Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki National Monument, Flagstaff, AZ, 62203-62204 [2014-24524]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 200 / Thursday, October 16, 2014 / Notices asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota. Hereafter, all tribes listed in this section are referred to as ‘‘The Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains From 1923 to 1935, human remains representing, at minimum, 94 individuals were removed from the Younge site (20LP1) in Lapeer County, MI. The site is located on farmland north of Imlay City and had been plowed over for years. Between 1923 and 1935, amateur archaeologist Carman Baggerly collected at the site with the landowner’s permission. Baggerly donated many of the human remains and objects to the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropological Archaeology (UMMAA) over that period. These donations prompted a UMMAA excavation of the site that occurred from July 19 to November 5, 1935, under the direction of Wilbert Hinsdale and Emerson Greenman. UMMAA’s excavation found 2 distinct structures at the site based on the presence of post molds. These structures were recorded as Enclosures 1 and 2. The structures were described as successively re-built longhouses standing parallel to one another with walls approximately 5–6 feet thick. All of the burials were found within or near Enclosure 1, which was only partially excavated. Archaeologists found hearths and pits filled with a mixture of ashes, charcoal, faunal bones, and tobacco pipe fragments above the burials throughout Enclosure 1. Excavations found 57 distinct burial features, with 16 additional site features having human remains. The individuals included both males and females, ages ranging from infants to older adults. No known individuals were identified. A variety of burial types were found at the site including extended burials, bundle burials, torso burials, and cremations. One burial was noted as containing red ochre. Many of the human remains found within Enclosure 1 show considerable evidence of post-mortem modifications. Post-mortem modifications included cutting, shaving and drilling of the ends of long bones; drilled perforations, smaller than 3cm diameter, at the top of crania and 1 manubrium; and plaque disc removals, larger than 3cm diameter, cut from either the top or back of crania. Some remains were noted as found rearticulated, with the modified heads VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:19 Oct 15, 2014 Jkt 235001 62203 of femora inserted into the obturator foramen of the pelvis. Between 1996 and 2006, 1 lot of DNA extractions was taken from human remains in this site collection. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period (900–1300 A.D.) based on objects found at the site. The 812 associated funerary objects present are 789 ceramic sherds, 20 black bear bone fragments, 1 stone celt, 1 ceramic elbow pipe, and 1 lot of red ochre and soil. Building, 503 S. Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu, by November 17, 2014. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The University of Michigan’s Office of Research is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Officials of the University of Michigan have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on cranial morphology, dental traits, accession documentation, and archeological context. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 94 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 812 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. • Treaties, Acts of Congress, and Executive Orders indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects may be to The Tribes. Dated: September 22, 2014. Melanie O’Brien, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects, should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan Office of Research, 4080 Fleming PO 00000 Frm 00112 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 [FR Doc. 2014–24516 Filed 10–15–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–16699; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki National Monument, Flagstaff, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki National Monument, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to Wupatki National Monument. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Wupatki National Monument at the address in this notice by November 17, 2014. ADDRESSES: Kayci Cook Collins, Superintendent, Flagstaff Area National Monuments, National Park Service, 6400 N. Hwy 89, Flagstaff, AZ 86004, (928) 526–1157 ext. 227, email Kayci_ Cook@nps.gov. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\16OCN1.SGM 16OCN1 62204 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 200 / Thursday, October 16, 2014 / Notices Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki National Monument, Flagstaff, AZ, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the Superintendent, Wupatki National Monument. asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History and Description of the Cultural Item(s) In 1933, 730 cultural items were removed from Wupatki Pueblo, within Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, during an authorized excavation conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. Records indicate that all of the items were recovered from burials and that the human remains were not collected. All of the items are in the physical custody of the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, AZ. The 730 unassociated funerary objects are 2 knotted twig fragments, 534 pottery sherds, 1 stone flake, 1 bag rotted wood, 4 pieces rotted wood, 2 shell bracelets, 2 fragments painted wood, 1 worked stone, 2 stone cylinders, 2 projectile points, 23 pendants, 1 Black Mesa