Proposed Adoption of Administration for Native Americans Program Policies and Procedures, 65974-65976 [2014-26426]

Download as PDF 65974 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 215 / Thursday, November 6, 2014 / Notices A new management information system is being developed which would improve efficiency and the quality of data, and make reporting easier. Standardized measures and reporting in these areas will enable ACF to track programming outputs and outcomes across programs, and will allow grantees to self-monitor progress. Additional data collection. As an additional component of the learning agenda, the FaMLE Cross-Site contractor will collect information from a sub-set of grantees on how they designed and implemented their programs (information on outcomes associated with programs will also be assessed). This sub-set of grantees will be required to participate in the additional data collection noted below. The following protocols have been developed: • Staff interview protocol on program design (will be collected from about half of all grantees); • Staff interview protocols on program implementation (will be collected from about 10 grantees); and • Program participant focus group protocol (will be conducted with about 10 grantees). ACF also seeks comment on these draft protocols. Respondents Fatherhood and Healthy Marriage Program grantees (e.g., grantee staff) and program participants. Annual Burden Estimates The table below is required by law for Federal Register notices like this one. The federal government’s Office of Management and Budget requires federal agencies, including ACF, to estimate how many hours it will take respondents to complete data collection, and to publish these estimates in the Federal Register. The following table provides our estimates. The respondents to the data collection instruments include Responsible ANNUAL BURDEN ESTIMATES Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 75,976. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Note: The annual number of hours shown for ‘‘applicant characteristics (staff burden)’’ (13,140) is slightly higher than the annual number of hours shown for ‘‘applicant characteristics (applicant burden)’’ (13,125) due to rounding up the average number of responses per staff to the nearest whole number (146). How To Obtain Copies of the Data Collection Instruments In compliance with the requirements of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Administration for Children and Families is soliciting public comment on the specific aspects of the information collection described above. Copies of the proposed collection of information can be obtained and comments may be forwarded by writing to the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 370 L’Enfant Promenade SW., Washington, DC 20447, Attn: OPRE Reports Clearance Officer. Email address: RFHM.FRN.response@ 19:46 Nov 05, 2014 Number of responses per respondent 157,500 1080 52,500 360 1 146 0.25 0.25 13,125 13,140 360 432 110,700 84,600 120 144 36,900 28,200 1 257 1 1 0.75 0.50 0.42 0.42 90 18,504 15,498 11,844 144 72 360 60 300 200 Applicant characteristics (applicant burden) ............ Applicant characteristics (staff burden) ................... Program operations (related to program characteristics) .................................................................... Program operations (related to service delivery) .... Participant outcomes (pre-test) ................................ Participant outcomes (post-test) .............................. Data entry (for grantees that do not use new management information system, includes applicant characteristics and participant outcomes) ............ Quarterly Performance Form (QPR) ........................ Semi-annual Performance Progress Report (PPR) Staff interview protocol on program design ............. Staff interview protocol on program implementation Program participant focus group protocol ............... VerDate Sep<11>2014 Annual number of respondents 48 24 120 20 100 67 274 1 2 1 1 1 0.21 1 3.2 1 1 1.50 2,762 24 768 20 100 101 Total number of respondents Instrument Jkt 235001 Average burden hours per response Annual burden hours acf.hhs.gov. All requests should be identified by the title of the information collection. Reference Specific Areas for Comment Karl Koerper, OPRE Reports Clearance Officer. The Department specifically requests comments on (a) whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Consideration will be given to comments and suggestions submitted within 60 days of this publication. PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 [1] http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/ ssact/title04/0403.htm. [FR Doc. 2014–26320 Filed 11–5–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4184–73–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families [CFDA Number: 93.612] Proposed Adoption of Administration for Native Americans Program Policies and Procedures Administration for Native Americans, ACF, HHS. ACTION: Notice for public comment. AGENCY: The Administration for Native Americans (ANA) invites public comment pursuant to Section 814 of the Native American Programs Act of 1974 SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 215 / Thursday, November 6, 2014 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES (NAPA), as amended, which requires ANA to provide members of the public with the opportunity to comment on proposed changes in interpretive rules, general statements of policy, and rules of agency procedure or practice that affect programs, projects, and activities authorized under the NAPA, and to give notice of the final adoption of such changes at least 30 days before the changes become effective. In accordance with notice requirements of NAPA, ANA herein describes its proposal to fund projects, beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2015, under Alaska-Specific SEDS. DATES: Submit written or electronic comments on this Notice, on or before December 8, 2014. ADDRESSES: Send comments in response to this notice via email to Lillian A. Sparks, Commissioner, Administration for Native Americans, at ANACommissioner@acf.hhs.gov. Comments will be available for inspection by members of the public at the Administration for Native Americans, 901 D Street SW., Washington, DC 20447. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Carmelia Strickland, Director, Division of Program Operations, ANA, (877) 922– 9262. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. Funding Opportunity Announcements Beginning in FY 2015, ANA proposes to re-establish publishing a separate Alaska-Specific SEDS Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to target support and attention to core capacity building at the Alaska Native Village level. This Alaska-Specific SEDS FOA, Social and Economic Development Strategies for AlaskaSEDS–AK (HHS–2015–ACF–ANA–NK– 0960) is intended to respond to the unique governmental structures in Alaska. Re-establishment of AlaskaSpecific SEDS, is designed to provide targeted support for Village-specific projects to improve and strengthen the administrative and management capacity of Alaska Native Village governments, governments that are central to social and economic selfsufficiency in Alaska. From FYs 1984 through 2009, ANA funded AlaskaSpecific SEDS projects under 45 CFR 1336.33 (a)(2) and (b)(4). In 2009, ANA stopped funding projects under AlaskaSpecific SEDS and, from FYs 2010 through 2014, projects that had previously been funded under AlaskaSpecific SEDS were funded under the general Social and Economic Development Strategies (SEDS) FOAs. This approach precluded VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Nov 05, 2014 Jkt 235001 implementation of 45 CFR 1336.33 (b)(4), a special provision applicable only to projects funded under AlaskaSpecific SEDS, under which funding for core administrative capacity building projects at the Village government level is allowable, if the village does not have governing systems in place. Based on review of historical data covering the period from FYs 1984 through 2014, ANA has decided to re-establish AlaskaSpecific SEDS in order to emphasize improving and strengthening the capacity of Alaska Native Village governments; focusing on the strengths present in Native Villages to generate evidence-based practices and sustainable approaches demonstrated to be effective at the Village level. In an effort to meaningfully create opportunities to build and strengthen core governmental capacity in the areas of administration and project management at the Alaska Native Village level, ANA will make up to $1,000,000 available for Alaska-Specific SEDS funding in FY 2015 for new, community-based Village-level projects that will be available through competition under Social and Economic Development Strategies for AlaskaSEDS–AK (HHS–2015–ACF–ANA–NK– 0960). All language in the standing FOA, Social and Economic Development Strategies—SEDS (HHS–2014–ACF– ANA–NA–0776) available at http:// www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/open/foa/ index.cfm?switch=foa&fon=HHS-2014ACF-ANA-NA-0776, will apply to the Alaska-Specific SEDS FOA, Social and Economic Development Strategies for Alaska-SEDS–AK (HHS–2015–ACF– ANA–NK–0960), except as follows: B. Alaska-Specific SEDS Program Areas of Interest ANA has identified the following program areas of interest for the AlaskaSpecific SEDS FOA, however funding is not restricted to those listed below: (a) Governance: Governance is defined as increasing the ability of tribal and Alaska Native Village governments to exercise local control and decisionmaking, and to develop and enforce laws, regulations, codes, and policies that reflect and promote the interests of community members. ANA recognizes the structure of governance that controls Native lands and communities in Alaska are more complex than in the lower 48 states. With some exceptions, most tribes in the lower 48 states escape the complicated jurisdictional and administrative situation that prevails in rural Alaska, where powers over lands, other resources, and relevant governmental programs are fragmented PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65975 and widely dispersed among tribes, corporations, municipalities, governmental agencies, and other bodies. Examples of Alaska-Specific program areas of interest are: • Administrative and program management capacity building— Planning and financial management capacity building to strengthen effective and accountable planning and management of Village-level government operations. • Governmental administration— Improving Village-level capacity related to regulatory, judicial, and administrative infrastructure, including clarifying jurisdiction, developing or amending codes and procedures, enforcing contracts and property rights, and addressing family and child welfare issues. • Comprehensive strategies— Developing Village-level strategies to assess and address the needs of children, youth, and community members. • Emergency Preparedness/Disaster Recovery/Disaster Preparedness— Planning, analysis, and mitigation efforts to ensure needed services to better communicate and coordinate preparedness, response, and recovery efforts. • Adaptation and mitigation of impacts of climate change— Assessment, planning, and implementation of efforts to adapt to climate change and to effectively respond to its impacts at the Village level, including efforts to address the effects of climate change on local fisheries and fresh water supplies, effects that increase the risk of flooding and wildfires, assessment and planning for relocation, and mitigation of impacts of erosion and permafrost melt. • Technology infrastructure— Establishing and implementing Villagelevel systems to address internet connectivity and broadband planning as well as technology upgrades at the Village level. (b) Economic Development: Projects that support the creation of sustainable local economies and promote selfsufficiency. Examples of Alaska-Specific program areas of interest are: • Economic stability—Conducting the necessary planning and/or research to support achievement of long-range economic development goals at the Village level. Examples may include performing gap or value-added analyses to identify strengths and weaknesses in the local Village economy, strengthening Village capacity to deliver programs that promote economic development and security. E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 65976 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 215 / Thursday, November 6, 2014 / Notices • Energy-related activities—Projects that promote traditional energy activities and practices that support conservation and help to mitigate the high costs of the purchase, transportation, and storage of fuel in Alaskan Villages, especially strategic energy plans that have been