Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas and Imported Oranges; Change in Size Requirements for Oranges, 41411-41413 [2014-16638]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 136 / Wednesday, July 16, 2014 / Rules and Regulations sufficient detail to inform the ASCR of the nature and date of an alleged civil rights violation. The statement must be signed by the complainant(s) or someone authorized to sign on behalf of the complainant(s). To accommodate the needs of people with disabilities, special needs, or who have Limited English Proficiency, a complaint may be in an alternative format. Compliance report means a written review of an agency’s compliance with civil rights requirements, to be prepared by OASCR and to identify each finding of non-compliance or other civil rights related issue. The review is conducted at the discretion of OASCR or if there has been a formal finding of noncompliance. Conducted Programs and Activities means the program services, benefits or resources delivered directly to the public by USDA. Days mean calendar days, not business days. Department (used interchangeably with USDA) means the Department of Agriculture and includes each of its operating agencies and other organizational units. Discrimination means unlawful treatment or denial of benefits, services, rights or privileges to a person or persons because of their race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, sexual orientation, familial status, parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or gender identity. Secretary means the Secretary of Agriculture or any officer or employee of the Department whom the Secretary has heretofore delegated, or whom the Secretary may hereafter delegate, the authority to act in his or her stead under the regulations in this part. ■ 4. Revise newly redesignated § 15d.3 to read as follows: ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with RULES § 15d.3 Discrimination prohibited. (a) No agency, officer, or employee of the USDA shall, on the grounds of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or gender identity, exclude from participation in, deny the benefits of, or subject to discrimination any person in the United States under any program or activity conducted by the USDA. (b) No person shall be subjected to reprisal for opposing any practice(s) prohibited by this part, for filing a complaint, or for participating in any other manner in a proceeding under this part. VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:23 Jul 15, 2014 Jkt 232001 41411 section 14006 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Pub. L. 110–246). § 15d.4 Compliance. ■ 6. Revise newly redesignated § 15d.5 (a) Compliance program. OASCR shall to read as follows: evaluate each agency’s efforts to comply § 15d.5 Complaints. with this part and shall make recommendations for improving such (a) Any person who believes that he efforts. or she (or any specific class of (1) OASCR shall oversee the individuals) has been, or is being, compliance reviews and evaluations, subjected to practices prohibited by this and issue compliance reports that part may file (or file through an monitor compliance efforts to ensure authorized representative) a written that there is equitable and fair treatment complaint alleging such discrimination. in conducted programs. The written complaint must be filed (2) OASCR shall monitor all within 180 calendar days from the date settlement agreements pertaining to the person knew or reasonably should program complaints for compliance to have known of the alleged ensure full implementation and discrimination, unless the time is enforcement. extended for good cause by the ASCR or (3) OASCR shall oversee Agency Head designee. Any person who complains of Assessments to ensure that Agency discrimination under this part in any Heads are in compliance with civil fashion shall be advised of the right to rights laws and regulations. file a complaint as herein provided. (4) OASCR shall monitor all findings (b) All complaints under this part of non-compliance to ensure that should be filed with the Office of the compliance is achieved. Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, (5) OASCR shall require agencies to 1400 Independence Ave. SW., U.S. collect the race, ethnicity and gender of Department of Agriculture, Washington, applicants and program participants, DC 20250, who will investigate the who choose to provide such information complaints. The ASCR will make final on a voluntary basis, in USDAdeterminations as to the merits of conducted programs, for purposes of complaints under this part and as to the civil rights compliance oversight, and corrective actions required to resolve evaluation. program complaints. The complainant (b) Agency data collection and will be notified of the final compliance reports. (1) Each Agency determination on the complaint. shall, for civil rights compliance, (c) Any complaint filed under this collect, maintain and annually compile part alleging discrimination on the basis data on all program applicants and of disability will be processed under 7 participants in conducted programs by CFR part 15e. county and State, including but not (d) For complaints OASCR deems limited to, application and participation appropriate for ADR, OASCR shall offer rate data regarding socially ADR services to complainants. disadvantaged and limited resources Dated: