Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions, 57431-57432 [2014-22507]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 186 / Thursday, September 25, 2014 / Rules and Regulations establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards. Applicability As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to the Boeing Model 777–300ER airplane. Should Boeing apply at a later date for a change to the type certificate to include another model incorporating the same novel or unusual design feature, the special conditions would apply to that model as well. Conclusion This action affects only certain novel or unusual design features on one model of airplane. It is not a rule of general applicability. Under standard practice, the effective date of final special conditions would be 30 days after the date of publication in the Federal Register; however, as the certification date for the Boeing Model 777–300ER airplane is imminent, the FAA finds that good cause exists to make these special conditions effective upon publication in the Federal Register. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 25 Aircraft, Aviation safety, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44702, 44704. The Special Conditions Accordingly, pursuant to the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the following special conditions are issued as part of the typecertification basis for Boeing Model 777–300ER airplanes. tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES Inflatable Lapbelt Special Conditions The inflatable lapbelts must meet the criteria of Special Conditions 25–187A– SC. Single-Occupant, Oblique (side-facing) Seats Special Conditions 1. Longitudinal (16g) occupant injury test(s), must be performed with the FAA Hybrid III ATD, undeformed floor, most critical yaw case(s) for injury, and with all lateral structural supports (armrests/ walls). The criteria for the pass/fail injury assessments are listed in special conditions 2 through 5 in this section. 2. Existing Criteria: All injury protection criteria of § 25.562(c)(1) through (c)(6) apply to the occupant of an oblique (side-facing) seat. Head injury criterion (HIC) assessments are only required for head contact with the seat and/or adjacent structures. If there VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:22 Sep 24, 2014 Jkt 232001 is no apparent contact with seat/ structure but there is contact with an inflatable restraint, the HIC15 score for that contact must be less than 700. 3. Body-to-Wall/Furnishing Contact Criteria: If an oblique (side-facing) seat is installed aft of structure (e.g., an interior wall or furnishing) that does not provide a homogenous contact surface for the expected range of occupants and yaw angles, then additional analysis and/or test(s) may be required to demonstrate that the injury criteria are met for the area which an occupant could contact. For example, if difference yaw angles could result in different inflatable restraint performance then additional analysis or separate test(s) may be necessary to evaluate. 4. Neck-Injury Criteria: a. In demonstrating that the design meets the criteria of FMVSS 571.208, the applicant must show the Nij to be below 1.0, where Nij =Fz/Fzc + My/Myc, and Nij intercepts limited to: i. Fzc = 1530 lb for tension ii. Fzc = 1385 lb for compression iii. Myc = 229 lb-ft in flexion iv. Myc = 100 lb-ft in extension b. In addition, peak Fz must be below 937 lb in tension and 899 lb in compression. c. Rotation of the head about its vertical axis relative to the torso is limited to 105 degrees in either direction from forward-facing. d. The neck must not impact any surface. 5. Spine and Torso Injury Criteria: a. The shoulders must remain aligned with the hips throughout the impact sequence, or support for the upper torso must be provided to prevent forward or lateral flailing beyond 45 degrees from the vertical during significant spinal loading. b. Occupant must not interact with the armrest or other seat components in any manner significantly different than would be expected for a forward-facing seat installation. 6. One longitudinal (16g) structural test must be performed with the Hybrid II ATD or FAA Hybrid III, deformed floor, with 10 degrees yaw, and with all lateral structural supports (armrests/ walls). Use existing structural pass/fail criteria from § 25.562. 7. One vertical (14g) test must be conducted with Hybrid II ATDs or FAA Hybrid III. Use existing pass/fail structural and injury criteria from § 25.562. Note: The applicant must demonstrate that the installation of seats via plinths or pallets meets all applicable requirements. Compliance with the guidance contained in FAA Policy Memorandum PS–ANM–100– PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 57431 2000–00123, dated February 2, 2000, titled ‘‘Guidance for Demonstrating Compliance with Seat Dynamic Testing for Plinths and Pallets,’’ is acceptable to the FAA. Issued in Renton, Washington September 19, 2014. Michael Kaszycki, Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2014–22781 Filed 9–24–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 91 [Docket No.: FAA–2014–0458; Amendment No. 91–333] RIN 2120–AA66 Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment. AGENCY: This action amends the Appendix listing airports/locations with special operating restrictions in FAA’s general operating and flight rules. Specifically, this action adds an additional entry for Houston, TX (William P. Hobby Airport), and San Diego, CA (Marine Corps Air Station Miramar), to the Appendix, which lists the airports where aircraft operating within 30 nautical miles (NM) of the listed airports, from the surface upward to 10,000 feet mean sea level (MSL) must be equipped with an altitude encoding transponder. The FAA is taking this action to correctly identify applicable airports under the appropriate sections in the Appendix. DATES: Effective Date: November 13, 2014. SUMMARY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colby Abbott, Airspace Policy and Regulations Group, AJV–113, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone (202) 267–8783, email colby.abbott@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, part 91, appendix D, section 1, lists the airports where special operating restrictions apply. Specifically, this section lists the locations at which aircraft operating within 30 NM of the listed airports, E:\FR\FM\25SER1.SGM 25SER1 tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES 57432 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 186 / Thursday, September 25, 2014 / Rules and Regulations from the surface upward to 10,000 feet MSL, must be equipped with an altitude encoding transponder. The locations listed in the section are intended