0043 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0044 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R6-ES-2015-0048 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0049 VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 PO 00000 Docket link .. .. .. .. Frm 00014 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules 37569 TABLE 1—NOT-SUBSTANTIAL PETITION FINDINGS—Continued Species Docket No. Gray wolf, excluding Mexican wolf, in the conterminous U.S.. Olympic torrent salamander Pigeon Mountain salamander. Weller’s salamander ............ Wingtail crayfish ................... Docket link FWS–HQ–ES–2015–0072 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-HQ-ES-2015-0072 FWS–R1–ES–2015–0056 .. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0058 .. http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R1-ES-2015-0056 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0058 FWS–R4–ES–2015–0065 .. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0067 .. http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0065 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0067 Status reviews: You may submit information on species for which a status review is being initiated (see Table 2, below) by one of the following methods: (1) Electronically: Go to the Federal eRulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. In the Search box, enter the appropriate docket number (see Table 2, below). Then click the Search button. You may submit information by clicking on ‘‘Comment Now!’’ If your information will fit in the provided comment box, please use this feature of http://www.regulations.gov, as it is most compatible with our information review procedures. If you attach your information as a separate document, our preferred file format is Microsoft Word. If you attach multiple comments (such as form letters), our preferred format is a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel. (2) By hard copy: Submit by U.S. mail or hand-delivery to: Public Comments Processing, Attn: [Insert appropriate docket number; see table below]; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS: BPHC, 5275 Leesburg Pike; Falls Church, VA 22041–3803. We request that you send information only by the methods described above. We will post all information received on http://www.regulations.gov. This generally means that we will post any personal information you provide us (see the Request for Information section, below, for more details). TABLE 2—SUBSTANTIAL PETITION FINDINGS Species Docket number Alligator snapping turtle ....... Apalachicola kingsnake ....... Arizona toad ......................... Blanding’s turtle ................... Cascade Caverns salamander. Cascades frog ...................... Cedar Key mole skink .......... Foothill yellow-legged frog ... Gopher frog .......................... Green salamander ............... Illinois chorus frog ................ Kern Canyon slender salamander. Key ringneck snake ............. Oregon slender salamander Relictual slender salamander Rim Rock crowned snake .... Rio Grande cooter ............... Silvery phacelia .................... Southern hog-nosed snake .. Spotted turtle ........................ Western spadefoot toad ....... FWS–R4–ES–2015–0038 FWS–R4–ES–2015–0039 FWS–R2–ES–2015–0040 FWS–R3–ES–2015–0041 FWS–R2–ES–2015–0045 .. .. .. .. .. http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0038 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0039 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R2-ES-2015-0040 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R3-ES-2015-0041 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R2-ES-2015-0045 FWS–R1–ES–2015–0046 FWS–R4–ES–2015–0047 FWS–R8–ES–2015–0050 FWS–R4–ES–2015–0051 FWS–R4–ES–2015–0052 FWS–R3–ES–2015–0053 FWS–R8–ES–2015–0054 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R1-ES-2015-0046 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0047 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0050 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0051 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0052 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R3-ES-2015-0053 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0054 FWS–R4–ES–2015–0055 FWS–R1–ES–2015–0057 FWS–R8–ES–2015–0059 FWS–R4–ES–2015–0060 FWS–R2–ES–2015–0061 FWS–R1–ES–2015–0062 FWS–R4–ES–2015–0063 FWS–R5–ES–2015–0064 FWS–R8–ES–2015–0066 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0055 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R1-ES-2015-0057 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0059 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0060 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R2-ES-2015-0061 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R1-ES-2015-0062 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0063 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R5-ES-2015-0064 http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0066 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Species Blanding’s turtle .... Blue Ridge graycheeked salamander. VerDate Sep<11>2014 Species Contact information Alligator snapping turtle. Apalachicola kingsnake. Arizona toad ......... Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Michelle Shaughnessy; (505) 248–6920 Laura Ragan; (612) 713–5350 Susan Cameron; (828) 258–3939, ext. 224 19:07 Jun 30, 2015 Docket link Jkt 235001 Contact information Species Contact information Caddo Mountain salamander. California giant salamander. Cascade Caverns salamander. Cascades frog ...... Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Dan Russell; (916) 414– 6647 Michelle Shaughnessy; (505) 248–6920 Paul Henson; (503) 231–6179 Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Leslie Ellwood; (303) 236–4747 Distinct population segment of North American wild horse. Foothill yellowlegged frog. Gopher frog .......... Doug Krofta; (703) 358– 2527 Cedar Key mole skink. Colorado checkered whiptail. PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Gray wolf, excluding Mexican wolf, in the conterminous U.S. E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 Dan Russell; (916) 414– 6647 Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Don Morgan; (703) 358– 2444 37570 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules Species Contact information Green salamander Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Laura Ragan; (612) 713–5350 Dan Russell; (916) 414– 6647 Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Eric Rickerson; (360) 753–9440 Paul Henson; (503) 231–6179 Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Dan Russell; (916) 414– 6647 Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Michelle Shaughnessy; (505) 248–6920 Paul Henson; (503) 231–6179 Andreas Moshogianis; (404) 679–7119 Wende Mahaney; (207) 866–3344 Susan Cameron; (828) 258–3939, ext. 224 Dan Russell; (916) 414– 6647 Patty Kelly; (850) 769– 0552, x 228 Illinois chorus frog Kern Canyon slender salamander. Key ringneck snake. Olympic torrent salamander. Oregon slender salamander. Pigeon Mountain salamander. Relictual slender salamander. Rim Rock crowned snake. Rio Grande cooter Silvery phacelia .... Southern hognosed snake. Spotted turtle ........ Weller’s salamander. Western spadefoot toad. Wingtail crayfish ... If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), please call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 800–877–8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Request for Information When we make a finding that a petition presents substantial information indicating that listing, reclassification, or delisting a species may be warranted, we are required to promptly review the status of the species (status review). For the status review to be complete and based on the best available scientific and commercial information, we request information on alligator snapping turtle, Apalachicola kingsnake, Arizona toad, Blanding’s turtle, Cascade Caverns salamander, Cascades frog, Cedar Key mole skink, foothill yellow-legged frog, gopher frog, green salamander, Illinois chorus frog, Kern Canyon slender salamander, Key ringneck snake, Oregon slender salamander, relictual slender salamander, Rim Rock crowned snake, Rio Grande cooter, silvery phacelia, southern hog-nosed snake, spotted turtle, and western spadefoot toad from governmental agencies, Native VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 American Tribes, the scientific community, industry, and any other interested parties. We seek information on: (1) The species’ biology, range, and population trends, including: (a) Habitat requirements; (b) Genetics and taxonomy; (c) Historical and current range, including distribution patterns; (d) Historical and current population levels, and current and projected trends; and (e) Past and ongoing conservation measures for the species, its habitat, or both. (2) The factors that are the basis for making a listing, reclassification, or delisting determination for a species under section 4(a)(1) of the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), which are: (a) The present or threatened destruction, modification, or curtailment of its habitat or range (Factor A); (b) Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes (Factor B); (c) Disease or predation (Factor C); (d) The inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms (Factor D); or (e) Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence (Factor E). (3) The potential effects of climate change on the species and its habitat. (4) If, after the status review, we determine that listing is warranted, we will propose critical habitat (see definition in section 3(5)(A) of the Act) under section 4 of the Act for those species that fall within the jurisdiction of the United States, to the maximum extent prudent and determinable at the time we propose to list the species. Therefore, we also specifically request data and information for the 21 species for which we are conducting status reviews on: (a) What may constitute ‘‘physical or biological features essential to the conservation of the species,’’ within the geographical range occupied by the species; (b) Where these features are currently found; (c) Whether any of these features may require special management considerations or protection; (d) Specific areas outside the geographical area occupied by the species that are ‘‘essential for the conservation of the species’’; and (e) What, if any, critical habitat you think we should propose for designation if the species is proposed for listing, and why such habitat meets the requirements of section 4 of the Act. Please include sufficient information with your submission (such as scientific PO 00000 Frm 00016 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 journal articles or other publications) to allow us to verify any scientific or commercial information you include. Submissions merely stating support for or opposition to the actions under consideration without providing supporting information or analysis, although noted, will not be considered in making a determination. Section 4(b)(1)(A) of the Act directs that determinations as to whether any species is an endangered or threatened species must be made ‘‘solely on the basis of the best scientific and commercial data available.’’ You may submit your information concerning these status reviews by one of the methods listed in the ADDRESSES section. If you submit information via http://www.regulations.gov, your entire submission—including any personal identifying information—will be posted on the Web site. If you submit a hardcopy that includes personal identifying information, you may request at the top of your document that we withhold this personal identifying information from public review. However, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. We will post all hardcopy submissions on http:// www.regulations.gov. Information and supporting documentation that we received and used in preparing this finding will be available for you to review at http:// www.regulations.gov, or you may make an appointment during normal business hours at the appropriate lead U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Field Office (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Background Section 4(b)(3)(A) of the Act requires that we make a finding on whether a petition to list, delist, or reclassify a species presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted. To the maximum extent practicable, we are to make this finding within 90 days of our receipt of the petition and publish our notice of the finding promptly in the Federal Register. Our standard for substantial scientific or commercial information within the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) with regard to a 90-day petition finding is ‘‘that amount of information that would lead a reasonable person to believe that the measure proposed in the petition may be warranted’’ (50 CFR 424.14(b)). If we find that substantial scientific or commercial information was presented, we are required to promptly commence a review of the status of the species, which we will subsequently summarize in our 12-month finding. E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules Section 4 of the Act (16 U.S.C. 1533) and its implementing regulations at 50 CFR 424 set forth the procedures for adding a species to, or removing a species from, the Federal Lists of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants. A species may be determined to be an endangered or threatened species due to one or more of the five factors described in section 4(a)(1) of the Act (see (2) under Request For Information, above). In considering what factors might constitute threats, we must look beyond the exposure of the species to a factor to evaluate whether the species may respond to the factor in a way that causes actual impacts to the species. If there is exposure to a factor and the species responds negatively, the factor may be a threat, and, during the subsequent status review, we attempt to determine how significant a threat it is. The threat is significant if it drives, or contributes to, the risk of extinction of the species such that the species may warrant listing as an ‘‘endangered species’’ or a ‘‘threatened species,’’ as those terms are defined in the Act. However, the identification of factors that could affect a species negatively may not be sufficient for us to find that the information in the petition and our files is substantial. The information must include evidence sufficient to suggest that these factors may be operative threats that act on the species to the point that the species may meet the definition of an ‘‘endangered species’’ or ‘‘threatened species’’ under the Act. tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Evaluation of a Petition To List the Alligator Snapping Turtle as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0038 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii; previously Macroclemys temminckii); Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from The Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the alligator snapping turtle, be listed as endangered VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii; previously Macroclemys temminckii) based on Factors A, B, C and D. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the alligator snapping turtle, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Apalachicola Kingsake as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0039 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Apalachicola kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula meansi); Florida Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from The Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Apalachicola kingsnake, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Apalachicola kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula meansi) based on Factor A. However, during our status PO 00000 Frm 00017 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 37571 review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Apalachicola kingsnake, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Arizona Toad as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R2–ES–2015–0040 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Arizona toad (Anaxyrus microscaphus); Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Arizona toad, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Arizona toad (Anaxyrus microscaphus) based on Factor E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Arizona toad, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Blanding’s Turtle as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R3–ES–2015–0041 under the Supporting Documents section. E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 37572 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules Species and Range Blanding’s turtle (Emydoidea blandingii); Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, New Hampshire, New York, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Wisconsin, United States; Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia, Canada. Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Blanding’s turtle, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Blanding’s turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) based on Factors A, B, C, D, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Blanding’s turtle, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Blue Ridge Gray-Cheeked Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0042 under the Supporting Documents section. tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Species and Range Blue Ridge gray-cheeked salamander (Plethodon amplus); North Carolina Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of amphibians and reptiles, including the Blue Ridge gray-cheeked salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial information indicating that listing the species may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0042 under the ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Blue Ridge gray-cheeked salamander salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Caddo Mountain Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0043 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Caddo Mountain salamander (Plethodon caddoensis); Arkansas Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of amphibians and reptiles, including the Caddo Mountain salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0043 under the PO 00000 Frm 00018 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Caddo Mountain salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Evaluation of a Petition To List the California Giant Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R8–ES–2015–0044 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range California giant salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus); California Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the California giant salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R8–ES–2015–0044 under the ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the California giant salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Cascade Caverns Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R2–ES–2015–0045 under the Supporting Documents section. E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules Species and Range Finding Cascade Caverns salamander (Eurycea latitans); Texas Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Cascades frog (Rana cascadae) based on Factors A, C, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Cascades frog, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012 from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Cascade Caverns salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Cascade Caverns salamander (Eurycea latitans) based on Factor A. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Cascade Caverns salamander, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R6–ES–2015–0048 under the ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Colorado checkered whiptail or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Petition History Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Cedar Key mole skink (Plestiodon egregius insularis) based on Factors A, B, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Cedar Key mole skink, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Jkt 235001 Petition History Cedar Key mole skink (Plestiodon egregius insularis); Florida Cascades frog (Rana cascadae); California, Oregon, and Washington 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Colorado checkered whiptail (Aspidoscelis neotesselata); Colorado Finding Finding VerDate Sep<11>2014 Species and Range Species and Range Species and Range On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Cascades frog, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R6–ES–2015–0048 under the Supporting Documents section. Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0047 under the Supporting Documents section. Evaluation of a Petition To List the Cedar Key Mole Skink as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R1–ES–2015–0046 under the Supporting Documents section. Petition History Evaluation of a Petition To List the Colorado Checkered Whiptail as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of amphibians and reptiles, including the Colorado checkered whiptail, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Cedar Key mole skink, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Evaluation of a Petition To List the Cascades Frog as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act 37573 PO 00000 Frm 00019 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Evaluation of a Petition To List the Distinct Population Segment of North American Wild Horse as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R8–ES–2015–0049 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range North American wild horse (population of the species Equus caballus); U.S. Federal public lands E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 37574 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules Petition History On June 17, 2014, we received a petition, dated June 10, 2014, from Friends of Animals and The Cloud Foundation, requesting that the distinct population segment (DPS) of North American wild horses on all U.S. federal public lands be listed as an endangered or threatened species under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner(s), as required by 50 CFR 424.14(a). In an October 3, 2014, letter to the petitioner, we responded that we reviewed the information presented in the petition and did not find that the petition warranted an emergency listing. This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial information indicating the petitioned entity may qualify as a DPS and, therefore, a listable entity under section 3(16) of the Act. The petition does not present substantial information supporting the characterization of North American wild horses on all U.S. Federal public lands as a DPS, because the discreteness criteria were not met. Therefore, this population is not a valid listable entity under section 3(16) of the Act, and we are not initiating a status review in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R8–ES–2015–0049 under the ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the North American wild horse or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Evaluation of a Petition To List the Foothill Yellow-Legged Frog as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R8–ES–2015–0050 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii); Oregon and California Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 and amphibians, including the foothill yellow-legged frog, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the gopher frog, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii) based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the foothill yellow-legged frog, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To Reclassify the Gray Wolf, Excluding Mexican Wolf, in the Conterminous U.S. as a Threatened Species Under the Act Evaluation of a Petition To List the Gopher Frog as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0051 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Gopher frog (Lithobates capito); Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the gopher frog, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the gopher frog (Lithobates capito) based on Factors A, C, D, and E. However, during our status review we will PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–HQ–ES–2015–0072 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Gray wolf, excluding the Mexican wolf (population of the species Canis lupus); conterminous United States. Petition History On January 27, 2015, we received a petition dated January 27, 2015, from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and twenty-two undersigned petitioners (The Center for Biological Diversity, The Fund for Animals, Born Free USA, Friends of Animals and Their Environment, Help Our Wolves Live, The Detroit Zoological Society, Midwest Environmental Advocates, Predator Defense, National Wolfwatcher Coalition, Northwoods Alliance, Wisconsin Federated Humane Societies, Minnesota Humane Society, Howling for Wolves, Detroit Audubon Society, Sault Sainte Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Wildlife Public Trust and Coexistence, Minnesota Voters for Animal Protection, Friends of the Wisconsin Wolf, Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin, Justice for Wolves, and Wildwoods (Minnesota)), requesting that the gray wolf, excluding the Mexican wolf subspecies, be reclassified as threatened throughout the conterminous United States (U.S.) under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). On March 10, 2015, we received electronic copies of the published references cited in the January, 27, 2015 petition from HSUS. In a March 27, 2015, letter to HSUS, we responded that we reviewed the information presented in the petition and did not find that the petition warranted an emergency listing. This finding addresses the petition. E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Finding Based on our review of the petition, we find the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating the petitioned entity may qualify as a DPS and, therefore, a listable entity under section 3(16) of the Act. Although any further evaluation of the petition was unnecessary because this is a sound basis for a not-substantial finding, due to the level of controversy surrounding the legal status of gray wolf under the Act and the high interest in this petition specifically we further evaluated the petition by analyzing the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1). Based on our review of the petition, sources cited in the petition, and our files we find the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that gray wolves, excluding Mexican wolves, in the coterminous U.S. may be likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future (a threatened species) due to any one of the five listing factors. We come to the same conclusion when we consider whether collective information presented in the petition represents substantial information. The petitioner’s information with respect to unoccupied suitable habitat is based on a misinterpretation of the Act. Moreover, despite making allegations with respect to disease, and small population size, the petitioners provided no information to support their claim. Inadequate existing regulatory mechanisms are not an independent source of threat, but relate to amelioration of threats under the other factors. Therefore, the petition only provides information with respect to possible overutilization from recreational hunting and trapping, and the information is not substantial. Thus the petition provides no information to combine with the information regarding possible overutilization from recreational hunting and trapping. In any case, even if the petition had presented information with respect to other sources of mortality, the existing state plans regulating take of wolves only allow take above certain population thresholds, such that if the other causes of mortality increased above certain levels, hunting and trapping would be reduced to prevent the population from dipping below those thresholds. So those plans have a built-in response to possible concerns relating to cumulative impacts. Accordingly, we are not initiating a status review in response to this petition. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–HQ–ES–2015–0072 under the ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the gray wolf or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). 37575 FWS–R3–ES–2015–0053 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris illinoensis or Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis); Illinois, Missouri, and Arkansas Petition History Evaluation of a Petition To List the Green Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0052 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Green salamander (Aneides aeneus); Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Ohio, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and South Carolina. On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Illinois chorus frog, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of amphibians and reptiles, including the green salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the green salamander (Aneides aeneus) based on Factors A, B, C, D, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the green salamander, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Illinois Chorus Frog as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris illinoensis or Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis) based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Illinois chorus frog, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Kern Canyon Slender Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R8–ES–2015–0054 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Kern Canyon slender salamander (Batrachoseps simatus); California Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of amphibians and reptiles, including the Kern Canyon slender salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 37576 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Kern Canyon slender salamander (Batrachoseps simatus) based on Factors A, D, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Kern Canyon slender salamander, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Key Ringneck Snake as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0055 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of amphibians and reptiles, including the Key ringneck snake, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Key ringneck snake (Diadophis punctatus acricus) based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Key ringneck snake, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 Evaluation of a Petition To List the Olympic Torrent Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R1–ES–2015–0056 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Olympic torrent salamander (Rhyacotriton olympicus); Washington Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Olympic torrent salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Key ringneck snake (Diadophis punctatus acricus); Florida VerDate Sep<11>2014 the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R1–ES–2015–0056 under the ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Olympic torrent salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Oregon Slender Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R1–ES–2015–0057 under the Supporting Documents section. PO 00000 Frm 00022 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Species and Range Oregon slender salamander (Batrachoseps wrighti; previously B. wrightorum); Oregon Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Oregon slender salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Oregon slender salamander (Batrachoseps wrighti) based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Oregon slender salamander, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Pigeon Mountain Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0058 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Pigeon Mountain salamander (Plethodon petraeus); Georgia Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of amphibians and reptiles, including the Pigeon Mountain salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0058 under the ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Pigeon Mountain salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Relictual Slender Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R8–ES–2015–0059 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Relictual slender salamander (Batrachoseps relictus); California Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of amphibians and reptiles, including the relictual slender salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the relictual slender salamander (Batrachoseps relictus) based on Factors A, D, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the relictual slender salamander, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Rim Rock Crowned Snake as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0060 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Rim Rock crowned snake (Tantilla oolitica); Florida Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from The Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Rim Rock crowned snake, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Rim Rock crowned snake (Tantilla oolitica) based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Rim Rock crowned snake, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). 37577 Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the Rio Grande cooter, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the Rio Grande cooter (Pseudemys gorzugi) based on Factors A, B, and D. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the Rio Grande cooter, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List Silvery Phacelia as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R1–ES–2015–0062 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Silvery phacelia (Phacelia argentea); Oregon and California Species and Range Rio Grande cooter or Western River cooter (Pseudemys gorzugi); Texas and New Mexico, United States; Coahuila, Neuvo Leon, and Tamaulipas, Mexico Petition History On March 7, 2014, we received a petition dated March 7, 2014, from The Center for Biological Diversity, Oregon Wild, Friends of Del Norte, Oregon Coast Alliance, The Native Plant Society of Oregon, The California Native Plant Society, The Environmental Protection Information Center, and KlamathSiskiyou Wildlands Center (the petitioners), requesting that silvery phacelia be listed as an endangered or threatened species and, if applicable, critical habitat be designated for this species under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from The Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we Evaluation of a Petition To List the Rio Grande Cooter as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R2–ES–2015–0061 under the Supporting Documents section. PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 37578 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the silvery phacelia (Phacelia argentea) based on Factors A and D. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the silvery phacelia, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Southern Hog-Nosed Snake as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Species and Range Southern hog-nosed snake (Heterodon simus); North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from The Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the southern hog-nosed snake, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the southern hog-nosed snake (Heterodon simus) based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the southern hog-nosed snake, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R5–ES–2015–0064 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Spotted turtle (Clemmys guttata); Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia Petition History Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0063 under the Supporting Documents section. VerDate Sep<11>2014 Evaluation of a Petition To List the Spotted Turtle as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the spotted turtle, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Petition History On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of amphibians and reptiles, including the Weller’s salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0065 under the ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Weller’s salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the spotted turtle (Clemmys guttata) based on Factors A, B, D, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the spotted turtle, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Western Spadefoot Toad as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Evaluation of a Petition To List the Weller’s Salamander as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Petition History Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0065 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Weller’s salamander (Plethodon welleri, 1931); North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R8–ES–2015–0066 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Western spadefoot toad (Spea hammondii or Scaphiopus hammondii); California, United States; Northwestern Baja California, Mexico On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of reptiles and amphibians, including the western spadefoot toad, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition. E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 126 / Wednesday, July 1, 2015 / Proposed Rules Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for the western spadefoot toad (Spea hammondii or Scaphiopus hammondii) based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species. Thus, for the western spadefoot toad, the Service requests information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, above). Evaluation of a Petition To List the Wingtail Crayfish as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0067 under the Supporting Documents section. Species and Range Wingtail crayfish (Procambarus (Leconticambarus) latipleurum); Florida Petition History On January 6, 2014, we received a petition dated January 6, 2014, from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that the wingtail crayfish be listed as an endangered or threatened species under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS Finding Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Jun 30, 2015 Jkt 235001 found as an appendix at http:// www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS–R4–ES–2015–0067 under the ‘‘Supporting Documents’’ section. However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the wingtail crayfish or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Conclusion On the basis of our evaluation of the information presented under section 4(b)(3)(A) of the Act, we have determined that the petitions summarized above for the Blue Ridge gray-cheeked salamander, Caddo Mountain salamander, California giant salamander, Colorado checkered whiptail, the distinct population segment of North American wild horse, gray wolf, excluding Mexican wolf, in the conterminous U.S., Olympic torrent salamander, Pigeon Mountain salamander, Weller’s salamander, and wingtail crayfish do not present substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the requested actions may be warranted. Therefore, we are not initiating status reviews for these species. On the basis of our evaluation of the information presented under section 4(b)(3)(A) of the Act, we have determined that the petitions summarized above for alligator snapping turtle, Apalachicola kingsnake, Arizona toad, Blanding’s turtle, Cascade Caverns salamander, Cascades frog, Cedar Key mole skink, foothill yellow-legged frog, gopher frog, green salamander, Illinois chorus frog, Kern Canyon slender salamander, Key ringneck snake, Oregon slender salamander, relictual slender salamander, Rim Rock crowned snake, Rio Grande cooter, silvery phacelia, southern hog-nosed snake, spotted turtle, and western spadefoot toad present substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the requested actions may be warranted. Because we have found that the petitions present substantial information indicating that the PO 00000 Frm 00025 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 9990 37579 petitioned actions may be warranted, we are initiating status reviews to determine whether these actions under the Act are warranted. At the conclusion of the status reviews, we will issue a 12month finding in accordance with section 4(b)(3)(B) of the Act, as to whether or not the Service believes listing is warranted. It is important to note that the ‘‘substantial information’’ standard for a 90-day finding as to whether the petitioned action may be warranted differs from the Act’s ‘‘best scientific and commercial data’’ standard that applies to the Service’s determination in a 12-month finding as to whether a petitioned action is in fact warranted. A 90-day finding is not based on a status review. In a 12-month finding, we will determine whether a petitioned action is warranted after we have completed a thorough status review of the species, which is conducted following a substantial 90-day finding. Because the Act’s standards for 90-day and 12month findings are different, as described above, a substantial 90-day finding does not mean that the 12month finding will result in a warranted finding. References Cited A complete list of references cited is available on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov and upon request from the appropriate lead field offices (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Authors The primary authors of this document are the staff members of the Branch of Listing, Ecological Services Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Authority The authority for these actions is the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Dated: June 22, 2015. Stephen Guertin, Acting Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2015–16001 Filed 6–30–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P E:\FR\FM\01JYP1.SGM 01JYP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 126 (Wednesday, July 1, 2015)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 37568-37579]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2015-16001]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

