Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Request and Comment Request, 22752-22756 [2014-09218]

Download as PDF wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 22752 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 78 / Wednesday, April 23, 2014 / Notices scheme, could allow market participants greater control over the execution of their orders. Specifically, the proposal may help market participants avoid having orders cancelled as a result of a narrow one-MPV price protection limit, particularly in instances when the order’s limit price expresses a willingness to trade more than one MPV away from the NBBO that prevailed at the time the order was received. The Commission notes, however, that such a result may still occur under the proposal, when either the default oneMPV price protection limit applies as a result of the member not providing customized instructions, or when a custom price protection limit sits between an order’s limit price and the NBBO at the time the order is received. The Commission notes further that, in order to accommodate the amended price protection functionality, the proposal will allow orders to trigger pauses at multiple successive price points, either through the Route Timer or Liquidity Refresh mechanisms. In addition to providing market participants greater control over the execution of their orders, the Commission believes that the proposal also could facilitate more order interaction. By allowing orders to execute at multiple price points, up or down to their price protection limit or limit price, and to route to away markets at multiple price points, the proposal will allow market participants to interact with greater liquidity both on MIAX and on away markets and increase the opportunity for their orders to receive an execution. Importantly, as is the case under the current price protection functionality, the Commission notes that under the revised process, MIAX will not execute incoming orders at prices inferior to the then-current NBBO. The Commission believes that the change regarding terminating a Liquidity Refresh Pause when a new quote or order is received during a Liquidity Refresh Pause on the same side of the market as the initiating orders’ remaining contracts that locks or crosses the original NBBO is consistent with the Act. The Commission notes that terminating the pause in such a situation allows the displayed opposite side of the MBBO to receive an immediate execution. Further, the Commission notes that, as under the current MIAX rules, orders will then be processed in the order in which they were received. Finally, the Commission believes that the proposed change to permit immediate routing in an additional situation (i.e., for Public Customer VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:37 Apr 22, 2014 Jkt 232001 orders resting on the book when an incoming Public Customer order has initiated a Route Mechanism) will benefit Public Customers by providing such orders with greater access to marketable away liquidity and will allow such orders more promptly to receive an execution instead of being restricted from immediately routing away. As the Commission noted in its approval of MIAX’s application for registration as a national securities exchange, pursuant to MIAX’s immediate routing process in Rule 529, orders have to meet a number of criteria to be eligible for immediate routing, and as such, many, if not most, orders are likely subject to the one second Route Timer, rather than immediately routing to an away exchange displaying the NBBO.19 While MIAX is not specifically required to route to away markets, the Commission believes that providing an additional opportunity for immediate routing should be beneficial to Public Customer orders. IV. Conclusion It is therefore ordered, pursuant to Section 19(b)(2) of the Act 20 that the proposed rule change (SR–MIAX–2014– 08), is approved. For the Commission, by the Division of Trading and Markets, pursuant to delegated authority.21 Kevin M. O’Neill, Deputy Secretary. [FR Doc. 2014–09211 Filed 4–22–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8011–01–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500–1] Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading April 21, 2014. It appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Valley Forge Composite Technologies, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended September 30, 2012. The Commission is of the opinion that the public interest and the protection of 19 See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 68341 (December 3, 2012), 77 FR 73065, 73086–87 (December 7, 2012) (noting that broker-dealers have a duty of best execution and thus broker-dealers need to consider and evaluate the functioning of the MIAX routing mechanisms and the quality of any resulting executions in making their determination of whether to route customer orders to MIAX). 20 15 U.S.C. 78f(b)(2). 21 17 CFR 200.30–3(a)(12). PO 00000 Frm 00135 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 investors require a suspension of trading in the securities of the above-listed company. Therefore, it is ordered, pursuant to Section 12(k) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, that trading in the securities of the abovelisted company is suspended for the period from 9:30 a.m. EDT on April 21, 2014, through 11:59 p.m. EDT on May 2, 2014. By the Commission. Kevin M. O’Neill, Deputy Secretary. [FR Doc. 2014–09314 Filed 4–21–14; 4:15 pm] BILLING CODE 8011–01–P SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Request and Comment Request The Social Security Administration (SSA) publishes a list of information collection packages requiring clearance by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with Public Law (Pub. L.) 104–13, the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, effective October 1, 1995. This notice includes revisions of OMB-approved information collections and one new information