Notice of Inventory Completion: Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 68463-68465 [2014-27142]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 221 / Monday, November 17, 2014 / Notices Dated: November 4, 2014. Michael O. Harmening, Chief Cadastral Surveyor, Nevada. Jackson Farm site (40WG17), also known as the Plum Grove site, in Washington County, TN. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. [FR Doc. 2014–27107 Filed 11–14–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–HC–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–17071; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN Consultation National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the USDA Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the USDA Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest at the address in this notice by December 17, 2014. ADDRESSES: Mr. JaSal Morris, Forest Supervisor, Supervisor’s Office, USDA Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, 2800 Ocoee Street N., Cleveland, TN 37312, telephone (423) 476–9700. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the USDA Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN. The human remains were removed from the asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:14 Nov 14, 2014 Jkt 235001 A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the USDA Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cherokee Nation, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains In 1977 and 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed from 20 burial units at the Jackson Farm site (40Wg17) in Washington County, TN, by the Forest Service archeologist Dr. Howard Earnest. The burials were extensively disturbed through massive sheet erosion of the site from flooding of the Nolichucky River in the fall of 1977. The human remains removed by Dr. Earnest have been curated by Western Carolina University since excavation. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Unassociated funerary objects were removed by Dr. Earnest and are a part of a separate Notice of Intent to Repatriate. In 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from three burial units at the Jackson Farm site (40Wg17) in Washington County, TN, by Dr. Cliff Boyd of Radford University. The human remains were disturbed by excavation performed by the Washington County, TN, Highway Department. The human remains removed by Dr. Boyd have been curated by Western Carolina University since excavation. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on the location of the Jackson Farm site, it is reasonable to assume a relationship of shared group identity between these human remains and the Cherokee people, currently represented by the Cherokee Nation; the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 68463 Determinations Made by the USDA Forest Service Cherokee National Forest Officials of the USDA Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 10 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Cherokee Nation, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Mr. JaSal Morris, Forest Supervisor, Supervisor’s Office, USDA Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, 2800 Ocoee Street N., Cleveland, TN 37312, telephone (423) 476–9700, by December 17, 2014. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Cherokee Nation, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma may proceed. The USDA Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest is responsible for notifying the Cherokee Nation, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: October 29, 2014. Melanie O’Brien, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2014–27145 Filed 11–14–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–16875; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\17NON1.SGM 17NON1 asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 68464 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 221 / Monday, November 17, 2014 / Notices University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Indiana University NAGPRA Office. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Indiana University NAGPRA Office at the address in this notice by December 17, 2014. ADDRESSES: Dr. Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, NAGPRA Office, Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, IN 47405, telephone (812) 856–5315, email thomajay@indiana.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Crittenden, Cross, Mississippi, and St. Francis Counties in Arkansas and Coahoma and DeSoto Counties in Mississippi. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by Indiana University professional staff in consultation with VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:14 Nov 14, 2014 Jkt 235001 representatives of The Quapaw Tribe of Indians. History and Description of the Remains On April 27, 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were recovered from the ‘‘B.U.’’ site in the Jericho Quadrangle of Crittenden County, AR. These human remains were received at the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology as a donation from a Mr. J.E. Boone. Notes indicate the discovery of a wide-mouthed bottle with the human remains. However, the whereabouts of the wide-mouthed bottle are unknown, and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology has no record of this wide-mouthed bottle in their collection. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In January 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were collected by Wiley Wilcox of Memphis, TN, from the Bradley site in Crittenden County, AR. These materials were donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology. No known individuals were identified. The 1 associated funerary object is a seed. Notes indicate the seed was found within a pot; however, the whereabouts of the pot are unknown, and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology has no record of this pot within their collection. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 12 individuals were removed from the Gant site in Mississippi County, AR, by unknown persons. This material was donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology by Wiley Wilcox of Memphis, TN, in January 1953. No known individuals were identified. The 16 associated funerary objects are 4 reconstructed pots and 12 pot sherds. In August 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were excavated from the Gant Site in Mississippi County, AR, by George and Francis Martin. This collection was donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology in July 1985. No known individuals were identified. The 38 associated funerary objects are 5 reconstructed pots, 29 pot sherds, 1 shell fragment, 1 vial of burnt bone, 1 vial of excavation debris, and 1 piece of clay. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 6 individuals were removed from the Rose Mound site by Wiley Wilcox of Memphis, TN. This site is located in Cross County, AR. The material was donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology in February 1953. No known individuals PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 were identified. The 102 associated funerary objects are 3 reconstructed pots, 76 pot sherds, 2 antler hafts, 5 antler flaking punches, 1 deer antler fork, 2 small antler fragments, 8 shell beads, 1 flint flake, 1 chert point, 1 flint scraper, 1 hammerstone, and 1 proximal deer ulna. In 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were collected from the Humbert Site in Coahoma County, MS, by Donald Willis of Memphis, TN. On an unknown date, this collection was donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology. No known individuals were identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are 19 pot sherds and 1 partially reconstructed polychrome water bottle. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were collected from the Lake Cormorant site in DeSoto County, MS, by Wiley Wilcox of Memphis, TN. This collection was donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology in March 1952. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were recovered from the Big Eddy site by Wiley Wilcox of Memphis, TN. This site is located near the St. Francis area in Arkansas. This material was donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory in 1953. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were recovered from the Brackenseed Place site in Arkansas. Notes indicate this material was collected by Wiley Wilcox and J.E. Boone of Memphis, TN. This collection was donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology in 1953. No known individuals were identified. The 6 associated funerary objects are 6 pieces of daub. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Edmondson site in Crittenden County, AR, by Donald Willis of Memphis, TN. This collection was donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology in 1953. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Oral traditions indicate that the Quapaw tribe originated in the Lower Ohio River Valley and eventually moved downstream to reside on both sides of the Mississippi River. After an epidemic swept through the villages in the 17th century, the Quapaw Tribe consolidated their villages on the western side of the Mississippi River E:\FR\FM\17NON1.SGM 17NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 221 / Monday, November 17, 2014 / Notices near the confluence of the White and Arkansas rivers. The Quapaw maintained a presence in the Central Mississippi valley until their removal to northwest Louisiana in 1824 when their lands in the Territory of Arkansas were ceded to the United States. Oral history evidence presented by representatives of The Quapaw Tribe of Indians indicates that the St. Francis River Valley region, which includes Cross and St. Francis Counties, has long been included in the traditional and hunting territory of the Quapaw. French colonial records (A.D. 1700) also indicate that the Quapaw were known to be the only Native American group present at that time in eastern Arkansas. Determinations Made by Indiana University Officials of the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 32 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 183 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and The Quapaw Tribe of Indians. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, NAGPRA Office, Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, IN 47405, telephone (812) 856–5315, email thomajay@ indiana.edu, by December 17, 2014. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Quapaw Tribe of Indians may proceed. Indiana University is responsible for notifying The Quapaw Tribe of Indians that this notice has been published. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:14 Nov 14, 2014 Jkt 235001 Dated: October 2, 2014. Melanie O’Brien, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2014–27142 Filed 11–14–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–70–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–17027; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Illinois State Museum has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no compelling evidence of cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Illinois State Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Illinois State Museum at the address in this notice by December 17, 2014. ADDRESSES: Dr. Robert E. Warren, Illinois State Museum, 1011 East Ash Street, Springfield, IL 62703, telephone (217) 524–7903, email warren@ museum.state.il.us. SUMMARY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL. The human remains were removed from the Wickliffe Mounds site in Ballard County, KY. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 68465 the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Illinois State Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and The Chickasaw Nation. History and Description of the Remains On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed by unknown parties from unknown locations at the Wickliffe Mounds site (15BA4) in Ballard County, KY. In 1956, the University of Chicago transferred the human remains to the Illinois State Museum (ISM 1956–8) along with collections of animal bone, freshwater mussel shell, and ceramic and lithic artifacts from the same site. The human remains include cranial and postcranial elements of one young adult (ISM NAGPRA 722) and postcranial elements of one infant (ISM NAGPRA 5547). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Determinations Made by the Illinois State Museum Officials of the Illinois State Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on their presumed association with prehistoric Native American occupations at the Wickliffe Mounds site. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian tribe due, in part, to the lack of specific information regarding the original provenience and removal of materials from the Wickliffe Mounds site. • The 1818 Treaty of Old Town, Mississippi, indicates that the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of The Chickasaw Nation. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians also has aboriginal land in western Kentucky, but not in Ballard County. E:\FR\FM\17NON1.SGM 17NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 221 (Monday, November 17, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 68463-68465]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-27142]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-16875; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Glenn A. Black Laboratory of 
Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana

