Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations; Clarification, 58672-58674 [2014-23250]

Download as PDF 58672 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 189 / Tuesday, September 30, 2014 / Rules and Regulations note); Energy Policy Act of 2005, Pub. L. 109–58, 119 Stat. 594 (2005). Sections 150.3, 150.15, 150.15a, 150.31, 150.32 also issued under Atomic Energy Act secs. 11e(2), 81, 83, 84 (42 U.S.C. 2014e(2), 2111, 2113, 2114). Section 150.14 also issued under Atomic Energy Act sec. 53 (42 U.S.C. 2073). Section 150.15 also issued under Nuclear Waste Policy Act secs. 135 (42 U.S.C. 10155, 10161). Section 150.17a also issued under Atomic Energy Act sec. 122 (42 U.S.C. 2152). Section 150.30 also issued under Atomic Energy Act sec. 234 (42 U.S.C. 2282). § 150.15 [Amended] 15. In § 150.15, remove paragraph (a)(9). ■ Dated at Rockville, Maryland, this 23rd day of September, 2014. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Annette L. Vietti-Cook, Secretary of the Commission. [FR Doc. 2014–23256 Filed 9–29–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7590–01–P NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 72 [NRC–2013–0269] RIN 3150–AJ30 List of Approved Spent Fuel Storage Casks: Transnuclear, Inc. NUHOMS® HD Cask System, Certificate of Compliance No. 1030, Amendment No. 2 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Direct final rule; confirmation of effective date. AGENCY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is confirming the effective date of October 14, 2014, for the direct final rule that was published in the Federal Register on July 31, 2014. This direct final rule amended the NRC’s spent fuel storage regulations by revising the Transnuclear, Inc. NUHOMS® HD Cask System listing within the ‘‘List of Approved Spent Fuel Storage Casks’’ to include Amendment No. 2 to Certificate of Compliance (CoC) No. 1030. DATES: Effective date: The effective date of October 14, 2014, for the direct final rule published July 31, 2014 (79 FR 44264), is confirmed. ADDRESSES: Please refer to Docket ID NRC–2013–0269 when contacting the NRC about the availability of information for this direct final rule. You may obtain publicly-available tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:10 Sep 29, 2014 Jkt 232001 information related to this direct final rule by any of the following methods: • Federal Rulemaking Web site: Go to: http://www.regulations.gov and search for Docket ID NRC–2013–0269. Address questions about NRC dockets to Carol Gallagher; telephone: 301–287– 3422; email: Carol.Gallagher@nrc.gov. For technical questions, contact the individual listed in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section of this document. • NRC’s Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS): You may obtain publiclyavailable documents online in the ADAMS Public Documents collection at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/ adams.html. To begin the search, select ‘‘ADAMS Public Documents’’ and then select ‘‘Begin Web-based ADAMS Search.’’ For problems with ADAMS, please contact the NRC’s Public Document Room (PDR) reference staff at 1–800–397–4209, 301–415–4737, or by email to pdr.resource@nrc.gov. The ADAMS accession number for each document referenced in this document (if that document is available in ADAMS) is provided the first time that a document is referenced. • NRC’s PDR: You may examine and purchase copies of public documents at the NRC’s PDR, Room O1–F21, One White Flint North, 11555 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland 20852. Gregory Trussell, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555–0001, telephone: 301–415– 6445, email: Gregory.Trussell@nrc.gov. On July 31, 2014 (79 FR 44264), the NRC published a direct final rule amending its regulations at § 72.214 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations by revising the Transnuclear, Inc. NUHOMS® HD Cask System listing within the ‘‘List of Approved Spent Fuel Storage Casks’’ to include Amendment No. 2 to CoC No. 1030. In the direct final rule, the NRC stated that if no significant adverse comments were received, the direct final rule would become effective on October 14, 2014. The NRC did not receive any comments on the direct final rule. Therefore, this direct final rule will become effective as scheduled. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Dated at Rockville, Maryland, this 24th day of September, 2014. PO 00000 Frm 00018 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cindy Bladey, Chief, Rules, Announcements, and Directives Branch, Division of Administrative Services, Office of Administration. [FR Doc. 2014–23220 Filed 9–29–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7590–01–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 135 [Docket No. FAA–2010–0982] RIN 2120–AJ53 Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations; Clarification Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; clarification. AGENCY: This document provides clarification of the intent of the Approach/Departure IFR Transitions regulation contained in the Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations final rule, published on February 22, 2014. After publication, the FAA received comments and questions from intended users and industry advocacy groups about the clarity of terms used in this regulation, specifically, regarding the use of published instrument approaches and departures and the visibility limitations and differences between the terms ‘‘proceed visually’’ and ‘‘proceed VFR’’. The FAA is clarifying the terms and intent of this regulation in order to increase situational awareness and enhance Helicopter Air Ambulance safety. This clarification is intended for Part 135 air carriers engaged in helicopter air ambulance operations, and Principal Inspectors with oversight responsibility for helicopter air ambulance operations. DATES: Effective September 30, 2014. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical questions, contact Andrew C. Pierce, Air Transportation Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration; telephone (202) 267–8238; email andy.pierce@ faa.gov. For legal questions contact Nancy Sanchez, Regulations Division, Office of the Chief Counsel, Federal Aviation Administration; telephone (202) 267–3073; email nancy.sanchez@ faa.gov. SUMMARY: On February 21, 2014, the FAA published a final rule entitled, ‘‘Helicopter Air SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: E:\FR\FM\30SER1.SGM 30SER1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 189 / Tuesday, September 30, 2014 / Rules and Regulations Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and part 91 Helicopter Operations’’ (79 FR 9932) (effective date delayed on April 21, 2014, at 79 FR 22012; final rule corrected at 79 FR 41125, July 15, 2014). In that final rule, the FAA addressed helicopter air ambulance operations and all commercial helicopter operations conducted under part 135. The FAA also established new weather minimums for helicopters operating under part 91 in Class G airspace. In the February 21, 2014, final rule, the FAA, among other things, added § 135.613 to Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations. Section 135.613, Approach/departure IFR transitions, describes the required weather minimums to transition into and out of the IFR environment, aiding in the transition from the minimum descent altitude on an instrument approach procedure, to the point of intended landing. tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES Background Copter Point-in-Space Instrument Approach Procedures with a final visual segment are designed to accommodate one of two types of visual transitions between the missed approach point (MAP) and the intended point of landing. The approach procedure may depict a visual transition noted as ‘‘proceed visually’’ or a visual transition noted as ‘‘proceed VFR’’. ‘‘Proceed visually’’ transition segments are designed with relatively short distances between the MAP and the intended landing site and are considered a continuation of the IFR procedure. ‘‘Proceed VFR’’ transition segments span longer distances and/or require turns from the final approach course toward a landing facility and therefore require commensurately greater ceilings and visibilities as defined within 14 CFR 135.613. The same may be said about departures from landing facilities to enter the IFR flight environment. Obstacle Departure Procedures (ODP) may provide takeoff minimum weather conditions for IFR departures from the landing site. Other landing facility departures that do not have published takeoff minimums on an ODP must observe higher ceiling and visibility minimums in accordance with 14 CFR 135.613. Discussion The FAA received a summary of comments and input from associations and various operators in the helicopter air ambulance industry on the Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations final rule. The summary paper was prepared by Helicopter VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:10 Sep 29, 2014 Jkt 232001 Association International (HAI), American Medical Operators Association (AMOA) and the Association of Air Medical Services (AAMS). The various operators stated that the title of 135.613 is misleading and will cause confusion. The commenters explained that the title of the regulation references IFR transitions when it should be referencing VFR transitions. The FAA clarifies that the regulation addresses IFR clearances and visual or VFR transitions into or out of the IFR flight environment, thus the regulation correctly characterizes the transitions as elements of the IFR environment. Multiple industry commenters also voiced concerns regarding technical differences between the terms ‘‘proceed visually’’ and ‘‘proceed VFR’’ as applied to transitions for instrument approaches and instrument departures. The following provides further explanation to assist industry in understanding what the difference is between the two terms. Copter Point-in-Space approaches provide an instrument descent along a predetermined course to safely allow IFR helicopter traffic to descend to a minimum descent altitude (MDA) prior to or upon arriving at MAP. At the MAP, the pilot must assess whether or not the flight can safely and legally proceed to the destination in the meteorological conditions present. Continuation of the flight beyond the MAP must be accomplished via a visual transition segment in accordance with the design of the