Air Carrier Contract Maintenance Requirements; Correction, 25215-25216 [2015-10423]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 85 / Monday, May 4, 2015 / Rules and Regulations tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES and gender classifications as those used on the Form EEO–1), without including personally identifiable information. Sections 1207.23(b)(9) and 1207.22(c) require that each Bank and the Office of Finance submit the baseline board demographic information collected to FHFA no later than September 30, 2015, and thereafter the information be included as part of the annual reports they are already required to submit under existing part 1207. Use: FHFA will use the information collected under § 1207.23(b)(9)(i) to assess the effectiveness of the policies and procedures that each of the Banks and the Office of Finance is required to implement to promote diversity in all of its business and activities ‘‘at all levels’’ and, specifically, to encourage diversity in the nomination and solicitation of nominees for members of its boards of directors. FHFA will also use the information to establish a baseline to analyze future trends relating to the diversity of the boards of directors of the Banks and the Office of Finance. Respondents: Respondents will be the approximately 210 individuals serving on the boards of directors of the Banks and the Office of Finance in any given year. Frequency: The information will be collected annually. Annual Burden Estimate: FHFA estimates the total annualized hour burden for all respondents to the proposed information collection to be 21 hours. FHFA estimates that an average of 210 board directors will provide information annually and that each response will take approximately 0.1 hours on average (210 respondents × 0.1 hours per response = 21 hours). There will be no annualized cost to the Federal government. V. Regulatory Flexibility Act The Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) requires that a regulation that has a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities, small businesses, or small organizations include an initial regulatory flexibility analysis describing the regulation’s impact on small entities. Such an analysis need not be undertaken if the agency has certified that the regulation will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. 5 U.S.C. 605(b). FHFA has considered the impact of the final rule under the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The General Counsel of FHFA certifies that the final rule is not likely to have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities because the regulation is applicable VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:34 May 01, 2015 Jkt 235001 only to the Banks and the Office of Finance, which are not small entities for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. List of Subjects in 12 CFR Part 1207 Discrimination, Diversity, Equal employment opportunity, Minority businesses, Office of Finance, Outreach, Regulated entities. Authority and Issuance For the reasons stated in the and under the authority of 12 U.S.C. 4526, FHFA amends part 1207 of title 12 of the Code of Federal Regulations as follows: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION, PART 1207—MINORITY AND WOMEN INCLUSION 1. The authority citation for part 1207 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 12 U.S.C. 4520 and 4526; 12 U.S.C. 1833e; E.O. 11478. 25215 (ii) A description of the outreach activities and strategies executed during the preceding year to promote diversity in nominating or soliciting nominees for positions on boards of directors of the Banks (consistent with 12 CFR 1261.9) and the Office of Finance; (10) A comparison of the data reported by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac under paragraphs (b)(1) through (8) of this section, and by the Banks and the Office of Finance under paragraphs (b)(1) through (9) of this section, to such data as reported in the previous year together with a narrative analysis; * * * * * Dated: April 28, 2015. Melvin L. Watt, Director, Federal Housing Finance Agency. [FR Doc. 2015–10374 Filed 5–1–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8070–01–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Subpart C—Minority and Women Inclusion and Diversity at Regulated Entities and the Office of Finance Federal Aviation Administration 2. Amend § 1207.22 by adding a new sentence at the end of paragraph (c) to read as follows: [Docket No. FAA–2011–1136; Amdt. Nos. 121–371A and 135–132A] ■ § 1207.22 Regulated entity and Office of Finance reports. * * * * * (c) * * * The data required to be reported by § 1207.23(b)(9) shall be submitted no later than September 30, 2015, and thereafter included in each annual report. * * * * * ■ 3. Amend § 1207.23 as follows: ■ a. Redesignate paragraphs (b)(9) through (19) as paragraphs (b)(10) through (20); and ■ b. Add new paragraph (b)(9) and revise newly redesignated paragraph (b)(10) to read as follows: § 1207.23 Annual reports—format and contents. * * * * * (b) * * * (9)(i) Data showing for the reporting year by minority and gender classification, the number of individuals on the board of directors of each Bank and the Office of Finance— (A) Using data collected by each Bank and the Office of Finance through an information collection requesting each director’s voluntary self-identification of his or her minority and gender classification without personally identifiable information; (B) Using the same classifications as those on the Form EEO–1; and PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 14 CFR Parts 121 and 135 RIN 2120–AJ33 Air Carrier Contract Maintenance Requirements; Correction Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; correction. AGENCY: The FAA is correcting a final rule published on March 4, 2015 (80 FR 11537). In that rule, the FAA amended its maintenance regulations for domestic, flag, and supplemental operations, and for commuter and ondemand operations for aircraft type certificated with a passenger seating configuration of 10 seats or more (excluding any pilot seat). The FAA originally proposed to make the effective date of the rule one year after its publication date to give affected operators time to come into compliance with the new requirements, and to allow the FAA time to review information submitted by the operators under the rule. However, in the final rule, the FAA inadvertently overlooked the proposed one-year compliance time, and included an effective date of 60 days after publication. This document corrects the effective date of that document. DATES: This correction is effective on May 4, 2015. The effective date of the final rule published March 4, 2015 (80 FR 11537), is corrected to March 4, 2016. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\04MYR1.SGM 04MYR1 25216 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 85 / Monday, May 4, 2015 / Rules and Regulations FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES For technical questions concerning this action, contact Wende T. DiMuro, AFS–330, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone (202) 267–1685; email wende.t.dimuro@faa.gov. For legal questions concerning this action, contact Edmund Averman, AGC–200, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone (202) 267–3147, email ed.averman@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background On March 4, 2015, the FAA published a final rule entitled, ‘‘Air Carrier Contract Maintenance Requirements’’ (80 FR 11537). In that final rule, the FAA revised its maintenance regulations for domestic, flag, and supplemental operations, and for commuter and on-demand operations for aircraft type certificated with a passenger seating configuration of 10 seats or more (excluding any pilot seat). The new rules require affected air carriers and operators to develop policies, procedures, methods, and instructions for performing contract maintenance that are acceptable to the FAA, and to include them in their maintenance manuals. The rules also require the air carriers and operators to provide a list to the FAA of all persons with whom they contract their maintenance, which also must include the physical address where the work will be carried out and a description of the type of work that is to be carried out at each location. In the notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) (77 FR 67584; Nov. 13, 2012), the FAA proposed to make the effective date one year after the publication of the final rule. The stated reason for this was that the agency recognized that the affected operators would need time to fully develop the policies, procedures, methods, and instructions for contract maintenance and to provide them in an acceptable format to the FAA. We also noted that operators would need time to prepare the list with the required information of their contract maintenance providers and to provide them in an acceptable format to their Certificate Holding District Offices (77 FR 67587). The FAA also noted that it would need time to review the information submitted by the operators. In publishing the final rule, the FAA inadvertently overlooked this proposed one-year compliance time, and included an effective date of 60 days after publication. This document corrects VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:00 May 01, 2015 Jkt 235001 that oversight so that the effective date is one year after the publication of the final rule, or March 4, 2016. Correction In FR Doc. 2015–04179, beginning on page 11537 in the Federal Register of March 4, 2015, make the following corrections: Correction 1. On page 11537, in the second column, in the paragraph entitled ‘‘DATES:’’, correct ‘‘May 4, 2015’’ to read ‘‘March 4, 2016.’’ Issued under authority provided by 49 U.S.C. 106(f) in Washington, DC, on April 29, 2015. John Barbagallo, Acting Director, Flight Standards Office. [FR Doc. 2015–10423 Filed 5–1–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1120 [CPSC Docket No. CPSC–2014–0024] Substantial Product Hazard List: Seasonal and Decorative Lighting Products Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The Consumer Product Safety Commission (‘‘CPSC’’ or ‘‘Commission’’) is issuing a final rule to specify that seasonal and decorative lighting products that do not contain any one of three readily observable characteristics (minimum wire size, sufficient strain relief, or overcurrent protection), as addressed in a voluntary standard, are deemed a substantial product hazard under the Consumer Product Safety Act (‘‘CPSA’’). Additionally, the Commission is making a technical amendment to reformat incorporations by reference in this part. DATES: Effective date: The rule takes effect on June 3, 2015. The incorporation by reference of the publication listed in this rule is approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of June 3, 2015. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mary Kroh, Office of Compliance and Field Operations, Consumer Product Safety Commission, 4330 East West Highway, Bethesda, MD 20814; telephone: 301–987–7886; mkroh@ cpsc.gov. SUMMARY: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 I. Background and Statutory Authority A. Statutory Authority Section 223 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (‘‘CPSIA’’), amended section 15 of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 2064, to add a new subsection (j). Section 15(j) of the CPSA provides the Commission with the authority to specify, by rule, for any consumer product or class of consumer products, characteristics whose existence or absence are deemed a substantial product hazard under section 15(a)(2) of the CPSA. Section 15(a)(2) of the CPSA defines a ‘‘substantial product hazard,’’ in relevant part, as a product defect which (because of the pattern of defect, the number of defective products distributed in commerce, the severity of the risk, or otherwise) creates a substantial risk of injury to the public. A rule under section 15(j) of the CPSA (a ‘‘15(j) rule’’) is not a consumer product safety rule that imposes performance or labeling requirements for newly manufactured products. Rather, a 15(j) rule is a Commission determination of a product defect based upon noncompliance with specific product characteristics that are addressed in an effective voluntary standard. For the Commission to issue a 15(j) rule, the product characteristics involved must be ‘‘readily observable’’ and have been addressed by a voluntary standard. Moreover, the voluntary standard must be effective in reducing the risk of injury associated with the consumer products, and there must be substantial compliance with the voluntary standard. B. Background On October 16, 2014, the Commission issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (‘‘NPR’’) in the Federal Register to amend the substantial product hazard list in 16 CFR part 1120 (‘‘part 1120’’) to add seasonal and decorative lighting products that lack certain readily observable safety characteristics addressed by a voluntary standard because such products pose a risk of electrical shock or fire. 79 FR 62081. The comment period on the proposed rule closed on December 30, 2014. As detailed in section II of this preamble, the Commission received 62 comments on the proposed rule. The Commission is now issuing a final rule to amend part 1120 by adding three readily observable characteristics of seasonal and decorative lighting products: (1) Minimum wire size; (2) sufficient strain relief; and (3) overcurrent protection. After reviewing the comments, the Commission made E:\FR\FM\04MYR1.SGM 04MYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 85 (Monday, May 4, 2015)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 25215-25216]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2015-10423]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Parts 121 and 135

