Rules and Regulations Under the Hobby Protection Act, 40691-40693 [2014-16340]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 134 / Monday, July 14, 2014 / Proposed Rules Environmental Review This proposal will be subject to an environmental analysis in accordance with FAA Order 1050.1E, ‘‘Environmental Impacts: Policies and Procedures’’ prior to any FAA final regulatory action. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71 Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (Air). The Proposed Amendment In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration proposes to amend 14 CFR Part 71 as follows: PART 71—DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS 1. The authority citation for part 71 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959– 1963 Comp., p. 389. § 71.1 [Amended] 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of FAA Order 7400.9X, Airspace Designations and Reporting Points, dated August 7, 2013 and effective September 15, 2013, is amended as follows: ■ Paragraph 6005 Class E Airspace areas extending upward from 700 feet or more above the surface of the earth. * * * * * ASW OK E5 Thomas, OK [New] Thomas Muni Airport, OK (Lat. 35°44′01″ N., long. 98°43′50″ W.) That airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface within a 6.5-mile radius of Thomas Muni Airport. Issued in Fort Worth, TX, on June 30, 2014. Walter Tweedy, Manager, Operations Support Group, ATO Central Service Center. [FR Doc. 2014–16349 Filed 7–11–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS 16 CFR Part 304 Rules and Regulations Under the Hobby Protection Act Federal Trade Commission. Request for public comments. AGENCY: ACTION: The Federal Trade Commission (‘‘Commission’’) requests public comment on the overall costs and benefits, and regulatory and economic SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:01 Jul 11, 2014 Jkt 232001 impact, of its Rules and Regulations Under the Hobby Protection Act (‘‘Rules’’), as part of the agency’s regular review of all its regulations and guides. DATES: Comments must be received on or before September 22, 2014. ADDRESSES: Interested parties may file a comment online or on paper, by following the instructions in the Request for Comment part of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ‘‘Hobby Protection Rules Review’’ on your comment. You may file your comment online at https:// ftcpublic.commentworks.com/ftc/ hobbyprotectionrules, by following the instructions on the Web-based form. If you prefer to file your comment on paper, mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite CC–5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW., 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 20024. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joshua S. Millard (202) 326–2454, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20580. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background On November 29, 1973, the President signed into law the Hobby Protection Act (‘‘Act’’), 15 U.S.C. 2101–06. The Act requires manufacturers and importers of ‘‘imitation political items’’ 1 to ‘‘plainly and permanently’’ mark them with the ‘‘calendar year’’ the items were manufactured. Id. § 2101(a). The Act also requires manufacturers and importers of ‘‘imitation numismatic items’’ 2 to ‘‘plainly and permanently’’ mark these items with the word ‘‘copy.’’ Id. § 2101(b). The Act directed the Commission to promulgate regulations for determining the ‘‘manner and form’’ that imitation political items and 1 An imitation political item is ‘‘an item which purports to be, but in fact is not, an original political item, or which is a reproduction, copy, or counterfeit of an original political item.’’ 15 U.S.C. 2106(2). The Act defines original political items as being any political button, poster, literature, sticker or any advertisement produced for use in any political cause. Id. section 2106(1). 2 An imitation numismatic item is ‘‘an item which purports to be, but in fact is not, an original numismatic item or which is a reproduction, copy, or counterfeit of an original numismatic item.’’ 15 U.S.C. 2106(4). The Act defines original numismatic items to include coins, tokens, paper money, and commemorative medals which have been part of a coinage or issue used in exchange or used to commemorate a person or event. Id. section 2106(3). PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 40691 imitation numismatic items are to be permanently marked with the calendar year of manufacture or the word ‘‘copy.’’ Id. § 2101(c). In 1975, the Commission issued Rules and Regulations Under the Hobby Protection Act, 16 CFR part 304.3 The Rules track the definitions used in the Act and implement the Act’s ‘‘plain and permanent’’ marking requirements by establishing the location of the marking on the item, the sizes and dimensions of the letters and numerals to be used, and how to mark incusable and nonincusable items.4 In 1988, the Commission amended the Rules to provide additional guidance on the minimum size of letters for the word ‘‘copy’’ as a proportion of the diameter of coin reproductions.5 53 FR 38942 (Oct. 4, 1988). The Commission most recently reviewed the Rules in 2004. That review yielded many comments proposing that the Commission expand coverage to products beyond the scope of the Act and address problems involving the selling (or passing off) as originals of reproductions of antiques and other items not covered by the Act. However, the Commission retained the Rules without change, noting that it did not have authority under the Act to expand the Rules as requested. 69 FR 9943 (Mar. 3, 2004). II. Regulatory Review Program The Commission periodically reviews all of its rules and guides. These reviews seek information about the costs and benefits of the agency’s rules and guides, and their regulatory and economic impact. The information obtained assists the Commission in identifying those rules and guides that warrant modification or rescission. Therefore, the Commission solicits comments on, among other things, the economic impact of and the continuing need for the Rules; possible developments in the case law that need to be reflected in the Rules; and the effect on the Rules of any technological, economic, or other industry changes. 3 40 FR 5459 (Feb. 6, 1975). items are those that can be impressed with a stamp. 