Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, 68474-68476 [2014-27144]

Download as PDF 68474 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 221 / Monday, November 17, 2014 / Notices Jeffrey Boland Fentress, San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, c/o Department of Anthropology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, CA 94132, telephone (415) 338–3075, email fentress@sfsu.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the correction of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from sites Ca-Tuo-279, Ca-Tuo-300, and CaTuo-314, in Tuolumne County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the minimum number of individuals and the number of associated funerary objects published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register (65 FR 80957, December 22, 2000) and a Notice of Inventory Completion correction in the Federal Register (77 FR 59659–59660, September 28, 2012). This notice corrects the number of funerary objects for Ca-Tuo-279, the number of funerary objects for Ca-Tuo-300, and the minimum number of individuals and the number of funerary objects for CaTuo-314, resulting from additional tribal consultation and ongoing collections work. Transfer of control of the items in this correction notice has not occurred. ADDRESSES: Correction asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES In the Federal Register (77 FR 59659– 59660, September 28, 2012), the entire notice is removed. In the Federal Register (65 FR 80957, December 22, 2000), paragraph 4, is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In 1970–71, human remains representing nine individuals were recovered from CA– TUO–279, a site located on a small peninsula that extended into the western side of the original Don Pedro Reservoir. During the construction of the new reservoir, an archeological data recovery project was undertaken by San Francisco State University. The site area is now inundated by the new Don Pedro Reservoir. No known individuals were identified. The 94 VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:14 Nov 14, 2014 Jkt 235001 individual and 3 lots of associated funerary objects are obsidian tools and debitage, chert tools and debitage, quartz crystals and flakes, ground stone tools, bone tools, olivella beads, a fused shale projectile point, historic material, a piece of red ochre, modified steatite and asbestos, a carbon sample, nut fragments, and unmodified faunal material. In the Federal Register (65 FR 80957, December 22, 2000), paragraph 5, is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In 1970–71, human remains representing 37 individuals were recovered from Ca-Tuo300, a site located near LaGrange, CA, during archeological excavations conducted by San Francisco State University. The site area is now inundated by the new Don Pedro Reservoir. No known individuals were identified. The 431 individual and 87 lots of associated funerary objects are obsidian tools and debitage, chert tools and debitage, basalt tools, slate tools, quartz crystals, ground stone tools, bone tools, olivella shell beads, haliotis pendants, a sandstone pendant, a tortoise core flake, historic material, steatite earplug, a steatite bowl fragment, a mineralized antler, red ochre, soil samples, unmodified shell, faunal, and lithics. In the Federal Register (65 FR 80957, December 22, 2000), paragraph 6, is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In 1970–71, human remains representing 20 individuals were recovered from CA– TUO–314, a site located on the southern bank of Moccasin Creek, near LaGrange, CA, during archeological excavations conducted by San Francisco State University. No known individuals were identified. The 31 individual and 9 lots of associated funerary objects are Olivella beads, bone tool fragments, flaked stone debitage; ground stone; and faunal materials including modified and unmodified animal bones and teeth, and modified bird bone. In the Federal Register (65 FR 80957, December 22, 2000), paragraph 8, is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: Determinations Made by the San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program Officials of the San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 66 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 655 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California. PO 00000 Frm 00070 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Jeffrey Boland Fentress, San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, c/o Department of Anthropology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, CA 94132, telephone (415) 338–3075, email fentress@sfsu.edu, by December 17, 2014. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Tuolumne Band of MeWuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California may proceed. The San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program is responsible for notifying the Tuolumne Band of MeWuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California that this notice has been published. Dated: October 25, 2014. Melanie O’Brien, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2014–27153 Filed 11–14–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–16959; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Southern Mississippi, SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\17NON1.SGM 17NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 221 / Monday, November 17, 2014 / Notices asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Hattiesburg. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, at the address in this notice by December 17, 2014. ADDRESSES: Marie Elaine Danforth, Professor, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Dr. #5074, Hattiesburg, MS 39406–0001, telephone (601) 266–4306, email m.danforth@ usm.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Southern Mississippii, Hattiesburg. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Southern Mississippi professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; and the Thlopthlocco Tribal Town. The following tribes were invited to consult but did not participate: AbsenteeShawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas); AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town; Caddo Nation of Oklahoma; Catawba Indian Nation (aka Catawba Tribe of South Carolina); Cherokee Nation; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:14 Nov 14, 2014 Jkt 235001 Oklahoma; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians; Kialegge Tribal Town; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians; Poarch Band of Creeks (previously listed as the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations); Shawnee Tribe; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; The Quapaw Tribe of Indians; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains In the mid-1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from the Taneksanya site (22JA504) in Jackson County, MS, under the direction of local archeologist Dale Greenwell. Several burials were removed in situ in a soil block and given to the Frazier Museum of Natural History at the University of Southern Mississippi. In the early 1990s, curation of the human remains was transferred to the Department of Anthropology and Sociology. At that point, they were removed from the soil block and underwent bio-archaeological analysis. The human remains were bundle burials and had no associated grave goods. Two individuals, a young adult female and a young adult male, were somewhat commingled; a third individual, a middle adult male, was apparently buried separately. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The site likely dates to the Early Woodland period. Sometime before 1988, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Shirley site (22JA520), Jackson County, MS, under the direction of local archeologist Dale Greenwell. A student who was involved in the excavation donated the remains to the University of Southern Mississippi. The human remains represent the essentially complete skeleton of a young to middle adult male. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. According to information on record at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, the site dates to the Mississippian period. Between 2008 and 2012, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed from a beach on Greenwood Island, in Jackson County, MS. The excavation, conducted under the direction of Marie Danforth at the University of Southern Mississippi, was part of a project to recover four Mexican War soldiers whose coffins PO 00000 Frm 00071 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 68475 were found washing out in the tidal zone. The human remains are believed to have eroded out of a Middle Woodland site (22JA516) located just south of the 19th century cemetery. The human remains include eight femoral diaphyses, two humeral diaphyses, two tibial diaphyses, and fragments of mandible, cranium, teeth, clavicle, ulna, foot, vertebrae, scapula and unidentified long bone, all belonging to adults. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The site dates to the Middle Woodland period. Sometime between 1980 and 2006, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed from Deer Island (22HR500), in Harrison County, MS. In the mid-1980s, a partial adult femur was recovered during surface collection by archeologist Baxter Mann. In 2006, additional human remains were recovered by archeologist Tony Boudreaux, also during surface collection. Elements included two right femoral diaphyses, neither of which matched the femur found earlier. In May 2014, the University of Southern Mississippi received additional human remains that had been recovered from the site by a local collector in the 1980s. Elements included two individuals, one a female represented by a skull, vertebrae, ribs, arms, and pelvis, and an adult of indeterminate sex represented by a tibia fragment and mandible. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from an unknown location, likely from Pinola, Simpson County, MS. The human remains were recovered from an estate sale for Dr. Alan in Pascagoula, MS, in 2010; a local resident donated the remains to the University of Southern Mississippi. The human remains were most likely recovered from Dr. Alan’s property in Pinola, Simpson County, MS. The human remains included a femur, tibia, ulna, ilium, and rib, and are consistent with belonging to an adult male. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the early 1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site 22 KE511 in Kemper County, MS, by archeologists John Blitz and Jerry Voss of the University of Southern Mississippi during a survey of Choctaw sites. A small number of human remains were recovered from the surface and were sent for curation at the Department of Anthropology and Sociology. The highly fragmentary remains include E:\FR\FM\17NON1.SGM 17NON1 68476 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 221 / Monday, November 17, 2014 / Notices cranium, one tooth, femur, ulna, tibia, innominate, patella, hand, and unidentified bone. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Ceramic sherds recovered from the site date the human remains to the protohistoric period. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from Smith Creek site (22WK526) in Wilkinson County, MS, by an avocational archeologist. In 2012, the human remains were discovered in the avocational archeologist’s belongings. The human remains include a maxilla and mandible from a 6–10 year old juvenile; a humerus from a 2–3 year old juvenile; a femur from an infant; a cranium and partial postcranium of a young adult probable female; partial crania, representing one adult male, one adult probable male, and one adult of indeterminate sex; and postcranial elements including maxilla, mandible, ilium, ribs, and vertebrae. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Ceramic sherds recovered from the site date the human remains to the Late Woodland period. Based on geographical, archeological, historical, and other information, there is a shared group identity between these human remains and the Choctaw tribes. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the University of Southern Mississippi Officials of the University of Southern Mississippi have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of at least 23 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Marie Elaine Danforth, Professor, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Dr. #5074, Hattiesburg, MS 39406–0001, telephone (601) 266–4306, email m.danforth@usm.edu, by December 17, 2014. After that date, if no additional VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:14 Nov 14, 2014 Jkt 235001 requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma may proceed. The University of Southern Mississippi is responsible for notifying the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; and the Thlopthlocco Tribal Town that this notice has been published. Melanie O’Brien, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2014–27144 Filed 11–14–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–17069; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program at the SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00072 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 address in this notice by December 17, 2014. ADDRESSES: Jeffrey Boland Fentress, San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, c/o Department of Anthropology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132, telephone (415) 338–3075, email fentress@sfsu.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from site Ca-Sha-169, in Shasta County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program professional staff in consultation with representatives of Redding Rancheria, California, and the Pit River Tribe, California (includes XL Ranch, Big Bend, Likely, Lookout, Montgomery Creek and Roaring Creek Rancherias). History and Description of the Remains In 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed from site Ca-Sha-169 in Redding, CA, by San Francisco State University personnel in conjunction with construction of the Wintu Pumping Plant as part of the Whiskeytown Reservoir project. Site materials from the Whiskeytown Reservoir project were curated at San Francisco State University after excavation and surface collection. The 270 individual and 1 lot of associated funerary objects are 9 obsidian projectile points and tools, 1 chert tool, 1 basalt tool, 5 bone tools, 2 ground stone tools, 230 olivella beads, 4 haliotis pendants, 13 glycymeris beads, 1 bone bead, 1 lot of traded beads, 1 possible charm stone, 1 mussel shell, and 2 pieces of red ochre. Ca-Sha-169 had archeological assemblages consistent with the Shasta Complex which is considered the E:\FR\FM\17NON1.SGM 17NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 221 (Monday, November 17, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 68474-68476]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-27144]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-16959; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology and 
Sociology, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University 
of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, has completed an inventory of 
human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or 
Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or 
representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains should submit a written request to the Department 
of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Southern 
Mississippi,

