Promise Zones Initiative: Proposed Second Round Selection Process Solicitation of Comment, 21785-21787 [2014-08772]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 74 / Thursday, April 17, 2014 / Notices TKELLEY on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES applicant that require translation into English. • The time required to find, hire, or otherwise obtain translations of supporting documents for immigration benefit requests. • The average out of pocket monetary cost if any to obtain translations of supporting documents when required. • Cost associated with the required Home Study (see 8 CFR 204.301). Respondents are required by 8 CFR 204.311 to submit a home study conducted and prepared by an individual or agency who is authorized under 22 CFR 96 to prepare such study. Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected agencies should address one or more of the following four points: (1) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) Evaluate the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Overview of this information collection (1) Type of Information Collection: Revision of a Currently Approved Collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative; Application for Advance Processing of Orphan Petition; Listing of Adult Member of the Household. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the DHS sponsoring the collection: Form I–600, Form I–600A and Supplement 1; USCIS. (4) Affected public who will be asked or required to respond, as well as a brief abstract: Primary: USCIS uses Form I– 600 to determine whether a child alien is an eligible orphan. Form I–600A is used to streamline the procedure for advance processing of orphan petitions. Supplement 1 is to be completed by every adult member (age 18 and older), who lives in the home of the prospective adoptive parent(s), except VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:28 Apr 16, 2014 Jkt 232001 for the spouse of the applicant/ petitioner. (5) An estimate of the total number of respondents and the amount of time estimated for an average respondent to respond: —Form I–600 respondents estimated at 2,665. The estimated average burden per response is .750 hours (45 minutes). —Form I–600A respondents estimated at 3,576. The estimated average burden per response is .750 hours (45 minutes). —Supplement 1 respondents estimated at 3,316. The estimated average burden per response is .25 hours (15 minutes). —Biometrics Respondents estimated at 12,873. The estimated average burden per response is 1.17 hours. (6) An estimate of the total public burden (in hours) associated with the collection: 19,789.66 annual burden hours. If you need a copy of the information collection instrument with instructions, or additional information, please visit the Federal eRulemaking Portal site at: http://www.regulations.gov. We may also be contacted at: USCIS, Office of Policy and Strategy, Regulatory Coordination Division, 20 Massachusetts Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20529–2140, Telephone number 202–272–8377. Dated: April 14, 2014. Samantha Deshommes, Acting Chief, Regulatory Coordination Division, Office of Policy and Strategy, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security. [FR Doc. 2014–08768 Filed 4–16–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–97–P DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. 5774–N–01] Promise Zones Initiative: Proposed Second Round Selection Process Solicitation of Comment Office of Community Planning and Development, HUD. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Through this notice, HUD solicits comment, for a period of 60days, on the proposed selection process, criteria and submissions for the second round of the Promise Zone initiative. DATES: Comments Due Date: June 16, 2014. SUMMARY: Interested persons are invited to submit comments regarding ADDRESSES: PO 00000 Frm 00075 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 21785 this proposal. Questions or comments should be directed by email to PromiseZones@hud.gov with ‘‘Second Round Promise Zone selections’’ in the subject line. Questions or comments may also be directed by postal mail to the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Development, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street SW., Room 7136, Washington, DC 20410 ATTN: 2nd Round Promise Zone selections. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brooke Bohnet, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC, 20410; telephone number 202–402–6693. This is not a toll-free number. Persons with hearing or speech impairments may access this number through TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Relay Service at (800) 877–8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background—Round 1 Promise Zones In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Obama announced the establishment of the Promise Zones initiative to partner with high-poverty communities across the country to create jobs, increase economic security, expand educational opportunities, increase access to quality, affordable housing, and improve public safety.1 On January 8, 2014, the President announced the first five Promise Zones, which are located in: San Antonio, TX; Philadelphia, PA; Los Angeles, CA; Southeastern