Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Recovery Plan for Georgia Pigtoe Mussel, Interrupted Rocksnail, and Rough Hornsnail, 65982-65983 [2014-26362]

Download as PDF 65982 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 215 / Thursday, November 6, 2014 / Notices of enhancement of the survival of the species. Hominidae Hylobatidae Lemuridae Macropodidae Tapiridae Accipitridae Anatidae Falconidae Struthionidae Sturnidae Alligatoridae Applicant: Corey Knowlton, Royse City, TX; PRT–33291B The applicant requests a permit to import the sport-hunted trophy of one male black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) taken from the wild in Namibia, for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. Applicant: Animals of Montana, Bozeman, MT; PRT–36691B The applicant requests renewal of a captive-bred wildlife registration under 50 CFR 17.21(g) for the African hunting dog (Lycaon pictus), clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa), snow leopard (Uncia uncia), and spotted leopard (Panthera pardus) to enhance the species’ survival through captive propagation. This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens, Los Angeles, CA; PRT–45687B The applicant requests a permit to import two female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) from Zoo La Palmyre, France, for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. The applicant requests a permit to import one male mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) from Tierpark Ueckermunde, Germany, for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport-hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) culled from a captive herd maintained under the management program of the Republic of South Africa, for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. Applicant: National Marine Mammal Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA; PRT– 212570 The applicant requests amendment of their captive-bred wildlife registration under 50 CFR 17.21(g) for the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) to enhance the species’ propagation or survival. The notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over the remainder of the 5-year period for which the permit would be valid. Applicant: Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY; PRT–45536B The applicant requests a permit to import two female captive-born southern pudus (Pudu puda) from Africam Safari, Mexico, for the purpose Jkt 235001 Multiple Applicants B. Endangered Marine Mammals and Marine Mammals Applicant: Close-Up Creatures, LLC, Naples, FL; PRT–19478A 19:46 Nov 05, 2014 The applicant requests a permit to import the sport-hunted trophy of one male black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) taken from the wild in Namibia, for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. Applicant: Denis Ksarnosky, Burlington, WI; PRT–47740B; Applicant: Robert Patton, Fort Worth, TX; PRT–46007B; Applicant: Austin Pipkin, Houston, TX; PRT–48390B; Applicant: Albert Seeno, Concord, CA; PRT–46538B; Applicant: Don Byrne, Montgomery, TX; PRT– 47538B; Applicant: Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens, Los Angeles, CA; PRT–43317B VerDate Sep<11>2014 Applicant: Michael Luzich, Las Vegas, NV; PRT–33743B The applicant requests renewal of the permit to harass walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) during aerial surveys in Alaska for the purpose of scientific research. This notification covers activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Concurrent with publishing this notice in the Federal Register, we are forwarding copies of the above applications to the Marine Mammal Commission and the Committee of Scientific Advisors for their review. Brenda Tapia, Program Analyst/Data Administrator, Branch of Permits, Division of Management Authority. [FR Doc. 2014–26357 Filed 11–5–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R4–ES–2014–N167; FXES11130400000C2–145–FF04E00000] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Recovery Plan for Georgia Pigtoe Mussel, Interrupted Rocksnail, and Rough Hornsnail Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. AGENCY: We, the Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the availability of the final recovery plan for the endangered Georgia pigtoe mussel, interrupted rocksnail, and rough hornsnail. The final recovery plan includes specific recovery objectives and criteria the interrupted rocksnail and rough hornsnail would have to meet in order for us to downlist them to threatened status under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). Recovery criteria for the Georgia pigtoe will be developed after we complete critical recovery actions and gain a greater understanding of the species. ADDRESSES: You may obtain a copy of the recovery plan by contacting Jeff Powell at the Alabama Field Office, by U.S. mail at U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alabama Field Office, 1208–B Main Street, Daphne, AL 36526, or by telephone at (251) 441–5858; or by visiting our recovery plan Web site at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/ species/recovery-plans.html. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeff Powell (see ADDRESSES above). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: Introduction We listed the Georgia pigtoe mussel (Pleurobema hanleyianum), interrupted rocksnail (Leptoxis foremani), and rough hornsnail (Pleurocera foremani) as endangered species under the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) on November 2, 2010 (75 FR 67512). All three species are endemic to the Coosa River drainage of the Mobile River Basin in Alabama and Georgia; the Georgia pigtoe also occurs in a Coosa River tributary in Tennessee. All three species have disappeared from 90 percent or more of their historical ranges, primarily due to impoundment of riverine habitats. A single population of interrupted rocksnail is known to survive in the Oostanaula River, Georgia. There are five localized populations of rough hornsnail, one each in Yellowleaf Creek, Alabama; lower Walnut Creek, Alabama; lower Hatchet and Weogufka Creeks, E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 215 / Thursday, November 6, 2014 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Alabama; and the lower Coosa River, Alabama. Surviving populations of Georgia pigtoe occur in the Conasauga River, Georgia, and possibly in the Coosa River (Weiss Bypass), Alabama. Both the rough hornsnail and interrupted rocksnail are State listed as a Priority 1 (P1) species in Alabama, while the Georgia pigtoe is State listed as endangered in Georgia. Approximately 258 km (160 mi) of stream channels in the Coosa River drainage have been designated as critical habitat for the interrupted rocksnail (101 km (63 mi)), rough hornsnail (27.4 km (17 mi)), and Georgia pigtoe mussel (153 km (95 mi)). Critical habitat is located in Cherokee, Clay, Coosa, Elmore and Shelby Counties, Alabama; Gordon, Floyd, Murray, and Whitfield Counties, Georgia; and Bradley and Polk Counties, Tennessee. The Georgia pigtoe mussel has a Federal recovery priority number of 5, which indicates that the species faces a high degree of threat but also has a low recovery potential. The interrupted rocksnail and rough hornsnail both have a recovery priority number of 2, which indicates that both species are facing a high degree of threat but have a high recovery potential. Background Restoring an endangered or threatened animal or plant to the point where it is again a secure, selfsustaining member of its ecosystem is a primary goal of our endangered species program. To help guide the recovery effort, we prepare recovery plans for most listed species. Recovery plans describe actions considered necessary for conservation of the species, establish criteria for downlisting or delisting, and estimate time and cost for implementing recovery measures. The Act requires the development of recovery plans for listed species, unless such a plan would not promote the conservation of a particular species. Section 4(f) of the Act requires us to provide public notice and an opportunity for public review and comment during recovery plan development. We will consider all information presented during a public comment period prior to approval of each new or revised recovery plan. We and other Federal agencies will take these comments into account in the course of implementing approved recovery plans. We made the draft of this recovery plan available for public comment from July 3, 2013, through September 3, 2013 (78 FR 40162). We received no public comments. We considered the information received from peer VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Nov 05, 2014 Jkt 235001 reviewers in our preparation and approval of this final recovery plan. Recovery Plan Components The Service’s recovery objectives are to work to reduce threats so that the interrupted rocksnail and rough hornsnail may be downlisted to threatened status, and to prevent further decline of the Georgia pigtoe’s Conasauga River population and prevent extinction of the species as a whole. Defining reasonable downlisting or delisting criteria for the Georgia pigtoe is not possible at this time, given the current low number of populations and individuals, lack of information about the species’ biology, and magnitude of threats. Therefore, this recovery plan only establishes downlisting criteria for the two snails. Instead of establishing downlisting or delisting criteria at this time for Georgia pigtoe, we are identifying preliminary actions to help us prevent its extinction until we can obtain further information on this species and determine recovery criteria. Downlisting of the interrupted rocksnail and rough hornsnail will be considered when we: 1. Protect and manage at least three geographically distinct populations for each species (to achieve this criterion, the populations can include the Oostanaula for the interrupted rocksnail and Yellowleaf Creek and Lower Coosa River for the rough hornsnail); 2. Achieve demonstrated and sustainable natural reproduction and recruitment in each population for each species as evident by multiple age classes of individuals, including naturally recruited juveniles, and recruitment rates exceeding mortality rates for a period of 5 years; and 3. Develop and implement habitat and population monitoring programs for each population. The following actions are identified as necessary to help prevent the extinction of the Georgia pigtoe: 1. Maintain, and where possible conduct efforts to improve, the Conasauga River population; 2. Develop and implement a monitoring plan to evaluate population size in response to management actions; 3. Develop a captive propagation program and establish an ark population (a secure, maintained captive population) to help support the Conasauga River population; 4. Conduct research, such as identification of an appropriate fish host, that is important to gain better understanding of this mussel’s life history; and PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65983 5. Identify, monitor, and where possible improve potential reintroduction sites in the species’ historic range. Authority The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533 (f). Dated: August 20, 2014. Mike Oetker, Acting Regional Director, Southeast Region. [FR Doc. 2014–26362 Filed 11–4–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R2–ES–2014–N230; FXES11130200000F5–156–FF02ENEH00] Emergency Exemption; Issuance of Emergency Permit To Capture a Suspected Gray Wolf in the Area of the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of issuance. AGENCY: The final rule to list the gray wolf as endangered throughout its range in the United States published in 1978. On October 6, 2014, a suspected gray wolf was seen wandering in the area of the North Rim of the Grand Canyon in Arizona. Deer hunting season is beginning in this area of Arizona, and it is believed that the wolf may be in danger of possible harm and could accidentally be shot either as a result of misunderstanding of status or misidentification. We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have, under an Endangered Species Act (ESA) permit, authorized qualified researchers to capture, draw blood, and possibly affix a brightly colored GPS radio collar on the suspect wolf and release it back into the general area where it was captured. It is essential for its safety to conduct these actions. ADDRESSES: Documents and other information concerning the permit are available for review, subject to the requirements of the Privacy Act and Freedom of Information Act. Documents will be available for public inspection, by appointment only, during normal business hours at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 500 Gold Ave. SW., Room 6034, Albuquerque, NM 87103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan Jacobsen, Chief, Division of Classification and Restoration, P.O. Box 1306, Albuquerque, NM 87103; (505) 248–6920. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 215 (Thursday, November 6, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65982-65983]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-26362]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R4-ES-2014-N167; FXES11130400000C2-145-FF04E00000]


Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Recovery 
Plan for Georgia Pigtoe Mussel, Interrupted Rocksnail, and Rough 
Hornsnail

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of availability.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the availability 
of the final recovery plan for the endangered Georgia pigtoe mussel, 
interrupted rocksnail, and rough hornsnail. The final recovery plan 
includes specific recovery objectives and criteria the interrupted 
rocksnail and rough hornsnail would have to meet in order for us to 
downlist them to threatened status under the Endangered Species Act of 
1973, as amended (Act). Recovery criteria for the Georgia pigtoe will 
be developed after we complete critical recovery actions and gain a 
greater understanding of the species.

ADDRESSES: You may obtain a copy of the recovery plan by contacting 
Jeff Powell at the Alabama Field Office, by U.S. mail at U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, Alabama Field Office, 1208-B Main Street, Daphne, AL 
36526, or by telephone at (251) 441-5858; or by visiting our recovery 
plan Web site at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/recovery-plans.html.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeff Powell (see ADDRESSES above).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Introduction

    We listed the Georgia pigtoe mussel (Pleurobema hanleyianum), 
interrupted rocksnail (Leptoxis foremani), and rough hornsnail 
(Pleurocera foremani) as endangered species under the Act (16 U.S.C. 
1531 et seq.) on November 2, 2010 (75 FR 67512). All three species are 
endemic to the Coosa River drainage of the Mobile River Basin in 
Alabama and Georgia; the Georgia pigtoe also occurs in a Coosa River 
tributary in Tennessee. All three species have disappeared from 90 
percent or more of their historical ranges, primarily due to 
impoundment of riverine habitats. A single population of interrupted 
rocksnail is known to survive in the Oostanaula River, Georgia. There 
are five localized populations of rough hornsnail, one each in 
Yellowleaf Creek, Alabama; lower Walnut Creek, Alabama; lower Hatchet 
and Weogufka Creeks,

[[Page 65983]]