collection. SSA is soliciting comments on the accuracy of the agency’s burden estimate; the need for the information; its practical utility; ways to enhance its quality, utility, and clarity; and ways to minimize burden on respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Mail, email, or fax your comments and recommendations on the information collection(s) to the OMB Desk Officer and SSA Reports Clearance Officer at the following addresses or fax numbers. (OMB) Office of Management and Budget, Attn: Desk Officer for SSA, Fax: 202–395–6974, Email address: OIRA_Submission@ omb.eop.gov. (SSA) Social Security Administration, OLCA, Attn: Reports Clearance Director, 3100 West High Rise, 6401 Security Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21235, Fax: 410–966–2830, Email address: OR.Reports.Clearance@ ssa.gov. I. The information collections below are pending at SSA. SSA will submit them to OMB within 60 days from the date of this notice. To be sure we consider your comments, we must E:\FR\FM\23APN1.SGM 23APN1 22753 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 78 / Wednesday, April 23, 2014 / Notices receive them no later than June 23, 2014. Individuals can obtain copies of the collection instruments by writing to the above email address. 1. Farm Arrangement Questionnaire— 20 CFR 404.1082(c)—0960–0064. When self-employed workers submit earnings data to SSA, they cannot count rental income from a farm unless they demonstrate ‘‘material participation’’ in the farm’s operation. A material participation arrangement means the farm owners must perform a combination of physical duties, management decisions, and capital investment in the farm they are renting out. SSA uses Form SSA–7157, the Farm Arrangement Questionnaire, to document material participation. The respondents are workers who are renting farmland to others; are involved in the operation of the farm; and want to claim countable income from work they perform relating to the farm. Type of Request: Revision of an OMBapproved information collection. Modality of completion Number of respondents Frequency of response Average burden per response (minutes) Estimated total annual burden (hours) SSA–7157 ........................................................................................................ 38,000 1 30 19,000 2. Plan for Achieving Self-Support (PASS)—20 CFR 416.110(e), 416.1180– 1182, 416.1225–1227—0960–0559. The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program encourages recipients to return to work. One of the program’s objectives is to provide incentives and opportunities that help recipients work toward employment. The PASS provision allows individuals to use available income or resources (such as business equipment, education, or specialized training) to enter or re-enter the workforce and become selfsupporting. In turn, SSA does not count the income or resources recipients use to fund a PASS when determining an individual’s SSI eligibility or payment amount. An SSI recipient who wants to use available income and resources to obtain education or training to become self-supporting completes Form SSA– 545. SSA uses the information from the SSA–545 to evaluate the recipient’s PASS, and to determine eligibility under the provisions of the SSI program. The respondents are SSI recipients who are blind or disabled and want to develop a return-to-work plan. Type of Request: Revision of an OMBapproved information collection. Modality of completion Number of respondents Frequency of response Average burden per response (minutes) Estimated total annual burden (hours) SSA–545 .......................................................................................................... 7,000 1 120 14,000 3. Help America Vote Act—0960– 0706. H.R. 3295, the Help America Vote Act of 2002, mandates that States verify the identities of newly registered voters. When newly registered voters do not have drivers’ licenses or State-issued ID cards, they must supply the last four digits of their Social Security Number to their local State election agencies for verification. The election agencies forward this information to their State Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA), which inputs the data into the American Association of MVAs, a central consolidation system that routes the voter data to SSA’s Help America Vote Verification (HAVV) system. Once SSA’s HAVV system confirms the identity of the voter, the information returns along the same route in reverse until it reaches the State election agency. The official respondents for this collection are the State MVAs. Type of Request: Revision of an OMBapproved information collection. Number of respondents Frequency of response Average burden per response (minutes) Estimated total annual burden (hours) HAVV ............................................................................................................... wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Modality of completion 2,352,204 1 2 78,407 II. SSA submitted the information collections below to OMB for clearance. Your comments regarding the information collections would be most useful if OMB and SSA receive them 30 days from the date of this publication. To be sure we consider your comments, we must receive them no later than May 23, 2014. Individuals can obtain copies of the OMB clearance packages by writing to OR.Reports.Clearance@ ssa.gov. VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:37 Apr 22, 2014 Jkt 232001 1. Promoting Readiness of Minors in SSI (PROMISE) Evaluation—0960– NEW. Background The Promoting Readiness of Minors in SSI (PROMISE) demonstration pursues positive outcomes for children with disabilities who receive SSI and their families by reducing dependency on SSI. The Department of Education (ED) awarded six cooperative agreements to states to improve the provision and coordination of services and support for PO 00000 Frm 00136 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 children with disabilities who receive SSI and their families to achieve improved education and employment outcomes. ED awarded PROMISE funds to five single-state projects, and to one six-state consortium.1 With support from the Department of Labor (DOL) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), SSA will evaluate the six PROMISE projects. 