Instrument Approach Procedure (IAP). There are two types of visual transition segments associated with continued flight beyond the MAP to one or more nearby landing facilities clustered around the MAP. The published approach procedure will indicate either ‘‘proceed visually’’ or ‘‘proceed VFR’’ along this transition segment. The presence of obstructions and terrain, combined with the distance between the MAP and the landing facility, determine the type of transition and the visibility required to legally and safely make the transition from the MAP to the destination. If a published approach depicts a ‘‘proceed visually’’ segment, that segment is conducted on a clearance under IFR and is not the subject of discussion under § 135.613. This case is analogous to the visual transition from a MAP to a runway on an IFR approach, which is conducted visually. In the case of the ‘‘proceed visually’’ transition, the minimum required visibility will be indicated on the published procedure. Generally, this means the pilot should be able to see the destination heliport PO 00000 Frm 00019 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 58673 from the MAP. The minimum distance between the MAP and a destination landing facility for a ‘‘proceed visually’’ transition is 0.65 nautical miles. This minimum segment distance is intended to facilitate avoidance of adverse consequences of combined high descent rates and deceleration rates. The minimum visibility for the ‘‘proceed visually’’ transition segment is 3⁄4 nautical mile, so that the pilot should always be able to visually acquire the point of intended landing before beginning the visual segment of the instrument approach. The required visibility is commensurately greater for ‘‘proceed visually’’ transition segments that are longer than 0.65 nautical miles. If a published approach depicts a ‘‘proceed VFR’’ segment, the visual segment must be conducted under VFR. 14 CFR 135.613 pertains to the ‘‘proceed VFR’’ transition when depicted on the published approach. If the distance between the MAP and the landing facility is less than or equal to one nautical mile, § 135.613(a)(1) sets the minimum visibility to 1 statute mile. If the distance between the MAP and the intended landing site is between one nautical mile and three nautical miles, § 135.613(a)(2) sets the day ceiling and visibility requirements to 600′ and 2 nautical miles, and sets the night ceiling and visibility requirements to 600′ and 3 nautical miles. If the distance between the MAP and the intended landing site is greater than three nautical miles, § 135.613(a)(3) requires the ceiling and visibility to meet either the helicopter air ambulance Class G VFR weather minimums shown in Table 1 of § 135.609, or, if within Class B, C, D, or E airspace, to meet the weather minimums referenced in § 135.205. With respect to instrument departures, § 135.613(b) addresses only VFR to IFR transitions, not departures conducted under an IFR clearance with takeoff minimums published on an ODP. If a departing flight obtains an IFR clearance valid from lift off and weather meets or exceeds the published ODP takeoff minimums, the pilot can ‘‘proceed visually’’ under the IFR clearance to the Initial Departure Fix (IDF). In this case, there is no VFR segment, the published takeoff weather requirements are in effect, and § 135.613(b) does not apply. If, however, the departing flight must lift off VFR and ‘‘proceed VFR’’ via an ODP to a point where an IFR clearance becomes effective or to a point where the IFR clearance may be obtained on the way to the IDF, § 135.613(b)(1) applies. This requires a minimum visibility of 1 nautical mile prior to lift off if the IDF is no more than 1 nautical E:\FR\FM\30SER1.SGM 30SER1 58674 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 189 / Tuesday, September 30, 2014 / Rules and Regulations mile away from the point of lift off. If the departure involves a VFR to IFR transition and does not meet the requirements of § 135.613(b)(1), (there is no ODP, and/or the IDF is more than 1 nautical mile from the point of lift off), the VFR weather minimums required by the class of airspace apply. If the flight is within Class G airspace, refer to § 135.609; if it is within Class B, C, D, or E airspace, refer to § 135.205. Issued in Washington, DC, on September 24, 2014. Michael J. Zenkovich, Deputy Director, Flight Standards Service. [FR Doc. 2014–23250 Filed 9–29–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau 27 CFR Part 25 [Docket No. TTB–2012–0006; T.D. TTB–123; Re: Notice No. 131 and T.D. TTB–109] RIN 1513–AB94 Small Brewers Bond Reduction and Requirement To File Tax Returns, Remit Tax Payments and Submit Reports Quarterly Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, Treasury. ACTION: Final rule; Treasury decision. AGENCY: The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) is adopting as a permanent regulatory change a flat $1,000 penal sum for the brewer’s bond for brewers whose excise tax liability is reasonably expected to be not more than $50,000 in a given calendar year and who were liable for not more than $50,000 in such taxes in the preceding calendar year. TTB originally set forth this change in a temporary rule issued on December 7, 2012. In addition, TTB