50 CFR Part 17

[4500030115]


Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Findings on 
31 Petitions

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of petition findings and initiation of status reviews.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce 90-
day findings on various petitions to list 30 species and one petition 
that describes itself as a petition to reclassify one species under the 
Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Based on our review, 
we find that eight petitions do not present substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned actions may be 
warranted, we find that one petition does not present substantial 
information that the petitioned entity may be a listable entity under 
the Act, and we find that one petition does not present substantial 
information that the petitioned entity may be a listable entity under 
the Act and does not present substantial scientific or commercial 
information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted, and 
we are not initiating status reviews in response to these petitions. We 
refer to these as ``not-substantial petition findings.'' Based on our 
review, we find that 21 petitions present substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned actions may be 
warranted. Therefore, with the publication of this document, we are 
initiating a review of the status of each of these species to determine 
if the petitioned actions are warranted. To ensure that these status 
reviews are comprehensive, we are requesting scientific and commercial 
data and other information regarding these species. Based on the status 
reviews, we will issue 12-month findings on the petitions, which will 
address whether the petitioned action is warranted, as provided in 
section 4(b)(3)(B) of the Act.

DATES: To allow us adequate time to conduct the status reviews, we 
request that we receive information on or before August 31, 2015. 
Information submitted electronically using the Federal eRulemaking 
Portal (see ADDRESSES, below) must be received by 11:59 p.m. Eastern 
Time on the closing date.

ADDRESSES: Not-substantial petition findings: The not-substantial 
petition findings announced in this document are available on http://www.regulations.gov under the appropriate docket number (see Table 1, 
below). Supporting information in preparing these findings is available 
for public inspection, by appointment, during normal business hours by 
contacting the appropriate person, as specified under FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT.

                                   Table 1--Not-Substantial Petition Findings
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Species                           Docket No.                         Docket link
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Blue Ridge gray-cheeked salamander......  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0042........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0042
Caddo Mountain salamander...............  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0043........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0043
California giant salamander.............  FWS-R8-ES-2015-0044........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0044
Colorado checkered whiptail.............  FWS-R6-ES-2015-0048........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R6-ES-2015-0048
Distinct population segment of North      FWS-R8-ES-2015-0049........  http://www.regulations.gov/
 American wild horse.                                                   #!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0049

[[Page 37569]]

 
Gray wolf, excluding Mexican wolf, in     FWS-HQ-ES-2015-0072........  http://www.regulations.gov/
 the conterminous U.S..                                                 #!docketDetail;D=FWS-HQ-ES-2015-0072
Olympic torrent salamander..............  FWS-R1-ES-2015-0056........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R1-ES-2015-0056
Pigeon Mountain salamander..............  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0058........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0058
Weller's salamander.....................  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0065........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0065
Wingtail crayfish.......................  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0067........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0067
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Status reviews: You may submit information on species for which a 
status review is being initiated (see Table 2, below) by one of the 
following methods:
    (1) Electronically: Go to the Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. In the Search box, enter the appropriate docket 
number (see Table 2, below). Then click the Search button. You may 
submit information by clicking on ``Comment Now!'' If your information 
will fit in the provided comment box, please use this feature of http://www.regulations.gov, as it is most compatible with our information 
review procedures. If you attach your information as a separate 
document, our preferred file format is Microsoft Word. If you attach 
multiple comments (such as form letters), our preferred format is a 
spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel.
    (2) By hard copy: Submit by U.S. mail or hand-delivery to: Public 
Comments Processing, Attn: [Insert appropriate docket number; see table 
below]; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS: BPHC, 5275 Leesburg Pike; 
Falls Church, VA 22041-3803.
    We request that you send information only by the methods described 
above. We will post all information received on http://www.regulations.gov. This generally means that we will post any 
personal information you provide us (see the Request for Information 
section, below, for more details).

