Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review, 70189-70190 [2014-27850]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 227 / Tuesday, November 25, 2014 / Notices The MEPS–HC was last approved by OMB on December 20th, 2012 and will expire on December 31, 2015. The OMB control number for the MEPS–HC is 0935–0118. All of the supporting documents for the current MEPS–HC can be downloaded from OMB’s Web site at. http://www.reginfo.gov/public/ do/PRAViewDocument?ref_nbr=2012090935-001. The MEPS is a multi-purpose survey. In addition to collecting data to yield annual estimates for a variety of measures related to health care use and expenditures, the MEPS also provides estimates of measures related to health status, consumer assessment of health care, health insurance coverage, demographic characteristics, employment and access to health care indicators. Estimates can be provided for individuals, families and population subgroups of interest. Data from the MEPS–HC are intended for a number of annual reports required to be produced by the Agency, including the National Health Care Quality Report and the National Health Care Disparities Report. AHRQ proposes to make the following changes to questions asked of respondents: wreier-aviles on DSK4TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Additions Closing—questions pertaining to respondent email and administration status of the Preventive Care selfadministered questionnaire; Re-enumeration—addition of questions pertaining to educational level attainment and the determination of institutional status; Provider Probes—determination if health care was received in an overnight facility; and Health Insurance—questions were added regarding interaction with the health insurance marketplace, enrollment through state health insurance exchanges, the extent of subsidized health insurance, monthly premiums, health insurance metal plan names, and medical debt. Preventive Care—a field test will be conducted to assess response lost through self-administration. Deletions Questions were removed from the following sections: Access to Care, Medical Conditions, Charge Payment, Child Preventive Health, Disability Days, Emergency Room, Employment, Health Status, Health Insurance, Hospital Stay, Income, Medical Provider Visits, Outpatient Departments, and Satisfaction with Health Plan. Questions were removed to reduce burden and redundancy, and additional questions were removed due to VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:41 Nov 24, 2014 Jkt 235001 difficulty in respondent interpretation, low frequency in response or minimal variation, and limited ability of respondent to respond accurately. Estimated Annual Respondent Burden There are no changes to the current burden estimates. Estimated Annual Costs to the Federal Government There are no changes to the current cost estimates. Request for Comments In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, comments on AHRQ’s information collection are requested with regard to any of the following: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of AHRQ health care research and health care information dissemination functions, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of AHRQ’s estimate of burden (including hours and costs) of the proposed collection(s) of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information upon the respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Comments submitted in response to this notice will be summarized and included in the Agency’s subsequent request for OMB approval of the proposed information collection. All comments will become a matter of public record. Dated: November 13, 2014. Richard Kronick, Director. [FR Doc. 2014–27687 Filed 11–24–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4160–90–M DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–15–14ARR] Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has submitted the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The notice for the proposed information collection is PO 00000 Frm 00034 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 70189 published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected agencies concerning the proposed collection of information are encouraged. Your comments should address any of the following: (a) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) Evaluate the accuracy of the agencies estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses; and (e) Assess information collection costs. To request additional information on the proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, call (404) 639–7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Written comments and/or suggestions regarding the items contained in this notice should be directed to the Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. Proposed Project Drug Overdose Response Investigation (DORI) Data Collections—New— National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description State and local health authorities frequently call upon CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) to assist in their response to urgent public health problems resulting from drug use, misuse, abuse, and overdose. When called, NCIPC supports the states and local health authorities by conducting Drug Overdose Response Investigations (DORI), which entails a rapid and flexible epidemiological response. Urgent requests, such as DORIs, depend on the time and resources available, number of persons involved, and other circumstances unique to the urgent conditions at hand, and usually involve the development of procedures, specific data collection E:\FR\FM\25NON1.SGM 25NON1 70190 