is adopting as a final rule its proposal, also issued on December 7, 2012, to require small brewers to file Federal excise tax returns, pay tax, and submit reports of operations quarterly. TTB expects these amendments to reduce the regulatory burdens on such brewers, reduce their administrative costs, and create administrative efficiencies for TTB. SUMMARY: SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 229, 230, 232, 239, 240, 243, and 249 [Release Nos. 33–9638; 34–72982; File No. S7–08–10] RIN 3235–AK37 Asset-Backed Securities Disclosure and Registration Correction In rule document 2014–21375 appearing on pages 57184 through 57346 in the issue of Wednesday, September 24, 2014, make the following corrections: § 229.601 (Item 601) Exhibits [Corrected] 1. On page 57312, in ‘‘Exhibit Table’’, in column‘‘10–Q’’, the entry corresponding with number ‘‘(31)’’ should read ‘‘X’’. ■ Appendix to § 229.1125—Schedule AL [Corrected] 2. On page 57328, in column three, on lines 29–33, the entry for paragraph ‘‘(b)’’ should read ‘‘If the asset pool includes asset-backed securities issued after November 23, 2016, provide the asset-level information specified in § 229.1111(h) for the assets backing each security in the asset pool.’’ ■ tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES [FR Doc. C1–2014–21375 Filed 9–29–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 1505–01–D VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:10 Sep 29, 2014 Jkt 232001 This final rule is effective on January 1, 2015. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ramona Hupp, Regulations and Rulings Division, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 1310 G Street NW., Box 12, Washington, DC 20005; telephone 202–453–1039, ext. 110, or email BeerRegs@ttb.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DATES: Background TTB Authority Chapter 51 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (IRC) pertains to the taxation of distilled spirits, wines, and beer (see title 26 of the United States Code (U.S.C.), chapter 51 (26 U.S.C. chapter 51)). With regard to beer, IRC section 5051 (26 U.S.C. 5051) imposes a Federal excise tax on all beer brewed or produced, and removed for consumption or sale, within the United States, or imported into the United States. The rate of the Federal excise tax on beer is $18 for every barrel PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 containing not more than 31 gallons, and a like rate for any other quantity or for fractional parts of a barrel, with an exception that the rate of tax is $7 a barrel for the first 60,000 barrels of beer for a domestic brewer that does not produce more than 2 million barrels of beer in a calendar year. Section 5054 (26 U.S.C. 5054) provides that, in general, the tax imposed on beer under section 5051 shall be determined at the time the beer is removed for consumption or sale, and shall be paid by the brewer in accordance with section 5061 (26 U.S.C. 5061). Section 5061 pertains to the time and method for submitting tax returns and payment of the applicable excise taxes. Section 5061 states that Federal excise taxes on distilled spirits, wines, and beer shall be collected on the basis of a return, and that the Secretary of the Treasury (the Secretary) shall, by regulation, prescribe the period or event for which such return shall be filed. Section 5061(d)(1) generally requires that the excise taxes owed on alcohol beverages, including beer, withdrawn under bond be paid no later than the 14th day after the last day of the semimonthly period during which the withdrawal occurs. Under a special rule, September has three return periods (section 5061(d)(5)), resulting in a total of 25 returns due each year. Section 5061(d)(4) provides an exception to the semimonthly rule for taxpayers who reasonably expect to be liable for not more than $50,000 in alcohol excise taxes in a calendar year and who were liable for not more than $50,000 in the preceding calendar year. Under this provision, such taxpayers may pay the excise taxes on alcohol beverages withdrawn under bond on a quarterly basis. Section 5401(b) (26 U.S.C. 5401(b)) provides that all brewers shall obtain a bond to insure the payment of any taxes owed. The amount of such bond shall be ‘‘in such reasonable penal sum’’ as prescribed by the Secretary in regulations ‘‘as necessary to protect and insure collection of the revenue.’’ Section 5415 of the IRC (26 U.S.C. 5415) requires brewers to keep records and to make true and accurate ‘‘returns’’ of their brewing and associated operations at the times and for such periods as the Secretary prescribes by regulation. The implementing regulations refer to these ‘‘returns’’ as ‘‘reports’’ of operations. The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) administers chapter 51 of the IRC and its implementing regulations pursuant to section 1111(d) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, codified at 6 U.S.C. 531(d). The E:\FR\FM\30SER1.SGM 30SER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 189 (Tuesday, September 30, 2014)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 58672-58674]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-23250]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 135