July 7, 2014. applicants and participants. At a Joe Leonard, Jr., minimum, the data should include: Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights. (i) Numbers of applicants and [FR Doc. 2014–16325 Filed 7–15–14; 8:45 am] participants by race, ethnicity, and BILLING CODE P gender, subject to appropriate privacy protections, as determined by the Secretary and in accordance with law; DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE and (ii) The application and participation Agricultural Marketing Service rate, by race, ethnicity, and gender, as a percentage of the total participation 7 CFR Parts 906 and 944 rate. (2) Each Agency shall submit to the [Doc. No. AMS–FV–14–0009; FV14–906–1 FIR] OASCR timely, complete and accurate program application and participation Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in reports containing the information described in § 15d.4(b)(1), on an annual Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas and Imported Oranges; Change in Size basis, and upon the request of the Requirements for Oranges OASCR independently of the annual requirement. AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, (c) Complaint reporting compliance. USDA. OASCR shall ensure compliance with ACTION: Affirmation of interim rule as mandated complaint reporting final rule. requirements, such as those required by 5. Revise newly redesignated § 15d.4 to read as follows: ■ PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\16JYR1.SGM 16JYR1 41412 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 136 / Wednesday, July 16, 2014 / Rules and Regulations The Department of Agriculture (USDA) is adopting, as a final rule, without change, an interim rule that relaxed the minimum size prescribed for oranges under the marketing order for oranges and grapefruit grown in Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas (order) and the orange import regulation. The interim rule relaxed the minimum size requirement for domestic and import shipments from 26⁄16 inches to 23⁄16 inches in diameter. This rule provides additional oranges to meet market demand, helping to maximize fresh shipments. DATES: Effective July 17, 2014. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Doris Jamieson, Marketing Specialist, or Christian D. Nissen, Regional Director, Southeast Marketing Field Office, Marketing Order and Agreement Division, Fruit and Vegetable Program, AMS, USDA; Telephone: (863) 324– 3375, Fax: (863) 325–8793, or Email: Doris.Jamieson@ams.usda.gov or Christian.Nissen@ams.usda.gov. Small businesses may obtain information on complying with this and other marketing order and agreement regulations by viewing a guide at the following Web site: http:// www.ams.usda.gov/ MarketingOrdersSmallBusinessGuide; or by contacting Jeffrey Smutny, Marketing Order and Agreement Division, Fruit and Vegetable Program, AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., STOP 0237, Washington, DC 20250–0237; Telephone: (202) 720– 2491, Fax: (202) 720–8938, or Email: Jeffrey.Smutny@ams.usda.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This rule is issued under Marketing Agreement and Order No. 906, as amended (7 CFR part 906), regulating the handling of oranges and grapefruit grown in the Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas, hereinafter referred to as the ‘‘order.’’ The order is effective under the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601–674), hereinafter referred to as the ‘‘Act.’’ This rule is also issued under section 8e of the Act, which provides that whenever certain specified commodities, including oranges, are regulated under a Federal marketing order, imports of these commodities into the United States are prohibited unless they meet the same or comparable grade, size, quality, or maturity requirements as those in effect for the domestically produced commodities. USDA is issuing this rule in conformance with Executive Orders 12866, 13563, and 13175. ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:23 Jul 15, 2014 Jkt 232001 The handling of oranges and grapefruit grown in the Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas is regulated by 7 CFR part 906. Prior to this change, the minimum size requirement for domestic shipments of oranges was 26⁄16 inches. The Texas Valley Citrus Committee (Committee) believes there is a shortage of fruit available to supply the fresh fruit market, which the Texas citrus growers and handlers should fill. The Committee also recognized that consumers are now showing a preference for smaller-sized fruit. The Committee believes relaxing the requirements makes more fruit available to fill the market shortfall and provides smaller-sized fruit to meet consumer demand. Therefore, this rule continues in effect the rule that relaxed the minimum size requirement for domestic shipments from 26⁄16 inches to 23⁄16 inches in diameter. Imported oranges are subject to regulations specified in 7 CFR part 944. Under those regulations, imported oranges must meet the same minimum size requirements as specified for domestic oranges under the order. Therefore, the minimum size requirement was also relaxed from 26⁄16 inches to 23⁄16 inches in diameter for oranges imported into the United States. In an interim rule published in the Federal Register on February 28, 2014, and effective on March 1, 2014, (79 FR 11297, Doc. No. AMS–FV–14–0009, FV14–906–1 IR), §§ 906.365 and 944.312 were amended by changing the minimum diameter for oranges from 26⁄16 inches (size 138) to 23⁄16 inches (size 163) in diameter. Section 906.340 was also revised by adding size 163 to the available pack sizes for oranges listed under Table I, and by adding language concerning pack and sizing requirements as appropriate. Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Pursuant to requirements set forth in the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) (5 U.S.C. 601–612), the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) has considered the economic impact of this action on small entities. Accordingly, AMS has prepared this final regulatory flexibility analysis. The purpose of the RFA is to fit regulatory actions to the scale of business subject to such actions in order that small businesses will not be unduly or disproportionately burdened. Marketing orders issued pursuant to the Act, and the rules issued thereunder, are unique in that they are brought about through group action of essentially small entities acting on their own behalf. Import regulations issued under PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 the Act are based on those established under Federal marketing orders. There are 13 registered handlers of Texas citrus who are subject to regulation under the marketing order and approximately 150 producers of oranges in the regulated area. There are approximately 220 importers of oranges. Small agricultural service firms, which include handlers and importers, are defined by the Small Business Administration (SBA) as those having annual receipts of less than $7,000,000, and small agricultural producers are defined as those having annual receipts of less than $750,000 (13 CFR 121.201). According to data from the National Agricultural Statistics Service and the industry and Committee, the average f.o.b. price for Texas oranges during the 2012–13 season was $25.30 per box, and total fresh orange shipments were approximately 1.5 million boxes. Using the average f.o.b. price and shipment data, the majority of Texas orange handlers could be considered small businesses under SBA’s definition. In addition, based on production data, grower prices, and the total number of Texas citrus growers, the average annual grower revenue is below $750,000. Information from the Foreign Agricultural Service, USDA, indicates that the dollar value of imported fresh oranges ranged from approximately $71.2 million in 2008 to $107.4 million in 2012. Using these values, most importers would have annual receipts of less than $7,000,000 for oranges. Thus, the majority of handlers, producers, and importers of oranges may be classified as small entities. Chile, South Africa, Mexico, and Australia are the major orangeproducing countries exporting oranges to the United States. In 2012, shipments of oranges imported into the United States totaled around 119,000 metric tons. Of that amount, 51,510 metric tons were imported from Chile, 35,960 metric tons were imported from South Africa, 17,421 metric tons were imported from Mexico, and 11,100 metric tons arrived from Australia. This rule continues in effect the action that relaxed the minimum size requirement for oranges grown in the Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas and imported oranges. This rule relaxes the minimum size requirement for domestic and import shipments from 26⁄16 inches (size 138) to 23⁄16 inches (size 163). This change makes additional fruit available for shipment to the fresh market, maximizes shipments, provides additional returns to handlers and growers, and responds to consumer demand for small-sized fruit. This rule amends the provisions of §§ 906.340, E:\FR\FM\16JYR1.SGM 16JYR1 ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with RULES Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 136 / Wednesday, July 16, 2014 / Rules and Regulations 906.365, and 944.312. Authority for the change in the order’s rules and regulations is provided in § 906.40. The change in the import regulation is required under section 8e of the Act. This action is not expected to increase the costs associated with the order requirements or the orange import regulation. Rather, it is anticipated that this action will have a beneficial impact. Reducing the size requirement makes additional fruit available for shipment to the fresh market. The Committee believes that this provides additional fruit to fill a shortage in the fresh market and provides the opportunity to fulfill a growing consumer demand for smaller sized fruit. This action also provides an outlet for fruit that may otherwise go unharvested, maximizing fresh shipments and increasing returns to handlers and growers. The benefits of this rule are expected to be equally available to all fresh orange growers, handlers, and importers, regardless of their size. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35), the order’s information collection requirements have been previously approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and assigned OMB No. 0581–0189, Generic Fruit Crops. No changes in those requirements as a result of this action are necessary. Should any changes become necessary, they would be submitted to OMB for approval. This rule will not impose any additional reporting or recordkeeping requirements on either small or large citrus handlers. As with all Federal marketing order programs, reports and forms are periodically reviewed to reduce information requirements and duplication by industry and public sector agencies. In addition, USDA has not identified any relevant Federal rules that duplicate, overlap or conflict with this rule. Further, the Committee’s meeting was widely publicized throughout the Texas citrus industry and all interested persons were invited to attend the meeting and participate in Committee deliberations. Like all Committee meetings, the December 11, 2013, meeting was a public meeting and all entities, both large and small, were able to express their views on this issue. Comments on the interim rule were required to be received on or before April 29, 2014. No comments were received. Therefore, for the reasons given in the interim rule, we are adopting the interim rule as a final rule, without change. To view the interim rule, go to: http://www.regulations.gov/ VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:23 Jul 15, 2014 Jkt 232001 #!documentDetail;D=AMS-FV-14-00090001. This action also affirms information contained in the interim rule concerning Executive Orders 12866, 12988, 13175, and 13563; the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35); and the EGov Act (44 U.S.C. 101). In accordance with section 8e of the Act, the United States Trade Representative has concurred with the issuance of this final rule. After consideration of all relevant material presented, it is found that finalizing the interim rule, without change, as published in the Federal Register (79 FR 11297, February 28, 2014) will tend to effectuate the declared policy of the Act. List of Subjects 7 CFR Part 906 Grapefruit, Marketing agreements, Oranges, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. 7 CFR Part 944 Avocados, Food grades and standards, Grapefruit, Grapes, Imports, Kiwifruit, Limes, Olives, Oranges. PARTS 906 and 944—[AMENDED] Accordingly, the interim rule that amended 7 CFR parts 906 and 944 and that was published at 79 FR 11297 on February 28, 2014, is adopted as final without change. ■ Dated: July 10, 2014. Rex A. Barnes, Associate Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service. [FR Doc. 2014–16638 Filed 7–15–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 946 and Part 980 [Doc. No. AMS–FV–13–0068; FV13–946–3 FIR] Irish Potatoes Grown in Washington and Imported Potatoes; Modification of the Handling Regulations, Reporting Requirements, and Import Regulations for Red Types of Potatoes Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Affirmation of interim rule as a final rule. AGENCY: The Department of Agriculture is adopting, as a final rule, without change, an interim rule that exempted red types of potatoes from SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 41413 minimum quality, maturity, pack, marking, and inspection requirements of the Washington potato marketing order and the potato import regulation for the 2013–2014 and subsequent fiscal periods. This rule also continues in effect the action that required handlers of red types of potatoes to submit reports during the period that red types of potatoes are exempt from regulation. This rule is expected to reduce overall industry expenses and increase net returns to producers and handlers while giving the industry the opportunity to explore alternative marketing strategies. DATES: Effective July 21, 2014. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Teresa Hutchinson, Marketing Specialist, or Gary Olson, Regional Director, Northwest Marketing Field Office, Marketing Order and Agreement Division, Fruit and Vegetable Program, AMS, USDA; Telephone: (503) 326– 2724, Fax: (503) 326–7440, or Email: Teresa.Hutchinson@ams.usda.gov or GaryD.Olson@ams.usda.gov. Small businesses may obtain information on complying with this and other marketing order regulations by viewing a guide at the following Web site: http://www.ams.usda.gov/ MarketingOrdersSmallBusinessGuide; or by contacting Jeffrey Smutny, Marketing Order and Agreement Division, Fruit and Vegetable Program, AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., STOP 0237, Washington, DC 20250–0237; Telephone: (202) 720– 2491, Fax: (202) 720–8938, or Email: Jeffrey.Smutny@ams.usda.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This rule is issued under Marketing Order No. 946, as amended (7 CFR part 946), regulating the handling of Irish potatoes grown in Washington, hereinafter referred to as the ‘‘order.’’ The order is effective under the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601–674), hereinafter referred to as the ‘‘Act.’’ This rule is also issued under section 8e of the Act, which provides that whenever certain specified commodities, including potatoes, are regulated under a Federal marketing order, imports of these commodities into the United States is prohibited unless they meet the same or comparable grade, size, quality, or maturity requirements as those in effect for domestically produced commodities. The Department of Agriculture (USDA) is issuing this rule in conformance with Executive Orders 12866, 13563, and 13175. The handling of Irish potatoes grown in Washington is regulated by 7 CFR part 946. Prior to this change, red types E:\FR\FM\16JYR1.SGM 16JYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 136 (Wednesday, July 16, 2014)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 41411-41413]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-16638]


