Implementation of Haitian Family Reunification Parole Program, 75581-75583 [2014-29533]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 243 / Thursday, December 18, 2014 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES and file the Form I–131 in effect at the time of filing—and follow any additional instructions included in the program eligibility notice they receive from either USCIS or the NVC in submitting their application. A completed Form I–131 and fee or fee waiver request must be filed for each individual on whose behalf parole is being requested. III. Participation in the CFRP Program and Application Process USCIS offers participation in the CFRP Program to Cuban nationals who reside in Cuba and who are the beneficiaries—including any eligible spouse and child accompanying or following-to-join the principal beneficiaries (see INA sec. 203(d), 8 U.S.C. 1153(d))—of an approved Form I–130, Petition for Alien Relative, but for whom an immigrant visa is not immediately available. Participation in the CFRP Program is voluntary. Prior to the date of this notice, the NVC mailed written notice to eligible U.S.-based U.S.C. and LPR petitioners with approved Forms I–130 indicating their beneficiaries’ eligibility to participate in the CFRP Program. The notice invited an interested petitioner to submit to the NVC a copy of their approved Form I–130 and other supporting documents to opt in to the CFRP Program and begin the process of requesting parole. No formal application form or fee was required to apply. As of the date of this notice, the NVC will no longer issue CFRP Program eligibility notices that do not require a form and fee to apply. Petitioners with CFRP Program eligibility notices dated prior to December 18, 2014 must submit to the NVC the complete required documentation to opt in to the CFRP Program prior to February 17, 2015 in order to be grandfathered and considered for processing without a form and fee. On or after February 17, 2015, participation in the CFRP Program will be predicated on submission of a Form I–131 and the requisite fee(s) or request for fee waiver that has been approved by USCIS. A U.S.C. or LPR petitioner in the United States with an approved Form I– 130 that was filed on behalf of a beneficiary relative residing in Cuba, for whom a visa is not anticipated to be available during the CFRP processing time, will receive a written invitation from the NVC regarding the beneficiary’s eligibility to participate in the CFRP Program and the procedures for requesting parole, if desired. The notice will instruct the recipient on how to file a completed Form I–131 and submit the required fee(s) or fee waiver VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:23 Dec 17, 2014 Jkt 235001 request to apply for the program. USCIS will reject a request for parole under the CFRP Program submitted without the required form and fee(s) or a request for a fee waiver. USCIS officers or Department of State consular officers will interview qualified beneficiaries in Havana to verify their eligibility for the program. Beneficiaries may also have their biometrics collected. If USCIS exercises its discretion to authorize parole under the CFRP Program, USCIS or the Department of State will issue the necessary travel documents to the beneficiary in Cuba. These travel documents will enable the beneficiary to travel safely to the United States and seek parole by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at a U.S. port-of-entry to join his or her family member. A beneficiary who is paroled into the United States would then be eligible to apply to adjust status to that of lawful permanent resident after he or she has been physically present in the United States for one year as provided by the Cuban Adjustment Act, Pub. L. 89–732, 80 Stat. 1161 (8 U.S.C. 1255 note), or once the beneficiary’s visa becomes available, whichever comes first. Participation in the CFRP Program is not available to aliens who qualify as ‘‘immediate relatives’’ under section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1151(b)(2)(A)(i). Such aliens may seek immigrant visas for travel to the United States immediately upon the approval of the immigrant visa petitions filed on their behalf. For eligible beneficiaries who are not ‘‘immediate relatives,’’ if an immigrant visa becomes available while the Form I–131 is pending, the beneficiary will be able to proceed with the parole process to completion, if desired. Alternatively, the beneficiary can choose to pursue immigrant visa processing, which will require payment of associated fees but will enable the individual to apply for admission to the United States as an immigrant, if found eligible by the Department of State for the visa and admissible by CBP at the port of entry. IV. Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) Under the PRA, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35, all Departments are required to submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval, any new reporting requirements they impose. The Application for Travel Document, Form I–131, has been approved by OMB and assigned OMB control number 1615–0013. USCIS is making no changes to the Form in connection with the CFRP Program and this notice; however, USCIS estimates that this notice will result in an annual PO 00000 Frm 00051 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 75581 average of 13,000–15,000 Form I–131 filings per year. The current OMBapproved estimate of the number of annual respondents filing a Form I–131 is 940,671. USCIS has overestimated the number of individuals who will use this form to apply for immigration benefits to the degree that additional respondents who