1 The six-state consortium project goes by the name Achieving Success by Promoting Readiness for Education and Employment (ASPIRE) rather than by PROMISE. E:\FR\FM\23APN1.SGM 23APN1 22754 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 78 / Wednesday, April 23, 2014 / Notices SSA contracted with Mathematica Policy Research to conduct the evaluation. Under PROMISE, targeted outcomes for youth include an enhanced sense of self-determination; achievement of secondary and post-secondary educational credentials; an attainment of early work experiences culminating with competitive employment in an integrated setting; and long-term reduction in reliance on SSI. Outcomes of interest for families include heightened expectations for and support of the long-term self-sufficiency of their youth; parent or guardian attainment of education and training credentials; and increases in earnings and total income. To achieve these outcomes, we expect the PROMISE projects to make better use of existing resources by improving service coordination among multiple state and local agencies and programs. ED, SSA, DOL, and HHS intend the PROMISE projects to address key limitations in the existing service system for youth with disabilities. By intervening early in the lives of these young people, at ages 14–16, the projects will engage the youth and their families well before critical decisions regarding the age 18 redetermination are upon them. We expect the required partnerships among the various state and Federal agencies that serve youth with disabilities to result in improved integration of services and fewer dropped handoffs as youth move from one agency to another. By requiring the programs to engage and serve families and provide youth with paid work experiences, the initiative is mandating the adoption of critical best practices in promoting the independence of youth with disabilities. Project Description SSA is requesting clearance for the collection of data needed to implement and evaluate PROMISE. The evaluation will provide empirical evidence on the impact of the intervention for youth and their families in several critical areas, including: (1) Improved educational attainment; (2) increased employment skills, experience, and earnings; and (3) long-term reduction in use of public benefits. We will base the PROMISE evaluation on a rigorous design that will entail the random assignment of approximately 2,000 youth in each of the six projects to treatment or control groups (12,000 total). Youth in the treatment groups will be eligible for enhanced services from the demonstration programs, whereas youth in the control groups will be eligible only for those services already available in their communities independent of the interventions. The evaluation will assess the effect of PROMISE services on educational attainment, employment, earnings, and reduced receipt of disability payments. The three components of this evaluation include: • The process analysis, which will document program models, assess the relationships among the partner organizations, document whether the programs are implemented as planned, identify features of the programs that may account for their impacts on youth and families, and identify lessons for future programs with similar objectives. • The impact analysis, which will determine whether youth and families in the treatment groups receive more services than their counterparts in the control groups. It will also determine whether treatment group members have better results than control group members with respect to the targeted outcomes noted above. • The cost-benefit analysis, which will assess whether the benefits of PROMISE, including increases in employment and reductions in benefit receipt, are large enough to justify its costs. We will conduct this assessment from a range of perspectives, including those of the participants, state and Federal governments, SSA, and society as a whole. SSA planned several data collection efforts for the evaluation. These include: (1) Follow-up interviews with youth and their parent or guardian 18 months and 5 years after enrollment; (2) phone and in-person interviews with local program administrators, program supervisors, and service delivery staff at two points in time over the course of the demonstration; (3) two rounds of focus groups with participating youth in the treatment group; (4) two rounds of focus groups with parents or guardians of participating youth; and (5) collection of administrative data. At this time, SSA requests clearance only for the interviews we will conduct with program staff and the focus group discussions we will conduct with youth and parents or guardians. We will conduct these interviews and group discussions twice: Once in 2014, and once in 2016. SSA will request clearance for the 18-month and 5-year survey interviews in a future submission. The respondents are PROMISE program staff, the youth participants in the PROMISE program, and the parents or guardians of the youth participants. Note: This is a correction notice. When we previously published this information on February 10, 2014, at 79 FR 7736, we inadvertently neglected to publish the cost burden on the respondents. We are correcting that oversight here. Type of Request: This is a new information collection. Time Burden on Respondents 2014 INTERVIEWS AND FOCUS GROUP DISCUSSIONS Number of responses wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Modality of completion Frequency of response Average burden per response (minutes) Estimated total annual burden (hours) Staff Interviews with Administrators or Directors ............................................. Staff Interviews with PROMISE Project Staff .................................................. Youth Focus Groups—Non-participants .......................................................... Youth Focus Groups—Participants ................................................................. Parents or Guardian Focus Groups—Non-participants ................................... Parents or Guardian Focus Groups—Participants .......................................... 