                                     Table 2--Substantial Petition Findings
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Species                         Docket number                        Docket link
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alligator snapping turtle...............  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0038........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0038
Apalachicola kingsnake..................  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0039........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0039
Arizona toad............................  FWS-R2-ES-2015-0040........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R2-ES-2015-0040
Blanding's turtle.......................  FWS-R3-ES-2015-0041........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R3-ES-2015-0041
Cascade Caverns salamander..............  FWS-R2-ES-2015-0045........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R2-ES-2015-0045
Cascades frog...........................  FWS-R1-ES-2015-0046........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R1-ES-2015-0046
Cedar Key mole skink....................  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0047........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0047
Foothill yellow-legged frog.............  FWS-R8-ES-2015-0050........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0050
Gopher frog.............................  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0051........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0051
Green salamander........................  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0052........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0052
Illinois chorus frog....................  FWS-R3-ES-2015-0053........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R3-ES-2015-0053
Kern Canyon slender salamander..........  FWS-R8-ES-2015-0054........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0054
Key ringneck snake......................  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0055........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0055
Oregon slender salamander...............  FWS-R1-ES-2015-0057........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R1-ES-2015-0057
Relictual slender salamander............  FWS-R8-ES-2015-0059........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0059
Rim Rock crowned snake..................  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0060........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0060
Rio Grande cooter.......................  FWS-R2-ES-2015-0061........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R2-ES-2015-0061
Silvery phacelia........................  FWS-R1-ES-2015-0062........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R1-ES-2015-0062
Southern hog-nosed snake................  FWS-R4-ES-2015-0063........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R4-ES-2015-0063
Spotted turtle..........................  FWS-R5-ES-2015-0064........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R5-ES-2015-0064
Western spadefoot toad..................  FWS-R8-ES-2015-0066........  http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FWS-R8-ES-2015-0066
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Species                        Contact information
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alligator snapping turtle................  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
Apalachicola kingsnake...................  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
Arizona toad.............................  Michelle Shaughnessy; (505)
                                            248-6920
Blanding's turtle........................  Laura Ragan; (612) 713-5350
Blue Ridge gray-cheeked salamander.......  Susan Cameron; (828) 258-
                                            3939, ext. 224
Caddo Mountain salamander................  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
California giant salamander..............  Dan Russell; (916) 414-6647
Cascade Caverns salamander...............  Michelle Shaughnessy; (505)
                                            248-6920
Cascades frog............................  Paul Henson; (503) 231-6179
Cedar Key mole skink.....................  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
Colorado checkered whiptail..............  Leslie Ellwood; (303) 236-
                                            4747
Distinct population segment of North       Doug Krofta; (703) 358-2527
 American wild horse.
Foothill yellow-legged frog..............  Dan Russell; (916) 414-6647
Gopher frog..............................  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
Gray wolf, excluding Mexican wolf, in the  Don Morgan; (703) 358-2444
 conterminous U.S.

[[Page 37570]]

 
Green salamander.........................  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
Illinois chorus frog.....................  Laura Ragan; (612) 713-5350
Kern Canyon slender salamander...........  Dan Russell; (916) 414-6647
Key ringneck snake.......................  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
Olympic torrent salamander...............  Eric Rickerson; (360) 753-
                                            9440
Oregon slender salamander................  Paul Henson; (503) 231-6179
Pigeon Mountain salamander...............  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
Relictual slender salamander.............  Dan Russell; (916) 414-6647
Rim Rock crowned snake...................  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
Rio Grande cooter........................  Michelle Shaughnessy; (505)
                                            248-6920
Silvery phacelia.........................  Paul Henson; (503) 231-6179
Southern hog-nosed snake.................  Andreas Moshogianis; (404)
                                            679-7119
Spotted turtle...........................  Wende Mahaney; (207) 866-3344
Weller's salamander......................  Susan Cameron; (828) 258-
                                            3939, ext. 224
Western spadefoot toad...................  Dan Russell; (916) 414-6647
Wingtail crayfish........................  Patty Kelly; (850) 769-0552,
                                            x 228
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), please 
call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 800-877-8339
    If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), please 
call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 800-877-8339.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Request for Information

    When we make a finding that a petition presents substantial 
information indicating that listing, reclassification, or delisting a 
species may be warranted, we are required to promptly review the status 
of the species (status review). For the status review to be complete 
and based on the best available scientific and commercial information, 
we request information on alligator snapping turtle, Apalachicola 
kingsnake, Arizona toad, Blanding's turtle, Cascade Caverns salamander, 
Cascades frog, Cedar Key mole skink, foothill yellow-legged frog, 
gopher frog, green salamander, Illinois chorus frog, Kern Canyon 
slender salamander, Key ringneck snake, Oregon slender salamander, 
relictual slender salamander, Rim Rock crowned snake, Rio Grande 
cooter, silvery phacelia, southern hog-nosed snake, spotted turtle, and 
western spadefoot toad from governmental agencies, Native American 
Tribes, the scientific community, industry, and any other interested 
parties. We seek information on:
    (1) The species' biology, range, and population trends, including:
    (a) Habitat requirements;
    (b) Genetics and taxonomy;
    (c) Historical and current range, including distribution patterns;
    (d) Historical and current population levels, and current and 
projected trends; and
    (e) Past and ongoing conservation measures for the species, its 
habitat, or both.
    (2) The factors that are the basis for making a listing, 
reclassification, or delisting determination for a species under 
section 4(a)(1) of the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), which are:
    (a) The present or threatened destruction, modification, or 
curtailment of its habitat or range (Factor A);
    (b) Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or 
educational purposes (Factor B);
    (c) Disease or predation (Factor C);
    (d) The inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms (Factor D); or
    (e) Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued 
existence (Factor E).
    (3) The potential effects of climate change on the species and its 
habitat.
    (4) If, after the status review, we determine that listing is 
warranted, we will propose critical habitat (see definition in section 
3(5)(A) of the Act) under section 4 of the Act for those species that 
fall within the jurisdiction of the United States, to the maximum 
extent prudent and determinable at the time we propose to list the 
species. Therefore, we also specifically request data and information 
for the 21 species for which we are conducting status reviews on:
    (a) What may constitute ``physical or biological features essential 
to the conservation of the species,'' within the geographical range 
occupied by the species;
    (b) Where these features are currently found;
    (c) Whether any of these features may require special management 
considerations or protection;
    (d) Specific areas outside the geographical area occupied by the 
species that are ``essential for the conservation of the species''; and
    (e) What, if any, critical habitat you think we should propose for 
designation if the species is proposed for listing, and why such 
habitat meets the requirements of section 4 of the Act.
    Please include sufficient information with your submission (such as 
scientific journal articles or other publications) to allow us to 
verify any scientific or commercial information you include.
    Submissions merely stating support for or opposition to the actions 
under consideration without providing supporting information or 
analysis, although noted, will not be considered in making a 
determination. Section 4(b)(1)(A) of the Act directs that 
determinations as to whether any species is an endangered or threatened 
species must be made ``solely on the basis of the best scientific and 
commercial data available.''
    You may submit your information concerning these status reviews by 
one of the methods listed in the ADDRESSES section. If you submit 
information via http://www.regulations.gov, your entire submission--
including any personal identifying information--will be posted on the 
Web site. If you submit a hardcopy that includes personal identifying 
information, you may request at the top of your document that we 
withhold this personal identifying information from public review. 
However, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. We will 
post all hardcopy submissions on http://www.regulations.gov.
    Information and supporting documentation that we received and used 
in preparing this finding will be available for you to review at http://www.regulations.gov, or you may make an appointment during normal 
business hours at the appropriate lead U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
Field Office (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT).