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Agricultural Marketing Service

7 CFR Parts 906 and 944

[Doc. No. AMS-FV-14-0009; FV14-906-1 FIR]


Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas 
and Imported Oranges; Change in Size Requirements for Oranges

AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA.

ACTION: Affirmation of interim rule as final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 41412]]

SUMMARY: The Department of Agriculture (USDA) is adopting, as a final 
rule, without change, an interim rule that relaxed the minimum size 
prescribed for oranges under the marketing order for oranges and 
grapefruit grown in Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas (order) and the 
orange import regulation. The interim rule relaxed the minimum size 
requirement for domestic and import shipments from 2\6/16\ inches to 
2\3/16\ inches in diameter. This rule provides additional oranges to 
meet market demand, helping to maximize fresh shipments.

DATES: Effective July 17, 2014.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Doris Jamieson, Marketing Specialist, 
or Christian D. Nissen, Regional Director, Southeast Marketing Field 
Office, Marketing Order and Agreement Division, Fruit and Vegetable 
Program, AMS, USDA; Telephone: (863) 324-3375, Fax: (863) 325-8793, or 
Email: Doris.Jamieson@ams.usda.gov or Christian.Nissen@ams.usda.gov.
    Small businesses may obtain information on complying with this and 
other marketing order and agreement regulations by viewing a guide at 
the following Web site: http://www.ams.usda.gov/MarketingOrdersSmallBusinessGuide; or by contacting Jeffrey Smutny, 
Marketing Order and Agreement Division, Fruit and Vegetable Program, 
AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., STOP 0237, Washington, DC 
20250-0237; Telephone: (202) 720-2491, Fax: (202) 720-8938, or Email: 
Jeffrey.Smutny@ams.usda.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This rule is issued under Marketing 
Agreement and Order No. 906, as amended (7 CFR part 906), regulating 
the handling of oranges and grapefruit grown in the Lower Rio Grande 
Valley in Texas, hereinafter referred to as the ``order.'' The order is 
effective under the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as 
amended (7 U.S.C. 601-674), hereinafter referred to as the ``Act.''
    This rule is also issued under section 8e of the Act, which 
provides that whenever certain specified commodities, including 
oranges, are regulated under a Federal marketing order, imports of 
these commodities into the United States are prohibited unless they 
meet the same or comparable grade, size, quality, or maturity 
requirements as those in effect for the domestically produced 
commodities.
    USDA is issuing this rule in conformance with Executive Orders 
12866, 13563, and 13175.
    The handling of oranges and grapefruit grown in the Lower Rio 
Grande Valley in Texas is regulated by 7 CFR part 906. Prior to this 
change, the minimum size requirement for domestic shipments of oranges 
was 2\6/16\ inches. The Texas Valley Citrus Committee (Committee) 
believes there is a shortage of fruit available to supply the fresh 
fruit market, which the Texas citrus growers and handlers should fill. 
The Committee also recognized that consumers are now showing a 
preference for smaller-sized fruit. The Committee believes relaxing the 
requirements makes more fruit available to fill the market shortfall 
and provides smaller-sized fruit to meet consumer demand. Therefore, 
this rule continues in effect the rule that relaxed the minimum size 
requirement for domestic shipments from 2\6/16\ inches to 2\3/16\ 
inches in diameter.
    Imported oranges are subject to regulations specified in 7 CFR part 
944. Under those regulations, imported oranges must meet the same 
minimum size requirements as specified for domestic oranges under the 
order. Therefore, the minimum size requirement was also relaxed from 