[[Page 68464]]

University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated 
funerary objects in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or 
Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or 
representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains should submit a written request to the Indiana 
University NAGPRA Office. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, 
Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to the 
Indiana University NAGPRA Office at the address in this notice by 
December 17, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, 
NAGPRA Office, Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, 
IN 47405, telephone (812) 856-5315, email thomajay@indiana.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Glenn A. Black 
Laboratory of Archaeology at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. The 
human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from 
Crittenden, Cross, Mississippi, and St. Francis Counties in Arkansas 
and Coahoma and DeSoto Counties in Mississippi.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by Indiana University professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of The Quapaw Tribe of Indians.

History and Description of the Remains

    On April 27, 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were recovered from the ``B.U.'' site in the Jericho 
Quadrangle of Crittenden County, AR. These human remains were received 
at the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology as a donation from a 
Mr. J.E. Boone. Notes indicate the discovery of a wide-mouthed bottle 
with the human remains. However, the whereabouts of the wide-mouthed 
bottle are unknown, and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology 
has no record of this wide-mouthed bottle in their collection. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In January 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were collected by Wiley Wilcox of Memphis, TN, from the 
Bradley site in Crittenden County, AR. These materials were donated to 
the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology. No known individuals were 
identified. The 1 associated funerary object is a seed. Notes indicate 
the seed was found within a pot; however, the whereabouts of the pot 
are unknown, and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology has no 
record of this pot within their collection.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 12 
individuals were removed from the Gant site in Mississippi County, AR, 
by unknown persons. This material was donated to the Glenn A. Black 
Laboratory of Archaeology by Wiley Wilcox of Memphis, TN, in January 
1953. No known individuals were identified. The 16 associated funerary 
objects are 4 reconstructed pots and 12 pot sherds.
    In August 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 
individuals were excavated from the Gant Site in Mississippi County, 
AR, by George and Francis Martin. This collection was donated to the 
Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology in July 1985. No known 
individuals were identified. The 38 associated funerary objects are 5 
reconstructed pots, 29 pot sherds, 1 shell fragment, 1 vial of burnt 
bone, 1 vial of excavation debris, and 1 piece of clay.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 6 
individuals were removed from the Rose Mound site by Wiley Wilcox of 
Memphis, TN. This site is located in Cross County, AR. The material was 
donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology in February 
1953. No known individuals were identified. The 102 associated funerary 
objects are 3 reconstructed pots, 76 pot sherds, 2 antler hafts, 5 
antler flaking punches, 1 deer antler fork, 2 small antler fragments, 8 
shell beads, 1 flint flake, 1 chert point, 1 flint scraper, 1 
hammerstone, and 1 proximal deer ulna.
    In 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
collected from the Humbert Site in Coahoma County, MS, by Donald Willis 
of Memphis, TN. On an unknown date, this collection was donated to the 
Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology. No known individuals were 
identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are 19 pot sherds and 1 
partially reconstructed polychrome water bottle.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were collected from the Lake Cormorant site in DeSoto 
County, MS, by Wiley Wilcox of Memphis, TN. This collection was donated 
to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology in March 1952. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were recovered from the Big Eddy site by Wiley Wilcox of 
Memphis, TN. This site is located near the St. Francis area in 
Arkansas. This material was donated to the Glenn A. Black Laboratory in 
1953. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 
individuals were recovered from the Brackenseed Place site in Arkansas. 
Notes indicate this material was collected by Wiley Wilcox and J.E. 
Boone of Memphis, TN. This collection was donated to the Glenn A. Black 
Laboratory of Archaeology in 1953. No known individuals were 
identified. The 6 associated funerary objects are 6 pieces of daub.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Edmondson site in Crittenden County, 
AR, by Donald Willis of Memphis, TN. This collection was donated to the 
Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology in 1953. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Oral traditions indicate that the Quapaw tribe originated in the 
Lower Ohio River Valley and eventually moved downstream to reside on 
both sides of the Mississippi River. After an epidemic swept through 
the villages in the 17th century, the Quapaw Tribe consolidated their 
villages on the western side of the Mississippi River

[[Page 68465]]

near the confluence of the White and Arkansas rivers. The Quapaw 
maintained a presence in the Central Mississippi valley until their 
removal to northwest Louisiana in 1824 when their lands in the 
Territory of Arkansas were ceded to the United States. Oral history 
evidence presented by representatives of The Quapaw Tribe of Indians 
indicates that the St. Francis River Valley region, which includes 
Cross and St. Francis Counties, has long been included in the 
traditional and hunting territory of the Quapaw. French colonial 
records (A.D. 1700) also indicate that the Quapaw were known to be the 
only Native American group present at that time in eastern Arkansas.

Determinations Made by Indiana University

    Officials of the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology at 
Indiana University have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 32 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 183 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and The Quapaw Tribe of Indians.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. 
Jayne-Leigh Thomas, NAGPRA Director, Indiana University, NAGPRA Office, 
Student Building 318, 701 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, IN 47405, 
telephone (812) 856-5315, email thomajay@indiana.edu, by December 17, 
2014. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to The Quapaw Tribe of Indians may proceed.
    Indiana University is responsible for notifying The Quapaw Tribe of 
Indians that this notice has been published.

    Dated: October 2, 2014.
Melanie O'Brien,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2014-27142 Filed 11-14-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-P