Kentucky, KY; and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, OK. Each of these communities (three urban, one rural and one tribal) submitted a plan on how they will partner with local business and community leaders to make investments that reward hard work and expand opportunity. In exchange, the Federal government is helping these Promise Zone designees secure the resources and flexibility they need to achieve their goals.2 The first five Promise Zones were selected through a competitive process following an invitation to eligible communities to apply for a designation, which was issued on October 30, 2013 with an application deadline of November 26, 2013.3 The urban designations were conferred by HUD while the rural and tribal designations were conferred by USDA. The pool of 1 See http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/ 2013/02/15/fact-sheet-president-s-plan-ensurehard-work-leads-decent-living. 2 See http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/ 2014/01/08/fact-sheet-president-obama-s-promisezones-initiative. 3 See www.hud.gov/promisezones. E:\FR\FM\17APN1.SGM 17APN1 21786 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 74 / Thursday, April 17, 2014 / Notices TKELLEY on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES eligible applicants was limited to communities with demonstrated capacity in one or more areas of Promise Zones’ work that would prepare them to broaden their efforts to additional revitalization priorities. Specifically, urban eligibility was limited to communities encompassing a Choice Neighborhoods or Promise Neighborhoods implementation grant, or a Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation grant, while rural and tribal eligibility was limited to communities encompassing a Stronger Economies Together, Sustainable Communities, Promise Neighborhoods Implementation, or Rural Jobs Accelerator grant. Promise Zones Benefits The Promise Zones designation enables the Federal government to partner with local leaders who are addressing multiple community revitalization challenges in a collaborative way and have demonstrated a commitment to results. Specifically, Federal staff will be stationed in each designated community to help navigate the array of Federal assistance which Promise Zones can access, subject to the availability of appropriations and Federal agency rules and statutes. This level of engagement will help communities make the most of funding that is already available to them. In addition, organizations contributing to Promise Zone strategies will receive preference for certain competitive Federal programs, as permissible under the rules and statutes of the individual programs and agencies, and subject to appropriations. Organizations contributing to Promise Zone strategies will also receive technical assistance and other noncompetitive support, again subject to available funding and as permissible under individual program and Federal agency rules and statutes. Businesses investing in Promise Zones or hiring residents of Promise Zones will also be eligible to receive tax incentives for these activities, if the tax incentives are enacted by Congress. Altogether, this package of assistance will help local leaders accelerate efforts to revitalize their communities. The Promise Zone designation will be for a term of 10 years, and will be extended as necessary to capture the full term of availability of the Promise Zone tax incentives, if the tax incentives are enacted. During this term, the specific benefits made available to Promise Zones may vary from year to year, and sometimes more often than annually, due to changes in Federal agency policies, and changes in appropriations VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:28 Apr 16, 2014 Jkt 232001 and authorizations for relevant programs. Second Round Promise Zones Selection Process A second round of Promise Zone designations is now being planned to open for solicitation in 2014 with announcements expected in early 2015. A total of 20 Promise Zone designations will be made by the end of 2016, including the five designations announced in January, 2014. We anticipate making at least five and as many as 15 total designations in the second round in the urban, rural and tribal categories, depending on resources available. Due to the nature of the initiative, Promise Zone activities are likely to be carried out by a variety of organizations and organization types. Eligible lead applicants for Urban Promise Zone designations are: Units of General Local Government 4 (UGLG or local government) including an office or department within local government; or non-profit organizations, housing authorities or school districts applying in partnership with local government. Eligible lead applicants for Rural and Tribal Promise Zone designations are: Local or tribal governments (which includes county, city, town, township, parish, village, governmental authority or other general-purpose political subdivision of a state or tribe or any combination thereof); offices/ departments within local government; non-profit organizations applying in partnership with local government; housing authorities applying in partnership with local government; or school districts applying in partnership with local