2\6/16\ inches to 2\3/16\ inches in diameter for oranges imported into 
the United States.
    In an interim rule published in the Federal Register on February 
28, 2014, and effective on March 1, 2014, (79 FR 11297, Doc. No. AMS-
FV-14-0009, FV14-906-1 IR), Sec. Sec.  906.365 and 944.312 were amended 
by changing the minimum diameter for oranges from 2\6/16\ inches (size 
138) to 2\3/16\ inches (size 163) in diameter. Section 906.340 was also 
revised by adding size 163 to the available pack sizes for oranges 
listed under Table I, and by adding language concerning pack and sizing 
requirements as appropriate.

Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

    Pursuant to requirements set forth in the Regulatory Flexibility 
Act (RFA) (5 U.S.C. 601-612), the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) 
has considered the economic impact of this action on small entities. 
Accordingly, AMS has prepared this final regulatory flexibility 
analysis.
    The purpose of the RFA is to fit regulatory actions to the scale of 
business subject to such actions in order that small businesses will 
not be unduly or disproportionately burdened. Marketing orders issued 
pursuant to the Act, and the rules issued thereunder, are unique in 
that they are brought about through group action of essentially small 
entities acting on their own behalf. Import regulations issued under 
the Act are based on those established under Federal marketing orders.
    There are 13 registered handlers of Texas citrus who are subject to 
regulation under the marketing order and approximately 150 producers of 
oranges in the regulated area. There are approximately 220 importers of 
oranges. Small agricultural service firms, which include handlers and 
importers, are defined by the Small Business Administration (SBA) as 
those having annual receipts of less than $7,000,000, and small 
agricultural producers are defined as those having annual receipts of 
less than $750,000 (13 CFR 121.201).
    According to data from the National Agricultural Statistics Service 
and the industry and Committee, the average f.o.b. price for Texas 
oranges during the 2012-13 season was $25.30 per box, and total fresh 
orange shipments were approximately 1.5 million boxes. Using the 
average f.o.b. price and shipment data, the majority of Texas orange 
handlers could be considered small businesses under SBA's definition. 
In addition, based on production data, grower prices, and the total 
number of Texas citrus growers, the average annual grower revenue is 
below $750,000. Information from the Foreign Agricultural Service, 
USDA, indicates that the dollar value of imported fresh oranges ranged 
from approximately $71.2 million in 2008 to $107.4 million in 2012. 
Using these values, most importers would have annual receipts of less 
than $7,000,000 for oranges. Thus, the majority of handlers, producers, 
and importers of oranges may be classified as small entities.
    Chile, South Africa, Mexico, and Australia are the major orange-
producing countries exporting oranges to the United States. In 2012, 
shipments of oranges imported into the United States totaled around 
119,000 metric tons. Of that amount, 51,510 metric tons were imported 
from Chile, 35,960 metric tons were imported from South Africa, 17,421 
metric tons were imported from Mexico, and 11,100 metric tons arrived 
from Australia.
    This rule continues in effect the action that relaxed the minimum 
size requirement for oranges grown in the Lower Rio Grande Valley in 
Texas and imported oranges. This rule relaxes the minimum size 
requirement for domestic and import shipments from 2\6/16\ inches (size 
138) to 2\3/16\ inches (size 163). This change makes additional fruit 
available for shipment to the fresh market, maximizes shipments, 
provides additional returns to handlers and growers, and responds to 
consumer demand for small-sized fruit. This rule amends the provisions 
of Sec. Sec.  906.340,