will use it to file for the CFRP Program will be covered within the 940,671 estimated. USCIS is not changing the collection instrument or increasing its burden estimates in connection with this notice. Therefore, USCIS is not publishing a notice under the PRA or making revisions to the currently approved burden for OMB control number 1615–0013. Additional information about the CFRP Program and the application process will be posted on the USCIS Web site at www.uscis.gov. Dated: December 11, 2014. ´ ´ Leon Rodrıguez Director, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. [FR Doc. 2014–29486 Filed 12–17–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–97–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services [CIS No. 2548–14; DHS Docket No. USCIS– 2014–0013] Implementation of Haitian Family Reunification Parole Program U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, DHS. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: This notice announces the implementation of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ (USCIS) Haitian Family Reunification Parole (HFRP) Program. Under this program, USCIS offers certain Haitian beneficiaries of family-based immigrant petitions approved on or before December 18, 2014 an opportunity to receive a discretionary grant of parole to enter the United States up to approximately two years before their immigrant visas become available, rather than remain in Haiti awaiting availability of their immigrant visas. The program is intended to expedite family reunification through safe, legal, and orderly channels of migration to the United States, increase existing avenues for legal migration from Haiti, and help Haiti continue to recover from the devastation and damage suffered in the January 12, 2010 earthquake. DATES: SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\18DEN1.SGM 18DEN1 75582 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 243 / Thursday, December 18, 2014 / Notices • The HFRP Program will only be available to Haitian beneficiaries of family-based immigrant petitions approved on or before December 18, 2014. • On or after February 2, 2015, the Department of State’s National Visa Center (NVC) will begin sending to eligible petitioners written invitations to apply to the HFRP Program. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maura Nicholson, Deputy Chief, International Operations Division, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security, 20 Massachusetts Avenue NW., Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20529, Telephone (202) 272–1892. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES I. Background of the HFRP Program The rebuilding and development of a safe and economically strong Haiti is a priority for the United States. While progress has been made since the 2010 earthquake that devastated parts of the country, Haiti continues to face significant development challenges. Reconstruction and development in Haiti will continue for many years.1 With the exception of ‘‘immediate relatives’’ of U.S. citizens (USCs) (i.e., parent, spouse and unmarried child(ren) under 21 years of age), see Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) sec. 201(b)(2)(A)(i), 8 U.S.C. 1151(b)(2)(A)(i), the number of family-based immigrant visas that are available in any given year is limited by statute. See INA secs. 201(c), 202(a) & 203, 8 U.S.C. 1151(c), 1152(a) & 1153. These statutory limits have resulted in long waiting periods before family members remaining in Haiti may join the U.S.C. and lawful permanent resident (LPR) family members in the United States who petitioned for them. Under the HFRP Program, USCIS will exercise its discretionary parole authority 2 to permit certain eligible Haitians in Haiti to join their family members in the United States up to approximately two years before their immigrant visas become available, thereby promoting family unity. By expanding existing legal means for Haitians to immigrate, the HFRP Program serves a significant public benefit by promoting safe, legal, and orderly migration to the United States. 1 http://www.state.gov/s/hsc/factsheets/2014/ 219539.htm. 2 See INA sec. 212(d)(5)(A), 8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(5)(A) (permitting parole of certain aliens into the United States, as a matter of discretion and on a case-bycase basis, for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit); see also 8 CFR 212.5(c) & (d) (discretionary authority for establishing conditions of parole and for terminating parole). VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:23 Dec 17, 2014 Jkt 235001 Furthermore, it supports U.S. goals for Haiti’s long-term reconstruction and development. Once paroled into the United States, HFRP Program beneficiaries will be eligible to apply for employment authorization, and those who are able to work may contribute to Haiti’s post-earthquake reconstruction and development through remittances. Whether to parole a particular alien remains, however, a case-by-case, discretionary determination. II. Participation in the HFRP Program and Application Process USCIS offers participation in the HFRP Program to eligible Haitians: (1) In Haiti; (2) who are the beneficiaries (including any accompanying or following-to-join spouse and children 3) of Forms I–130, Petition for Alien Relative, that were approved on or before the date of publication of this notice; (3) whose immigrant visas are not available, but are expected to become available within approximately 18 to 30 months; and (4) whose petitioning relatives in the United States have received a written invitation to apply for the HFRP Program on their behalf from the Department of