government. The selection process under consideration is that any community meeting the qualifying criteria set forth in the Second Round Application Guide would be eligible to apply for Promise Zone designation. All of the following must be present in an application for a proposed Urban Promise Zone to be eligible for a designation: (1) The Promise Zone must encompass one or more census tract(s) or portions of census tracts across a contiguous geography; (2) The rate of overall poverty or Extremely Low Income rate (whichever is greater) of residents within the Promise Zone must be over 33 percent; (3) Promise Zone boundaries must encompass a population of at least 10,000 but no more than 200,000 4 Unit of general local government as defined in section 102(a)(1) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5302(a)(1)). See definition (a)(1) Unit of General Local Government. PO 00000 Frm 00076 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 residents; and (4) Local leadership, including the mayors of jurisdictions represented in the Promise Zone, must demonstrate commitment to the Promise Zone effort. No substantive or technical corrections will be accepted or reviewed after the application deadline. The draft Second Round Application Guide can be found at www.hud.gov/promisezones. Under the second round process under consideration, only one Promise Zone application may be submitted within a UGLG per application cycle. If more than one application is submitted for a Promise Zone meeting the qualifying criteria, the one submitted with local government support will be accepted. If more than one application is submitted with local government support, all of the applications from that UGLG will be disqualified for the current application cycle. If a Promise Zone designated in Round 1 is located within a UGLG in which a new application is being made, the applicant is directed to include an explanation of how, if a second Promise Zone designation is made, the UGLG plans to work with all of the Promise Zone designees at the same time and sustain the level of effort, resources and support committed to each Promise Zone under its respective Promise Zone plan for the full term of each Promise Zone designation. This explanation should be evidenced by commitments from the UGLG in materials submitted by the mayor or local official in support of the application. Solicitation of Comment Prior to commencement of the second round of designations, HUD seeks to take advantage of experience with the first round applicants to develop aspects of the Promise Zones initiative, so that the initiative can support other communities more effectively in future years. In this regard, HUD welcomes feedback from first round applicants, and comment from other interested parties and the public generally, on the first round of the Promise Zones initiative, and on the proposed selection process for the second round of the Promise Zone initiative. HUD specifically seeks comment on the draft Second Round Application Guide, which can be found at www.hud.gov/ promisezones. After fully considering comments, a final draft Second Round Application Guide may be posted at least 30 days before final application materials are posted. E:\FR\FM\17APN1.SGM 17APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 74 / Thursday, April 17, 2014 / Notices Dated: April 10, 2014. Valerie Piper, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Development. telephone (703) 358–2071; or electronic mail (email) CBRA@fws.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: [FR Doc. 2014–08772 Filed 4–16–14; 8:45 am] Background BILLING CODE 4210–67–P Background information on the CBRA (CBRA; 16 U.S.C. 3501 et. seq.) and the CBRS, as well as information on the digital conversion effort and the methodology used to produce the revised maps, can be found in a notice the Service published in the Federal Register on August 29, 2013 (78 FR 53467). For how to access the final revised maps, see the Availability of Final Maps and Related Information section below. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–HQ–ES–2014–N012; FF09E15000– FXHC112509CBRA1–145] John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System; Availability of Final Revised Maps for Delaware, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, and Texas AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. Notice of availability. ACTION: The Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) requires the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) to review the maps of the John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS) at least once every 5 years and make any minor and technical modifications to the boundaries of the CBRS as are necessary to reflect changes that have occurred in the size or location of any CBRS unit as a result of natural forces. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has conducted this review and has prepared final revised maps for all of the CBRS units in Delaware, all units in South Carolina (including one unit that crosses the State boundary into North Carolina), all units in Texas, and one unit in Florida. The maps were produced by the Service in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and in consultation with the appropriate Federal, State, and local officials. This notice announces the findings of the Service’s review and the availability of final revised maps for 69 CBRS units. The final revised maps for these CBRS units, dated December 6, 2013, are the official controlling CBRS maps for these areas. DATES: Changes to the CBRS depicted on the final revised maps, dated December 6, 2013, become effective on April 17, 2014. ADDRESSES: For information about how to get copies of the maps or where to go to view them, see SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Katie Niemi, Coastal Barriers Coordinator, Division of Budget and Technical Support, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Room 840, Arlington, VA 22203; TKELLEY on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:28 Apr 16, 2014 Jkt 232001 Announced Map Modifications This notice announces modifications to the maps for all of the CBRS units in Delaware, all units in South Carolina (including one unit that crosses that State boundary into North Carolina), all units in Texas, and one unit in Florida. Most of the modifications were made to reflect changes to the CBRS units as a result of natural forces (e.g., erosion and accretion). The CBRA requires the Secretary to review the CBRS maps at least once every 5 years and make, in consultation with the appropriate Federal, State, and local officials, any minor and technical modifications to the boundaries of the CBRS as are necessary to reflect changes that have occurred in the size or location of any CBRS unit as a result of natural forces (16 U.S.C. 3503(c)). Additionally, one of the maps for South Carolina also includes a voluntary addition to the CBRS that was requested by the owners of the property. The CBRA authorizes the Secretary to add a parcel of real property to the CBRS if the parcel is an undeveloped coastal barrier and the owner of the parcel requests, in writing, that the Secretary add the parcel to the CBRS (16 U.S.C. 3503(d)). The Service’s review resulted in a set of 87 final revised maps, dated December 6, 2013, depicting a total of 69 CBRS units. The set of maps is comprised of 7 maps for 10 CBRS units located in Delaware, 24 maps for 23 CBRS units located in South Carolina (including 1 unit that crosses the State boundary into North Carolina), 55 maps for 35 CBRS units located in Texas, and 1 map for 1 CBRS unit located in Florida. The Service found that 62 of the 69 units reviewed had experienced changes in their size or location as a result of natural forces since they were last mapped. The revised maps were produced by the Service in partnership with FEMA. PO 00000 Frm 00077 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 21787 The Service is specifically notifying the following stakeholders concerning the availability of the final revised maps: the Chair and Ranking Member of the House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources; the Chair and Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works; the members of the Senate and House of Representatives for the affected areas; the Governors of the affected areas; and other appropriate Federal, State, and local officials. Consultation With Federal, State, and Local Officials Consultation and Comment Period The CBRA requires consultation with the appropriate Federal, State, and local officials (stakeholders) on the proposed CBRS boundary modifications to reflect changes that have occurred in the size or location of any CBRS unit as a result of natural forces (16 U.S.C 3503(c)). The Service fulfilled this requirement by holding a 32-day comment period on the draft maps (dated November 30, 2012) for Federal, State, and local stakeholders, from August 29, 2013, through September 30, 2013. This comment period was announced in a notice published in the Federal Register (78 FR 53467) on August 29, 2013. Formal notification of the comment period was provided via letters to approximately 175 stakeholders, including the Chair and Ranking Member of the House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources; the Chair and Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works; the members of the Senate and House of Representatives for the affected areas; the Governors of the affected areas; the local elected officials of the affected areas; and other appropriate Federal, State, and local officials. Comments and Service Responses The Service received written comments and/or acknowledgements from the following seven stakeholders (in no particular order): 1. FEMA: FEMA had no comment on the proposed modifications. 2. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Philadelphia District: The Corps provided comments on two CBRS units in Delaware, Units DE–06 and H00, and requested that the Service reassess the CBRS designation affecting particular areas within these two units. The Corps indicated that they conduct beach nourishment both north and south of Unit DE–06, and that residential development has occurred in these areas subsequent to the CBRS designation. E:\FR\FM\17APN1.SGM 17APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 74 (Thursday, April 17, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 21785-21787]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-08772]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

