Certifications Pursuant to Section 609 of Public Law 101-162, 30318-30319 [2015-12750]

Download as PDF 30318 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 101 / Wednesday, May 27, 2015 / Notices 5. Authorization for the Social Security Administration to Obtain Account Records from a Financial Institution and Request for Records (Medicare)—0960–0729. The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) established the Medicare Part D program for voluntary prescription drug coverage of premium, deductible, and copayment costs for individuals with limited income and resources. The MMA mandates that the Government provide subsidies for those individuals who qualify for the program, and who meet eligibility criteria for help with premium, deductible, or co-payment costs. SSA uses the SSA–4640, Authorization for the Social Security Administration to Obtain Account Records from a Financial Institution and Request for Records (Medicare) to determine if subsidy applicants or recipients qualify, or continue to qualify, for the subsidy. SSA uses Form SSA–4640 to: (1) Obtain the individual’s consent to verify balances of financial institution (FI) accounts; and (2) obtain verification of such balances from the FI. Respondents are Medicare Part D program subsidy applicants or claimants, and their financial institutions. This is a correction notice. SSA published this information collection as a revision on March 9, 2015 at 80 FR 12542. Since we are not revising the Privacy Act Statement, this is now an extension of an OMB-approved information collection. Type of Request: Extension of an OMB-approved information collection. Modality of completion Number of respondents Frequency of response Average burden per response (minutes) Estimated total annual burden (hours) Medicare Part D Subsidy Applicants ............................................................... Financial Institutions ........................................................................................ 5,000 5,000 1 1 1 4 83 333 Total .......................................................................................................... 10,000 ........................ ........................ 416 Dated: May 20, 2015. Faye I. Lipsky, Reports Clearance Officer, Social Security Administration. [FR Doc. 2015–12671 Filed 5–26–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4191–02–P DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 9147] Certifications Pursuant to Section 609 of Public Law 101–162 On April 27, 2015, the Department of State certified, pursuant to Section 609 of Public Law 101–162, that 14 nations have adopted programs to reduce the incidental capture of sea turtles in their shrimp fisheries comparable to the program in effect in the United States. The Department also certified that the fishing environments in 26 other countries and one economy do not pose a threat of the incidental taking of sea turtles protected under Section 609. DATES: Effective on Publication. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen J. Wilger, Office of Marine Conservation, Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, Department of State, Washington, DC 20520–7818; telephone: (202) 647–3263; email: wilgersj2@ state.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 609 of Public Law 101–162 (‘‘Section 609’’) prohibits imports of certain categories of shrimp unless the President certifies to the Congress by May 1, 1991, and annually thereafter, mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:45 May 26, 2015 Jkt 235001 either: (1) That the harvesting nation has adopted a program governing the incidental capture of sea turtles in its commercial shrimp fishery comparable to the program in effect in the United States and has an incidental take rate comparable to that of the United States; or (2) that the fishing environment in the harvesting nation does not pose a threat of the incidental taking of sea turtles. The President has delegated the authority to make this certification to the Department of State (‘‘the Department’’). Revised State Department guidelines for making the required certifications were published in the Federal Register on July 2, 1999 (Vol. 64, No. 130, Public Notice 3086). On April 27, 2015, the Department certified 14 nations on the basis that their sea turtle protection programs are comparable to that of the United States: Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Gabon, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, and Suriname. The Department also certified 26 shrimp harvesting nations and one economy as having fishing environments that do not pose a danger to sea turtles. Sixteen nations have shrimping grounds only in cold waters where the risk of taking sea turtles is negligible. They are: Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Russia, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and Uruguay. Ten nations and one economy only harvest shrimp using small boats with crews of less than five that use manual rather than mechanical means to retrieve nets, or PO 00000 Frm 00113 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 catch shrimp using other methods that do not threaten sea turtles. Use of such small-scale technology does not adversely affect sea turtles. The 10 nations and one economy are: The Bahamas, Belize, China, the Dominican Republic, Fiji, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Oman, Peru, Sri Lanka, and Venezuela. The Department of State has communicated the certifications under Section 609 to the Office of Field Operations of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. All DS–2031 forms accompanying shrimp imports from uncertified nations must be originals and signed by the competent domestic fisheries authority. Shrimp harvested with turtle excluder devices (TEDs) in an uncertified nation may, under specific circumstances, be eligible for importation into the United States under the DS–2031 section 7(A)(2) provision for ‘‘shrimp harvested by commercial shrimp trawl vessels using TEDs comparable in effectiveness to those required in the United States.’’ Use of this provision requires that the Department of State determine in advance that the government of the harvesting nation has put in place adequate procedures to monitor the use of TEDS in the specific fishery in question and to ensure the accurate completion of the DS–2031 forms. At this time, the Department has made such a determination only with respect to specific and limited fisheries in Australia and France. Thus, the importation of TED-caught shrimp from any other uncertified nation will not be allowed. For Australia, shrimp harvested in the Exmouth Gulf Prawn Fishery, the Northern Prawn Fishery, E:\FR\FM\27MYN1.SGM 27MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 101 / Wednesday, May 27, 2015 / Notices the Queensland East Coast Trawl Fishery, and the Torres Strait Prawn Fishery are eligible for entry under this provision. For France, shrimp harvested in the French Guiana domestic trawl fishery are eligible for entry under this provision. An official of the competent domestic fisheries authority for the country where the shrimp were harvested must sign the DS–2031 form accompanying these imports into the United States. In addition, the Department has determined that shrimp harvested in the Spencer Gulf region in Australia and Mediterranean red shrimp (Aristeus antennatus) harvested in the Mediterranean Sea by Spain may be exported to the United States under the DS–2031 section 7(A)(4) provision for ‘‘shrimp harvested in a manner or under circumstances determined by the Department of State not to pose a threat of the incidental taking of sea turtles.’’ An official of the Government of Australia or Spain must certify the DS– 2031 form accompanying these imports into the United States. Dated: May 20, 2015. David A. Balton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and Fisheries, Department of State. [FR Doc. 2015–12750 Filed 5–26–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4710–09–P DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 9148] Determination and Certification Under Section 40A of the Arms Export Control Act Pursuant to section 40A of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2781), and Executive Order 13637, as amended, I hereby determine and certify to the Congress that the following countries are not cooperating fully with United States antiterrorism efforts: mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Eritrea Iran Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, or North Korea) Syria Venezuela This determination and certification shall be transmitted to the Congress and published in the Federal Register. Dated: May 11, 2015. John Kerry, Secretary of State. [FR Doc. 2015–12747 Filed 5–26–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4710–10–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:45 May 26, 2015 Jkt 235001 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Buy America Waiver Notification Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: This notice provides information regarding FHWA’s finding that a Buy America waiver is appropriate for the obligation of Federal-aid funds for 21 State projects involving the acquisition of vehicles and equipment on the condition that they be assembled in the U.S. DATES: The effective date of the waiver is May 28, 2015. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For questions about this notice, please contact Mr. Gerald Yakowenko, FHWA Office of Program Administration, 202– 366–1562, or via email at gerald.yakowenko@dot.gov. For legal questions, please contact Mr. Jomar Maldonado, FHWA Office of the Chief Counsel, 202–366–1373, or via email at jomar.maldonado@dot.gov. Office hours for the FHWA are from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., e.t., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: Electronic Access An electronic copy of this document may be downloaded from the Federal Register’s home page at http:// www.archives.gov and the Government Printing Office’s database at http:// www.access.gpo.gov/nara. Background This notice provides information regarding FHWA’s finding that a Buy America waiver is appropriate for the obligation of Federal-aid funds for 21 State projects involving the acquisition of vehicles (including sedans, vans, pickups, trucks, buses, and street sweepers) and equipment (such as snooper truck and trail grooming equipment) on the condition that they be assembled in the U.S. The waiver would apply to approximately 249 vehicles. The requests, available at http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/construction/ contracts/cmaq150325.cfm, are incorporated by reference into this notice. These projects are being undertaken to implement air quality improvement, safety, and mobility goals under FHWA’s Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program; National Bridge and Tunnel Inventory and Inspection Program; and the Recreational Trails Program. PO 00000 Frm 00114 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 30319 Title 23, Code of Federal Regulations, section 635.410 requires that steel or iron materials (including protective coatings) that will be permanently incorporated in a Federal-aid project must be manufactured in the U.S. For FHWA, this means that all the processes that modified the chemical content, physical shape or size, or final finish of the material (from initial melting and mixing, continuing through the bending and coating) occurred in the U.S. The statute and regulations create a process for granting waivers from the Buy America requirements when its application would be inconsistent with the public interest or when satisfactory quality domestic steel and iron products are not sufficiently available. In 1983, FHWA determined that it was both in the public interest and consistent with the legislative intent to waive Buy America for manufactured products other than steel manufactured products. However, FHWA’s national waiver for manufactured products does not apply to the requests in this notice because they involve predominately steel and iron manufactured products. The FHWA’s Buy America requirements do not have special provisions for applying Buy America to ‘‘rolling stock’’ such as vehicles or vehicle components (see 49 U.S.C. 5323(j)(2)(C), 49 CFR 661.11, and 49 U.S.C. 24405(a)(2)(C) for examples of Buy America rolling stock provisions for other DOT agencies). Based on all the information available to the agency, FHWA concludes that there are no domestic manufacturers that produce the vehicles and vehicle components identified in this notice in such a way that their steel and iron elements are manufactured domestically. The FHWA’s Buy America requirements were tailored to the types of products that are typically used in highway construction, which generally meet the requirement that steel and iron materials be manufactured domestically. In today’s global industry, vehicles are assembled with iron and steel components that are manufactured all over the world. The FHWA is not aware of any domestically produced vehicle on the market that meets FHWA’s Buy America requirement to have all its iron and steel be manufactured exclusively in the U.S. For example, the Chevrolet Volt, which was identified by many commenters in a November 21, 2011, Federal Register Notice (76 FR 72027) as a car that is made in the U.S., is comprised of only 45 percent of U.S. and Canadian content according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Part 583 American Automobile Labeling Act Report Web E:\FR\FM\27MYN1.SGM 27MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 101 (Wednesday, May 27, 2015)]
[Notices]
[Pages 30318-30319]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2015-12750]