5 Before this amendment, if a coin were too small to comply with the minimum letter size requirements, the manufacturer or importer had to request a variance from those requirements from the Commission. Because imitation miniature coins were becoming more common, the Commission determined that it was in the public interest to allow the word ‘‘copy’’ to appear on miniature imitation coins in sizes that could be reduced proportionately with the size of the item. 4 Incusable E:\FR\FM\14JYP1.SGM 14JYP1 40692 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 134 / Monday, July 14, 2014 / Proposed Rules mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS III. Request for Comment The Commission solicits comment on the following specific questions related to the Rules: (1) Is there a continuing need for the Rules as currently promulgated? Why or why not? (2) What benefits have the Rules provided to consumers? What evidence supports the asserted benefits? (3) What modifications, if any, should the Commission make to the Rules to increase their benefits to consumers? (a) What evidence supports your proposed modifications? (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for consumers? (c) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for businesses, particularly small businesses? (4) What impact have the Rules had on the flow of truthful information to consumers and on the flow of deceptive information to consumers? (5) What significant costs, if any, have the Rules imposed on consumers? What evidence supports the asserted costs? (6) What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rules to reduce any costs imposed on consumers? (a) What evidence supports your proposed modifications? (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for consumers? (c) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for businesses, particularly small businesses? (7) What benefits, if any, have the Rules provided to businesses, and in particular to small businesses? What evidence supports the asserted benefits? (8) What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rules to increase their benefits to businesses, and particularly to small businesses? (a) What evidence supports your proposed modifications? (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for consumers? (c) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for businesses? (9) What significant costs, if any, including costs of compliance, have the Rules imposed on businesses, particularly small businesses? What evidence supports the asserted costs? (10) What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rules to reduce the costs imposed on businesses, and particularly on small businesses? (a) What evidence supports your proposed modifications? VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:01 Jul 11, 2014 Jkt 232001 (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for consumers? (c) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for businesses? (11) What evidence is available concerning the degree of industry compliance with the Rules? Does this evidence indicate that the Rules should be modified? If so, why, and how? If not, why not? (12) Are any of the Rules’ requirements no longer needed? If so, explain. Please provide supporting evidence. (13) What potentially unfair or deceptive practices concerning imitation political items and imitation numismatic items, if any, are not covered by the Rules? (a) What evidence demonstrates the existence of such practices? (b) With reference to such practices, should the Rules be modified? If so, why, and how? If not, why not? (14) What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rules to account for changes in relevant technology or economic conditions? (a) What evidence supports the proposed modifications? (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for consumers and businesses, particularly small businesses? (15) Do the Rules overlap or conflict with other federal, state, or local laws or regulations? If so, how? (a) What evidence supports the asserted conflicts? (b) With reference to the asserted conflicts, should the Rules be modified? If so, why, and how? If not, why not? (16) Are there foreign or international laws, regulations, or standards with respect to the products or services covered by the Rules that the Commission should consider as it reviews the Rules? If so, what are they? (a) Should the Rules be modified in order to harmonize with these foreign or international laws, regulations, or standards? If so, why, and how? If not, why not? (b) How would such harmonization affect the costs and benefits of the Rules for consumers and businesses, particularly small businesses? IV. Instructions for Submitting Comments You can file a comment online or on paper. For the Commission to consider your comment, we must receive it on or before September 22, 2014. Write ‘‘Hobby Protection Rules Review’’ on the comment. Your comment, including your name and your state, will be PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 placed on the public record of this proceeding, including, to the extent practicable, on the public Commission Web site, at http://www.ftc.gov/os/ publiccomments.shtm. As a matter of discretion, the Commission tries to remove individuals’ home contact information from comments before placing them on the Commission Web site. Because your comment will be made public, you are solely responsible for making sure that your comment does not include any sensitive personal information, such as a Social Security number, date of birth, driver’s license number or other state identification number or foreign country equivalent, passport number, financial account number, or credit or debit card number. You are also solely responsible for making sure that your comment does not include any sensitive health information, such as medical records or other individually identifiable health information. In addition, do not include any ‘‘[t]rade secret or any commercial or financial information which is . . . privileged or confidential,’’ as discussed in Section 6(f) of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. 46(f), and FTC Rule 4.10(a)(2), 16 CFR 4.10(a)(2). In particular, do not include competitively sensitive information such as costs, sales statistics, inventories, formulas, patterns, devices, manufacturing processes, or customer names. If you want the Commission to give your comment confidential treatment, you must file it in paper form, with a request for confidential treatment, and you must follow the procedure explained in FTC Rule 4.9(c), 16 CFR 4.9(c). In particular, the written request for confidential treatment that accompanies the comment must include the factual and legal basis for the request, and must identify the specific portions of the comments to be withheld from the public record. Your comment will be kept confidential only if the FTC General Counsel, in his or her sole discretion, grants your request in accordance with the law and the public interest. Postal mail addressed to the Commission is subject to delay due to heightened security screening. As a result, we encourage you to submit your comment online. To make sure that the Commission considers your online comment, you must file it at https:// ftcpublic.commentworks.com/ftc/ hobbyprotectionrules, by following the instructions on the web-based form. If this Notice appears at http:// www.regulations.gov/#!home, you also may file a comment through