to be the Class B airspace area primary airports. On June 21, 1988, the FAA published the ATC Transponder with Automatic Altitude Reporting Capability Requirement final rule (the ‘‘Mode C rule’’) (53 FR 23356). The rule established the requirement for a transponder with automatic altitude reporting capability for aircraft operating within certain airspace. Effective July 1, 1989, all aircraft were required to have a transponder with Mode C when operating within 30 miles of any designated Terminal Control Area (TCA) primary airport from the surface upward to 10,000 feet MSL (the Mode C ‘‘veil’’). Exclusion provisions were established for aircraft which were not originally certificated with an engine-driven electrical system or which have not subsequently been certified with such a system installed, balloons, and gliders. This requirement was also to apply on the effective date of any future TCA primary airport designated by rulemaking actions associated with the establishment or modification of a TCA. On August 18, 1989, the FAA published the Revision of General Operating and Flight Rules final rule (54 FR 34284). That rule reorganized and realigned the general operating and flight rules to make them more understandable and easier to use. The Mode C veil requirements for aircraft operating in all airspace within 30 NM of any designated TCA primary airport from the surface upward to 10,000 feet MSL, as well as the exclusion provisions, were retained as established in 1988. The rule simply realigned the part 91 Mode C veil requirements previously contained in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) § 91.24 to become 14 CFR 91.215. On December 17, 1991, the FAA published the Airspace Reclassification final rule (56 FR 65638). The rule reclassified TCA airspace to become Class B airspace, effective September 16, 1993. The FAA did not modify any Mode C veil requirements under the airspace reclassification final rule. The rule did amend the regulatory text in 14 CFR 91.215(b)(2) by changing the text from applying to all all aircraft in all airspace within 30 nautical miles of a terminal control area primary airport from the surface upward to 10,000 feet MSL, to applying to all aircraft in all airspace within 30 nautical miles of an airport listed in appendix D, section 1 of the part from the surface upward to VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:22 Sep 24, 2014 Jkt 232001 10,000 feet MSL. The airports listed in appendix D, section 1 were intended to be the Class B airspace (previously TCA airspace) primary airports consistent with the guidance published in the Revision of General Operating and Flight Rules final rule published in 1989, as noted above. On November 13, 1973, the FAA issued a final rule (38 FR 31286) which established the Houston TCA and listed the Houston Intercontinental Airport as the primary airport. In 1992, the FAA issued a final rule (57 FR 30818) and a final rule; correction (57 FR 40095) which amended the Houston TCA and listed the Houston Intercontinental Airport (later renamed the George Bush Intercontinental Airport) and William P. Hobby Airport as primary airports, which they remain today, to the Houston Class B airspace area. Similarly, on March 20, 1980, the FAA published the final rule (45 FR 18336) that established the San Diego, CA, TCA and listed San Diego (Lindbergh Field), CA, and Miramar Naval Air Station (NAS), Miramar, CA, as primary airports. Miramar NAS was renamed Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar effective October 1, 1997, but both airports have remained primary airports to the San Diego, CA, Class B airspace area. When the Airspace Reclassification final rule amended the regulatory text in 14 CFR 91.215(b)(2) by changing the text to applying to all aircraft in all airspace within 30 nautical miles of an airport listed in appendix D, section 1 of the part, the airports listed in appendix D, section 1 inadvertently overlooked including MCAS Miramar (formerly Miramar NAS) as one of the primary airports of the San Diego Class B airspace area when the list was established. Subsequently, when William P. Hobby Airport became a primary airport of the Houston Class B airspace area, the regulatory action to list the airport in appendix D, section 1 was also inadvertently overlooked. This action corrects those unintentional errors by adding MCAS Miramar and William P. Hobby Airport to the part 91, appendix D, section 1 list of locations for which the requirements of §§ 91.215(b)(2) and 91.225(d)(2) apply below 10,000 feet MSL within a 30 NM radius of each location. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 91 Air traffic control, Aircraft, Airmen, Airports, Aviation safety. The Amendment In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 amends Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 91, as follows: PART 91—GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES 1. The authority citation for part 91 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(f), 106(g), 1155, 40103, 40113, 40120, 44101, 44111, 44701, 44704, 44709, 44711, 44712, 44715, 44716, 44717, 44722, 46306, 46315, 46316, 46504, 46506–46507, 47122, 47508, 47528–47531, 47534, articles 12 and 29 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (61 Stat. 1180), (126 Stat. 11). 2. Appendix D to Part 91, Section 1, is amended by adding entries for ‘‘Houston, TX’’ and ‘‘San Diego, CA’’ in alphabetical order to read as follows: ■ Appendix D to Part 91—Airports/ Locations: Special Operating Restrictions (Amended) Section 1. Locations at which the requirements of § 91.215(b)(2) and § 91.225(d)(2) apply. The requirements of §§ 91.215(b)(2) and 91.225(d)(2) apply below 10,000 feet MSL within a 30-nautical-mile radius of each location in the following list. * * * * * Houston, TX (William P. Hobby Airport) * * * * * San Diego, CA (Marine Corps Air Station Miramar) * * * * * Issued in Washington, DC, on September 4, 2014. Mark W. Bury, Assistant Chief Counsel for International Law, Legislation and Regulations. [FR Doc. 2014–22507 Filed 9–24–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 97 [Docket No. 30975; Amdt. No. 3606] Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: This rule amends, suspends, or revokes Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) and associated Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of the adoption of new or revised criteria, SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\25SER1.SGM 25SER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 186 (Thursday, September 25, 2014)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 57431-57432]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-22507]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 91