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DEPARTMENT OF STATE

 [Public Notice: 9147]


Certifications Pursuant to Section 609 of Public Law 101-162

SUMMARY: On April 27, 2015, the Department of State certified, pursuant 
to Section 609 of Public Law 101-162, that 14 nations have adopted 
programs to reduce the incidental capture of sea turtles in their 
shrimp fisheries comparable to the program in effect in the United 
States. The Department also certified that the fishing environments in 
26 other countries and one economy do not pose a threat of the 
incidental taking of sea turtles protected under Section 609.

DATES: Effective on Publication.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen J. Wilger, Office of Marine 
Conservation, Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and 
Scientific Affairs, Department of State, Washington, DC 20520-7818; 
telephone: (202) 647-3263; email: wilgersj2@state.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 609 of Public Law 101-162 (``Section 
609'') prohibits imports of certain categories of shrimp unless the 
President certifies to the Congress by May 1, 1991, and annually 
thereafter, either: (1) That the harvesting nation has adopted a 
program governing the incidental capture of sea turtles in its 
commercial shrimp fishery comparable to the program in effect in the 
United States and has an incidental take rate comparable to that of the 
United States; or (2) that the fishing environment in the harvesting 
nation does not pose a threat of the incidental taking of sea turtles. 
The President has delegated the authority to make this certification to 
the Department of State (``the Department''). Revised State Department 
guidelines for making the required certifications were published in the 
Federal Register on July 2, 1999 (Vol. 64, No. 130, Public Notice 
3086).
    On April 27, 2015, the Department certified 14 nations on the basis 
that their sea turtle protection programs are comparable to that of the 
United States: Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Gabon, 
Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, 
Panama, and Suriname. The Department also certified 26 shrimp 
harvesting nations and one economy as having fishing environments that 
do not pose a danger to sea turtles. Sixteen nations have shrimping 
grounds only in cold waters where the risk of taking sea turtles is 
negligible. They are: Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Denmark, 
Finland, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, 
Norway, Russia, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and Uruguay. Ten nations 
and one economy only harvest shrimp using small boats with crews of 
less than five that use manual rather than mechanical means to retrieve 
nets, or catch shrimp using other methods that do not threaten sea 
turtles. Use of such small-scale technology does not adversely affect 
sea turtles. The 10 nations and one economy are: The Bahamas, Belize, 
China, the Dominican Republic, Fiji, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Oman, Peru, 
Sri Lanka, and Venezuela. The Department of State has communicated the 
certifications under Section 609 to the Office of Field Operations of 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
    All DS-2031 forms accompanying shrimp imports from uncertified 
nations must be originals and signed by the competent domestic 
fisheries authority.
    Shrimp harvested with turtle excluder devices (TEDs) in an 
uncertified nation may, under specific circumstances, be eligible for 
importation into the United States under the DS-2031 section 7(A)(2) 
provision for ``shrimp harvested by commercial shrimp trawl vessels 
using TEDs comparable in effectiveness to those required in the United 
States.'' Use of this provision requires that the Department of State 
determine in advance that the government of the harvesting nation has 
put in place adequate procedures to monitor the use of TEDS in the 
specific fishery in question and to ensure the accurate completion of 
the DS-2031 forms. At this time, the Department has made such a 
determination only with respect to specific and limited fisheries in 
Australia and France. Thus, the importation of TED-caught shrimp from 
any other uncertified nation will not be allowed. For Australia, shrimp 
harvested in the Exmouth Gulf Prawn Fishery, the Northern Prawn 
Fishery,

[[Page 30319]]

the Queensland East Coast Trawl Fishery, and the Torres Strait Prawn 
Fishery are eligible for entry under this provision. For France, shrimp 
harvested in the French Guiana domestic trawl fishery are eligible for 
entry under this provision. An official of the competent domestic 
fisheries authority for the country where the shrimp were harvested 
must sign the DS-2031 form accompanying these imports into the United 
States.
    In addition, the Department has determined that shrimp harvested in 
the Spencer Gulf region in Australia and Mediterranean red shrimp 
(Aristeus antennatus) harvested in the Mediterranean Sea by Spain may 
be exported to the United States under the DS-2031 section 7(A)(4) 
provision for ``shrimp harvested in a manner or under circumstances 
determined by the Department of State not to pose a threat of the 
incidental taking of sea turtles.'' An official of the Government of 
Australia or Spain must certify the DS-2031 form accompanying these 
imports into the United States.

    Dated: May 20, 2015.
David A. Balton,
Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and Fisheries, 
Department of State.
[FR Doc. 2015-12750 Filed 5-26-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4710-09-P