identified in tribally approved strategic energy plans. Examples include projects to implement renewable energy resources at the Village level such as bio-energy, geothermal, hydropower, solar, wind, or other methods appropriate to the geographical location. • Infrastructure—Developing Villagelevel infrastructure (transportation systems, communication, distribution networks, financial institutions, etc.) to support the Village workforce and to make sustainable business activity possible. • Subsistence—Enhancing subsistence and agricultural activities to retain or revitalize traditional food sources and practices at the Villagelevel. (c) Social Development: Projects that develop and implement culturally appropriate strategies to meet the social service needs of Alaska Natives. Examples of Alaska-Specific program areas of interest are: • Community living—Development and coordination of services to assist people with disabilities by helping them reach their maximum potential through increased independence, productivity, and integration within the Village community. • Early childhood education and development—Supporting stable and high-quality, culturally responsive early childhood programs, creating early childhood education and development jobs, and improving Village level planning and coordination of early childhood education and development programs. • Youth development—Improving the well-being of youth through life skills training at the Village level, workforce development, mentoring programs, substance abuse programs, and preventing suicides and juvenile crime. • Community Health—Promoting improved access to health care and quality of care through coordinated Village and regional approaches, expanding access to healthy foods available in Native Villages, and supporting environmental health. • Arts and culture—Developing or enhancing activities, at the Village level that promote, preserve, or restore Native Village culture and arts. • Rescue archaeology—Recovery of cultural material due to climate change VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Nov 05, 2014 Jkt 235001 such as exposure of cultural artifacts due to permafrost melting. • Organizational Development— Increasing organizational capacity at the Village level to successfully implement mission and goals. • Nutrition and Fitness—Promoting increased knowledge and participation in activities that promote healthy foods, active lifestyles, the reduction of obesity, and other healthy-living habits • Strengthening Families— Incorporating culturally relevant strategies to strengthen families and promote family preservation, responsible parenting, and healthy relationship skills; and to foster the well-being of children residing in Villages • Responsible Fatherhood— Supporting responsible fatherhood through activities such as counseling, mentoring, marriage education, enhancing relationship skills, parenting, and activities to foster economic stability • Suicide Prevention—Promoting safety, resilience, and protective factors necessary to foster mental health and reduce incidences of suicide and suicidal ideation • Human Trafficking—Development of Village-level assessments and strategies to address human trafficking, including efforts to bring awareness of human trafficking to the public, development of prevention strategies to address the needs of victims, and establishment of collaborative partnerships including those that train public safety officials to recognize traffickers and their victims. C. Eligible Applicants Applicants eligible under the AlaskaSpecific SEDS FOA are those listed in 45 CFR 1336.33(a)(2): that is, ‘‘(i) Federally recognized Indian tribes in Alaska; (ii) Alaska Native villages as defined in the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANSCA) and/or nonprofit village consortia; (iii) Incorporated nonprofit Alaska Native multi-purpose community-based organizations; (iv) Nonprofit Alaska Native Regional Corporations/ Associations in Alaska with village specific projects; and (v) Nonprofit Native organizations in Alaska with village specific projects.’’ As this listing already appears in our regulations we are not seeking comment on this aspect of the Alaska-Specific SEDS Projects. Statutory Authority: This notice for public comment is required by Section 814 of the PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Native American Programs Act of 1974 (NAPA), as amended. Kimberly Romine, Deputy Commissioner, Administration for Native American. [FR Doc. 2014–26426 Filed 11–5–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4184–34–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA–2011–N–0509] Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Appeals of Science-Based Decisions Above the Division Level at the Center for Veterinary Medicine AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of certain information by the Agency. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (the PRA), Federal Agencies are required to publish notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension of an existing collection of information, and to allow 60 days for public comment in response to the notice. This notice solicits comments on the information collection requirements for appeals of science-based decisions above the division level at the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM). DATES: Submit electronic or written comments on the collection of information by January 5, 2015. ADDRESSES: Submit electronic comments on the collection of information to http:// www.regulations.gov. Submit written comments on the collection of information to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA–305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. All comments should be identified with the docket number found in brackets in the heading of this document. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: FDA PRA Staff, Office of Operations, Food and Drug Administration, 8455 Colesville Rd., COLE–14526, Silver Spring, MD 20993–0002, PRAStaff@ fda.hhs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501–3520), Federal Agencies must obtain approval from the SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 215 (Thursday, November 6, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65974-65976]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-26426]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Administration for Children and Families