[[Page 41413]]

906.365, and 944.312. Authority for the change in the order's rules and 
regulations is provided in Sec.  906.40. The change in the import 
regulation is required under section 8e of the Act.
    This action is not expected to increase the costs associated with 
the order requirements or the orange import regulation. Rather, it is 
anticipated that this action will have a beneficial impact. Reducing 
the size requirement makes additional fruit available for shipment to 
the fresh market. The Committee believes that this provides additional 
fruit to fill a shortage in the fresh market and provides the 
opportunity to fulfill a growing consumer demand for smaller sized 
fruit. This action also provides an outlet for fruit that may otherwise 
go unharvested, maximizing fresh shipments and increasing returns to 
handlers and growers. The benefits of this rule are expected to be 
equally available to all fresh orange growers, handlers, and importers, 
regardless of their size.
    In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 
Chapter 35), the order's information collection requirements have been 
previously approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and 
assigned OMB No. 0581-0189, Generic Fruit Crops. No changes in those 
requirements as a result of this action are necessary. Should any 
changes become necessary, they would be submitted to OMB for approval.
    This rule will not impose any additional reporting or recordkeeping 
requirements on either small or large citrus handlers. As with all 
Federal marketing order programs, reports and forms are periodically 
reviewed to reduce information requirements and duplication by industry 
and public sector agencies. In addition, USDA has not identified any 
relevant Federal rules that duplicate, overlap or conflict with this 
rule.
    Further, the Committee's meeting was widely publicized throughout 
the Texas citrus industry and all interested persons were invited to 
attend the meeting and participate in Committee deliberations. Like all 
Committee meetings, the December 11, 2013, meeting was a public meeting 
and all entities, both large and small, were able to express their 
views on this issue.
    Comments on the interim rule were required to be received on or 
before April 29, 2014. No comments were received. Therefore, for the 
reasons given in the interim rule, we are adopting the interim rule as 
a final rule, without change.
    To view the interim rule, go to: http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=AMS-FV-14-0009-0001.
    This action also affirms information contained in the interim rule 
concerning Executive Orders 12866, 12988, 13175, and 13563; the 
Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35); and the E-Gov Act (44 
U.S.C. 101).
    In accordance with section 8e of the Act, the United States Trade 
Representative has concurred with the issuance of this final rule.
    After consideration of all relevant material presented, it is found 
that finalizing the interim rule, without change, as published in the 
Federal Register (79 FR 11297, February 28, 2014) will tend to 
effectuate the declared policy of the Act.

List of Subjects

7 CFR Part 906

    Grapefruit, Marketing agreements, Oranges, Reporting and 
recordkeeping requirements.

7 CFR Part 944

    Avocados, Food grades and standards, Grapefruit, Grapes, Imports, 
Kiwifruit, Limes, Olives, Oranges.

PARTS 906 and 944--[AMENDED]

0
Accordingly, the interim rule that amended 7 CFR parts 906 and 944 and 
that was published at 79 FR 11297 on February 28, 2014, is adopted as 
final without change.

    Dated: July 10, 2014.
Rex A. Barnes,
Associate Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service.
[FR Doc. 2014-16638 Filed 7-15-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P