[Docket No.: FAA-2014-0458; Amendment No. 91-333]
RIN 2120-AA66


Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This action amends the Appendix listing airports/locations 
with special operating restrictions in FAA's general operating and 
flight rules. Specifically, this action adds an additional entry for 
Houston, TX (William P. Hobby Airport), and San Diego, CA (Marine Corps 
Air Station Miramar), to the Appendix, which lists the airports where 
aircraft operating within 30 nautical miles (NM) of the listed 
airports, from the surface upward to 10,000 feet mean sea level (MSL) 
must be equipped with an altitude encoding transponder. The FAA is 
taking this action to correctly identify applicable airports under the 
appropriate sections in the Appendix.

DATES: Effective Date: November 13, 2014.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colby Abbott, Airspace Policy and 
Regulations Group, AJV-113, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 
Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone (202) 267-
8783, email colby.abbott@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

    Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, part 91, appendix D, 
section 1, lists the airports where special operating restrictions 
apply. Specifically, this section lists the locations at which aircraft 
operating within 30 NM of the listed airports,

[[Page 57432]]

from the surface upward to 10,000 feet MSL, must be equipped with an 
altitude encoding transponder. The locations listed in the section are 
intended to be the Class B airspace area primary airports.
    On June 21, 1988, the FAA published the ATC Transponder with 
Automatic Altitude Reporting Capability Requirement final rule (the 
``Mode C rule'') (53 FR 23356). The rule established the requirement 
for a transponder with automatic altitude reporting capability for 
aircraft operating within certain airspace. Effective July 1, 1989, all 
aircraft were required to have a transponder with Mode C when operating 
within 30 miles of any designated Terminal Control Area (TCA) primary 
airport from the surface upward to 10,000 feet MSL (the Mode C 
``veil''). Exclusion provisions were established for aircraft which 
were not originally certificated with an engine-driven electrical 
system or which have not subsequently been certified with such a system 
installed, balloons, and gliders. This requirement was also to apply on 
the effective date of any future TCA primary airport designated by 
rulemaking actions associated with the establishment or modification of 
a TCA.
    On August 18, 1989, the FAA published the Revision of General 
Operating and Flight Rules final rule (54 FR 34284). That rule 
reorganized and realigned the general operating and flight rules to 
make them more understandable and easier to use. The Mode C veil 
requirements for aircraft operating in all airspace within 30 NM of any 
designated TCA primary airport from the surface upward to 10,000 feet 
MSL, as well as the exclusion provisions, were retained as established 
in 1988. The rule simply realigned the part 91 Mode C veil requirements 
previously contained in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 
CFR) Sec.  91.24 to become 14 CFR 91.215.
    On December 17, 1991, the FAA published the Airspace 
Reclassification final rule (56 FR 65638). The rule reclassified TCA 
airspace to become Class B airspace, effective September 16, 1993. The 
FAA did not modify any Mode C veil requirements under the airspace 
reclassification final rule. The rule did amend the regulatory text in 
14 CFR 91.215(b)(2) by changing the text from applying to all all 
aircraft in all airspace within 30 nautical miles of a terminal control 
area primary airport from the surface upward to 10,000 feet MSL, to 
applying to all aircraft in all airspace within 30 nautical miles of an 
