Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ, 62201-62202 [2014-24526]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 200 / Thursday, October 16, 2014 / Notices Jenwhite@illinois.edu, by November 17, 2014. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary object to Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government may proceed. The Spurlock Museum is responsible for notifying the Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government that this notice has been published. Dated: September 12, 2014. Melanie O’Brien, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2014–24519 Filed 10–15–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–16761; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument at the address in this notice by November 17, 2014. ADDRESSES: Brent K. Range, Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, 10 Organ Pipe asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:19 Oct 15, 2014 Jkt 235001 Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ, and in the physical custody of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. The human remains were removed from the vicinity of the Bates Well Ranch Site, Pima County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Consultation AGENCY: ACTION: Drive, Ajo, AZ 85321–9626, telephone (520) 387–6849, email brent_range@ nps.gov. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument and Arizona State Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; and Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). The following tribes were invited to consult but did not participate: Cocopah Tribe of Arizona; Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and California; Fort Mohave Indian Tribe of Arizona, California & Nevada; Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California & Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Invited Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains Between 1951–1952, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the vicinity of the Bates Well Ranch Site in Pima County, AZ, during a cooperative archeological project between Arizona State Museum and Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument under the direction of Paul H. Ezell. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. PO 00000 Frm 00110 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 62201 Based upon the archeological context, Ezell’s field notes, and osteological analysis, the cremated human remains have been determined to be Native American dating to A.D. 500–1500. This time range in southern Arizona is commonly known to the archeological community as the Pioneer, Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic Hohokam periods. A relationship of shared group identity can reasonably be traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the four southern O’odham tribes of Arizona. The O’odham people comprise four Federally recognized Indian tribes (the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona) and one Indian group that is not Federally recognized, the Hia C-ed O’odham. An O’odham association with lands lying directly to the west of the Ajo Mountains, including Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, is documented throughout the historic period and into the 20th century. O’odham oral histories describe the end time of the Hohokam, when armies gathered and marched on the Great House communities (e.g., Casa Grande, Pueblo Grande) and cast out the Hohokam societies there. The armies then occupied the conquered lands, intermarrying with the remnants of the Hohokam and ultimately becoming the O’odham people. Other evidence of the O’odham-Hohokam connection includes similar settlement patterns, irrigation systems, residence styles, and a possible relationship between modern O’odham kickball games and formal Hohokam ball courts. A relationship of shared group identity can also reasonably be traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Hopi history is based, in large part, on clan migration narratives. The Hopi consider all of Arizona to be within traditional Hopi lands, i.e., areas in and through which Hopi clans are believed to have migrated in the past. Hopi oral history and the anthropological record show that some clans originated in the Salt-Gila region and were descended from the Hohokam. After the fall of the Great House communities, Hohokam refugees were absorbed into the Hopi culture. A relationship of shared group identity can also reasonably be traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni E:\FR\FM\16OCN1.SGM 16OCN1 62202 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 200 / Thursday, October 16, 2014 / Notices Reservation, New Mexico. Zuni oral history tells of ancestral migrations and settling throughout this region in their search for the Middle Place of the World (present day Pueblo of Zuni). Elders have identified features in the area, including shrines and petroglyphs, as Zuni. Zuni ancestors left many markers of their passing including trails, habitation sites, campsites, burials, sacred shrines, and rock art. Determinations Made by Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Officials of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Brent K. Range, Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, 10 Organ Pipe Drive, Ajo, AZ 85321–9626, telephone (520) 387–6849, email brent_range@ nps.gov, by November 17, 2014. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River PimaMaricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes and The Invited Tribes that this notice has been published. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:19 Oct 15, 2014 Jkt 235001 Dated: September 22, 2014. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2014–24526 Filed 10–15–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–16766; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Michigan. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Michigan at the address in this notice by November 17, 2014. ADDRESSES: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan Office of Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 S. Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains and associated SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00111 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 funerary objects were removed from private land in Lapeer County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University of Michigan officials in consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (formerly the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; and the Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma. Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California and Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red E:\FR\FM\16OCN1.SGM 16OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 200 (Thursday, October 16, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 62201-62202]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-24526]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-16761; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, 
Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument has completed an inventory of human 
remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural 
affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or 
Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of 
any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains 
should submit a written request to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. 
If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native 
Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Organ 
Pipe Cactus National Monument at the address in this notice by November 
17, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Brent K. Range, Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National 
Monument, 10 Organ Pipe Drive, Ajo, AZ 85321-9626, telephone (520) 387-
6849, email brent_range@nps.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park 
Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ, and in the 
physical custody of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, 
Tucson, AZ. The human remains were removed from the vicinity of the 
Bates Well Ranch Site, Pima County, AZ.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Organ Pipe 
Cactus National Monument and Arizona State Museum professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Ak Chin Indian Community of 
the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian 
Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; and Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona (hereafter referred to as 
``The Consulted Tribes'').
    The following tribes were invited to consult but did not 
participate: Cocopah Tribe of Arizona; Colorado River Indian Tribes of 
the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and California; Fort 
Mohave Indian Tribe of Arizona, California & Nevada; Pascua Yaqui Tribe 
of Arizona; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, 
California & Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the 
Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as ``The Invited 
Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    Between 1951-1952, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from the vicinity of the Bates Well Ranch Site 
in Pima County, AZ, during a cooperative archeological project between 
Arizona State Museum and Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument under the 
direction of Paul H. Ezell. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Based upon the archeological context, Ezell's field notes, and 
osteological analysis, the cremated human remains have been determined 
to be Native American dating to A.D. 500-1500. This time range in 
southern Arizona is commonly known to the archeological community as 
the Pioneer, Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic Hohokam periods.
    A relationship of shared group identity can reasonably be traced 
between members of the Hohokam culture and the four southern O'odham 
tribes of Arizona. The O'odham people comprise four Federally 
recognized Indian tribes (the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa 
(Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of 
the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa 
Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Tohono 
O'odham Nation of Arizona) and one Indian group that is not Federally 
recognized, the Hia C-ed O'odham. An O'odham association with lands 
lying directly to the west of the Ajo Mountains, including Organ Pipe 
Cactus National Monument, is documented throughout the historic period 
and into the 20th century.
    O'odham oral histories describe the end time of the Hohokam, when 
armies gathered and marched on the Great House communities (e.g., Casa 
Grande, Pueblo Grande) and cast out the Hohokam societies there. The 
armies then occupied the conquered lands, intermarrying with the 
remnants of the Hohokam and ultimately becoming the O'odham people. 
Other evidence of the O'odham-Hohokam connection includes similar 
settlement patterns, irrigation systems, residence styles, and a 
possible relationship between modern O'odham kickball games and formal 
Hohokam ball courts.
    A relationship of shared group identity can also reasonably be 
traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona. Hopi history is based, in large part, on clan migration 
narratives. The Hopi consider all of Arizona to be within traditional 
Hopi lands, i.e., areas in and through which Hopi clans are believed to 
have migrated in the past. Hopi oral history and the anthropological 
record show that some clans originated in the Salt-Gila region and were 
descended from the Hohokam. After the fall of the Great House 
communities, Hohokam refugees were absorbed into the Hopi culture.
    A relationship of shared group identity can also reasonably be 
traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni

[[Page 62202]]

Reservation, New Mexico. Zuni oral history tells of ancestral 
migrations and settling throughout this region in their search for the 
Middle Place of the World (present day Pueblo of Zuni). Elders have 
identified features in the area, including shrines and petroglyphs, as 
Zuni. Zuni ancestors left many markers of their passing including 
trails, habitation sites, campsites, burials, sacred shrines, and rock 
art.

Determinations Made by Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

    Officials of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa 
(Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of 
the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt 
River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, 
Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New Mexico.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Brent K. 
Range, Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, 10 Organ 
Pipe Drive, Ajo, AZ 85321-9626, telephone (520) 387-6849, email 
brent_range@nps.gov, by November 17, 2014. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains to the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) 
Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila 
River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River 
Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; 
Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New Mexico may proceed.
    Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is responsible for notifying 
The Consulted Tribes and The Invited Tribes that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: September 22, 2014.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2014-24526 Filed 10-15-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P