75 145 320 80 320 80 1 1 1 1 1 1 66 66 5 100 5 100 83 160 27 133 27 133 Totals ........................................................................................................ 1,020 ........................ ........................ 563 VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:37 Apr 22, 2014 Jkt 232001 PO 00000 Frm 00137 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\23APN1.SGM 23APN1 22755 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 78 / Wednesday, April 23, 2014 / Notices 2016 INTERVIEWS AND FOCUS GROUP DISCUSSIONS Number of responses Modality of completion Frequency of response Average burden per response (minutes) Estimated total annual burden (hours) Staff Interviews with Administrators or Directors ............................................. Staff Interviews with PROMISE Project Staff .................................................. Youth Focus Groups—Non-participants .......................................................... Youth Focus Groups—Participants ................................................................. Parents or Guardian Focus Groups—Non-participants ................................... Parents or Guardian Focus Groups—Participants .......................................... 75 145 320 80 320 80 1 1 1 1 1 1 66 66 5 100 5 100 83 160 27 133 27 133 Totals ........................................................................................................ 1,020 ........................ ........................ 563 Grand Total ............................................................................................... 2,040 ........................ ........................ 1,126 Average burden per response (minutes) Median hourly wage rate (dollars) Cost Burden on Respondents 2014 ANNUAL COST TO RESPONDENTS Number of respondents Respondent type Frequency of response Total respondent cost (dollars) Parent or Guardian Focus Group—Non-Participants .......... Parent or Guardian Focus Group—Participants .................. 320 80 1 1 5 100 $7.38 7.38 $196.01 984.20 Total .............................................................................. 400 ........................ ........................ ........................ 1,180.21 Average burden per response (minutes) Median hourly wage rate (dollars) 2016 ANNUAL COST TO RESPONDENTS Number of respondents Respondent type Frequency of response Total respondent cost (dollars) Parent or Guardian Focus Group—Non-Participants .......... Parent or Guardian Focus Group—Participants .................. 320 80 1 1 5 100 $7.38 7.38 $196.01 984.20 Total .............................................................................. 400 ........................ ........................ ........................ 1,180.21 Grand Total ................................................................... 800 ........................ ........................ ........................ 2,360.42 2. Request for Medical Treatment in an SSA Employee Health Facility: Patient Self-Administered or Staff Administered Care—0960–0772. SSA operates onsite Employee Health Clinics (EHC) in eight different States. These clinics provide health care for all SSA employees including treatments of personal medical conditions when authorized through a physician. Form SSA–5072 is the employee’s personal physician’s order form. The information we collect on Form SSA–5072 gives the nurses the guidance they need by law to perform certain medical procedures and to administer prescription medications such as allergy immunotherapy. In addition, the information allows the wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Modality of completion Number of respondents Frequency of response SSA medical officer to determine whether the treatment can be administered safely and appropriately in the SSA EHCs. Respondents are physicians of SSA employees who need to have medical treatment in an SSA EHC. Type of Request: Revision of an OMBapproved information collection. Number of responses Estimated total annual burden (hours) Average burden per response (minutes) SSA–5072 Annually ............................................................. SSA–5072 Bi-Annually ......................................................... 25 75 1 2 25 150 5 5 2 13 Totals ............................................................................ 100 ........................ 175 ........................ 15 VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:37 Apr 22, 2014 Jkt 232001 PO 00000 Frm 00138 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\23APN1.SGM 23APN1 22756 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 78 / Wednesday, April 23, 2014 / Notices Dated: April 18, 2014. Faye Lipsky, Reports Clearance Director, Social Security Administration. [FR Doc. 2014–09218 Filed 4–22–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4191–02–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary Federal Environmental Statutes, Regulations, and Executive Orders Applicable to the Development and Review of Transportation Infrastructure Projects Office of the Secretary, DOT. Notice of availability. AGENCY: ACTION: The United States Department of Transportation (Department) has prepared a document listing Federal environmental statutes, regulations, and Executive Orders that establish requirements applicable to the development and review of transportation infrastructure projects. The Department strives to ensure compliance with these requirements in a manner that is both environmentally sound and expeditious. The goal of this document is to contribute to this important effort by providing a brief description of the primary statutes, regulations, and Executive Orders applicable to the development and review of these transportation infrastructure projects. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Amy Coyle, Senior Attorney Advisor, U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the General Counsel; 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. Telephone 202–366–0691. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The United States Department of Transportation (Department or DOT) has prepared a document listing Federal environmental statutes, regulations, and Executive Orders that establish requirements applicable to the development and review of transportation infrastructure projects that receive financial support from the Department. DOT strives to meet these requirements in a manner that is both environmentally sound and expeditious. The goal of this list is to contribute to this important effort by providing a brief description of the primary statutes, regulations, and Executive Orders applicable to the development and review of these transportation infrastructure projects. Additionally, many agencies have developed guidance to assist in implementation of the law, and this document references certain wreier-aviles on DSK5TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:37 Apr 22, 2014 Jkt 232001 guidance. This summary is not, and should not be relied upon as, a complete list of statutes, regulations, and Executive Orders that could apply to a transportation infrastructure project or an official or independent interpretation or expression of policy on the matters summarized. This document replaces the notice, ‘‘Federal Environmental Laws and Executive Orders Applicable to Development and Review of Transportation Infrastructure Projects,’’ 69 FR 25451, May 6, 2004. The document is available online at http://www.dot.gov/policy/ transportation-policy/environment/ laws. Issued in Washington, DC on April 10, 2014. Kathryn B. Thomson, General Counsel. [FR Doc. 2014–09219 Filed 4–22–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–9X–P terminal in Wilmette, Illinois. On July 26, 2012, FTA in cooperation with CTA published a supplemental NOI in the Federal Register (77 FR 43903) to inform interested parties that the EIS would no longer be a Tier 1 EIS as originally proposed and instead would be a standard project-level EIS. Since that time, FTA and CTA have decided to pursue a more tailored approach of environmental review for each project of independent utility within the RPM corridor. FTA and CTA anticipate that environmental assessments, leading to Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI), and categorical exclusions would be the appropriate classes of action under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for these projects. Therefore, the FTA has decided to rescind the NOI for the EIS. Comments and questions concerning the proposed actions should be directed to FTA at the address provided above. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ´ Marisol R. Simon, Regional Administrator. Federal Transit Administration [FR Doc. 2014–09273 Filed 4–22–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P Notice To Rescind Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Transit Improvements to the Red and Purple Lines, Cook County, Illinois Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Rescind notice of intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement. AGENCY: The Federal Transit Administration (FTA), in cooperation with the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), is issuing this notice to advise the public that the Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed transportation improvements on the Red and Purple lines between Belmont Station in Chicago and Linden terminal in Wilmette, Illinois is being rescinded. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Reginald Arkell, Community Planner, Federal Transit Administration, Region V, 200 West Adams Street, Suite 320, Chicago, IL 60606, phone 312–886– 3704, email reginald.arkell@dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FTA, as the lead federal agency, in cooperation with the CTA published a NOI in the Federal Register on January 3, 2011 (76 FR 207–210) to prepare a Tier 1 EIS for the Red and Purple Modernization (RPM) project to bring 9.6 miles of the Red and Purple lines up to a state of good repair, from the track structure immediately north of Belmont Station in Chicago to the Linden SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00139 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. DOT–MARAD–2014–0063] Agency Requests for Renewal of a Previously Approved Information Collection(s): Automated Mutual Assistance Vessel Rescue System (AMVER) Maritime Administration, DOT. Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: ACTION: The Department of Transportation (DOT) invites public comments about our intention to request the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval to renew an information collection. We are required to publish this notice in the Federal Register by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104–13. DATES: Written comments should be submitted by June 23, 2014. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments [identified by Docket No. DOT– MARAD–2014–0063] through one of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. • Fax: 1–202–493–2251. • Mail or Hand Delivery: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building, Room W12– SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\23APN1.SGM 23APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 78 (Wednesday, April 23, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 22752-22756]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-09218]