that Web site. E:\FR\FM\14JYP1.SGM 14JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 134 / Monday, July 14, 2014 / Proposed Rules If you file your comment on paper, write ‘‘Hobby Protection Rules Review’’ on your comment and on the envelope, and mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite CC– 5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW., 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 20024. Visit the Commission Web site at http://www.ftc.gov to read this Notice and the news release describing it. The FTC Act and other laws that the Commission administers permit the collection of public comments to consider and use in this proceeding as appropriate. The Commission will consider all timely and responsive public comments that it receives on or before September 22, 2014. You can find more information, including routine uses permitted by the Privacy Act, in the Commission’s privacy policy, at http://www.ftc.gov/ftc/privacy.htm. By direction of the Commission. Donald S. Clark, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2014–16340 Filed 7–11–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6750–01–P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA–R05–OAR–2011–0969; EPA–R05– OAR–2012–0991; EPA–R05–OAR–2013– 0435; FRL–9913–16–Region–5] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Infrastructure SIP Requirements for the 2008 Ozone, 2010 NO2, and 2010 SO2 NAAQS Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. AGENCY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to approve some elements and disapprove other elements of a state implementation plan (SIP) submission from Illinois regarding the infrastructure requirements of section 110 of the Clean Air Act (CAA) for the 2008 8-hour ground level ozone, 2010 nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and 2010 sulfur dioxide (SO2) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The infrastructure requirements are designed to ensure that the structural components of each state’s air quality management mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with PROPOSALS SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:01 Jul 11, 2014 Jkt 232001 program are adequate to meet the state’s responsibilities under the CAA. Illinois already administers Federally promulgated regulations that address the proposed disapprovals described in today’s rulemaking. Therefore, the state will not be obligated to submit any new or additional regulations as a result of a future final disapproval. DATES: Comments must be received on or before August 13, 2014. ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA–R05– OAR–2011–0969 (2008 ozone infrastructure elements), EPA–R05– OAR–2012–0991 (2010 NO2 infrastructure elements), or EPA–R05– OAR–2013–0435 (2010 SO2 infrastructure elements) by one of the following methods: 1. www.regulations.gov: Follow the on-line instructions for submitting comments. 2. Email: aburano.douglas@epa.gov. 3. Fax: (312) 408–2279. 4. Mail: Douglas Aburano, Chief, Attainment Planning and Maintenance Section, Air Programs Branch (AR–18J), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604. 5. Hand Delivery: Douglas Aburano, Chief, Attainment Planning and Maintenance Section, Air Programs Branch (AR–18J), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604. Such deliveries are only accepted during the Regional Office normal hours of operation, and special arrangements should be made for deliveries of boxed information. The Regional Office official hours of business are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., excluding Federal holidays. Instructions: Direct your comments to Docket ID. EPA–R05–OAR–2011–0969 (2008 ozone infrastructure elements), EPA–R05–OAR–2012–0991 (2010 NO2 infrastructure elements), or EPA–R05– OAR–2013–0435 (2010 SO2 infrastructure elements). EPA’s policy is that all comments received will be included in the public docket without change and may be made available online at www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided, unless the comment includes information claimed to be Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Do not submit information that you consider to be CBI or otherwise protected through www.regulations.gov or email. The www.regulations.gov Web site is an ‘‘anonymous access’’ system, which means EPA will not know your identity PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 40693 or contact information unless you provide it in the body of your comment. If you send an email comment directly to EPA without going through www.regulations.gov your email address will be automatically captured and included as part of the comment that is placed in the public docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that you include your name and other contact information in the body of your comment and with any disk or CD–ROM you submit. If EPA cannot read your comment due to technical difficulties and cannot contact you for clarification, EPA may not be able to consider your comment. Electronic files should avoid the use of special characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses. Docket: All documents in the docket are listed in the www.regulations.gov index. Although listed in the index, some information is not publicly available, e.g., CBI or other information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Certain other material, such as copyrighted material, will be publicly available only in hard copy. Publicly available docket materials are available either electronically in www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, Air and Radiation Division, 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604. This facility is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding Federal holidays. We recommend that you telephone Andy Chang, Environmental Engineer, at (312) 886– 0258 before visiting the Region 5 office. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andy Chang, Environmental Engineer, Attainment Planning and Maintenance Section, Air Programs Branch (AR–18J), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604, (312) 886–0258, chang.andy@epa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Throughout this document whenever ‘‘we,’’ ‘‘us,’’ or ‘‘our’’ is used, we mean EPA. This supplementary information section is arranged as follows: I. What should I consider as I prepare my comments for EPA? II. What is the background of these SIP submissions? A. What state SIP submissions does this rulemaking address? B. Why did the state make these SIP submissions? C. What is the scope of this rulemaking? III. What guidance is EPA using to evaluate these SIP submissions? E:\FR\FM\14JYP1.SGM 14JYP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 134 (Monday, July 14, 2014)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 40691-40693]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-16340]