State’s National Visa Center (NVC). The NVC will issue a written invitation to petitioners of approved Forms I–130 based upon the date when the immigrant visas for their beneficiary relatives are expected to become available. Each year the NVC will identify approved Forms I–130 whose filing dates (priority dates) are expected to become current in approximately the next 18 to 30 months, meaning that the immigrant visas for those cases are expected to become available within that timeframe. The NVC will prioritize the issuance of invitations to petitioners within that group, beginning with the oldest Form I–130 filing date and working forward to the most recent filing date. The number of HFRP Program invitations may be limited annually based on U.S. Government operational capacity in Haiti and the availability of U.S. Government resources to aid program beneficiaries. Initially, the U.S. Government will seek to interview approximately 5,000 HFRP Program beneficiaries in Haiti per year. Petitioners will be given a deadline by which they must apply to have their beneficiary relatives considered for parole under the program. Participation in the HFRP Program is voluntary. On or after February 2, 2015, eligible U.S.-based U.S.C. and LPR petitioners with approved Forms I–130 filed on behalf of a beneficiary relative in Haiti 3 See PO 00000 INA sec. 203(d), 8 U.S.C. 1153(d). Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 for whom a visa is not available but expected to become available within approximately 18 to 30 months, will receive a written notice from the NVC regarding the beneficiary’s eligibility to participate in the HFRP Program and the procedures for requesting parole, if desired. The notice will instruct the recipient on how to file a completed Form I–131, Application for Travel Document, and submit the required fee(s) or fee waiver request to apply for parole under the HFRP Program on behalf of each beneficiary. USCIS will reject a request for parole under the HFRP Program that is not submitted as instructed, without the required completed form, or without the fee(s) or a request for a fee waiver. USCIS or Department of State consular officers will interview qualified beneficiaries in Port au Prince, Haiti, to verify their eligibility for the program. Beneficiaries may also have their biometrics collected. If USCIS exercises its discretion to grant parole under the HFRP Program, USCIS or the Department of State will issue the necessary travel documents to the beneficiary in Haiti. These travel documents will enable the beneficiary to travel to the United States and seek parole from U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at a U.S. port-of-entry to join his or her family. A beneficiary who is paroled into the United States would then be eligible to apply to adjust status to that of lawful permanent resident once the beneficiary’s immigrant visa becomes available. Participation in the HFRP Program is not available to aliens who qualify as ‘‘immediate relatives’’ under section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1151(b)(2)(A)(i). Such aliens may seek immigrant visas for travel to the United States immediately upon the approval of immigrant visa petitions filed on their behalf. If, however, an immigrant visa becomes available for a beneficiary who is not an ‘‘immediate relative’’ while the Form I–131 is pending, the beneficiary will still be able to complete the parole process, if desired. Alternatively, the beneficiary can choose to pursue immigrant visa processing, which will require payment of associated fees, but will enable the individual to apply for admission to the United States as an immigrant, if found eligible by the Department of State for the visa and admissible by CBP at the port of entry. III. Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) Under the PRA, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35, all Departments are required to submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval, any new reporting requirements they E:\FR\FM\18DEN1.SGM 18DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 243 / Thursday, December 18, 2014 / Notices impose. The USCIS, Application for Travel Document, (Form I–131), has been approved by OMB and assigned OMB control number 1615–0013. USCIS is making no changes to this form in connection with the implementation of the HFRP Program and this notice. USCIS estimates that the HFRP Program will result in an average of 5,000 Form I–131 filings per year. The current OMBapproved estimated number of annual respondents filing Form I–131 is 940,671. USCIS believes it has overestimated the number of individuals who will use this form to apply for immigration benefits to the degree that additional respondents who will use it to file a HFRP Programrelated request will be covered within the 940,671 estimated. Because USCIS is not changing the collection instrument or increasing its burden estimates in connection with this notice, it is publishing no notice under the PRA and making no revisions to the currently approved burden for OMB control number 1615–0013. Additional information about the HFRP program and the application process will be posted on the USCIS Web site at www.uscis.gov. Dated: December 11, 2014. ´ ´ Leon Rodrıguez, Director, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. [FR Doc. 2014–29533 Filed 12–17–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–97–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR [Docket No. ONRR–2014–0002; DS63610000 DR2PS0000.CH7000 145D0102R2] Office of Natural Resources Revenue; Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection–United States Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (USEITI) Revenue