Background

    Section 4(b)(3)(A) of the Act requires that we make a finding on 
whether a petition to list, delist, or reclassify a species presents 
substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the 
petitioned action may be warranted. To the maximum extent practicable, 
we are to make this finding within 90 days of our receipt of the 
petition and publish our notice of the finding promptly in the Federal 
Register.
    Our standard for substantial scientific or commercial information 
within the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) with regard to a 90-day 
petition finding is ``that amount of information that would lead a 
reasonable person to believe that the measure proposed in the petition 
may be warranted'' (50 CFR 424.14(b)). If we find that substantial 
scientific or commercial information was presented, we are required to 
promptly commence a review of the status of the species, which we will 
subsequently summarize in our 12-month finding.

[[Page 37571]]

    Section 4 of the Act (16 U.S.C. 1533) and its implementing 
regulations at 50 CFR 424 set forth the procedures for adding a species 
to, or removing a species from, the Federal Lists of Endangered and 
Threatened Wildlife and Plants. A species may be determined to be an 
endangered or threatened species due to one or more of the five factors 
described in section 4(a)(1) of the Act (see (2) under Request For 
Information, above).
    In considering what factors might constitute threats, we must look 
beyond the exposure of the species to a factor to evaluate whether the 
species may respond to the factor in a way that causes actual impacts 
to the species. If there is exposure to a factor and the species 
responds negatively, the factor may be a threat, and, during the 
subsequent status review, we attempt to determine how significant a 
threat it is. The threat is significant if it drives, or contributes 
to, the risk of extinction of the species such that the species may 
warrant listing as an ``endangered species'' or a ``threatened 
species,'' as those terms are defined in the Act. However, the 
identification of factors that could affect a species negatively may 
not be sufficient for us to find that the information in the petition 
and our files is substantial. The information must include evidence 
sufficient to suggest that these factors may be operative threats that 
act on the species to the point that the species may meet the 
definition of an ``endangered species'' or ``threatened species'' under 
the Act.

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Alligator Snapping Turtle as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0038 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii; previously 
Macroclemys temminckii); Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, 
Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
The Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the alligator snapping turtle, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii; 
previously Macroclemys temminckii) based on Factors A, B, C and D. 
However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all 
potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the alligator snapping turtle, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Apalachicola Kingsake as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0039 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Apalachicola kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula meansi); Florida

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
The Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Apalachicola kingsnake, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Apalachicola kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula meansi) 
based on Factor A. However, during our status review we will thoroughly 
evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Apalachicola kingsnake, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Arizona Toad as an Endangered or 
Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R2-ES-2015-0040 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Arizona toad (Anaxyrus microscaphus); Arizona, California, Nevada, 
New Mexico, and Utah

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Arizona toad, be listed as 
endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the 
Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the 
requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 
CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Arizona toad (Anaxyrus microscaphus) based on Factor 
E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all 
potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Arizona toad, the Service requests information on the 
five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the 
factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, 
above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Blanding's Turtle as an Endangered 
or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R3-ES-2015-0041 under the Supporting Documents section.

[[Page 37572]]

Species and Range

    Blanding's turtle (Emydoidea blandingii); Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, 
New Hampshire, New York, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Wisconsin, 
United States; Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia, Canada.

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Blanding's turtle, be listed as 
endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the 
Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the 
requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 
CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Blanding's turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) based on 
Factors A, B, C, D, and E. However, during our status review we will 
thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Blanding's turtle, the Service requests information 
on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including 
the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, 
above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Blue Ridge Gray-Cheeked Salamander 
as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0042 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Blue Ridge gray-cheeked salamander (Plethodon amplus); North 
Carolina

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, including the Blue Ridge gray-cheeked 
salamander, be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat 
be designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as 
such and included the requisite identification information for the 
petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the 
petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial 
information indicating that listing the species may be warranted. We 
are not initiating a status review of this species in response to the 
petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an 
appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS-R4-ES-2015-
0042 under the ``Supporting Documents'' section. However, we ask that 
the public submit to us any new information that becomes available 
concerning the status of, or threats to, the Blue Ridge gray-cheeked 
salamander salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Caddo Mountain Salamander as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0043 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Caddo Mountain salamander (Plethodon caddoensis); Arkansas

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, including the Caddo Mountain salamander, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial 
scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned 
action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this 
species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding 
can be found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket 
No. FWS-R4-ES-2015-0043 under the ``Supporting Documents'' section. 
However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that 
becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Caddo 
Mountain salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the California Giant Salamander as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R8-ES-2015-0044 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    California giant salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus); California

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the California giant salamander, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial 
scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned 
action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this 
species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding 
can be found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket 
No. FWS-R8-ES-2015-0044 under the ``Supporting Documents'' section. 
However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that 
becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the 
California giant salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Cascade Caverns Salamander as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R2-ES-2015-0045 under the Supporting Documents section.

[[Page 37573]]

Species and Range

    Cascade Caverns salamander (Eurycea latitans); Texas

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012 from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Cascade Caverns salamander, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Cascade Caverns salamander (Eurycea latitans) based 
on Factor A. However, during our status review we will thoroughly 
evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Cascade Caverns salamander, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Cascades Frog as an Endangered or 
Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R1-ES-2015-0046 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Cascades frog (Rana cascadae); California, Oregon, and Washington

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Cascades frog, be listed as 
endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the 
Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the 
requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 
CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Cascades frog (Rana cascadae) based on Factors A, C, 
and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate 
all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Cascades frog, the Service requests information on 
the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including 
the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, 
above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Cedar Key Mole Skink as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0047 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Cedar Key mole skink (Plestiodon egregius insularis); Florida

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Cedar Key mole skink, be listed 
as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under 
the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included 
the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required 
at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Cedar Key mole skink (Plestiodon egregius insularis) 
based on Factors A, B, and E. However, during our status review we will 
thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Cedar Key mole skink, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Colorado Checkered Whiptail as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R6-ES-2015-0048 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Colorado checkered whiptail (Aspidoscelis neotesselata); Colorado

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, including the Colorado checkered whiptail, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial 
scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned 
action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this 
species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding 
can be found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket 
No. FWS-R6-ES-2015-0048 under the ``Supporting Documents'' section. 
However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that 
becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Colorado 
checkered whiptail or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Distinct Population Segment of 
North American Wild Horse as an Endangered or Threatened Species Under 
the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R8-ES-2015-0049 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    North American wild horse (population of the species Equus 
caballus); U.S. Federal public lands

[[Page 37574]]

Petition History

    On June 17, 2014, we received a petition, dated June 10, 2014, from 
Friends of Animals and The Cloud Foundation, requesting that the 
distinct population segment (DPS) of North American wild horses on all 
U.S. federal public lands be listed as an endangered or threatened 
species under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such 
and included the requisite identification information for the 
petitioner(s), as required by 50 CFR 424.14(a). In an October 3, 2014, 
letter to the petitioner, we responded that we reviewed the information 
presented in the petition and did not find that the petition warranted 
an emergency listing. This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial 
information indicating the petitioned entity may qualify as a DPS and, 
therefore, a listable entity under section 3(16) of the Act. The 
petition does not present substantial information supporting the 
characterization of North American wild horses on all U.S. Federal 
public lands as a DPS, because the discreteness criteria were not met. 
Therefore, this population is not a valid listable entity under section 
3(16) of the Act, and we are not initiating a status review in response 
to the petition. Our justification for this finding can be found as an 
appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS-R8-ES-2015-
0049 under the ``Supporting Documents'' section. However, we ask that 
the public submit to us any new information that becomes available 
concerning the status of, or threats to, the North American wild horse 
or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Foothill Yellow-Legged Frog as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R8-ES-2015-0050 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii); Oregon and California

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the foothill yellow-legged frog, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii) based on 
Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly 
evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the foothill yellow-legged frog, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Gopher Frog as an Endangered or 
Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0051 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Gopher frog (Lithobates capito); Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, 
Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the gopher frog, be listed as 
endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the 
Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the 
requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 
CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the gopher frog (Lithobates capito) based on Factors A, 
C, D, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly 
evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the gopher frog, the Service requests information on the 
five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including the 
factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, 
above).