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FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION

16 CFR Part 304


Rules and Regulations Under the Hobby Protection Act

AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission.

ACTION: Request for public comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Federal Trade Commission (``Commission'') requests public 
comment on the overall costs and benefits, and regulatory and economic 
impact, of its Rules and Regulations Under the Hobby Protection Act 
(``Rules''), as part of the agency's regular review of all its 
regulations and guides.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before September 22, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Interested parties may file a comment online or on paper, by 
following the instructions in the Request for Comment part of the 
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ``Hobby Protection Rules 
Review'' on your comment. You may file your comment online at https://ftcpublic.commentworks.com/ftc/hobbyprotectionrules, by following the 
instructions on the Web-based form. If you prefer to file your comment 
on paper, mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade 
Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite 
CC-5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the 
following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 
Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW., 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex 
B), Washington, DC 20024.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joshua S. Millard (202) 326-2454, 
Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission, 600 
Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20580.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

    On November 29, 1973, the President signed into law the Hobby 
Protection Act (``Act''), 15 U.S.C. 2101-06. The Act requires 
manufacturers and importers of ``imitation political items'' \1\ to 
``plainly and permanently'' mark them with the ``calendar year'' the 
items were manufactured. Id. Sec.  2101(a). The Act also requires 
manufacturers and importers of ``imitation numismatic items'' \2\ to 
``plainly and permanently'' mark these items with the word ``copy.'' 
Id. Sec.  2101(b). The Act directed the Commission to promulgate 
regulations for determining the ``manner and form'' that imitation 
political items and imitation numismatic items are to be permanently 
marked with the calendar year of manufacture or the word ``copy.'' Id. 
Sec.  2101(c).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ An imitation political item is ``an item which purports to 
be, but in fact is not, an original political item, or which is a 
reproduction, copy, or counterfeit of an original political item.'' 
15 U.S.C. 2106(2). The Act defines original political items as being 
any political button, poster, literature, sticker or any 
advertisement produced for use in any political cause. Id. section 
2106(1).
    \2\ An imitation numismatic item is ``an item which purports to 
be, but in fact is not, an original numismatic item or which is a 
reproduction, copy, or counterfeit of an original numismatic item.'' 
15 U.S.C. 2106(4). The Act defines original numismatic items to 
include coins, tokens, paper money, and commemorative medals which 
have been part of a coinage or issue used in exchange or used to 
commemorate a person or event. Id. section 2106(3).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In 1975, the Commission issued Rules and Regulations Under the 
Hobby Protection Act, 16 CFR part 304.\3\ The Rules track the 
definitions used in the Act and implement the Act's ``plain and 
permanent'' marking requirements by establishing the location of the 
marking on the item, the sizes and dimensions of the letters and 
numerals to be used, and how to mark incusable and nonincusable 
items.\4\ In 1988, the Commission amended the Rules to provide 
additional guidance on the minimum size of letters for the word 
``copy'' as a proportion of the diameter of coin reproductions.\5\ 53 
FR 38942 (Oct. 4, 1988).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ 40 FR 5459 (Feb. 6, 1975).
    \4\ Incusable items are those that can be impressed with a 
stamp.
    \5\ Before this amendment, if a coin were too small to comply 
with the minimum letter size requirements, the manufacturer or 
importer had to request a variance from those requirements from the 
Commission. Because imitation miniature coins were becoming more 
common, the Commission determined that it was in the public interest 
to allow the word ``copy'' to appear on miniature imitation coins in 
sizes that could be reduced proportionately with the size of the 
item.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Commission most recently reviewed the Rules in 2004. That 
review yielded many comments proposing that the Commission expand 
coverage to products beyond the scope of the Act and address problems 
involving the selling (or passing off) as originals of reproductions of 
