Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting, 63539 [2014-25390]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 206 / Friday, October 24, 2014 / Rules and Regulations distribution, or use of energy. At the time of proposal of the implementation rule for the prior 1997 PM2.5 standard, information on the methodology and data regarding the assessment of potential energy impacts regarding implementation of the 2006 PM2.5 standard was not addressed because the 2006 PM2.5 NAAQS is not a significant energy action. This is based on the fact that no impacts are specifically ascribed to the standard only. Potential energy impacts are ascribed during the implementation phase by the states. An energy impact analysis, as part of a regulatory impact analysis or other assessment for the PM2.5 NAAQS rule, was prepared by the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Research Triangle Park, NC, April 24, 2003. (71 FR 60853, October 17, 2006) rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with RULES I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer Advancement Act of 1995 (NTTAA), Public Law 104–113, section 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 note) directs EPA to use voluntary consensus standards (VCS) in its regulatory activities unless to do so would be inconsistent with applicable law or otherwise impracticable. VCS are technical standards (e.g., materials specifications, test methods, sampling procedures, and business practices) that are developed or adopted by VCS bodies. The NTTAA directs EPA to provide Congress, through OMB, explanations when the Agency decides not to use available and applicable VCS. This action does not involve technical standards. Therefore, EPA did not consider the use of any VCS. J. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions To Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations Executive Order 12898 (59 FR 7629 (Feb. 16, 1994)) establishes federal executive policy on environmental justice. Its main provision directs federal agencies, to the greatest extent practicable and permitted by law, to make environmental justice part of their mission by identifying and addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects of their programs, policies, and activities on minority populations and low-income populations in the United States. EPA has determined that this final action will not have disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects on minority or low-income populations because it does not directly affect the level of protection VerDate Sep<11>2014 14:09 Oct 23, 2014 Jkt 235001 provided to human health or the environment. This notice is making a finding concerning whether California has submitted or failed to submit a complete SIP for the interstate transport requirements specified in CAA section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(I) necessary to implement the 2006 PM2.5 NAAQS. K. Congressional Review Act The Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., as added by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, generally provides that before a rule may take effect, the agency promulgating the rule must submit a rule report, which includes a copy of the rule, to each House of the Congress and to the Comptroller General of the United States. EPA will submit a report containing this action and other required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior to publication of the action in the Federal Register. A Major rule cannot take effect until 60 days after it is published in the Federal Register. This action is not a ‘‘major rule’’ as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). This action will be effective November 24, 2014. L. Judicial Review Section 307(b)(1) of the CAA indicates which Federal Courts of Appeal have venue for petitions of review of final actions by EPA. This section provides, in part, that petitions for review must be filed in the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit: (i) When the EPA action consists of ‘‘nationally applicable regulations promulgated, or final actions taken, by the Administrator,’’ or (ii) when such action is locally or regionally applicable, if ‘‘such action is based on a determination of nationwide scope or effect and if in taking such action the Administrator finds and publishes that such action is based on such a determination.’’ The Administrator is determining that this action making a finding of failure to submit SIPs related to the section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(I) requirements for the 2006 24-hour PM2.5 NAAQS is of nationwide scope and effect for the purposes of section 307(b)(1). This is particularly appropriate because in the report on the 1977 Amendments that revised section 307(b)(1) of the CAA, Congress noted that the Administrator’s determination that an action is of ‘‘nationwide scope or effect’’ would be appropriate for any action that has ‘‘scope or effect beyond a single judicial circuit.’’ H.R. Rep. No. 95–294 at 323, 324, reprinted in 1977 U.S.C.C.A.N.1402–03. Here, the scope PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 9990 63539 and effect of this rulemaking extends to numerous judicial circuits since the finding of failure to submit a SIP applies to a rulemaking of national scope and effect. In these circumstances, section 307(b)(1) and its legislative history call for the Administrator to find the rule to be of ‘‘nationwide scope or effect’’ and for venue to be in the District of Columbia Circuit. Thus, any petitions for review of this action related to a finding of failure to submit SIPs related to the requirements of section 110(a)(2)(D)(i)(I) of the CAA must be filed in the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit within 60 days from the date final action is published in the Federal Register. List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and promulgation of implementation plans, Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedures, Air pollution control, Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations, Particulate matter, and Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Dated: September 29, 2014. Jared Blumenfeld, Regional Administrator, U.S. EPA, Region IX. [FR Doc. 2014–25279 Filed 10–23–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 98 Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 96 to 99, revised as of July 1, 2013, on page 765, in § 98.226, paragraph (c) is reinstated to read as follows: § 98.226 Data reporting requirements. * * * * * (c) Annual nitric acid production from each nitric acid train (tons, 100 percent acid basis). * * * * * [FR Doc. 2014–25390 Filed 10–23–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 1505–01–D E:\FR\FM\24OCR1.SGM 24OCR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 206 (Friday, October 24, 2014)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Page 63539]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-25390]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 98


Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting

CFR Correction

    In Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 96 to 99, 
revised as of July 1, 2013, on page 765, in Sec.  98.226, paragraph (c) 
is reinstated to read as follows:


Sec.  98.226  Data reporting requirements.

* * * * *
    (c) Annual nitric acid production from each nitric acid train 
(tons, 100 percent acid basis).
* * * * *
[FR Doc. 2014-25390 Filed 10-23-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 1505-01-D