[CFDA Number: 93.612]


Proposed Adoption of Administration for Native Americans Program 
Policies and Procedures

AGENCY: Administration for Native Americans, ACF, HHS.

ACTION: Notice for public comment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Administration for Native Americans (ANA) invites public 
comment pursuant to Section 814 of the Native American Programs Act of 
1974

[[Page 65975]]

(NAPA), as amended, which requires ANA to provide members of the public 
with the opportunity to comment on proposed changes in interpretive 
rules, general statements of policy, and rules of agency procedure or 
practice that affect programs, projects, and activities authorized 
under the NAPA, and to give notice of the final adoption of such 
changes at least 30 days before the changes become effective. In 
accordance with notice requirements of NAPA, ANA herein describes its 
proposal to fund projects, beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2015, under 
Alaska-Specific SEDS.

DATES: Submit written or electronic comments on this Notice, on or 
before December 8, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Send comments in response to this notice via email to 
Lillian A. Sparks, Commissioner, Administration for Native Americans, 
at ANACommissioner@acf.hhs.gov. Comments will be available for 
inspection by members of the public at the Administration for Native 
Americans, 901 D Street SW., Washington, DC 20447.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Carmelia Strickland, Director, 
Division of Program Operations, ANA, (877) 922-9262.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

A. Funding Opportunity Announcements

    Beginning in FY 2015, ANA proposes to re-establish publishing a 
separate Alaska-Specific SEDS Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to 
target support and attention to core capacity building at the Alaska 
Native Village level. This Alaska-Specific SEDS FOA, Social and 
Economic Development Strategies for Alaska-SEDS-AK (HHS-2015-ACF-ANA-
NK-0960) is intended to respond to the unique governmental structures 
in Alaska. Re-establishment of Alaska-Specific SEDS, is designed to 
provide targeted support for Village-specific projects to improve and 
strengthen the administrative and management capacity of Alaska Native 
Village governments, governments that are central to social and 
economic self-sufficiency in Alaska. From FYs 1984 through 2009, ANA 
funded Alaska-Specific SEDS projects under 45 CFR 1336.33 (a)(2) and 
(b)(4). In 2009, ANA stopped funding projects under Alaska-Specific 
SEDS and, from FYs 2010 through 2014, projects that had previously been 
funded under Alaska-Specific SEDS were funded under the general Social 
and Economic Development Strategies (SEDS) FOAs. This approach 
precluded implementation of 45 CFR 1336.33 (b)(4), a special provision 
applicable only to projects funded under Alaska-Specific SEDS, under 
which funding for core administrative capacity building projects at the 
Village government level is allowable, if the village does not have 
governing systems in place. Based on review of historical data covering 
the period from FYs 1984 through 2014, ANA has decided to re-establish 
Alaska-Specific SEDS in order to emphasize improving and strengthening 
the capacity of Alaska Native Village governments; focusing on the 
strengths present in Native Villages to generate evidence-based 
practices and sustainable approaches demonstrated to be effective at 
the Village level.
    In an effort to meaningfully create opportunities to build and 
strengthen core governmental capacity in the areas of administration 
and project management at the Alaska Native Village level, ANA will 
make up to $1,000,000 available for Alaska-Specific SEDS funding in FY 