[[Page 68475]]

Hattiesburg. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, 
or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to the 
Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Southern 
Mississippi, Hattiesburg, at the address in this notice by December 17, 
2014.

ADDRESSES: Marie Elaine Danforth, Professor, Department of Anthropology 
and Sociology, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Dr. 
#5074, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001, telephone (601) 266-4306, email 
m.danforth@usm.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the 
University of Southern Mississippii, Hattiesburg.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Southern 
Mississippi professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; 
The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; and the 
Thlopthlocco Tribal Town. The following tribes were invited to consult 
but did not participate: Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; 
Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as the Alabama-
Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Caddo Nation 
of Oklahoma; Catawba Indian Nation (aka Catawba Tribe of South 
Carolina); Cherokee Nation; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band 
of the Cherokee Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Jena Band 
of Choctaw Indians; Kialegge Tribal Town; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians; 
Poarch Band of Creeks (previously listed as the Poarch Band of Creek 
Indians of Alabama); Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as 
the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood 
& Tampa Reservations); Shawnee Tribe; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; The 
Quapaw Tribe of Indians; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Tunica-Biloxi 
Indian Tribe; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in 
Oklahoma.

History and Description of the Remains

    In the mid-1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from the Taneksanya site (22JA504) in Jackson 
County, MS, under the direction of local archeologist Dale Greenwell. 
Several burials were removed in situ in a soil block and given to the 
Frazier Museum of Natural History at the University of Southern 
Mississippi. In the early 1990s, curation of the human remains was 
transferred to the Department of Anthropology and Sociology. At that 
point, they were removed from the soil block and underwent bio-
archaeological analysis. The human remains were bundle burials and had 
no associated grave goods. Two individuals, a young adult female and a 
young adult male, were somewhat commingled; a third individual, a 
middle adult male, was apparently buried separately. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present. The site likely dates to the Early Woodland period.
    Sometime before 1988, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from the Shirley site (22JA520), Jackson 
County, MS, under the direction of local archeologist Dale Greenwell. A 
student who was involved in the excavation donated the remains to the 
University of Southern Mississippi. The human remains represent the 
essentially complete skeleton of a young to middle adult male. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present. According to information on record at the Mississippi 
Department of Archives and History, the site dates to the Mississippian 
period.
    Between 2008 and 2012, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals were removed from a beach on Greenwood Island, in Jackson 
County, MS. The excavation, conducted under the direction of Marie 
Danforth at the University of Southern Mississippi, was part of a 
project to recover four Mexican War soldiers whose coffins were found 
washing out in the tidal zone. The human remains are believed to have 
eroded out of a Middle Woodland site (22JA516) located just south of 
the 19th century cemetery. The human remains include eight femoral 
diaphyses, two humeral diaphyses, two tibial diaphyses, and fragments 
of mandible, cranium, teeth, clavicle, ulna, foot, vertebrae, scapula 
and unidentified long bone, all belonging to adults. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present. The site dates to the Middle Woodland period.
    Sometime between 1980 and 2006, human remains representing, at 
minimum, five individuals were removed from Deer Island (22HR500), in 
Harrison County, MS. In the mid-1980s, a partial adult femur was 
recovered during surface collection by archeologist Baxter Mann. In 
2006, additional human remains were recovered by archeologist Tony 
Boudreaux, also during surface collection. Elements included two right 
femoral diaphyses, neither of which matched the femur found earlier. In 
May 2014, the University of Southern Mississippi received additional 
human remains that had been recovered from the site by a local 
collector in the 1980s. Elements included two individuals, one a female 
represented by a skull, vertebrae, ribs, arms, and pelvis, and an adult 
of indeterminate sex represented by a tibia fragment and mandible. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from an unknown location, likely from Pinola, 
Simpson County, MS. The human remains were recovered from an estate 
sale for Dr. Alan in Pascagoula, MS, in 2010; a local resident donated 
the remains to the University of Southern Mississippi. The human 
remains were most likely recovered from Dr. Alan's property in Pinola, 
Simpson County, MS. The human remains included a femur, tibia, ulna, 
ilium, and rib, and are consistent with belonging to an adult male. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In the early 1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from site 22 KE511 in Kemper County, MS, by 
archeologists John Blitz and Jerry Voss of the University of Southern 
Mississippi during a survey of Choctaw sites. A small number of human 
remains were recovered from the surface and were sent for curation at 
the Department of Anthropology and Sociology. The highly fragmentary 
remains include

[[Page 68476]]

cranium, one tooth, femur, ulna, tibia, innominate, patella, hand, and 
unidentified bone. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present. Ceramic sherds recovered from the site 
date the human remains to the protohistoric period.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, seven 
individuals were removed from Smith Creek site (22WK526) in Wilkinson 
County, MS, by an avocational archeologist. In 2012, the human remains 
were discovered in the avocational archeologist's belongings. The human 
remains include a maxilla and mandible from a 6-10 year old juvenile; a 
humerus from a 2-3 year old juvenile; a femur from an infant; a cranium 
and partial postcranium of a young adult probable female; partial 
crania, representing one adult male, one adult probable male, and one 
adult of indeterminate sex; and postcranial elements including maxilla, 
mandible, ilium, ribs, and vertebrae. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Ceramic sherds 
recovered from the site date the human remains to the Late Woodland 
period.
    Based on geographical, archeological, historical, and other 
information, there is a shared group identity between these human 
remains and the Choctaw tribes.

Determinations Made by the University of Southern Mississippi

    Officials of the University of Southern Mississippi have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of at least 23 
individuals of Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and 
The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Marie 
Elaine Danforth, Professor, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, 
University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Dr. #5074, Hattiesburg, 
MS 39406-0001, telephone (601) 266-4306, email m.danforth@usm.edu, by 
December 17, 2014. After that date, if no additional requestors have 
come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the 
Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma 
may proceed.
    The University of Southern Mississippi is responsible for notifying 
the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; 
The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; and the 
Thlopthlocco Tribal Town that this notice has been published.

Melanie O'Brien,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2014-27144 Filed 11-14-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P