Technical Amendment to the List of CBP Preclearance Offices in Foreign Countries: Addition of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 46348-46350 [2014-18759]

Download as PDF 46348 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 153 / Friday, August 8, 2014 / Rules and Regulations the application for CTAP payments for the particular program year. The provisions of § 1412.54 apply to shares of CTAP payments. § 1412.84 Impact of CTAP application on ARC or PLC. (a) Applications for CTAP do not establish eligibility for ARC or PLC. Interested producers are required to file documents that are specifically required for CTAP as specified on the CTAP application. An application for CTAP will not be considered an intent to participate in ARC or PLC and, conversely, an election or enrollment in ARC or PLC will not establish eligibility for CTAP. (b) [Reserved] § 1412.86 CTAP payments. (a) In the case of producers on a farm who apply for CTAP as specified in this part, and where all other eligibility provisions have been satisfied, CCC will make CTAP payments available to the producers on a farm’s application as specified in this subpart. (b) CTAP payments for upland cotton producers on farms with eligible upland cotton base acres as specified in § 1412.82(a) are equal to: (1) For 2014, the product of multiplying 60 percent of the farm’s upland cotton base acres, times the farm’s direct payment yield for upland cotton, times $0.09, times the producer’s share on the approved application; or (2) Where applicable for 2015 according to this part and subpart, the product of multiplying 36.5 percent of the farm’s upland cotton base acres, times the farm’s direct payment yield for upland cotton, times $0.09, times the producer’s share on the approved application. wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with RULES § 1412.87 Transfer of land and successionin-interest. (a) A succession in interest application for CTAP is required if there has been a change in the producer shares of upland cotton base acres in § 1412.82(a) for 2014 or 2015, as applicable, due to: (1) A sale of land; (2) A change of producer, including a change in a partnership that increases or decreases the number of partners or changes who are partners; (3) A foreclosure, bankruptcy, or involuntary loss of the farm; (4) A change in producer shares to reflect changes in the producer’s share of the upland cotton base acres relevant to the originally approved application; or (5) Any other change determined by the Deputy Administrator to be a VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:19 Aug 07, 2014 Jkt 232001 succession that will not adversely affect or defeat the purpose of CTAP. (b) A succession in interest to the CTAP application is not permitted if CCC determines that the change: (1) Results in a violation of the landlord-tenant provisions specified in § 1412.55; or (2) Adversely affects or otherwise defeats the purpose of CTAP. (c) If a producer who is entitled to receive CTAP payments dies, becomes incompetent, or is otherwise unable to receive the payment, CCC will make the payment in accordance with part 707 of this title. (d) A producer or owner of an enrolled farm is required to inform the county committee of changes in interest in base acres of upland cotton as specified in § 1412.82(b) on the farm not later than: (1) August 1 of the fiscal year in which the change occurs if the change requires a reconstitution be completed in accordance with part 718 of this title; or (2) September 30 of the fiscal year in which the change occurs if the change does not require a reconstitution be completed in accordance with part 718 of this title. (e) In any case in which a CTAP payment has previously been made to a predecessor, such payment will not be paid to the successor, unless such payment has been refunded in full by the predecessor. § 1412.88 Executed application not in conformity with regulations. If, after a CTAP application is approved by CCC, it is discovered that such any information contained in the application is not in conformity with the provisions of this part, the provisions of this part will prevail. § 1412.89 Division of CTAP payments and provisions relating to tenants and sharecroppers. (a) CTAP payments will be divided in the manner specified in the applicable application approved by CCC. CCC will ensure that 2014 or 2015 producers who would have a 2014 or 2015 reported share interest in cropland on the farm specified in § 1412.82(b) receive treatment that CCC deems to be equitable, as determined by CCC. CCC will refrain from acting on an application if, as determined by CCC, there is a disagreement among any person or legal entity applying as to the person’s or legal entity’s eligibility to apply as a tenant and there is insufficient evidence to indicate whether the person seeking participation as a tenant does or does PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 not have a reported share interest in the cropland on the farm sufficient to cover the claimed share interest in cotton base acres of that farm as specified in § 1412.82(b) in 2014 or 2015, as applicable. (b) CCC may remove an operator or tenant from an application under this subpart and part when the operator or tenant: (1) Requests, in writing to be removed from the application; (2) Files for bankruptcy and the trustee or debtor in possession fails to affirm the application, to the extent permitted by the provisions of applicable bankruptcy laws; (3) Dies during the 2014 or 2015 program year and the Administrator of the estate fails to succeed to the application within a period of time determined by the Deputy Administrator; or (4) Is the subject of an order of a court of competent jurisdiction requiring the removal from the application under this part and subpart of the operator or tenant and such order is received by FSA, as determined by CCC. (c) In addition to the provisions in paragraph (b) of this section, tenants are required to maintain their tenancy throughout the crop year in order to remain on an application. Tenants who fail to maintain tenancy on the acreage under the application, including failure to comply with provisions under applicable State law, may be removed from an application by CCC. CCC will assume the tenancy is being maintained unless notified otherwise by a participant specified in the application. Signed on August 4, 2014. Juan M. Garcia, Executive Vice President, Commodity Credit Corporation, and Administrator, Farm Service Agency. [FR Doc. 2014–18719 Filed 8–6–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–05–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR PART 101 [CBP Dec. 14–09] Technical Amendment to the List of CBP Preclearance Offices in Foreign Countries: Addition of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. AGENCY: E:\FR\FM\08AUR1.SGM 08AUR1 46349 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 153 / Friday, August 8, 2014 / Rules and Regulations ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment. B. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Preclearance Operations B. The Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order 12866 This rule amends U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to reflect that CBP has added a preclearance location in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. CBP Preclearance operations in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates officially began on January 24, 2014, pursuant to an agreement between the Governments of the United States and the United Arab Emirates. CBP Officers at preclearance locations conduct inspections and examinations to ensure compliance with U.S. customs, immigration, and agriculture laws, as well as other laws enforced by CBP at the U.S. border. Such inspections and examinations prior to arrival in the United States generally enable travelers to exit the domestic terminal or connect directly to a U.S. domestic flight without undergoing further CBP processing. DATES: Effective Date: August 8, 2014. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dylan DeFrancisci, Office of Field Operations, 202–344–3671, dylan.defrancisci@cbp.dhs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: An ‘‘Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on Air Transport Preclearance’’ (Agreement) was signed on April 15, 2013. Among other things, the Agreement sets forth the obligations of the United Arab Emirates and the United States and establishes the Abu Dhabi International Airport as a preclearance location. Under the Agreement, flights eligible for preclearance are non-stop commercial flights that are destined from the United Arab Emirates to the United States. The Agreement provides that it will be carried out in a manner consistent with the laws and constitutions of both governments. Preclearance operations officially began in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates on January 24, 2014. Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do not apply. This amendment does not meet the criteria for a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ as specified in Executive Order 12866, as supplemented by Executive Order 13563. C. Regulatory Amendment Customs duties and inspection, Customs ports of entry, Foreign trade statistics, Imports, Organization and functions (Government agencies), Shipments, Vessels. SUMMARY: wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with RULES I. Background A. Preclearance Operations CBP preclearance operations have been in existence since 1952. Preclearance facilities are established through the cooperative efforts of CBP, foreign government representatives, and the local facility authorities and are evidenced with signed preclearance agreements. Each facility is staffed with CBP Officers responsible for conducting inspections and examinations in connection with preclearing passengers, crew, and their goods bound for the United States. Generally, travelers who are inspected at a preclearance facility are permitted to arrive at a U.S. domestic facility and exit the U.S. domestic terminal upon arrival or connect directly to a U.S. domestic flight without further CBP processing. Preclearance operations enhance security in the air environment through the screening and inspection of travelers prior to their arrival in the United States. Additionally, preclearance operations facilitate legitimate travel and relieve passenger congestion at federal inspection facilities in the United States. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2013, over 16 million aircraft travelers were processed at preclearance locations. This figure represents more than 15.5 percent of all commercial aircraft travelers cleared by CBP in FY 2013. VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:19 Aug 07, 2014 Jkt 232001 Section 101.5 of the CBP regulations (19 CFR 101.5) sets forth a list of CBP preclearance offices in foreign countries. This document amends this section to add Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates to the list of preclearance offices. This document also corrects the misspelling of the Oranjestad, Aruba preclearance location. II. Statutory and Regulatory Requirements Under the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 553(b)), an agency may waive the normal notice and comment requirements if it finds, for good cause, that they are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest. Based on an Agreement between the Governments of the United States and the United Arab Emirates, preclearance operations in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates have been operating since January 24, 2014. The final rule merely adds Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates to the list of CBP preclearance locations in foreign countries. This amendment is a technical change to merely update the list of preclearance locations. Therefore, notice and comment for this rule is unnecessary and contrary to the public interest because the rule has no substantive impact, is technical in nature, and relates only to management, organization, procedure, and practice. For the same reasons, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3), a delayed effective date is not required. Frm 00015 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 This document is being issued in accordance with 19 CFR 0.2(a) because preclearance locations are not within the bounds of those regulations for which the Secretary of the Treasury has retained sole authority. Therefore, this rule may be signed by the Secretary of Homeland Security or his or her designee. List of Subjects In 19 CFR Part 101 Amendments to Regulations For the reasons discussed above, part 101 of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR Part 101) is amended as set forth below. PART 101—GENERAL PROVISIONS A. Inapplicability of Public Notice and Delayed Effective Date Requirements PO 00000 C. Signing Authority 1. The general authority citation for part 101 and specific authority citation for § 101.5 continue to read as follows: ■ Authority: 5 U.S.C. 301; 19 U.S.C. 2, 66, 1202 (General Note 3(i), Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States), 1623, 1624, 1629, 1646a. * * * * * Section 101.5 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1629. * ■ * * * * 2. Revise § 101.5 to read as follows: § 101.5 CBP preclearance offices in foreign countries. Listed below are the preclearance offices in foreign countries where CBP Officers are located. A Director, Preclearance, located in the Office of Field Operations at CBP Headquarters, is the responsible CBP Officer exercising supervisory control over all preclearance offices. Country Aruba ......................... The Bahamas ............ Bermuda .................... E:\FR\FM\08AUR1.SGM 08AUR1 CBP office Oranjestad. Freeport. Nassau. Kindley Field. 46350 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 153 / Friday, August 8, 2014 / Rules and Regulations Country CBP office Canada ...................... Calgary, Alberta. Edmonton, Alberta. Halifax, Nova Scotia. Montreal, Quebec. Ottawa, Ontario. Toronto, Ontario. Vancouver, British Columbia. Winnipeg, Manitoba. Dublin. Shannon. Abu Dhabi. Ireland ....................... United Arab Emirates Dated: August 4, 2014. R. Gil Kerlikowske, Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection. [FR Doc. 2014–18759 Filed 8–7–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–14–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION 19 CFR Part 201 Rules of General Application International Trade Commission. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The United States International Trade Commission (‘‘Commission’’) amends provisions of its Rules of Practice and Procedure concerning national security information. The amendments are designed to ensure that the Commission’s procedures with respect to national security information are consistent with applicable authorities. DATES: This final rule is effective September 8, 2014. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lisa R. Barton, Secretary, telephone (202) 205–2000, or Clara Kuehn, AttorneyAdvisor, Office of the General Counsel, telephone (202) 205–3012, United States International Trade Commission. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal at (202) 205–1810. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its Internet server at http://www.usitc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 335 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1335) authorizes the Commission to adopt such reasonable procedures, rules, and regulations as it deems necessary to carry out its functions and duties. This rulemaking updates Subpart F of Part 201 of the Commission’s existing Rules of Practice wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:19 Aug 07, 2014 Jkt 232001 and Procedure concerning national security information to ensure that Subpart F is consistent with Executive Order 13526 of December 29, 2009, and its implementing directive (32 CFR part 2001). On April 17, 2014, the Commission published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) in the Federal Register. 79 FR 21658, April 17, 2014. In the NOPR, the Commission proposed amendments to Subpart F that would make non-substantive changes to existing section 201.42; eliminate existing section 201.43 and existing subsections 201.44(b) through (f); and update the procedures for processing mandatory declassification review (‘‘MDR’’) requests in existing subsection 201.44(a) and incorporate them into a new section 201.43. In the NOPR, the Commission requested public comment on the proposed rules, but no comments were received. The Commission found no reason to change the proposed rules before adopting them as final rules, which are republished below. A sectionby-section analysis of the rules can be found at 79 FR 21658–21661 (April 17, 2014). The Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) is inapplicable to this rulemaking because it is not one for which a notice of proposed rulemaking is required under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) or any other statute. Although the Commission published a notice of proposed rulemaking, these regulations are ‘‘agency rules of procedure and practice,’’ and thus are exempt from the notice requirement imposed by 5 U.S.C. 553(b). Moreover, these rules are certified as not having a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. These amended rules do not contain any information collection requirements subject to the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). No actions are necessary under title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995, Public Law 104–4 (2 U.S.C. 1531–1538) because these amended rules will not result in the expenditure by State, local, and tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100,000,000 or more in any one year, and will not significantly or uniquely affect small governments. The Commission has determined that these amended rules do not constitute a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). These amended rules do not have federalism implications warranting the preparation of a federalism summary PO 00000 Frm 00016 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 impact statement under Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 4, 1999). These amended rules are not ‘‘major rules’’ as defined by section 251 of the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (5 U.S.C. 801 et seq.). Moreover, they are exempt from the reporting requirements of the Act because they concern rules of agency organization, procedure, or practice that do not substantially affect the rights or obligations of non-agency parties. List of Subjects in 19 CFR Part 201 Administrative practice and procedure. For the reasons stated in the preamble, the United States International Trade Commission amends 19 CFR part 201 as follows: PART 201—RULES OF GENERAL APPLICATION 1. The authority citation for part 201 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: Sec. 335 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1335), and sec. 603 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2482), unless otherwise noted. ■ 2. Revise subpart F to read as follows: Subpart F—National Security Information Sec. 201.42 Purpose and scope. 201.43 Mandatory declassification review. Authority: 19 U.S.C. 1335; E.O. 13526, 75 FR 707. Subpart F—National Security Information § 201.42 Purpose and scope. This subpart supplements Executive Order 13526 of December 29, 2009, and its implementing directive (32 CFR part 2001) as it applies to the Commission. § 201.43 review. Mandatory declassification (a) Requests for mandatory declassification review—(1) Definitions. Mandatory declassification review (‘‘MDR’’) means the review for declassification of classified information in response to a request for declassification that meets the requirements under section 3.5 of Executive Order 13526. (2) Procedures. Requests for MDR of information in the custody of the Commission that is classified under Executive Order 13526 or predecessor orders shall be directed to the Secretary to the Commission, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436. MDR requests will be processed in accordance with Executive Order 13526, its E:\FR\FM\08AUR1.SGM 08AUR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 153 (Friday, August 8, 2014)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 46348-46350]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-18759]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