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 227 / Tuesday, November 25, 2014 / Notices instruments, and the collection of critical data. This request is for a new generic approval to conduct information collections during DORIs. A three-year clearance is requested to ensure: (1) Rapid deployment of data collection tools and (2) timely information collection of vital information. Of particular interest is response to increasing trends in, or changing characteristics of, overdose from prescription drugs (with a special interest in opioid analgesics such as oxycodone or methadone; benzodiazepines such as alprazolam) and/or illicit drugs (e.g., heroin). Specifically, this request covers investigative collections with the following aims: (1) To understand sudden increases in drug use and misuse associated with fatal and nonfatal overdoses; (2) to understand the drivers and risk factors associated with those trends; and (3) to identify the groups most affected. This will allow CDC to effectively advise states on recommended actions to control local epidemics. Thus, the ultimate goals of these collections are to minimize adverse health consequences, provide epidemiological data collection support to the states and, based on the findings from the investigation, appropriately assist with implementation of prevention and control measures. Data is collected by epidemiologists, psychologists, medical professionals, subject matter experts, and biostatisticians. Examples of data collection modes that may be employed during DORIs include: Archival record abstractions and reviews, face-to-face interviews, telephone interviews, webbased questionnaires, and selfadministered questionnaires. For example, information collected through archival chart review from hospitals and medical examiners could include demographics, drug use history, reported medical and mental health conditions, place of overdose, place of death, drug paraphernalia on the scene, mode of administration, observers present, naloxone administration, hospital admittance, autopsy findings, and toxicology results. Information collected through interviews with representatives from agencies involved in preventing, intervening, or responding to drug overdose could include professional history, personal experience with drug overdose cases or investigations, prevention or intervention efforts engaged in, and perceptions of characteristics of, or changes in drug overdose cases (e.g., transition from opioids to heroin; increasing or decreasing rates). Collection of information from nonfatal overdose victims, and friends and family of overdose victims could include substance use history, prescription drug history, number of providers and pharmacies used, pain history, co-occurring health conditions (e.g., abnormal snoring indicative of respiratory depression), mental health conditions (e.g., depression, anxiety disorders), enrollment in drug treatment programs, sources of drugs, route of drug administration, and criminal history. Finally, collection of spatial information could be obtained through city, county, and state government agencies to determine structural and environmental factors associated with location of overdose deaths. Respondent type will also vary by investigation, but will include organizations typically involved in prevention, intervention, and response to drug overdose (e.g., public health, law enforcement authorities, health systems, and community organizations). Respondents also may include victims of non-fatal drug overdoses, as well as family and friends of victims. During a DORI, data is collected once, with the rare need for follow-up. There are no costs to respondents other than their time. ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Type of respondent Form name Number of respondents Number of responses per respondent Average burden per response (in hours) Drug Overdose Response Investigation Participants. Drug Overdose Response Investigation Data Collection Instruments. 2,700 1 .5 Leroy A. Richardson, Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [FR Doc. 2014–27850 Filed 11–24–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4163–18–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES wreier-aviles on DSK4TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–15–0913] Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has submitted the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:41 Nov 24, 2014 Jkt 235001 (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The notice for the proposed information collection is published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected agencies concerning the proposed collection of information are encouraged. Your comments should address any of the following: (a) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) Evaluate the accuracy of the agencies estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be PO 00000 Frm 00035 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 collected; (d) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses; and (e) Assess information collection costs. To request additional information on the proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, call (404) 639–7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Written comments and/or suggestions regarding the items contained in this notice should be directed to the Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. E:\FR\FM\25NON1.SGM 25NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 227 (Tuesday, November 25, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 70189-70190]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-27850]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[30Day-15-14ARR]


Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has submitted 
the following information collection request to the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with 
the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The notice for the proposed 
information collection is published to obtain comments from the public 
and affected agencies.
    Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected 
agencies concerning the proposed collection of information are 
encouraged. Your comments should address any of the following: (a) 
Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary 
for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including 
whether the information will have practical utility; (b) Evaluate the 
accuracy of the agencies estimate of the burden of the proposed 
collection of information, including the validity of the methodology 
and assumptions used; (c) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of 
the information to be collected; (d) Minimize the burden of the 
collection of information on those who are to respond, including 
through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or 
other technological collection techniques or other forms of information 
technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses; and 
(e) Assess information collection costs.
    To request additional information on the proposed project or to 
obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, call 
(404) 639-7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Written comments and/or 
suggestions regarding the items contained in this notice should be 
directed to the Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and 
Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395-5806. Written 
comments should be received within 30 days of this notice.

Proposed Project

    Drug Overdose Response Investigation (DORI) Data Collections--New--
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Background and Brief Description

    State and local health authorities frequently call upon CDC's 
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) to assist in 
their response to urgent public health problems resulting from drug 
use, misuse, abuse, and overdose. When called, NCIPC supports the 
states and local health authorities by conducting Drug Overdose 
Response Investigations (DORI), which entails a rapid and flexible 
epidemiological response. Urgent requests, such as DORIs, depend on the 
time and resources available, number of persons involved, and other 
circumstances unique to the urgent conditions at hand, and usually 
involve the development of procedures, specific data collection

[[Page 70190]]

instruments, and the collection of critical data.
    This request is for a new generic approval to conduct information 
collections during DORIs. A three-year clearance is requested to 
ensure: (1) Rapid deployment of data collection tools and (2) timely 
information collection of vital information. Of particular interest is 
response to increasing trends in, or changing characteristics of, 
overdose from prescription drugs (with a special interest in opioid 
analgesics such as oxycodone or methadone; benzodiazepines such as 
alprazolam) and/or illicit drugs (e.g., heroin).
    Specifically, this request covers investigative collections with 
the following aims: (1) To understand sudden increases in drug use and 
misuse associated with fatal and nonfatal overdoses; (2) to understand 
the drivers and risk factors associated with those trends; and (3) to 
identify the groups most affected. This will allow CDC to effectively 
advise states on recommended actions to control local epidemics. Thus, 
the ultimate goals of these collections are to minimize adverse health 
consequences, provide epidemiological data collection support to the 
states and, based on the findings from the investigation, appropriately 
assist with implementation of prevention and control measures.
    Data is collected by epidemiologists, psychologists, medical 
professionals, subject matter experts, and biostatisticians. Examples 
of data collection modes that may be employed during DORIs include: 
Archival record abstractions and reviews, face-to-face interviews, 
telephone interviews, web-based questionnaires, and self-administered 
questionnaires.
    For example, information collected through archival chart review 
from hospitals and medical examiners could include demographics, drug 
use history, reported medical and mental health conditions, place of 
overdose, place of death, drug paraphernalia on the scene, mode of 
administration, observers present, naloxone administration, hospital 
admittance, autopsy findings, and toxicology results. Information 
collected through interviews with representatives from agencies 
involved in preventing, intervening, or responding to drug overdose 
could include professional history, personal experience with drug 
overdose cases or investigations, prevention or intervention efforts 
engaged in, and perceptions of characteristics of, or changes in drug 
overdose cases (e.g., transition from opioids to heroin; increasing or 
decreasing rates). Collection of information from nonfatal overdose 
victims, and friends and family of overdose victims could include 
substance use history, prescription drug history, number of providers 
and pharmacies used, pain history, co-occurring health conditions 
(e.g., abnormal snoring indicative of respiratory depression), mental 
health conditions (e.g., depression, anxiety disorders), enrollment in 
drug treatment programs, sources of drugs, route of drug 
administration, and criminal history. Finally, collection of spatial 
information could be obtained through city, county, and state 
government agencies to determine structural and environmental factors 
associated with location of overdose deaths.
    Respondent type will also vary by investigation, but will include 
organizations typically involved in prevention, intervention, and 
response to drug overdose (e.g., public health, law enforcement 
authorities, health systems, and community organizations). Respondents 
also may include victims of non-fatal drug overdoses, as well as family 
and friends of victims.
    During a DORI, data is collected once, with the rare need for 
follow-up. There are no costs to respondents other than their time.

                                        Estimated Annualized Burden Hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Number of      Average burden
         Type of respondent                  Form name            Number of      responses per     per response
                                                                 respondents       respondent       (in hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Drug Overdose Response Investigation  Drug Overdose Response            2,700                1               .5
 Participants.                         Investigation Data
                                       Collection Instruments.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Leroy A. Richardson,
Chief, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific 
Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the 
Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
[FR Doc. 2014-27850 Filed 11-24-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4163-18-P