Emergency Exemption; Issuance of Emergency Permits to Survey for New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse Within Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico, 54284-54285 [2014-21659]

Download as PDF mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 54284 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 176 / Thursday, September 11, 2014 / Notices Additionally, CoCs approve their preliminary pro-rata need and affirm their annual renewal demand, and HUD collects information regarding the CoC’s board structure and the capacity of the CoC to carry out the various activities outlined in the program regulations. The registration information is necessary to assist in the selection of project proposals submitted to HUD (by State and local governments, public housing authorities, and nonprofit organizations) for the awarded funds during the annual CoC competition because it provides vital information about the CoC applicants. All collaborative applicants are required to register their CoCs in the esnaps electronic grants management system prior to the opening of the CoC Homeless Assistance competition. The registration requirements include a basic description of the CoC’s lead organization, contact information, and geographic area. The information to be collected by HUD will be used to determine eligibility for CoC Homeless Assistance and establish grant amounts. To determine the total amount a CoC may request for renewal funding, collaborative applicants will list their Continuum’s programs on a Grant Inventory Worksheet (GIW) that will allow HUD to accurately assess individual project applications during the CoC Application process. The information from the GIW is essential for operation of the CoC competition. For the CoC, the GIW allows each CoC to see all the project grants side-by-side that will be eligible for competition in the annual competition. This then allows them to determine, in communication with HUD, the total amount of funding (the annual renewal demand or ARD) that their CoC has available in a given competition year, which then allows them to make informed planning decisions about which project grants they want to prioritize, reduce or eliminate in the actual CoC Homeless Assistance Program Application. In turn, the program details in the GIW allow HUD to conduct an accurate assessment of renewal project applications and to determine in the aggregate what the total renewal demand for all CoCs will likely be. HUD can then determine how much of the annual appropriation will be available for new projects (once all the funding for renewals is covered), or in years of budget shortages, how much CoCs will be advised to cut from their total funding to meet the amount of funds available. The optional board requirement questions in the registration forms are an important part of the registration VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:29 Sep 10, 2014 Jkt 232001 process. To meet the performance goals established by statute, CoCs will need to significantly increase their capacity for strategy, planning, monitoring, and evaluation. In addition, the HEARTH Act and the 24 CFR part 578 allow for the development of United Funding Agencies (UFAs), a significant change to the structure of the CoC and the relationship between HUD and grantees. For the CoCs that seek UFA status, they must demonstrate that they have the operational capacity and a high functioning CoC Board that can serve as the sole manager of their projects, in order to qualify. With UFA established by statute and regulation, HUD needs as much information as possible regarding the baseline operational readiness of CoCs, and the few CoCs that may apply as a UFA will need to provide more information during the Registration process. As recently as the FY2013 competition, only 16 CoCs applied for UFA status, three were conditionally approved, and ultimately only two met the high standards of management and organizational capacity needed to serve this function. Providing all CoCs with the option of reporting their Board status will allow HUD to prepare for UFA applications and estimate how our program resources will need to be allocated over the next few years of program implementation. Respondents (i.e. affected public): States, local governments, private nonprofit organizations, public housing authorities, and community mental health associations that are public nonprofit organizations. Estimated Number of Respondents: 410 Respondents. Estimated Number of Responses: 410 responses per year. Frequency of Response: Once a year. Average Hours per Response: Two to three hours per response (two for most applicants and three for UFA applicants). Total Estimated Burdens: 840 hours. B. Solicitation of Public Comment This notice is soliciting comments from members of the public and affected parties concerning the collection of information described in Section A on the following: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) The accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (3) Ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 (4) Ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond; including through the use of appropriate automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. HUD encourages interested parties to submit comment in response to these questions. Authority: Section 3507 of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35. Dated: September 3, 2014. Clifford Taffet, General Deputy Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development. [FR Doc. 2014–21634 Filed 9–10–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4210–67–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R2–ES–2014–N172; FXES11130200000F5–145–FF02ENEH00] Emergency Exemption; Issuance of Emergency Permits to Survey for New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse Within Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of issuance of endangered species emergency permits. AGENCY: The final rule to list the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse as endangered throughout its range in New Mexico published in the Federal Register on June 10, 2014. Without authorized personnel to survey for this species, valuable information on population numbers for this elusive species would be lost for the 2014 field season. Under an Endangered Species Act permit, we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have authorized qualified researchers to survey for New Mexico meadow jumping mouse during its survey season of July and August 2014. ADDRESSES: Documents and other information concerning the permit are available for review, subject to the requirements of the Privacy Act and Freedom of Information Act. Documents will be available for public inspection, by appointment only, during normal business hours at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 500 Gold Ave. SW., Room 6034, Albuquerque, NM 87103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan Jacobsen, Chief, Division of Classification and Restoration, P.O. Box 1306, Albuquerque, NM 87103; (505) 248–6920. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\11SEN1.SGM 11SEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 176 / Thursday, September 11, 2014 / Notices The final rule to list the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonicus luteus) as endangered throughout its range in New Mexico published in the Federal Register on June 10, 2014 (79 FR 33119). Without authorized personnel to survey for this species, valuable information on population numbers for this elusive species would be lost for the 2014 field season. Under permits pursuant to the Endangered Species Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), we have authorized qualified researchers to survey for New Mexico meadow jumping mouse during its survey season of July and August 2014. Since 2005, there have been 29 documented remaining populations (2 in Colorado, 15 in New Mexico, and 12 in Arizona) spread across eight geographic management areas. Nearly all of these populations are isolated and widely separated, and all have patches of suitable habitat that are too small to support resilient populations of the mouse. Since 2005, four of the eight geographic management areas have two or more locations known to be occupied by the jumping mouse, but all are too small to support resilient populations. The remaining four areas have only one location known to be occupied since 2005, and each population is too small to be resilient. Due to the small population size estimates, surveys are needed to determine actual numbers. The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse is a small mammal that hibernates about 8 or 9 months out of the year—longer than most mammals— and is only active 3 or 4 months during the summer. Within this short time frame, it must breed, birth, raise young, and store up sufficient fat reserves to survive the next year’s hibernation period. In addition, the species only lives up to 1 years and has one litter annually, with seven or fewer young. As a result, if resources are not available in a single season, populations are greatly stressed. The species’ historical distribution likely included riparian wetlands along streams in the Sangre de Cristo and San Juan Mountains, from southern Colorado to central New Mexico, including the Jemez and Sacramento Mountains and the Rio Grande Valley from Espanola to Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, and into parts of the White Mountains in eastern Arizona. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Permit TE–40088B Applicant: Jennifer Frey, Radium Springs, New Mexico. VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:29 Sep 10, 2014 Jkt 232001 We approved the applicant’s request for a new permit for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/ absence surveys of New Mexico meadow jumping mouse within New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado. Permit TE–40886B Applicant: Jennifer Zahratka, Durango, Colorado. We approved the applicant’s request for a new permit for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/ absence surveys of New Mexico meadow jumping mouse within Colorado and New Mexico. Permit TE–676811 Applicant: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Southwest Region, Albuquerque, New Mexico. We approved the applicant’s request for an amendment to a current permit for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys of New Mexico meadow jumping mouse within Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. These emergency permits are issued for the sole purpose of facilitating presence/absence surveys for the 2014 survey season. Any further authorization for surveys or research of the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse will be processed separately. Authority: 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq. Dated: August 21, 2014. Joy E. Nicholopoulos, Regional Director, Southwest Region, Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2014–21659 Filed 9–10–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R2–ES–2014–N181; FXES11130200000–145–FF02ENEH00] Receipt of an Incidental Take Permit Application for Participation in the Oil and Gas Industry Conservation Plan for the American Burying Beetle in Oklahoma Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for public comments. AGENCY: Under the Endangered Species Act, as amended (Act), we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, invite the public to comment on an incidental take permit application for take of the federally listed American burying beetle resulting from activities associated with SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 54285 the construction, operation, maintenance, repair, and decommissioning of oil and gas pipelines and related well field activities in Oklahoma. If approved, the permit would be issued under the approved Oil and Gas Industry Conservation Plan Associated with Issuance of Endangered Species Act Section 10(a)(1)(B) Permits for the American Burying Beetle in Oklahoma (ICP). To ensure consideration, written comments must be received on or before October 14, 2014. ADDRESSES: You may obtain copies of all documents and submit comments on the applicant’s ITP application by one of the following methods. Please refer to the permit number when requesting documents or submitting comments. Æ U.S. Mail: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Endangered Species—HCP Permits, P.O. Box 1306, Room 6034, Albuquerque, NM 87103. Æ Electronically: fw2_hcp_permits@ fws.gov. DATES: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Marty Tuegel, Branch Chief, by U.S. mail at Environmental Review, P.O. Box 1306, Room 6034, Albuquerque, NM 87103; or by telephone at 505–248– 6651. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Introduction Under the Endangered Species Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.; Act), we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, invite the public to comment on an incidental take permit (ITP) application for take of the federally listed American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) resulting from activities associated with the construction, operation, maintenance, repair, and decommissioning of oil and gas pipelines and related well field activities in Oklahoma. If approved, the permit would be issued to the applicant under the Oil and Gas Industry Conservation Plan Associated with Issuance of Endangered Species Act Section 10(a)(1)(B) Permits for the American Burying Beetle in Oklahoma (ICP). The ICP was made available for comment on April 16, 2014 (79 FR 21480), and approved on May 21, 2014 (publication of the FONSI notice was on July 25, 2014, 79 FR 43504). The ICP and the associated environmental assessment/finding of no significant impact are available on the Web site at http://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/ oklahoma/ABBICP. However, we are no longer taking comments on these documents. E:\FR\FM\11SEN1.SGM 11SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 176 (Thursday, September 11, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 54284-54285]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-21659]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R2-ES-2014-N172; FXES11130200000F5-145-FF02ENEH00]