[Docket No. 5774-N-01]


Promise Zones Initiative: Proposed Second Round Selection Process 
Solicitation of Comment

AGENCY: Office of Community Planning and Development, HUD.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Through this notice, HUD solicits comment, for a period of 60-
days, on the proposed selection process, criteria and submissions for 
the second round of the Promise Zone initiative.

DATES: Comments Due Date: June 16, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Interested persons are invited to submit comments regarding 
this proposal. Questions or comments should be directed by email to 
PromiseZones@hud.gov with ``Second Round Promise Zone selections'' in 
the subject line. Questions or comments may also be directed by postal 
mail to the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic 
Development, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 
Seventh Street SW., Room 7136, Washington, DC 20410 ATTN: 2nd Round 
Promise Zone selections.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brooke Bohnet, U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC, 
20410; telephone number 202-402-6693. This is not a toll-free number. 
Persons with hearing or speech impairments may access this number 
through TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Relay Service at (800) 
877-8339.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background--Round 1 Promise Zones

    In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Obama announced 
the establishment of the Promise Zones initiative to partner with high-
poverty communities across the country to create jobs, increase 
economic security, expand educational opportunities, increase access to 
quality, affordable housing, and improve public safety.\1\ On January 
8, 2014, the President announced the first five Promise Zones, which 
are located in: San Antonio, TX; Philadelphia, PA; Los Angeles, CA; 
Southeastern Kentucky, KY; and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, OK. Each 
of these communities (three urban, one rural and one tribal) submitted 
a plan on how they will partner with local business and community 
leaders to make investments that reward hard work and expand 
opportunity. In exchange, the Federal government is helping these 
Promise Zone designees secure the resources and flexibility they need 
to achieve their goals.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ See http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/02/15/fact-sheet-president-s-plan-ensure-hard-work-leads-decent-living.
    \2\ See http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/01/08/fact-sheet-president-obama-s-promise-zones-initiative.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The first five Promise Zones were selected through a competitive 
process following an invitation to eligible communities to apply for a 
designation, which was issued on October 30, 2013 with an application 
deadline of November 26, 2013.\3\ The urban designations were conferred 
by HUD while the rural and tribal designations were conferred by USDA. 
The pool of

[[Page 21786]]

eligible applicants was limited to communities with demonstrated 
capacity in one or more areas of Promise Zones' work that would prepare 
them to broaden their efforts to additional revitalization priorities. 
Specifically, urban eligibility was limited to communities encompassing 
a Choice Neighborhoods or Promise Neighborhoods implementation grant, 
or a Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation grant, while rural and tribal 
eligibility was limited to communities encompassing a Stronger 
Economies Together, Sustainable Communities, Promise Neighborhoods 
Implementation, or Rural Jobs Accelerator grant.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ See www.hud.gov/promisezones.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Promise Zones Benefits

    The Promise Zones designation enables the Federal government to 
partner with local leaders who are addressing multiple community 
revitalization challenges in a collaborative way and have demonstrated 
a commitment to results. Specifically, Federal staff will be stationed 
in each designated community to help navigate the array of Federal 
assistance which Promise Zones can access, subject to the availability 
of appropriations and Federal agency rules and statutes. This level of 
engagement will help communities make the most of funding that is 
already available to them. In addition, organizations contributing to 
Promise Zone strategies will receive preference for certain competitive 
Federal programs, as permissible under the rules and statutes of the 
individual programs and agencies, and subject to appropriations. 
Organizations contributing to Promise Zone strategies will also receive 
technical assistance and other non-competitive support, again subject 
to available funding and as permissible under individual program and 
Federal agency rules and statutes. Businesses investing in Promise 
Zones or hiring residents of Promise Zones will also be eligible to 
receive tax incentives for these activities, if the tax incentives are 
enacted by Congress. Altogether, this package of assistance will help 
local leaders accelerate efforts to revitalize their communities.
    The Promise Zone designation will be for a term of 10 years, and 
will be extended as necessary to capture the full term of availability 
of the Promise Zone tax incentives, if the tax incentives are enacted. 
During this term, the specific benefits made available to Promise Zones 
may vary from year to year, and sometimes more often than annually, due 
to changes in Federal agency policies, and changes in appropriations 
and authorizations for relevant programs.