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SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION


Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Request and 
Comment Request

    The Social Security Administration (SSA) publishes a list of 
information collection packages requiring clearance by the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with Public Law (Pub. L.) 
104-13, the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, effective October 1, 1995. 
This notice includes revisions of OMB-approved information collections 
and one new information collection.
    SSA is soliciting comments on the accuracy of the agency's burden 
estimate; the need for the information; its practical utility; ways to 
enhance its quality, utility, and clarity; and ways to minimize burden 
on respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or 
other forms of information technology. Mail, email, or fax your 
comments and recommendations on the information collection(s) to the 
OMB Desk Officer and SSA Reports Clearance Officer at the following 
addresses or fax numbers.

(OMB)
Office of Management and Budget,
Attn: Desk Officer for SSA,
Fax: 202-395-6974,
Email address: OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov.

(SSA)
Social Security Administration, OLCA,
Attn: Reports Clearance Director,
3100 West High Rise,
6401 Security Blvd.,
Baltimore, MD 21235,
Fax: 410-966-2830,
Email address: OR.Reports.Clearance@ssa.gov.

    I. The information collections below are pending at SSA. SSA will 
submit them to OMB within 60 days from the date of this notice. To be 
sure we consider your comments, we must

[[Page 22753]]

receive them no later than June 23, 2014. Individuals can obtain copies 
of the collection instruments by writing to the above email address.
    1. Farm Arrangement Questionnaire--20 CFR 404.1082(c)--0960-0064. 
When self-employed workers submit earnings data to SSA, they cannot 
count rental income from a farm unless they demonstrate ``material 
participation'' in the farm's operation. A material participation 
arrangement means the farm owners must perform a combination of 
physical duties, management decisions, and capital investment in the 
farm they are renting out. SSA uses Form SSA-7157, the Farm Arrangement 
Questionnaire, to document material participation. The respondents are 
workers who are renting farmland to others; are involved in the 
operation of the farm; and want to claim countable income from work 
they perform relating to the farm.
    Type of Request: Revision of an OMB-approved information 
collection.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                 Average burden  Estimated total
           Modality of completion                Number of       Frequency of     per response    annual burden
                                                respondents        response        (minutes)         (hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SSA-7157....................................          38,000                1               30           19,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2. Plan for Achieving Self-Support (PASS)--20 CFR 416.110(e), 
416.1180-1182, 416.1225-1227--0960-0559. The Supplemental Security 
Income (SSI) program encourages recipients to return to work. One of 
the program's objectives is to provide incentives and opportunities 
that help recipients work toward employment. The PASS provision allows 
individuals to use available income or resources (such as business 
equipment, education, or specialized training) to enter or re-enter the 
workforce and become self-supporting. In turn, SSA does not count the 
income or resources recipients use to fund a PASS when determining an 
individual's SSI eligibility or payment amount. An SSI recipient who 
wants to use available income and resources to obtain education or 
training to become self-supporting completes Form SSA-545. SSA uses the 
information from the SSA-545 to evaluate the recipient's PASS, and to 
determine eligibility under the provisions of the SSI program. The 
respondents are SSI recipients who are blind or disabled and want to 
develop a return-to-work plan.
    Type of Request: Revision of an OMB-approved information 
collection.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                 Average burden  Estimated total
           Modality of completion                Number of       Frequency of     per response    annual burden
                                                respondents        response        (minutes)         (hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SSA-545.....................................           7,000                1              120           14,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    3. Help America Vote Act--0960-0706. H.R. 3295, the Help America 
Vote Act of 2002, mandates that States verify the identities of newly 
registered voters. When newly registered voters do not have drivers' 
licenses or State-issued ID cards, they must supply the last four 
digits of their Social Security Number to their local State election 
agencies for verification. The election agencies forward this 
information to their State Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA), which 
inputs the data into the American Association of MVAs, a central 
consolidation system that routes the voter data to SSA's Help America 
Vote Verification (HAVV) system. Once SSA's HAVV system confirms the 
identity of the voter, the information returns along the same route in 
reverse until it reaches the State election agency. The official 
respondents for this collection are the State MVAs.
    Type of Request: Revision of an OMB-approved information 
collection.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                 Average burden  Estimated total
           Modality of completion                Number of       Frequency of     per response    annual burden
                                                respondents        response        (minutes)         (hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HAVV........................................       2,352,204                1                2           78,407
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    II. SSA submitted the information collections below to OMB for 
clearance. Your comments regarding the information collections would be 
most useful if OMB and SSA receive them 30 days from the date of this 
publication. To be sure we consider your comments, we must receive them 
no later than May 23, 2014. Individuals can obtain copies of the OMB 
clearance packages by writing to OR.Reports.Clearance@ssa.gov.