Evaluation of a Petition To Reclassify the Gray Wolf, Excluding Mexican 
Wolf, in the Conterminous U.S. as a Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-HQ-ES-2015-0072 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Gray wolf, excluding the Mexican wolf (population of the species 
Canis lupus); conterminous United States.

Petition History

    On January 27, 2015, we received a petition dated January 27, 2015, 
from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and twenty-two 
undersigned petitioners (The Center for Biological Diversity, The Fund 
for Animals, Born Free USA, Friends of Animals and Their Environment, 
Help Our Wolves Live, The Detroit Zoological Society, Midwest 
Environmental Advocates, Predator Defense, National Wolfwatcher 
Coalition, Northwoods Alliance, Wisconsin Federated Humane Societies, 
Minnesota Humane Society, Howling for Wolves, Detroit Audubon Society, 
Sault Sainte Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Wildlife Public Trust and 
Coexistence, Minnesota Voters for Animal Protection, Friends of the 
Wisconsin Wolf, Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin, Justice for Wolves, 
and Wildwoods (Minnesota)), requesting that the gray wolf, excluding 
the Mexican wolf subspecies, be reclassified as threatened throughout 
the conterminous United States (U.S.) under the Act. The petition 
clearly identified itself as such and included the requisite 
identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 
424.14(a). On March 10, 2015, we received electronic copies of the 
published references cited in the January, 27, 2015 petition from HSUS. 
In a March 27, 2015, letter to HSUS, we responded that we reviewed the 
information presented in the petition and did not find that the 
petition warranted an emergency listing. This finding addresses the 
petition.

[[Page 37575]]

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition, we find the petition does not 
provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating the 
petitioned entity may qualify as a DPS and, therefore, a listable 
entity under section 3(16) of the Act. Although any further evaluation 
of the petition was unnecessary because this is a sound basis for a 
not-substantial finding, due to the level of controversy surrounding 
the legal status of gray wolf under the Act and the high interest in 
this petition specifically we further evaluated the petition by 
analyzing the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1). Based on our 
review of the petition, sources cited in the petition, and our files we 
find the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial 
information indicating that gray wolves, excluding Mexican wolves, in 
the coterminous U.S. may be likely to become an endangered species 
within the foreseeable future (a threatened species) due to any one of 
the five listing factors. We come to the same conclusion when we 
consider whether collective information presented in the petition 
represents substantial information. The petitioner's information with 
respect to unoccupied suitable habitat is based on a misinterpretation 
of the Act. Moreover, despite making allegations with respect to 
disease, and small population size, the petitioners provided no 
information to support their claim. Inadequate existing regulatory 
mechanisms are not an independent source of threat, but relate to 
amelioration of threats under the other factors. Therefore, the 
petition only provides information with respect to possible 
overutilization from recreational hunting and trapping, and the 
information is not substantial. Thus the petition provides no 
information to combine with the information regarding possible 
overutilization from recreational hunting and trapping. In any case, 
even if the petition had presented information with respect to other 
sources of mortality, the existing state plans regulating take of 
wolves only allow take above certain population thresholds, such that 
if the other causes of mortality increased above certain levels, 
hunting and trapping would be reduced to prevent the population from 
dipping below those thresholds. So those plans have a built-in response 
to possible concerns relating to cumulative impacts. Accordingly, we 
are not initiating a status review in response to this petition.
    Our justification for this finding can be found as an appendix at 
http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. FWS-HQ-ES-2015-0072 under 
the ``Supporting Documents'' section. However, we ask that the public 
submit to us any new information that becomes available concerning the 
status of, or threats to, the gray wolf or its habitat at any time (see 
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Green Salamander as an Endangered 
or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0052 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Green salamander (Aneides aeneus); Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, 
Maryland, Mississippi, Ohio, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and South 
Carolina.

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, including the green salamander, be listed as 
endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the 
Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the 
requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 
CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the green salamander (Aneides aeneus) based on Factors A, 
B, C, D, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly 
evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the green salamander, the Service requests information on 
the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including 
the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, 
above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Illinois Chorus Frog as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R3-ES-2015-0053 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris illinoensis or Pseudacris 
streckeri illinoensis); Illinois, Missouri, and Arkansas

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Illinois chorus frog, be listed 
as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under 
the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included 
the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required 
at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Illinois chorus frog (Pseudacris illinoensis or 
Pseudacris streckeri illinoensis) based on Factors A and E. However, 
during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all potential 
threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Illinois chorus frog, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Kern Canyon Slender Salamander as 
an Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R8-ES-2015-0054 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Kern Canyon slender salamander (Batrachoseps simatus); California

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, including the Kern Canyon slender salamander, 
be listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be 
designated under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as 
such

[[Page 37576]]

and included the requisite identification information for the 
petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the 
petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Kern Canyon slender salamander (Batrachoseps simatus) 
based on Factors A, D, and E. However, during our status review we will 
thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Kern Canyon slender salamander, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Key Ringneck Snake as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0055 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Key ringneck snake (Diadophis punctatus acricus); Florida

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, including the Key ringneck snake, be listed as 
endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the 
Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the 
requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 
CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Key ringneck snake (Diadophis punctatus acricus) 
based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will 
thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Key ringneck snake, the Service requests information 
on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including 
the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, 
above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Olympic Torrent Salamander as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R1-ES-2015-0056 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Olympic torrent salamander (Rhyacotriton olympicus); Washington

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Olympic torrent salamander, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial 
scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned 
action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this 
species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding 
can be found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket 
No. FWS-R1-ES-2015-0056 under the ``Supporting Documents'' section. 
However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that 
becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Olympic 
torrent salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Oregon Slender Salamander as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R1-ES-2015-0057 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Oregon slender salamander (Batrachoseps wrighti; previously B. 
wrightorum); Oregon

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Oregon slender salamander, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Oregon slender salamander (Batrachoseps wrighti) 
based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will 
thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Oregon slender salamander, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Pigeon Mountain Salamander as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0058 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Pigeon Mountain salamander (Plethodon petraeus); Georgia

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, including the Pigeon Mountain salamander, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

[[Page 37577]]

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial 
scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned 
action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this 
species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding 
can be found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket 
No. FWS-R4-ES-2015-0058 under the ``Supporting Documents'' section. 
However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that 
becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Pigeon 
Mountain salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Relictual Slender Salamander as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R8-ES-2015-0059 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Relictual slender salamander (Batrachoseps relictus); California

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, including the relictual slender salamander, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the relictual slender salamander (Batrachoseps relictus) 
based on Factors A, D, and E. However, during our status review we will 
thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the relictual slender salamander, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Rim Rock Crowned Snake as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0060 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Rim Rock crowned snake (Tantilla oolitica); Florida

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
The Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Rim Rock crowned snake, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Rim Rock crowned snake (Tantilla oolitica) based on 
Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly 
evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Rim Rock crowned snake, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Rio Grande Cooter as an Endangered 
or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R2-ES-2015-0061 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Rio Grande cooter or Western River cooter (Pseudemys gorzugi); 
Texas and New Mexico, United States; Coahuila, Neuvo Leon, and 
Tamaulipas, Mexico