black-on-white bowl, 1 Black Mesa black-on-white miniature pitcher, 1 Tusayan black-onwhite bowl fragment, 1 turquoise figurine, 63 shell beads, 2 Sunset red jars, 1 Lino gray jar, 1 Lino black-ongray bowl, 1 Youngs red smudged bowl, 1 Elden corrugated jar, 3 Sunset red bowls, 1 bone awl, 4 Sunset smudged bowls, 2 Flagstaff black-on-white bowl fragments, 5 Walnut black-on-white bowl fragments, 1 Chevelon black-onwhite bowl fragment, 1 Tusayan polychrome bowl fragment, 1 Kana-a gray jar fragment, 1 Flagstaff black-onwhite miniature jar, 1 Tusayan corrugated jar, 2 Tusayan black-on-red jars, 3 cocoons, 1 shell necklace, 1 Mogollon brownware bowl, and 56 basket fragments. In 1934, 18 cultural items were removed from Nalakihu Pueblo, within Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, during an authorized excavation conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. Records indicate that all of the items were recovered from burials and that the human remains were not collected. All of the items are in the physical custody VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:19 Oct 15, 2014 Jkt 235001 of the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, AZ. The 18 unassociated funerary objects are 17 pottery sherds and 1 Sunset red bowl. In 1952, one cultural item was removed from Wupatki Pueblo, within Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, during authorized excavations incidental to stabilization of the pueblo. Records indicate that the item was recovered from a burial and that the human remains were not collected. The item is in the physical custody of the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, AZ. The one unassociated funerary object is a stone necklace. In 1965, six cultural items were removed from Wupatki Pueblo, within Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, by a National Park Service archeologist. Records indicate that the items were recovered from a burial and that the human remains were not collected. The items are in the physical custody of the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, AZ. The six unassociated funerary objects are painted wooden staff fragments. In 1986, one cultural item was removed from site WS 1953, within Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, during an authorized survey of the monument. Records indicate that the item was recovered from a burial and that the human remains were not collected. The one unassociated funerary object is a Tusayan polychrome bowl. On the basis of architecture and artifacts, Wupatki Pueblo is dated to A.D. 900–1300 and Nalakihu Pueblo is dated to A.D. 1150–1300. On the basis of artifacts, WS 1953 is dated to A.D. 1050–1250. Evidence demonstrating continuity between the people of Wupatki Pueblo, Nalakihu Pueblo, and WS 1953 from A.D. 900–1300 and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona includes similarities in material culture, architecture, mortuary practices, settlement patterns, and agricultural methods. Hopi oral history indicates connections to the people of Wupatki and Nalakihu Pueblos and numerous Hopi clans can be traced to Wupatki Pueblo. Determinations Made by Wupatki National Monument Officials of Wupatki National Monument have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 756 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and PO 00000 Frm 00113 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Kayci Cook Collins, Superintendent, Wupatki National Monument, 6400 N. Hwy 89, Flagstaff, AZ 86004, (928) 526– 1157 ext. 227, email Kayci_Cook@ nps.gov, by November 17, 2014. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may proceed. Wupatki National Monument is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona that this notice has been published. Dated: September 24, 2014. Melanie O’Brien, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2014–24524 Filed 10–15–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–16662; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: School for Advanced Research, Indian Arts Research Center, Santa Fe, NM National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The School for Advanced Research, Indian Arts Research Center, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of sacred objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the School for Advanced Research, Indian Arts Research Center. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\16OCN1.SGM 16OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 200 (Thursday, October 16, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 62203-62204]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-24524]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-16699; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of 
the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki National Monument, 
Flagstaff, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, 
Wupatki National Monument, in consultation with the appropriate Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the 
cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of 
unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of 
any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written 
request to Wupatki National Monument. If no additional claimants come 
forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal 
descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim these cultural items should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to Wupatki National Monument at the 
address in this notice by November 17, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Kayci Cook Collins, Superintendent, Flagstaff Area National 
Monuments, National Park Service, 6400 N. Hwy 89, Flagstaff, AZ 86004, 
(928) 526-1157 ext. 227, email Kayci_Cook@nps.gov.