1. Promoting Readiness of Minors in SSI (PROMISE) Evaluation--0960-NEW.

Background

    The Promoting Readiness of Minors in SSI (PROMISE) demonstration 
pursues positive outcomes for children with disabilities who receive 
SSI and their families by reducing dependency on SSI. The Department of 
Education (ED) awarded six cooperative agreements to states to improve 
the provision and coordination of services and support for children 
with disabilities who receive SSI and their families to achieve 
improved education and employment outcomes. ED awarded PROMISE funds to 
five single-state projects, and to one six-state consortium.\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ The six-state consortium project goes by the name Achieving 
Success by Promoting Readiness for Education and Employment (ASPIRE) 
rather than by PROMISE.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    With support from the Department of Labor (DOL) and the Department 
of Health and Human Services (HHS), SSA will evaluate the six PROMISE 
projects.

[[Page 22754]]

SSA contracted with Mathematica Policy Research to conduct the 
evaluation.
    Under PROMISE, targeted outcomes for youth include an enhanced 
sense of self-determination; achievement of secondary and post-
secondary educational credentials; an attainment of early work 
experiences culminating with competitive employment in an integrated 
setting; and long-term reduction in reliance on SSI. Outcomes of 
interest for families include heightened expectations for and support 
of the long-term self-sufficiency of their youth; parent or guardian 
attainment of education and training credentials; and increases in 
earnings and total income. To achieve these outcomes, we expect the 
PROMISE projects to make better use of existing resources by improving 
service coordination among multiple state and local agencies and 
programs.
    ED, SSA, DOL, and HHS intend the PROMISE projects to address key 
limitations in the existing service system for youth with disabilities. 
By intervening early in the lives of these young people, at ages 14-16, 
the projects will engage the youth and their families well before 
critical decisions regarding the age 18 redetermination are upon them. 
We expect the required partnerships among the various state and Federal 
agencies that serve youth with disabilities to result in improved 
integration of services and fewer dropped handoffs as youth move from 
one agency to another. By requiring the programs to engage and serve 
families and provide youth with paid work experiences, the initiative 
is mandating the adoption of critical best practices in promoting the 
independence of youth with disabilities.

Project Description

    SSA is requesting clearance for the collection of data needed to 
implement and evaluate PROMISE. The evaluation will provide empirical 
evidence on the impact of the intervention for youth and their families 
in several critical areas, including: (1) Improved educational 
attainment; (2) increased employment skills, experience, and earnings; 
and (3) long-term reduction in use of public benefits. We will base the 
PROMISE evaluation on a rigorous design that will entail the random 
assignment of approximately 2,000 youth in each of the six projects to 
treatment or control groups (12,000 total). Youth in the treatment 
groups will be eligible for enhanced services from the demonstration 
programs, whereas youth in the control groups will be eligible only for 
those services already available in their communities independent of 
the interventions.
    The evaluation will assess the effect of PROMISE services on 
educational attainment, employment, earnings, and reduced receipt of 
disability payments. The three components of this evaluation include:
     The process analysis, which will document program models, 
assess the relationships among the partner organizations, document 
whether the programs are implemented as planned, identify features of 
the programs that may account for their impacts on youth and families, 
and identify lessons for future programs with similar objectives.
     The impact analysis, which will determine whether youth 
and families in the treatment groups receive more services than their 
counterparts in the control groups. It will also determine whether 
treatment group members have better results than control group members 
with respect to the targeted outcomes noted above.
     The cost-benefit analysis, which will assess whether the 
benefits of PROMISE, including increases in employment and reductions 
in benefit receipt, are large enough to justify its costs. We will 
conduct this assessment from a range of perspectives, including those 
of the participants, state and Federal governments, SSA, and society as 
a whole.
    SSA planned several data collection efforts for the evaluation. 
These include: (1) Follow-up interviews with youth and their parent or 
guardian 18 months and 5 years after enrollment; (2) phone and in-
person interviews with local program administrators, program 
supervisors, and service delivery staff at two points in time over the 
course of the demonstration; (3) two rounds of focus groups with 
participating youth in the treatment group; (4) two rounds of focus 
groups with parents or guardians of participating youth; and (5) 
collection of administrative data.
    At this time, SSA requests clearance only for the interviews we 
will conduct with program staff and the focus group discussions we will 
conduct with youth and parents or guardians. We will conduct these 
interviews and group discussions twice: Once in 2014, and once in 2016. 
SSA will request clearance for the 18-month and 5-year survey 
interviews in a future submission. The respondents are PROMISE program 
staff, the youth participants in the PROMISE program, and the parents 
or guardians of the youth participants.