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
The Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the Rio Grande cooter, be listed as 
endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the 
Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the 
requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 
CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the Rio Grande cooter (Pseudemys gorzugi) based on 
Factors A, B, and D. However, during our status review we will 
thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the Rio Grande cooter, the Service requests information 
on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including 
the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, 
above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List Silvery Phacelia as an Endangered or 
Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R1-ES-2015-0062 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Silvery phacelia (Phacelia argentea); Oregon and California

Petition History

    On March 7, 2014, we received a petition dated March 7, 2014, from 
The Center for Biological Diversity, Oregon Wild, Friends of Del Norte, 
Oregon Coast Alliance, The Native Plant Society of Oregon, The 
California Native Plant Society, The Environmental Protection 
Information Center, and Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center (the 
petitioners), requesting that silvery phacelia be listed as an 
endangered or threatened species and, if applicable, critical habitat 
be designated for this species under the Act. The petition clearly 
identified itself as such and included the requisite identification 
information for the petitioner, required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This 
finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we

[[Page 37578]]

find that the petition presents substantial scientific or commercial 
information indicating that the petitioned action may be warranted for 
the silvery phacelia (Phacelia argentea) based on Factors A and D. 
However, during our status review we will thoroughly evaluate all 
potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the silvery phacelia, the Service requests information on 
the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including 
the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, 
above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Southern Hog-Nosed Snake as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0063 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Southern hog-nosed snake (Heterodon simus); North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Georgia, and Florida

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
The Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the southern hog-nosed snake, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the southern hog-nosed snake (Heterodon simus) based on 
Factors A and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly 
evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the southern hog-nosed snake, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Spotted Turtle as an Endangered or 
Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R5-ES-2015-0064 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Spotted turtle (Clemmys guttata); Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, 
Georgia, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, 
Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South 
Carolina, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the spotted turtle, be listed as 
endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under the 
Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the 
requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 
CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the spotted turtle (Clemmys guttata) based on Factors A, 
B, D, and E. However, during our status review we will thoroughly 
evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the spotted turtle, the Service requests information on 
the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the Act, including 
the factors identified in this finding (see Request for Information, 
above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Weller's Salamander as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0065 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Weller's salamander (Plethodon welleri, 1931); North Carolina, 
Tennessee, and Virginia

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that 53 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, including the Weller's salamander, be listed 
as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated under 
the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included 
the requisite identification information for the petitioner, required 
at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial 
scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned 
action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this 
species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding 
can be found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket 
No. FWS-R4-ES-2015-0065 under the ``Supporting Documents'' section. 
However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that 
becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the Weller's 
salamander or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
CONTACT).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Western Spadefoot Toad as an 
Endangered or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R8-ES-2015-0066 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Western spadefoot toad (Spea hammondii or Scaphiopus hammondii); 
California, United States; Northwestern Baja California, Mexico

Petition History

    On July 11, 2012, we received a petition dated July 11, 2012, from 
the Center for Biological Diversity requesting that 53 species of 
reptiles and amphibians, including the western spadefoot toad, be 
listed as endangered or threatened and critical habitat be designated 
under the Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and 
included the requisite identification information for the petitioner, 
required at 50 CFR 424.14(a). This finding addresses the petition.

[[Page 37579]]

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition presents substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the petitioned action may be 
warranted for the western spadefoot toad (Spea hammondii or Scaphiopus 
hammondii) based on Factors A and E. However, during our status review 
we will thoroughly evaluate all potential threats to the species.
    Thus, for the western spadefoot toad, the Service requests 
information on the five listing factors under section 4(a)(1) of the 
Act, including the factors identified in this finding (see Request for 
Information, above).

Evaluation of a Petition To List the Wingtail Crayfish as an Endangered 
or Threatened Species Under the Act

    Additional information regarding our review of this petition can be 
found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket No. 
FWS-R4-ES-2015-0067 under the Supporting Documents section.

Species and Range

    Wingtail crayfish (Procambarus (Leconticambarus) latipleurum); 
Florida

Petition History

    On January 6, 2014, we received a petition dated January 6, 2014, 
from the Center for Biological Diversity, requesting that the wingtail 
crayfish be listed as an endangered or threatened species under the 
Act. The petition clearly identified itself as such and included the 
requisite identification information for the petitioner, required at 50 
CFR 424.14(a).

Finding

    Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the 
petition, we find that the petition does not provide substantial 
scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned 
action may be warranted. We are not initiating a status review of this 
species in response to the petition. Our justification for this finding 
can be found as an appendix at http://www.regulations.gov under Docket 
No. FWS-R4-ES-2015-0067 under the ``Supporting Documents'' section. 
However, we ask that the public submit to us any new information that 
becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the wingtail 
crayfish or its habitat at any time (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
CONTACT).

Conclusion

    On the basis of our evaluation of the information presented under 
section 4(b)(3)(A) of the Act, we have determined that the petitions 
summarized above for the Blue Ridge gray-cheeked salamander, Caddo 
Mountain salamander, California giant salamander, Colorado checkered 
whiptail, the distinct population segment of North American wild horse, 
gray wolf, excluding Mexican wolf, in the conterminous U.S., Olympic 
torrent salamander, Pigeon Mountain salamander, Weller's salamander, 
and wingtail crayfish do not present substantial scientific or 
commercial information indicating that the requested actions may be 
warranted. Therefore, we are not initiating status reviews for these 
species.
    On the basis of our evaluation of the information presented under 
section 4(b)(3)(A) of the Act, we have determined that the petitions 
summarized above for alligator snapping turtle, Apalachicola kingsnake, 
Arizona toad, Blanding's turtle, Cascade Caverns salamander, Cascades 
frog, Cedar Key mole skink, foothill yellow-legged frog, gopher frog, 
green salamander, Illinois chorus frog, Kern Canyon slender salamander, 
Key ringneck snake, Oregon slender salamander, relictual slender 
salamander, Rim Rock crowned snake, Rio Grande cooter, silvery 
phacelia, southern hog-nosed snake, spotted turtle, and western 
spadefoot toad present substantial scientific or commercial information 
indicating that the requested actions may be warranted. Because we have 
found that the petitions present substantial information indicating 
that the petitioned actions may be warranted, we are initiating status 
reviews to determine whether these actions under the Act are warranted. 
At the conclusion of the status reviews, we will issue a 12-month 
finding in accordance with section 4(b)(3)(B) of the Act, as to whether 
or not the Service believes listing is warranted.
    It is important to note that the ``substantial information'' 
standard for a 90-day finding as to whether the petitioned action may 
be warranted differs from the Act's ``best scientific and commercial 
data'' standard that applies to the Service's determination in a 12-
month finding as to whether a petitioned action is in fact warranted. A 
90-day finding is not based on a status review. In a 12-month finding, 
we will determine whether a petitioned action is warranted after we 
have completed a thorough status review of the species, which is 
conducted following a substantial 90-day finding. Because the Act's 
standards for 90-day and 12-month findings are different, as described 
above, a substantial 90-day finding does not mean that the 12-month 
finding will result in a warranted finding.

References Cited

    A complete list of references cited is available on the Internet at 
http://www.regulations.gov and upon request from the appropriate lead 
field offices (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT).

Authors

    The primary authors of this document are the staff members of the 
Branch of Listing, Ecological Services Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service.

Authority

    The authority for these actions is the Endangered Species Act of 
1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.).

    Dated: June 22, 2015.
Stephen Guertin,
Acting Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
[FR Doc. 2015-16001 Filed 6-30-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4310-55-P