[Docket No. FAA-2010-0982]
RIN 2120-AJ53


Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 
Helicopter Operations; Clarification

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule; clarification.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This document provides clarification of the intent of the 
Approach/Departure IFR Transitions regulation contained in the 
Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter 
Operations final rule, published on February 22, 2014. After 
publication, the FAA received comments and questions from intended 
users and industry advocacy groups about the clarity of terms used in 
this regulation, specifically, regarding the use of published 
instrument approaches and departures and the visibility limitations and 
differences between the terms ``proceed visually'' and ``proceed VFR''. 
The FAA is clarifying the terms and intent of this regulation in order 
to increase situational awareness and enhance Helicopter Air Ambulance 
safety. This clarification is intended for Part 135 air carriers 
engaged in helicopter air ambulance operations, and Principal 
Inspectors with oversight responsibility for helicopter air ambulance 
operations.

DATES: Effective September 30, 2014.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical questions, contact 
Andrew C. Pierce, Air Transportation Division, Flight Standards 
Service, Federal Aviation Administration; telephone (202) 267-8238; 
email andy.pierce@faa.gov. For legal questions contact Nancy Sanchez, 
Regulations Division, Office of the Chief Counsel, Federal Aviation 
Administration; telephone (202) 267-3073; email nancy.sanchez@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On February 21, 2014, the FAA published a 
final rule entitled, ``Helicopter Air

[[Page 58673]]

Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and part 91 Helicopter Operations'' 
(79 FR 9932) (effective date delayed on April 21, 2014, at 79 FR 22012; 
final rule corrected at 79 FR 41125, July 15, 2014). In that final 
rule, the FAA addressed helicopter air ambulance operations and all 
commercial helicopter operations conducted under part 135. The FAA also 
established new weather minimums for helicopters operating under part 
91 in Class G airspace. In the February 21, 2014, final rule, the FAA, 
among other things, added Sec.  135.613 to Title 14, Code of Federal 
Regulations. Section 135.613, Approach/departure IFR transitions, 
describes the required weather minimums to transition into and out of 
the IFR environment, aiding in the transition from the minimum descent 
altitude on an instrument approach procedure, to the point of intended 
landing.

Background

    Copter Point-in-Space Instrument Approach Procedures with a final 
visual segment are designed to accommodate one of two types of visual 
transitions between the missed approach point (MAP) and the intended 
point of landing. The approach procedure may depict a visual transition 
noted as ``proceed visually'' or a visual transition noted as ``proceed 
VFR''. ``Proceed visually'' transition segments are designed with 
relatively short distances between the MAP and the intended landing 
site and are considered a continuation of the IFR procedure. ``Proceed 
VFR'' transition segments span longer distances and/or require turns 
from the final approach course toward a landing facility and therefore 
require commensurately greater ceilings and visibilities as defined 
within 14 CFR 135.613. The same may be said about departures from 
landing facilities to enter the IFR flight environment. Obstacle 
Departure Procedures (ODP) may provide takeoff minimum weather 
conditions for IFR departures from the landing site. Other landing 
facility departures that do not have published takeoff minimums on an 
ODP must observe higher ceiling and visibility minimums in accordance 
with 14 CFR 135.613.