airport listed in appendix D, section 1 of the part from the surface 
upward to 10,000 feet MSL. The airports listed in appendix D, section 1 
were intended to be the Class B airspace (previously TCA airspace) 
primary airports consistent with the guidance published in the Revision 
of General Operating and Flight Rules final rule published in 1989, as 
noted above.
    On November 13, 1973, the FAA issued a final rule (38 FR 31286) 
which established the Houston TCA and listed the Houston 
Intercontinental Airport as the primary airport. In 1992, the FAA 
issued a final rule (57 FR 30818) and a final rule; correction (57 FR 
40095) which amended the Houston TCA and listed the Houston 
Intercontinental Airport (later renamed the George Bush 
Intercontinental Airport) and William P. Hobby Airport as primary 
airports, which they remain today, to the Houston Class B airspace 
area. Similarly, on March 20, 1980, the FAA published the final rule 
(45 FR 18336) that established the San Diego, CA, TCA and listed San 
Diego (Lindbergh Field), CA, and Miramar Naval Air Station (NAS), 
Miramar, CA, as primary airports. Miramar NAS was renamed Marine Corps 
Air Station (MCAS) Miramar effective October 1, 1997, but both airports 
have remained primary airports to the San Diego, CA, Class B airspace 
area.
    When the Airspace Reclassification final rule amended the 
regulatory text in 14 CFR 91.215(b)(2) by changing the text to applying 
to all aircraft in all airspace within 30 nautical miles of an airport 
listed in appendix D, section 1 of the part, the airports listed in 
appendix D, section 1 inadvertently overlooked including MCAS Miramar 
(formerly Miramar NAS) as one of the primary airports of the San Diego 
Class B airspace area when the list was established. Subsequently, when 
William P. Hobby Airport became a primary airport of the Houston Class 
B airspace area, the regulatory action to list the airport in appendix 
D, section 1 was also inadvertently overlooked.
    This action corrects those unintentional errors by adding MCAS 
Miramar and William P. Hobby Airport to the part 91, appendix D, 
section 1 list of locations for which the requirements of Sec. Sec.  
91.215(b)(2) and 91.225(d)(2) apply below 10,000 feet MSL within a 30 
NM radius of each location.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 91

    Air traffic control, Aircraft, Airmen, Airports, Aviation safety.

The Amendment

    In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation 
Administration amends Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 
91, as follows:

PART 91--GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES

0
1. The authority citation for part 91 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(f), 106(g), 1155, 40103, 40113, 40120, 
44101, 44111, 44701, 44704, 44709, 44711, 44712, 44715, 44716, 
44717, 44722, 46306, 46315, 46316, 46504, 46506-46507, 47122, 47508, 
47528-47531, 47534, articles 12 and 29 of the Convention on 
International Civil Aviation (61 Stat. 1180), (126 Stat. 11).


0
2. Appendix D to Part 91, Section 1, is amended by adding entries for 
``Houston, TX'' and ``San Diego, CA'' in alphabetical order to read as 
follows:

Appendix D to Part 91--Airports/Locations: Special Operating 
Restrictions (Amended)

    Section 1. Locations at which the requirements of Sec.  
91.215(b)(2) and Sec.  91.225(d)(2) apply. The requirements of 
Sec. Sec.  91.215(b)(2) and 91.225(d)(2) apply below 10,000 feet MSL 
within a 30-nautical-mile radius of each location in the following 
list.
* * * * *
Houston, TX (William P. Hobby Airport)
* * * * *
San Diego, CA (Marine Corps Air Station Miramar)
* * * * *

    Issued in Washington, DC, on September 4, 2014.
Mark W. Bury,
Assistant Chief Counsel for International Law, Legislation and 
Regulations.
[FR Doc. 2014-22507 Filed 9-24-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P