2015 for new, community-based Village-level projects that will be 
available through competition under Social and Economic Development 
Strategies for Alaska-SEDS-AK (HHS-2015-ACF-ANA-NK-0960).
    All language in the standing FOA, Social and Economic Development 
Strategies--SEDS (HHS-2014-ACF-ANA-NA-0776) available at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/open/foa/index.cfm?switch=foa&fon=HHS-2014-ACF-ANA-NA-0776, will apply to the Alaska-Specific SEDS FOA, Social and 
Economic Development Strategies for Alaska-SEDS-AK (HHS-2015-ACF-ANA-
NK-0960), except as follows:

B. Alaska-Specific SEDS Program Areas of Interest

    ANA has identified the following program areas of interest for the 
Alaska-Specific SEDS FOA, however funding is not restricted to those 
listed below:
    (a) Governance: Governance is defined as increasing the ability of 
tribal and Alaska Native Village governments to exercise local control 
and decision-making, and to develop and enforce laws, regulations, 
codes, and policies that reflect and promote the interests of community 
members. ANA recognizes the structure of governance that controls 
Native lands and communities in Alaska are more complex than in the 
lower 48 states. With some exceptions, most tribes in the lower 48 
states escape the complicated jurisdictional and administrative 
situation that prevails in rural Alaska, where powers over lands, other 
resources, and relevant governmental programs are fragmented and widely 
dispersed among tribes, corporations, municipalities, governmental 
agencies, and other bodies. Examples of Alaska-Specific program areas 
of interest are:
     Administrative and program management capacity building--
Planning and financial management capacity building to strengthen 
effective and accountable planning and management of Village-level 
government operations.
     Governmental administration--Improving Village-level 
capacity related to regulatory, judicial, and administrative 
infrastructure, including clarifying jurisdiction, developing or 
amending codes and procedures, enforcing contracts and property rights, 
and addressing family and child welfare issues.
     Comprehensive strategies--Developing Village-level 
strategies to assess and address the needs of children, youth, and 
community members.
     Emergency Preparedness/Disaster Recovery/Disaster 
Preparedness--Planning, analysis, and mitigation efforts to ensure 
needed services to better communicate and coordinate preparedness, 
response, and recovery efforts.
     Adaptation and mitigation of impacts of climate change--
Assessment, planning, and implementation of efforts to adapt to climate 
change and to effectively respond to its impacts at the Village level, 
including efforts to address the effects of climate change on local 
fisheries and fresh water supplies, effects that increase the risk of 
flooding and wildfires, assessment and planning for relocation, and 
mitigation of impacts of erosion and permafrost melt.
     Technology infrastructure--Establishing and implementing 
Village-level systems to address internet connectivity and broadband 
planning as well as technology upgrades at the Village level.
    (b) Economic Development: Projects that support the creation of 
sustainable local economies and promote self-sufficiency. Examples of 
Alaska-Specific program areas of interest are:
     Economic stability--Conducting the necessary planning and/
or research to support achievement of long-range economic development 
goals at the Village level. Examples may include performing gap or 
value-added analyses to identify strengths and weaknesses in the local 
Village economy, strengthening Village capacity to deliver programs 
that promote economic development and security.