Alabama; and the lower Coosa River, Alabama. Surviving populations of 
Georgia pigtoe occur in the Conasauga River, Georgia, and possibly in 
the Coosa River (Weiss Bypass), Alabama. Both the rough hornsnail and 
interrupted rocksnail are State listed as a Priority 1 (P1) species in 
Alabama, while the Georgia pigtoe is State listed as endangered in 
Georgia.
    Approximately 258 km (160 mi) of stream channels in the Coosa River 
drainage have been designated as critical habitat for the interrupted 
rocksnail (101 km (63 mi)), rough hornsnail (27.4 km (17 mi)), and 
Georgia pigtoe mussel (153 km (95 mi)). Critical habitat is located in 
Cherokee, Clay, Coosa, Elmore and Shelby Counties, Alabama; Gordon, 
Floyd, Murray, and Whitfield Counties, Georgia; and Bradley and Polk 
Counties, Tennessee.
    The Georgia pigtoe mussel has a Federal recovery priority number of 
5, which indicates that the species faces a high degree of threat but 
also has a low recovery potential. The interrupted rocksnail and rough 
hornsnail both have a recovery priority number of 2, which indicates 
that both species are facing a high degree of threat but have a high 
recovery potential.

Background

    Restoring an endangered or threatened animal or plant to the point 
where it is again a secure, self-sustaining member of its ecosystem is 
a primary goal of our endangered species program. To help guide the 
recovery effort, we prepare recovery plans for most listed species. 
Recovery plans describe actions considered necessary for conservation 
of the species, establish criteria for downlisting or delisting, and 
estimate time and cost for implementing recovery measures.
    The Act requires the development of recovery plans for listed 
species, unless such a plan would not promote the conservation of a 
particular species. Section 4(f) of the Act requires us to provide 
public notice and an opportunity for public review and comment during 
recovery plan development. We will consider all information presented 
during a public comment period prior to approval of each new or revised 
recovery plan. We and other Federal agencies will take these comments 
into account in the course of implementing approved recovery plans.
    We made the draft of this recovery plan available for public 
comment from July 3, 2013, through September 3, 2013 (78 FR 40162). We 
received no public comments. We considered the information received 
from peer reviewers in our preparation and approval of this final 
recovery plan.

Recovery Plan Components

    The Service's recovery objectives are to work to reduce threats so 
that the interrupted rocksnail and rough hornsnail may be downlisted to 
threatened status, and to prevent further decline of the Georgia 
pigtoe's Conasauga River population and prevent extinction of the 
species as a whole. Defining reasonable downlisting or delisting 
criteria for the Georgia pigtoe is not possible at this time, given the 
current low number of populations and individuals, lack of information 
about the species' biology, and magnitude of threats. Therefore, this 
recovery plan only establishes downlisting criteria for the two snails. 
Instead of establishing downlisting or delisting criteria at this time 
for Georgia pigtoe, we are identifying preliminary actions to help us 
prevent its extinction until we can obtain further information on this 
species and determine recovery criteria.
    Downlisting of the interrupted rocksnail and rough hornsnail will 
be considered when we:
    1. Protect and manage at least three geographically distinct 
populations for each species (to achieve this criterion, the 
populations can include the Oostanaula for the interrupted rocksnail 
and Yellowleaf Creek and Lower Coosa River for the rough hornsnail);
    2. Achieve demonstrated and sustainable natural reproduction and 
recruitment in each population for each species as evident by multiple 
age classes of individuals, including naturally recruited juveniles, 
and recruitment rates exceeding mortality rates for a period of 5 
years; and
    3. Develop and implement habitat and population monitoring programs 
for each population.
    The following actions are identified as necessary to help prevent 
the extinction of the Georgia pigtoe:
    1. Maintain, and where possible conduct efforts to improve, the 
Conasauga River population;
    2. Develop and implement a monitoring plan to evaluate population 
size in response to management actions;
    3. Develop a captive propagation program and establish an ark 
population (a secure, maintained captive population) to help support 
the Conasauga River population;
    4. Conduct research, such as identification of an appropriate fish 
host, that is important to gain better understanding of this mussel's 
life history; and
    5. Identify, monitor, and where possible improve potential 
reintroduction sites in the species' historic range.

Authority

    The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered 
Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533 (f).

    Dated: August 20, 2014.
Mike Oetker,
Acting Regional Director, Southeast Region.
[FR Doc. 2014-26362 Filed 11-4-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P