19 CFR PART 101

[CBP Dec. 14-09]


Technical Amendment to the List of CBP Preclearance Offices in 
Foreign Countries: Addition of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland 
Security.

[[Page 46349]]


ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This rule amends U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) 
regulations to reflect that CBP has added a preclearance location in 
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. CBP Preclearance operations in Abu 
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates officially began on January 24, 2014, 
pursuant to an agreement between the Governments of the United States 
and the United Arab Emirates. CBP Officers at preclearance locations 
conduct inspections and examinations to ensure compliance with U.S. 
customs, immigration, and agriculture laws, as well as other laws 
enforced by CBP at the U.S. border. Such inspections and examinations 
prior to arrival in the United States generally enable travelers to 
exit the domestic terminal or connect directly to a U.S. domestic 
flight without undergoing further CBP processing.

DATES: Effective Date: August 8, 2014.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dylan DeFrancisci, Office of Field 
Operations, 202-344-3671, dylan.defrancisci@cbp.dhs.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Background

A. Preclearance Operations

    CBP preclearance operations have been in existence since 1952. 
Preclearance facilities are established through the cooperative efforts 
of CBP, foreign government representatives, and the local facility 
authorities and are evidenced with signed preclearance agreements.
    Each facility is staffed with CBP Officers responsible for 
conducting inspections and examinations in connection with preclearing 
passengers, crew, and their goods bound for the United States. 
Generally, travelers who are inspected at a preclearance facility are 
permitted to arrive at a U.S. domestic facility and exit the U.S. 
domestic terminal upon arrival or connect directly to a U.S. domestic 
flight without further CBP processing.
    Preclearance operations enhance security in the air environment 
through the screening and inspection of travelers prior to their 
arrival in the United States. Additionally, preclearance operations 
facilitate legitimate travel and relieve passenger congestion at 
federal inspection facilities in the United States. In Fiscal Year (FY) 
2013, over 16 million aircraft travelers were processed at preclearance 
locations. This figure represents more than 15.5 percent of all 
commercial aircraft travelers cleared by CBP in FY 2013.

B. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Preclearance Operations

    An ``Agreement Between the Government of the United States of 
America and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on Air Transport 
Preclearance'' (Agreement) was signed on April 15, 2013. Among other 
things, the Agreement sets forth the obligations of the United Arab 
Emirates and the United States and establishes the Abu Dhabi 
International Airport as a preclearance location. Under the Agreement, 
flights eligible for preclearance are non-stop commercial flights that 
are destined from the United Arab Emirates to the United States. The 
Agreement provides that it will be carried out in a manner consistent 
with the laws and constitutions of both governments. Preclearance 
operations officially began in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates on 
January 24, 2014.

C. Regulatory Amendment

    Section 101.5 of the CBP regulations (19 CFR 101.5) sets forth a 
list of CBP preclearance offices in foreign countries. This document 
amends this section to add Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates to the list 
of preclearance offices. This document also corrects the misspelling of 
the Oranjestad, Aruba preclearance location.

II. Statutory and Regulatory Requirements

A. Inapplicability of Public Notice and Delayed Effective Date 
Requirements

    Under the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 553(b)), an agency 
may waive the normal notice and comment requirements if it finds, for 
good cause, that they are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to 
the public interest. Based on an Agreement between the Governments of 
the United States and the United Arab Emirates, preclearance operations 
in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates have been operating since January 
24, 2014. The final rule merely adds Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates to 
the list of CBP preclearance locations in foreign countries. This 
amendment is a technical change to merely update the list of 
preclearance locations. Therefore, notice and comment for this rule is 
unnecessary and contrary to the public interest because the rule has no 
substantive impact, is technical in nature, and relates only to 
management, organization, procedure, and practice. For the same 
reasons, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3), a delayed effective date is 
not required.

B. The Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order 12866

    Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the 
provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do 
not apply. This amendment does not meet the criteria for a 
``significant regulatory action'' as specified in Executive Order 
12866, as supplemented by Executive Order 13563.

C. Signing Authority

    This document is being issued in accordance with 19 CFR 0.2(a) 
because preclearance locations are not within the bounds of those 
regulations for which the Secretary of the Treasury has retained sole 
authority. Therefore, this rule may be signed by the Secretary of 
Homeland Security or his or her designee.

List of Subjects In 19 CFR Part 101

    Customs duties and inspection, Customs ports of entry, Foreign 
trade statistics, Imports, Organization and functions (Government 
agencies), Shipments, Vessels.

Amendments to Regulations

    For the reasons discussed above, part 101 of title 19 of the Code 
of Federal Regulations (19 CFR Part 101) is amended as set forth below.

PART 101--GENERAL PROVISIONS

0
1. The general authority citation for part 101 and specific authority 
citation for Sec.  101.5 continue to read as follows:

    Authority:  5 U.S.C. 301; 19 U.S.C. 2, 66, 1202 (General Note 
3(i), Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States), 1623, 1624, 
1629, 1646a.
* * * * *
    Section 101.5 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1629.
* * * * *

0
2. Revise Sec.  101.5 to read as follows:


Sec.  101.5  CBP preclearance offices in foreign countries.

    Listed below are the preclearance offices in foreign countries 
where CBP Officers are located. A Director, Preclearance, located in 
the Office of Field Operations at CBP Headquarters, is the responsible 
CBP Officer exercising supervisory control over all preclearance 
offices.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Country                            CBP office
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aruba.....................................  Oranjestad.
The Bahamas...............................  Freeport.
                                            Nassau.
Bermuda...................................  Kindley Field.

[[Page 46350]]

 
Canada....................................  Calgary, Alberta.
                                            Edmonton, Alberta.
                                            Halifax, Nova Scotia.
                                            Montreal, Quebec.
                                            Ottawa, Ontario.
                                            Toronto, Ontario.
                                            Vancouver, British Columbia.
                                            Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Ireland...................................  Dublin.
                                            Shannon.
United Arab Emirates......................  Abu Dhabi.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Dated: August 4, 2014.
R. Gil Kerlikowske,
Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
[FR Doc. 2014-18759 Filed 8-7-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9111-14-P