Information Collection, Comment Request Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR), Interior. ACTION: Notice of a new information collection. AGENCY: To comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), we are inviting comments on an information request that we will submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. This Information Collection Request (ICR) covers the voluntary paperwork requirements for participation in the United States’ implementation of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). It encompasses mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:23 Dec 17, 2014 Jkt 235001 upcoming requests that certain companies voluntarily provide information on the amount of revenue which they have paid to the Federal government for extracting Federallyowned natural resources. DATES: Submit written comments on or before February 17, 2015. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments on this ICR to ONRR by using one of the following three methods (please use ONRR 2014–0002 as an identifier in your comment): 1. Electronically, go to http:// www.regulations.gov. In the entry titled ‘‘Enter Keyword or ID,’’ enter ONRR– 2014–0002 and then click ‘‘Search.’’ Follow the instructions to submit public comments. ONRR will post all comments. 2. Mail comments to Mr. Luis Aguilar, Regulatory Specialist, ONRR, P.O. Box 25165, MS 61030A, Denver, Colorado 80225–0165. 3. Hand-carry or mail comments, using an overnight courier service, to ONRR. Our courier address is Building 85, Room A–614, Denver Federal Center, West 6th Ave. and Kipling St., Denver, Colorado 80225. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For questions on technical issues, contact Mr. Jon Swedin, Program Analyst, at (303) 231–3028, or email Jonathan.Swedin@onrr.gov. For other questions, contact Mr. Luis Aguilar, telephone (303) 231–3418, or email Luis.Aguilar@onrr.gov. You may also contact Mr. Aguilar to obtain copies, at no cost, of (1) the ICR, (2) any associated form, and (3) the regulations that require us to collect the information. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: United States Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (USEITI) Revenue Information Collection. OMB Control Number: 1012—0NEW. Bureau Form Number: United States Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (USEITI) Company Payment Reporting Template. Abstract: The Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior is responsible for mineral resource development on Federal and Indian lands and the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Under various laws, the Secretary’s responsibility is to manage mineral resources production on Federal and Indian lands and the OCS, collect the royalties and other mineral revenues due, and distribute the funds collected under those laws. ONRR performs the royalty management functions and assists the Secretary in carrying out the Department’s responsibility. We have posted those laws pertaining to mineral leases on PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 75583 Federal and Indian lands and the OCS at http://www.onrr.gov/Laws_R_D/ PubLaws/default.htm. In September 2011, President Obama announced the U.S. commitment to domestic implementation of EITI, a key element of the President’s Open Government Partnership commitments. President Obama appointed the Secretary of the Interior as the senior U.S. official to lead USEITI implementation. EITI is a voluntary global effort designed to strengthen transparency, accountability, and public trust for the revenues paid and received for a country’s oil, gas, and mineral resources. The Administration renewed its commitment to implement EITI in the December 2013 U.S. Open Government National Action Plan. By signing onto the global EITI standard, the U.S. Government will help ensure that American taxpayers are receiving every dollar due for the extraction of these valuable public resources. The EITI Standard contains the set of requirements that countries need to meet in order to be recognized first as an EITI Candidate and, ultimately, an EITI-Compliant Country. In March 2014, the U.S. became the first G7 country to achieve Candidate Country status. When fully implemented, EITI will ensure more transparency in how the country’s natural resources are governed and also will provide full disclosure of government revenues from its extractive sector. The following laws and executive initiative are applicable to USEITI, including the Secretary’s and ONRR’s management of mineral resource production, revenue, and information disclosure obligations: • U.S. Open Government National Action Plan • Freedom of Information Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. 552) • Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, as amended (43 U.S.C. 1331–56b), including provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 15801 et seq.) • Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 as amended by the Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 (30 U.S.C. 1701–1759). • Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 (30 U.S.C. 1001–28) • Mineral Leasing Act (30 U.S.C. 181– 287) • Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands (30 U.S.C. 351–60) General Information International EITI requirements direct participating governments to publish annual reports to help citizens E:\FR\FM\18DEN1.SGM 18DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 243 (Thursday, December 18, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 75581-75583]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-29533]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