Discussion

    The FAA received a summary of comments and input from associations 
and various operators in the helicopter air ambulance industry on the 
Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter 
Operations final rule. The summary paper was prepared by Helicopter 
Association International (HAI), American Medical Operators Association 
(AMOA) and the Association of Air Medical Services (AAMS). The various 
operators stated that the title of 135.613 is misleading and will cause 
confusion. The commenters explained that the title of the regulation 
references IFR transitions when it should be referencing VFR 
transitions.
    The FAA clarifies that the regulation addresses IFR clearances and 
visual or VFR transitions into or out of the IFR flight environment, 
thus the regulation correctly characterizes the transitions as elements 
of the IFR environment.
    Multiple industry commenters also voiced concerns regarding 
technical differences between the terms ``proceed visually'' and 
``proceed VFR'' as applied to transitions for instrument approaches and 
instrument departures. The following provides further explanation to 
assist industry in understanding what the difference is between the two 
terms.
    Copter Point-in-Space approaches provide an instrument descent 
along a predetermined course to safely allow IFR helicopter traffic to 
descend to a minimum descent altitude (MDA) prior to or upon arriving 
at MAP. At the MAP, the pilot must assess whether or not the flight can 
safely and legally proceed to the destination in the meteorological 
conditions present. Continuation of the flight beyond the MAP must be 
accomplished via a visual transition segment in accordance with the 
design of the Instrument Approach Procedure (IAP).
    There are two types of visual transition segments associated with 
continued flight beyond the MAP to one or more nearby landing 
facilities clustered around the MAP. The published approach procedure 
will indicate either ``proceed visually'' or ``proceed VFR'' along this 
transition segment. The presence of obstructions and terrain, combined 
with the distance between the MAP and the landing facility, determine 
the type of transition and the visibility required to legally and 
safely make the transition from the MAP to the destination.
    If a published approach depicts a ``proceed visually'' segment, 
that segment is conducted on a clearance under IFR and is not the 
subject of discussion under Sec.  135.613. This case is analogous to 
the visual transition from a MAP to a runway on an IFR approach, which 
is conducted visually. In the case of the ``proceed visually'' 
transition, the minimum required visibility will be indicated on the 
published procedure. Generally, this means the pilot should be able to 
see the destination heliport from the MAP. The minimum distance between 
the MAP and a destination landing facility for a ``proceed visually'' 
transition is 0.65 nautical miles. This minimum segment distance is 
intended to facilitate avoidance of adverse consequences of combined 
high descent rates and deceleration rates. The minimum visibility for 
the ``proceed visually'' transition segment is \3/4\ nautical mile, so 
that the pilot should always be able to visually acquire the point of 
intended landing before beginning the visual segment of the instrument 
approach. The required visibility is commensurately greater for 
``proceed visually'' transition segments that are longer than 0.65 
nautical miles.
    If a published approach depicts a ``proceed VFR'' segment, the 
visual segment must be conducted under VFR. 14 CFR 135.613 pertains to 
the ``proceed VFR'' transition when depicted on the published approach. 
If the distance between the MAP and the landing facility is less than 
or equal to one nautical mile, Sec.  135.613(a)(1) sets the minimum 
visibility to 1 statute mile. If the distance between the MAP and the 
intended landing site is between one nautical mile and three nautical 
miles, Sec.  135.613(a)(2) sets the day ceiling and visibility 
requirements to 600' and 2 nautical miles, and sets the night ceiling 
and visibility requirements to 600' and 3 nautical miles. If the 
distance between the MAP and the intended landing site is greater than 
three nautical miles, Sec.  135.613(a)(3) requires the ceiling and 
visibility to meet either the helicopter air ambulance Class G VFR 
weather minimums shown in Table 1 of Sec.  135.609, or, if within Class 
B, C, D, or E airspace, to meet the weather minimums referenced in 
Sec.  135.205.
    With respect to instrument departures, Sec.  135.613(b) addresses 
only VFR to IFR transitions, not departures conducted under an IFR 
clearance with takeoff minimums published on an ODP. If a departing 
flight obtains an IFR clearance valid from lift off and weather meets 
or exceeds the published ODP takeoff minimums, the pilot can ``proceed 
visually'' under the IFR clearance to the Initial Departure Fix (IDF). 
In this case, there is no VFR segment, the published takeoff weather 
requirements are in effect, and Sec.  135.613(b) does not apply.
    If, however, the departing flight must lift off VFR and ``proceed 
VFR'' via an ODP to a point where an IFR clearance becomes effective or 
to a point where the IFR clearance may be obtained on the way to the 
IDF, Sec.  135.613(b)(1) applies. This requires a minimum visibility of 
1 nautical mile prior to lift off if the IDF is no more than 1 nautical

[[Page 58674]]

mile away from the point of lift off. If the departure involves a VFR 
to IFR transition and does not meet the requirements of Sec.  
135.613(b)(1), (there is no ODP, and/or the IDF is more than 1 nautical 
mile from the point of lift off), the VFR weather minimums required by 
the class of airspace apply. If the flight is within Class G airspace, 
refer to Sec.  135.609; if it is within Class B, C, D, or E airspace, 
refer to Sec.  135.205.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on September 24, 2014.
Michael J. Zenkovich,
Deputy Director, Flight Standards Service.
[FR Doc. 2014-23250 Filed 9-29-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P