[[Page 65976]]

     Energy-related activities--Projects that promote 
traditional energy activities and practices that support conservation 
and help to mitigate the high costs of the purchase, transportation, 
and storage of fuel in Alaskan Villages, especially strategic energy 
plans that have been identified in tribally approved strategic energy 
plans. Examples include projects to implement renewable energy 
resources at the Village level such as bio-energy, geothermal, 
hydropower, solar, wind, or other methods appropriate to the 
geographical location.
     Infrastructure--Developing Village-level infrastructure 
(transportation systems, communication, distribution networks, 
financial institutions, etc.) to support the Village workforce and to 
make sustainable business activity possible.
     Subsistence--Enhancing subsistence and agricultural 
activities to retain or revitalize traditional food sources and 
practices at the Village-level.
    (c) Social Development: Projects that develop and implement 
culturally appropriate strategies to meet the social service needs of 
Alaska Natives. Examples of Alaska-Specific program areas of interest 
are:
     Community living--Development and coordination of services 
to assist people with disabilities by helping them reach their maximum 
potential through increased independence, productivity, and integration 
within the Village community.
     Early childhood education and development--Supporting 
stable and high-quality, culturally responsive early childhood 
programs, creating early childhood education and development jobs, and 
improving Village level planning and coordination of early childhood 
education and development programs.
     Youth development--Improving the well-being of youth 
through life skills training at the Village level, workforce 
development, mentoring programs, substance abuse programs, and 
preventing suicides and juvenile crime.
     Community Health--Promoting improved access to health care 
and quality of care through coordinated Village and regional 
approaches, expanding access to healthy foods available in Native 
Villages, and supporting environmental health.
     Arts and culture--Developing or enhancing activities, at 
the Village level that promote, preserve, or restore Native Village 
culture and arts.
     Rescue archaeology--Recovery of cultural material due to 
climate change such as exposure of cultural artifacts due to permafrost 
melting.
     Organizational Development--Increasing organizational 
capacity at the Village level to successfully implement mission and 
goals.
     Nutrition and Fitness--Promoting increased knowledge and 
participation in activities that promote healthy foods, active 
lifestyles, the reduction of obesity, and other healthy-living habits
     Strengthening Families--Incorporating culturally relevant 
strategies to strengthen families and promote family preservation, 
responsible parenting, and healthy relationship skills; and to foster 
the well-being of children residing in Villages
     Responsible Fatherhood--Supporting responsible fatherhood 
through activities such as counseling, mentoring, marriage education, 
enhancing relationship skills, parenting, and activities to foster 
economic stability
     Suicide Prevention--Promoting safety, resilience, and 
protective factors necessary to foster mental health and reduce 
incidences of suicide and suicidal ideation
     Human Trafficking--Development of Village-level 
assessments and strategies to address human trafficking, including 
efforts to bring awareness of human trafficking to the public, 
development of prevention strategies to address the needs of victims, 
and establishment of collaborative partnerships including those that 
train public safety officials to recognize traffickers and their 
victims.

C. Eligible Applicants

    Applicants eligible under the Alaska-Specific SEDS FOA are those 
listed in 45 CFR 1336.33(a)(2): that is, ``(i) Federally recognized 
Indian tribes in Alaska; (ii) Alaska Native villages as defined in the 
Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANSCA) and/or non-profit village 
consortia; (iii) Incorporated nonprofit Alaska Native multi-purpose 
community-based organizations; (iv) Nonprofit Alaska Native Regional 
Corporations/Associations in Alaska with village specific projects; and 
(v) Nonprofit Native organizations in Alaska with village specific 
projects.'' As this listing already appears in our regulations we are 
not seeking comment on this aspect of the Alaska-Specific SEDS 
Projects.

    Statutory Authority:  This notice for public comment is required 
by Section 814 of the Native American Programs Act of 1974 (NAPA), 
as amended.

Kimberly Romine,
Deputy Commissioner, Administration for Native American.
[FR Doc. 2014-26426 Filed 11-5-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4184-34-P