[CIS No. 2548-14; DHS Docket No. USCIS-2014-0013]


Implementation of Haitian Family Reunification Parole Program

AGENCY: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, DHS.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This notice announces the implementation of U.S. Citizenship 
and Immigration Services' (USCIS) Haitian Family Reunification Parole 
(HFRP) Program. Under this program, USCIS offers certain Haitian 
beneficiaries of family-based immigrant petitions approved on or before 
December 18, 2014 an opportunity to receive a discretionary grant of 
parole to enter the United States up to approximately two years before 
their immigrant visas become available, rather than remain in Haiti 
awaiting availability of their immigrant visas. The program is intended 
to expedite family reunification through safe, legal, and orderly 
channels of migration to the United States, increase existing avenues 
for legal migration from Haiti, and help Haiti continue to recover from 
the devastation and damage suffered in the January 12, 2010 earthquake.

DATES: 

[[Page 75582]]

     The HFRP Program will only be available to Haitian 
beneficiaries of family-based immigrant petitions approved on or before 
December 18, 2014.
     On or after February 2, 2015, the Department of State's 
National Visa Center (NVC) will begin sending to eligible petitioners 
written invitations to apply to the HFRP Program.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maura Nicholson, Deputy Chief, 
International Operations Division, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration 
Services, Department of Homeland Security, 20 Massachusetts Avenue NW., 
Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20529, Telephone (202) 272-1892.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background of the HFRP Program

    The rebuilding and development of a safe and economically strong 
Haiti is a priority for the United States. While progress has been made 
since the 2010 earthquake that devastated parts of the country, Haiti 
continues to face significant development challenges. Reconstruction 
and development in Haiti will continue for many years.\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ http://www.state.gov/s/hsc/factsheets/2014/219539.htm.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    With the exception of ``immediate relatives'' of U.S. citizens 
(USCs) (i.e., parent, spouse and unmarried child(ren) under 21 years of 
age), see Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) sec. 201(b)(2)(A)(i), 8 
U.S.C. 1151(b)(2)(A)(i), the number of family-based immigrant visas 
that are available in any given year is limited by statute. See INA 
secs. 201(c), 202(a) & 203, 8 U.S.C. 1151(c), 1152(a) & 1153. These 
statutory limits have resulted in long waiting periods before family 
members remaining in Haiti may join the U.S.C. and lawful permanent 
resident (LPR) family members in the United States who petitioned for 
them.
    Under the HFRP Program, USCIS will exercise its discretionary 
parole authority \2\ to permit certain eligible Haitians in Haiti to 
join their family members in the United States up to approximately two 
years before their immigrant visas become available, thereby promoting 
family unity. By expanding existing legal means for Haitians to 
immigrate, the HFRP Program serves a significant public benefit by 
promoting safe, legal, and orderly migration to the United States. 
Furthermore, it supports U.S. goals for Haiti's long-term 
reconstruction and development. Once paroled into the United States, 
HFRP Program beneficiaries will be eligible to apply for employment 
authorization, and those who are able to work may contribute to Haiti's 
post-earthquake reconstruction and development through remittances. 
Whether to parole a particular alien remains, however, a case-by-case, 
discretionary determination.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ See INA sec. 212(d)(5)(A), 8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(5)(A) 
(permitting parole of certain aliens into the United States, as a 
matter of discretion and on a case-by-case basis, for urgent 
humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit); see also 8 CFR 
212.5(c) & (d) (discretionary authority for establishing conditions 
of parole and for terminating parole).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