Second Round Promise Zones Selection Process

    A second round of Promise Zone designations is now being planned to 
open for solicitation in 2014 with announcements expected in early 
2015. A total of 20 Promise Zone designations will be made by the end 
of 2016, including the five designations announced in January, 2014. We 
anticipate making at least five and as many as 15 total designations in 
the second round in the urban, rural and tribal categories, depending 
on resources available.
    Due to the nature of the initiative, Promise Zone activities are 
likely to be carried out by a variety of organizations and organization 
types. Eligible lead applicants for Urban Promise Zone designations 
are: Units of General Local Government \4\ (UGLG or local government) 
including an office or department within local government; or non-
profit organizations, housing authorities or school districts applying 
in partnership with local government. Eligible lead applicants for 
Rural and Tribal Promise Zone designations are: Local or tribal 
governments (which includes county, city, town, township, parish, 
village, governmental authority or other general-purpose political 
subdivision of a state or tribe or any combination thereof); offices/
departments within local government; non-profit organizations applying 
in partnership with local government; housing authorities applying in 
partnership with local government; or school districts applying in 
partnership with local government.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ Unit of general local government as defined in section 
102(a)(1) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 
U.S.C. 5302(a)(1)). See definition (a)(1) Unit of General Local 
Government.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The selection process under consideration is that any community 
meeting the qualifying criteria set forth in the Second Round 
Application Guide would be eligible to apply for Promise Zone 
designation. All of the following must be present in an application for 
a proposed Urban Promise Zone to be eligible for a designation: (1) The 
Promise Zone must encompass one or more census tract(s) or portions of 
census tracts across a contiguous geography; (2) The rate of overall 
poverty or Extremely Low Income rate (whichever is greater) of 
residents within the Promise Zone must be over 33 percent; (3) Promise 
Zone boundaries must encompass a population of at least 10,000 but no 
more than 200,000 residents; and (4) Local leadership, including the 
mayors of jurisdictions represented in the Promise Zone, must 
demonstrate commitment to the Promise Zone effort. No substantive or 
technical corrections will be accepted or reviewed after the 
application deadline. The draft Second Round Application Guide can be 
found at www.hud.gov/promisezones.
    Under the second round process under consideration, only one 
Promise Zone application may be submitted within a UGLG per application 
cycle. If more than one application is submitted for a Promise Zone 
meeting the qualifying criteria, the one submitted with local 
government support will be accepted. If more than one application is 
submitted with local government support, all of the applications from 
that UGLG will be disqualified for the current application cycle. If a 
Promise Zone designated in Round 1 is located within a UGLG in which a 
new application is being made, the applicant is directed to include an 
explanation of how, if a second Promise Zone designation is made, the 
UGLG plans to work with all of the Promise Zone designees at the same 
time and sustain the level of effort, resources and support committed 
to each Promise Zone under its respective Promise Zone plan for the 
full term of each Promise Zone designation. This explanation should be 
evidenced by commitments from the UGLG in materials submitted by the 
mayor or local official in support of the application.

Solicitation of Comment

    Prior to commencement of the second round of designations, HUD 
seeks to take advantage of experience with the first round applicants 
to develop aspects of the Promise Zones initiative, so that the 
initiative can support other communities more effectively in future 
years. In this regard, HUD welcomes feedback from first round 
applicants, and comment from other interested parties and the public 
generally, on the first round of the Promise Zones initiative, and on 
the proposed selection process for the second round of the Promise Zone 
initiative. HUD specifically seeks comment on the draft Second Round 
Application Guide, which can be found at www.hud.gov/promisezones. 
After fully considering comments, a final draft Second Round 
Application Guide may be posted at least 30 days before final 
application materials are posted.


[[Page 21787]]


    Dated: April 10, 2014.
Valerie Piper,
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Development.
[FR Doc. 2014-08772 Filed 4-16-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4210-67-P