    Note:  This is a correction notice. When we previously published 
this information on February 10, 2014, at 79 FR 7736, we 
inadvertently neglected to publish the cost burden on the 
respondents. We are correcting that oversight here.

    Type of Request: This is a new information collection.

Time Burden on Respondents

                                   2014 Interviews and Focus Group Discussions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      Average        Estimated
                                                     Number of     Frequency of     burden per     total annual
             Modality of completion                  responses       response        response         burden
                                                                                     (minutes)        (hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Staff Interviews with Administrators or                       75               1              66              83
 Directors......................................
Staff Interviews with PROMISE Project Staff.....             145               1              66             160
Youth Focus Groups--Non-participants............             320               1               5              27
Youth Focus Groups--Participants................              80               1             100             133
Parents or Guardian Focus Groups--Non-                       320               1               5              27
 participants...................................
Parents or Guardian Focus Groups--Participants..              80               1             100             133
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Totals......................................           1,020  ..............  ..............             563
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 22755]]


                                   2016 Interviews and Focus Group Discussions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      Average        Estimated
                                                     Number of     Frequency of     burden per     total annual
             Modality of completion                  responses       response        response         burden
                                                                                     (minutes)        (hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Staff Interviews with Administrators or                       75               1              66              83
 Directors......................................
Staff Interviews with PROMISE Project Staff.....             145               1              66             160
Youth Focus Groups--Non-participants............             320               1               5              27
Youth Focus Groups--Participants................              80               1             100             133
Parents or Guardian Focus Groups--Non-                       320               1               5              27
 participants...................................
Parents or Guardian Focus Groups--Participants..              80               1             100             133
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Totals......................................           1,020  ..............  ..............             563
                                                 ===============================================================
    Grand Total.................................           2,040  ..............  ..............           1,126
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cost Burden on Respondents

                                         2014 Annual Cost to Respondents
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                      Average
                                     Number of     Frequency  of    burden per    Median  hourly       Total
         Respondent type            respondents      response        response        wage rate      respondent
                                                                     (minutes)       (dollars)    cost (dollars)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Parent or Guardian Focus Group--             320               1               5           $7.38         $196.01
 Non-Participants...............
Parent or Guardian Focus Group--              80               1             100            7.38          984.20
 Participants...................
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total.......................             400  ..............  ..............  ..............        1,180.21
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                         2016 Annual Cost to Respondents
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                      Average                          Total
                                     Number of     Frequency  of    burden per    Median  hourly    respondent
         Respondent type            respondents      response        response        wage rate         cost
                                                                     (minutes)       (dollars)       (dollars)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Parent or Guardian Focus Group--             320               1               5           $7.38         $196.01
 Non-Participants...............
Parent or Guardian Focus Group--              80               1             100            7.38          984.20
 Participants...................
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total.......................             400  ..............  ..............  ..............        1,180.21
                                 ===============================================================================
    Grand Total.................             800  ..............  ..............  ..............        2,360.42
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2. Request for Medical Treatment in an SSA Employee Health 
Facility: Patient Self-Administered or Staff Administered Care--0960-
0772. SSA operates onsite Employee Health Clinics (EHC) in eight 
different States. These clinics provide health care for all SSA 
employees including treatments of personal medical conditions when 
authorized through a physician. Form SSA-5072 is the employee's 
personal physician's order form. The information we collect on Form 
SSA-5072 gives the nurses the guidance they need by law to perform 
certain medical procedures and to administer prescription medications 
such as allergy immunotherapy. In addition, the information allows the 
SSA medical officer to determine whether the treatment can be 
administered safely and appropriately in the SSA EHCs. Respondents are 
physicians of SSA employees who need to have medical treatment in an 
SSA EHC.
    Type of Request: Revision of an OMB-approved information 
collection.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      Average        Estimated
                                     Number of     Frequency  of     Number of      burden per     total  annual
     Modality of  completion        respondents      response        responses       response         burden
                                                                                     (minutes)        (hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SSA-5072 Annually...............              25               1              25               5               2
SSA-5072 Bi-Annually............              75               2             150               5              13
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Totals......................             100  ..............             175  ..............              15
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



[[Page 22756]]

    Dated: April 18, 2014.
Faye Lipsky,
Reports Clearance Director, Social Security Administration.
[FR Doc. 2014-09218 Filed 4-22-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4191-02-P