II. Participation in the HFRP Program and Application Process

    USCIS offers participation in the HFRP Program to eligible 
Haitians: (1) In Haiti; (2) who are the beneficiaries (including any 
accompanying or following-to-join spouse and children \3\) of Forms I-
130, Petition for Alien Relative, that were approved on or before the 
date of publication of this notice; (3) whose immigrant visas are not 
available, but are expected to become available within approximately 18 
to 30 months; and (4) whose petitioning relatives in the United States 
have received a written invitation to apply for the HFRP Program on 
their behalf from the Department of State's National Visa Center (NVC).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ See INA sec. 203(d), 8 U.S.C. 1153(d).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The NVC will issue a written invitation to petitioners of approved 
Forms I-130 based upon the date when the immigrant visas for their 
beneficiary relatives are expected to become available. Each year the 
NVC will identify approved Forms I-130 whose filing dates (priority 
dates) are expected to become current in approximately the next 18 to 
30 months, meaning that the immigrant visas for those cases are 
expected to become available within that timeframe. The NVC will 
prioritize the issuance of invitations to petitioners within that 
group, beginning with the oldest Form I-130 filing date and working 
forward to the most recent filing date. The number of HFRP Program 
invitations may be limited annually based on U.S. Government 
operational capacity in Haiti and the availability of U.S. Government 
resources to aid program beneficiaries. Initially, the U.S. Government 
will seek to interview approximately 5,000 HFRP Program beneficiaries 
in Haiti per year. Petitioners will be given a deadline by which they 
must apply to have their beneficiary relatives considered for parole 
under the program. Participation in the HFRP Program is voluntary.
    On or after February 2, 2015, eligible U.S.-based U.S.C. and LPR 
petitioners with approved Forms I-130 filed on behalf of a beneficiary 
relative in Haiti for whom a visa is not available but expected to 
become available within approximately 18 to 30 months, will receive a 
written notice from the NVC regarding the beneficiary's eligibility to 
participate in the HFRP Program and the procedures for requesting 
parole, if desired. The notice will instruct the recipient on how to 
file a completed Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, and 
submit the required fee(s) or fee waiver request to apply for parole 
under the HFRP Program on behalf of each beneficiary. USCIS will reject 
a request for parole under the HFRP Program that is not submitted as 
instructed, without the required completed form, or without the fee(s) 
or a request for a fee waiver.
    USCIS or Department of State consular officers will interview 
qualified beneficiaries in Port au Prince, Haiti, to verify their 
eligibility for the program. Beneficiaries may also have their 
biometrics collected. If USCIS exercises its discretion to grant parole 
under the HFRP Program, USCIS or the Department of State will issue the 
necessary travel documents to the beneficiary in Haiti. These travel 
documents will enable the beneficiary to travel to the United States 
and seek parole from U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at a U.S. 
port-of-entry to join his or her family. A beneficiary who is paroled 
into the United States would then be eligible to apply to adjust status 
to that of lawful permanent resident once the beneficiary's immigrant 
visa becomes available.
    Participation in the HFRP Program is not available to aliens who 
qualify as ``immediate relatives'' under section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
INA, 8 U.S.C. 1151(b)(2)(A)(i). Such aliens may seek immigrant visas 
for travel to the United States immediately upon the approval of 
immigrant visa petitions filed on their behalf. If, however, an 
immigrant visa becomes available for a beneficiary who is not an 
``immediate relative'' while the Form I-131 is pending, the beneficiary 
will still be able to complete the parole process, if desired. 
Alternatively, the beneficiary can choose to pursue immigrant visa 
processing, which will require payment of associated fees, but will 
enable the individual to apply for admission to the United States as an 
immigrant, if found eligible by the Department of State for the visa 
and admissible by CBP at the port of entry.

III. Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA)

    Under the PRA, 44 U.S.C. chapter 35, all Departments are required 
to submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and 
approval, any new reporting requirements they

[[Page 75583]]

impose. The USCIS, Application for Travel Document, (Form I-131), has 
been approved by OMB and assigned OMB control number 1615-0013. USCIS 
is making no changes to this form in connection with the implementation 
of the HFRP Program and this notice. USCIS estimates that the HFRP 
Program will result in an average of 5,000 Form I-131 filings per year. 
The current OMB-approved estimated number of annual respondents filing 
Form I-131 is 940,671. USCIS believes it has overestimated the number 
of individuals who will use this form to apply for immigration benefits 
to the degree that additional respondents who will use it to file a 
HFRP Program-related request will be covered within the 940,671 
estimated. Because USCIS is not changing the collection instrument or 
increasing its burden estimates in connection with this notice, it is 
publishing no notice under the PRA and making no revisions to the 
currently approved burden for OMB control number 1615-0013.
    Additional information about the HFRP program and the application 
process will be posted on the USCIS Web site at www.uscis.gov.

    Dated: December 11, 2014.
Le[oacute]n Rodr[iacute]guez,
Director, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
[FR Doc. 2014-29533 Filed 12-17-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9111-97-P