[[Page 62204]]


SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the 
control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, 
Wupatki National Monument, Flagstaff, AZ, that meet the definition of 
unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
Superintendent, Wupatki National Monument.

History and Description of the Cultural Item(s)

    In 1933, 730 cultural items were removed from Wupatki Pueblo, 
within Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, during an 
authorized excavation conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. 
Records indicate that all of the items were recovered from burials and 
that the human remains were not collected. All of the items are in the 
physical custody of the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, AZ. 
The 730 unassociated funerary objects are 2 knotted twig fragments, 534 
pottery sherds, 1 stone flake, 1 bag rotted wood, 4 pieces rotted wood, 
2 shell bracelets, 2 fragments painted wood, 1 worked stone, 2 stone 
cylinders, 2 projectile points, 23 pendants, 1 Black Mesa black-on-
white bowl, 1 Black Mesa black-on-white miniature pitcher, 1 Tusayan 
black-on-white bowl fragment, 1 turquoise figurine, 63 shell beads, 2 
Sunset red jars, 1 Lino gray jar, 1 Lino black-on-gray bowl, 1 Youngs 
red smudged bowl, 1 Elden corrugated jar, 3 Sunset red bowls, 1 bone 
awl, 4 Sunset smudged bowls, 2 Flagstaff black-on-white bowl fragments, 
5 Walnut black-on-white bowl fragments, 1 Chevelon black-on-white bowl 
fragment, 1 Tusayan polychrome bowl fragment, 1 Kana-a gray jar 
fragment, 1 Flagstaff black-on-white miniature jar, 1 Tusayan 
corrugated jar, 2 Tusayan black-on-red jars, 3 cocoons, 1 shell 
necklace, 1 Mogollon brownware bowl, and 56 basket fragments.
    In 1934, 18 cultural items were removed from Nalakihu Pueblo, 
within Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, during an 
authorized excavation conducted by the Museum of Northern Arizona. 
Records indicate that all of the items were recovered from burials and 
that the human remains were not collected. All of the items are in the 
physical custody of the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, AZ. 
The 18 unassociated funerary objects are 17 pottery sherds and 1 Sunset 
red bowl.
    In 1952, one cultural item was removed from Wupatki Pueblo, within 
Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, during authorized 
excavations incidental to stabilization of the pueblo. Records indicate 
that the item was recovered from a burial and that the human remains 
were not collected. The item is in the physical custody of the Museum 
of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, AZ. The one unassociated funerary 
object is a stone necklace.
    In 1965, six cultural items were removed from Wupatki Pueblo, 
within Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, by a National 
Park Service archeologist. Records indicate that the items were 
recovered from a burial and that the human remains were not collected. 
The items are in the physical custody of the Museum of Northern Arizona 
in Flagstaff, AZ. The six unassociated funerary objects are painted 
wooden staff fragments.
    In 1986, one cultural item was removed from site WS 1953, within 
Wupatki National Monument in Coconino County, AZ, during an authorized 
survey of the monument. Records indicate that the item was recovered 
from a burial and that the human remains were not collected. The one 
unassociated funerary object is a Tusayan polychrome bowl.
    On the basis of architecture and artifacts, Wupatki Pueblo is dated 
to A.D. 900-1300 and Nalakihu Pueblo is dated to A.D. 1150-1300. On the 
basis of artifacts, WS 1953 is dated to A.D. 1050-1250.
    Evidence demonstrating continuity between the people of Wupatki 
Pueblo, Nalakihu Pueblo, and WS 1953 from A.D. 900-1300 and the Hopi 
Tribe of Arizona includes similarities in material culture, 
architecture, mortuary practices, settlement patterns, and agricultural 
methods. Hopi oral history indicates connections to the people of 
Wupatki and Nalakihu Pueblos and numerous Hopi clans can be traced to 
Wupatki Pueblo.

Determinations Made by Wupatki National Monument

    Officials of Wupatki National Monument have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 756 cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
these cultural items should submit a written request with information 
in support of the claim to Kayci Cook Collins, Superintendent, Wupatki 
National Monument, 6400 N. Hwy 89, Flagstaff, AZ 86004, (928) 526-1157 
ext. 227, email Kayci_Cook@nps.gov, by November 17, 2014. After that 
date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control 
of the unassociated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may 
proceed.
    Wupatki National Monument is responsible for notifying the Hopi 
Tribe of Arizona that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 24, 2014.
Melanie O'Brien,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2014-24524 Filed 10-15-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P