[Docket No. FAA-2011-1136; Amdt. Nos. 121-371A and 135-132A]
RIN 2120-AJ33


Air Carrier Contract Maintenance Requirements; Correction

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule; correction.

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SUMMARY: The FAA is correcting a final rule published on March 4, 2015 
(80 FR 11537). In that rule, the FAA amended its maintenance 
regulations for domestic, flag, and supplemental operations, and for 
commuter and on-demand operations for aircraft type certificated with a 
passenger seating configuration of 10 seats or more (excluding any 
pilot seat). The FAA originally proposed to make the effective date of 
the rule one year after its publication date to give affected operators 
time to come into compliance with the new requirements, and to allow 
the FAA time to review information submitted by the operators under the 
rule. However, in the final rule, the FAA inadvertently overlooked the 
proposed one-year compliance time, and included an effective date of 60 
days after publication. This document corrects the effective date of 
that document.

DATES: This correction is effective on May 4, 2015. The effective date 
of the final rule published March 4, 2015 (80 FR 11537), is corrected 
to March 4, 2016.

[[Page 25216]]


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
For technical questions concerning this action, contact Wende T. 
DiMuro, AFS-330, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence 
Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone (202) 267-1685; email 
wende.t.dimuro@faa.gov.
    For legal questions concerning this action, contact Edmund Averman, 
AGC-200, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue SW., 
Washington, DC 20591; telephone (202) 267-3147, email 
ed.averman@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

    On March 4, 2015, the FAA published a final rule entitled, ``Air 
Carrier Contract Maintenance Requirements'' (80 FR 11537).
    In that final rule, the FAA revised its maintenance regulations for 
domestic, flag, and supplemental operations, and for commuter and on-
demand operations for aircraft type certificated with a passenger 
seating configuration of 10 seats or more (excluding any pilot seat). 
The new rules require affected air carriers and operators to develop 
policies, procedures, methods, and instructions for performing contract 
maintenance that are acceptable to the FAA, and to include them in 
their maintenance manuals. The rules also require the air carriers and 
operators to provide a list to the FAA of all persons with whom they 
contract their maintenance, which also must include the physical 
address where the work will be carried out and a description of the 
type of work that is to be carried out at each location.
    In the notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) (77 FR 67584; Nov. 13, 
2012), the FAA proposed to make the effective date one year after the 
publication of the final rule. The stated reason for this was that the 
agency recognized that the affected operators would need time to fully 
develop the policies, procedures, methods, and instructions for 
contract maintenance and to provide them in an acceptable format to the 
FAA. We also noted that operators would need time to prepare the list 
with the required information of their contract maintenance providers 
and to provide them in an acceptable format to their Certificate 
Holding District Offices (77 FR 67587). The FAA also noted that it 
would need time to review the information submitted by the operators. 
In publishing the final rule, the FAA inadvertently overlooked this 
proposed one-year compliance time, and included an effective date of 60 
days after publication. This document corrects that oversight so that 
the effective date is one year after the publication of the final rule, 
or March 4, 2016.

Correction

    In FR Doc. 2015-04179, beginning on page 11537 in the Federal 
Register of March 4, 2015, make the following corrections:

Correction

    1. On page 11537, in the second column, in the paragraph entitled 
``DATES:'', correct ``May 4, 2015'' to read ``March 4, 2016.''

    Issued under authority provided by 49 U.S.C. 106(f) in 
Washington, DC, on April 29, 2015.
John Barbagallo,
Acting Director, Flight Standards Office.
[FR Doc. 2015-10423 Filed 5-1-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-13-P