antiques and other items not covered by the Act. However, the 
Commission retained the Rules without change, noting that it did not 
have authority under the Act to expand the Rules as requested. 69 FR 
9943 (Mar. 3, 2004).

II. Regulatory Review Program

    The Commission periodically reviews all of its rules and guides. 
These reviews seek information about the costs and benefits of the 
agency's rules and guides, and their regulatory and economic impact. 
The information obtained assists the Commission in identifying those 
rules and guides that warrant modification or rescission. Therefore, 
the Commission solicits comments on, among other things, the economic 
impact of and the continuing need for the Rules; possible developments 
in the case law that need to be reflected in the Rules; and the effect 
on the Rules of any technological, economic, or other industry changes.

[[Page 40692]]

III. Request for Comment

    The Commission solicits comment on the following specific questions 
related to the Rules:
    (1) Is there a continuing need for the Rules as currently 
promulgated? Why or why not?
    (2) What benefits have the Rules provided to consumers? What 
evidence supports the asserted benefits?
    (3) What modifications, if any, should the Commission make to the 
Rules to increase their benefits to consumers?
    (a) What evidence supports your proposed modifications?
    (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for consumers?
    (c) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for businesses, particularly small businesses?
    (4) What impact have the Rules had on the flow of truthful 
information to consumers and on the flow of deceptive information to 
consumers?
    (5) What significant costs, if any, have the Rules imposed on 
consumers? What evidence supports the asserted costs?
    (6) What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rules to 
reduce any costs imposed on consumers?
    (a) What evidence supports your proposed modifications?
    (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for consumers?
    (c) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for businesses, particularly small businesses?
    (7) What benefits, if any, have the Rules provided to businesses, 
and in particular to small businesses? What evidence supports the 
asserted benefits?
    (8) What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rules to 
increase their benefits to businesses, and particularly to small 
businesses?
    (a) What evidence supports your proposed modifications?
    (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for consumers?
    (c) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for businesses?
    (9) What significant costs, if any, including costs of compliance, 
have the Rules imposed on businesses, particularly small businesses? 
What evidence supports the asserted costs?
    (10) What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rules to 
reduce the costs imposed on businesses, and particularly on small 
businesses?
    (a) What evidence supports your proposed modifications?
    (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for consumers?
    (c) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for businesses?
    (11) What evidence is available concerning the degree of industry 
compliance with the Rules? Does this evidence indicate that the Rules 
should be modified? If so, why, and how? If not, why not?
    (12) Are any of the Rules' requirements no longer needed? If so, 
explain. Please provide supporting evidence.
    (13) What potentially unfair or deceptive practices concerning 
imitation political items and imitation numismatic items, if any, are 
not covered by the Rules?
    (a) What evidence demonstrates the existence of such practices?
    (b) With reference to such practices, should the Rules be modified? 
If so, why, and how? If not, why not?
    (14) What modifications, if any, should be made to the Rules to 
account for changes in relevant technology or economic conditions?
    (a) What evidence supports the proposed modifications?
    (b) How would these modifications affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for consumers and businesses, particularly small businesses?
    (15) Do the Rules overlap or conflict with other federal, state, or 
local laws or regulations? If so, how?
    (a) What evidence supports the asserted conflicts?
    (b) With reference to the asserted conflicts, should the Rules be 
modified? If so, why, and how? If not, why not?
    (16) Are there foreign or international laws, regulations, or 
standards with respect to the products or services covered by the Rules 
that the Commission should consider as it reviews the Rules? If so, 
what are they?
    (a) Should the Rules be modified in order to harmonize with these 
foreign or international laws, regulations, or standards? If so, why, 
and how? If not, why not?
    (b) How would such harmonization affect the costs and benefits of 
the Rules for consumers and businesses, particularly small businesses?