Emergency Exemption; Issuance of Emergency Permits to Survey for 
New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse Within Arizona, Colorado, and New 
Mexico

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of issuance of endangered species emergency permits.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The final rule to list the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse as 
endangered throughout its range in New Mexico published in the Federal 
Register on June 10, 2014. Without authorized personnel to survey for 
this species, valuable information on population numbers for this 
elusive species would be lost for the 2014 field season. Under an 
Endangered Species Act permit, we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
have authorized qualified researchers to survey for New Mexico meadow 
jumping mouse during its survey season of July and August 2014.

ADDRESSES: Documents and other information concerning the permit are 
available for review, subject to the requirements of the Privacy Act 
and Freedom of Information Act. Documents will be available for public 
inspection, by appointment only, during normal business hours at the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 500 Gold Ave. SW., Room 6034, 
Albuquerque, NM 87103.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan Jacobsen, Chief, Division of 
Classification and Restoration, P.O. Box 1306, Albuquerque, NM 87103; 
(505) 248-6920.

[[Page 54285]]


SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The final rule to list the New Mexico meadow 
jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonicus luteus) as endangered throughout its 
range in New Mexico published in the Federal Register on June 10, 2014 
(79 FR 33119). Without authorized personnel to survey for this species, 
valuable information on population numbers for this elusive species 
would be lost for the 2014 field season. Under permits pursuant to the 
Endangered Species Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), we have 
authorized qualified researchers to survey for New Mexico meadow 
jumping mouse during its survey season of July and August 2014.
    Since 2005, there have been 29 documented remaining populations (2 
in Colorado, 15 in New Mexico, and 12 in Arizona) spread across eight 
geographic management areas. Nearly all of these populations are 
isolated and widely separated, and all have patches of suitable habitat 
that are too small to support resilient populations of the mouse. Since 
2005, four of the eight geographic management areas have two or more 
locations known to be occupied by the jumping mouse, but all are too 
small to support resilient populations. The remaining four areas have 
only one location known to be occupied since 2005, and each population 
is too small to be resilient. Due to the small population size 
estimates, surveys are needed to determine actual numbers.
    The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse is a small mammal that 
hibernates about 8 or 9 months out of the year--longer than most 
mammals--and is only active 3 or 4 months during the summer. Within 
this short time frame, it must breed, birth, raise young, and store up 
sufficient fat reserves to survive the next year's hibernation period. 
In addition, the species only lives up to 1 years and has one litter 
annually, with seven or fewer young. As a result, if resources are not 
available in a single season, populations are greatly stressed.
    The species' historical distribution likely included riparian 
wetlands along streams in the Sangre de Cristo and San Juan Mountains, 
from southern Colorado to central New Mexico, including the Jemez and 
Sacramento Mountains and the Rio Grande Valley from Espanola to Bosque 
del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, and into parts of the White 
Mountains in eastern Arizona.

Permit TE-40088B

Applicant: Jennifer Frey, Radium Springs, New Mexico.

    We approved the applicant's request for a new permit for research 
and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys of New Mexico 
meadow jumping mouse within New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado.

Permit TE-40886B

Applicant: Jennifer Zahratka, Durango, Colorado.

    We approved the applicant's request for a new permit for research 
and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys of New Mexico 
meadow jumping mouse within Colorado and New Mexico.

Permit TE-676811

Applicant: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Southwest Region, 
Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    We approved the applicant's request for an amendment to a current 
permit for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence 
surveys of New Mexico meadow jumping mouse within Arizona, Colorado, 
and New Mexico.
    These emergency permits are issued for the sole purpose of 
facilitating presence/absence surveys for the 2014 survey season. Any 
further authorization for surveys or research of the New Mexico meadow 
jumping mouse will be processed separately.

    Authority: 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.

    Dated: August 21, 2014.
Joy E. Nicholopoulos,
Regional Director, Southwest Region, Fish and Wildlife Service.
[FR Doc. 2014-21659 Filed 9-10-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P