IV. Instructions for Submitting Comments

    You can file a comment online or on paper. For the Commission to 
consider your comment, we must receive it on or before September 22, 
2014. Write ``Hobby Protection Rules Review'' on the comment. Your 
comment, including your name and your state, will be placed on the 
public record of this proceeding, including, to the extent practicable, 
on the public Commission Web site, at http://www.ftc.gov/os/publiccomments.shtm. As a matter of discretion, the Commission tries to 
remove individuals' home contact information from comments before 
placing them on the Commission Web site. Because your comment will be 
made public, you are solely responsible for making sure that your 
comment does not include any sensitive personal information, such as a 
Social Security number, date of birth, driver's license number or other 
state identification number or foreign country equivalent, passport 
number, financial account number, or credit or debit card number. You 
are also solely responsible for making sure that your comment does not 
include any sensitive health information, such as medical records or 
other individually identifiable health information.
    In addition, do not include any ``[t]rade secret or any commercial 
or financial information which is . . . privileged or confidential,'' 
as discussed in Section 6(f) of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. 46(f), and FTC 
Rule 4.10(a)(2), 16 CFR 4.10(a)(2). In particular, do not include 
competitively sensitive information such as costs, sales statistics, 
inventories, formulas, patterns, devices, manufacturing processes, or 
customer names.
    If you want the Commission to give your comment confidential 
treatment, you must file it in paper form, with a request for 
confidential treatment, and you must follow the procedure explained in 
FTC Rule 4.9(c), 16 CFR 4.9(c). In particular, the written request for 
confidential treatment that accompanies the comment must include the 
factual and legal basis for the request, and must identify the specific 
portions of the comments to be withheld from the public record. Your 
comment will be kept confidential only if the FTC General Counsel, in 
his or her sole discretion, grants your request in accordance with the 
law and the public interest.
    Postal mail addressed to the Commission is subject to delay due to 
heightened security screening. As a result, we encourage you to submit 
your comment online. To make sure that the Commission considers your 
online comment, you must file it at https://ftcpublic.commentworks.com/ftc/hobbyprotectionrules, by following the instructions on the web-
based form. If this Notice appears at http://www.regulations.gov/#!home, you also may file a comment through that Web site.

[[Page 40693]]

    If you file your comment on paper, write ``Hobby Protection Rules 
Review'' on your comment and on the envelope, and mail your comment to 
the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the 
Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Suite CC-5610 (Annex B), 
Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: 
Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 
400 7th Street SW., 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 
20024.
    Visit the Commission Web site at http://www.ftc.gov to read this 
Notice and the news release describing it. The FTC Act and other laws 
that the Commission administers permit the collection of public 
comments to consider and use in this proceeding as appropriate. The 
Commission will consider all timely and responsive public comments that 
it receives on or before September 22, 2014. You can find more 
information, including routine uses permitted by the Privacy Act, in 
the Commission's privacy policy, at http://www.ftc.gov/ftc/privacy.htm.

    By direction of the Commission.
Donald S. Clark,
Secretary.
[FR Doc. 2014-16340 Filed 7-11-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6750-01-P