Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ, 18064-18065 [2014-07144]

Download as PDF 18064 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 61 / Monday, March 31, 2014 / Notices tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Museum of California at the address in this notice by April 30, 2014. ADDRESSES: Lori Fogarty, Director, Oakland Museum of California, 1000 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, (510) 318–8400, email lfogarty@museumca.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the control of the Oakland Museum of California, Oakland, CA that meets the definition of a sacred object and an object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Item(s) Between 1897 and 1928, one cultural item was removed from Wrangell, AK, by Fred W. Carlyon, a local shop owner. Carlyon and his sister, Anna Vaughn, collected the Shtax’ Heen Kwaan Kaachadi Frog Hat during their time in Wrangell in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Later, the hat passed from the collectors to Dorothy K. Haberman, who was Miss Vaughn’s daughter. Mrs. Haberman donated the hat to the Oakland Museum of California in 1959. The sacred object/object of cultural patrimony is a clan crest hat in the shape of a frog carved from wood and with copper overlay on formline. The eyes are overlaid with abalone and the hat is topped with five woven spruce root rings. Oral traditions say that the Tlingit Indians have inhabited Southeast Alaska since time immemorial. They share an identity as a tribe and trace that identity to multiple ancestral groups. ´ ´ ´ The Khaach.adi clan of Xhıxhch’i Hıt ´ (Frog House) of the Shtax Heen Khwaan (‘‘Wrangell People’’) have origin stories ´ tracing the group from the Naas Heeni ´ (Naas River) to the Shtax Heen (Stikine River). An ancestress of the clan obtained rights to the Frog crest on the ´ Shtaxh Heen. The Frog Hat is considered a sacred object/object of cultural patrimony because of its status ´ as at.oow—a clan owned object brought out in ceremonies by a clan appointed caretaker and an object that could not be alienated without the consent of the VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:10 Mar 28, 2014 Jkt 232001 entire clan. The Frog Hat, as clan property, is needed for the present-day clan members to participate in ongoing ceremonies. Determinations Made by the Oakland Museum of California Officials of the Oakland Museum of California have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the cultural item described above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the cultural item described above has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony and the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Lori Fogarty, Director, Oakland Museum of California, 1000 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, (510) 318–8400, email lfogarty@museumca.org, by April 30, 2014. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony to the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes may proceed. The Oakland Museum of California is responsible for notifying the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: March 4, 2014. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2014–07147 Filed 3–28–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P PO 00000 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–15187; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Museum of Northern Arizona, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Museum of Northern Arizona. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the Indian tribes stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Museum of Northern Arizona at the address in this notice by April 30, 2014. ADDRESSES: Elaine Hughes, Collection Manager, Museum of Northern Arizona, 3103 North Fort Valley Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, telephone (928) 774–5211 email ehughes@mna.mus.az.us. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUMMARY: History and Description of the Cultural Items All of the cultural objects described below were removed from private or state-owned lands in Coconino County, Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\31MRN1.SGM 31MRN1 tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 61 / Monday, March 31, 2014 / Notices AZ, between 1932 and 1953. These objects were collected by private individuals without permission or knowledge of the landowners. Records kept by the individuals provide substantive evidence that the objects were recovered in association with human remains from prehistoric archeological sites. The human remains were not collected, so these items are considered unassociated funerary objects. In 1981, these objects were donated to the Museum of Northern Arizona, where they are currently housed. Due to the interspersed nature of the private and state land parcels and the casual nature of the excavation records, it is not possible to accurately establish the location of the sites from which the objects were removed. The site names listed below were used by the private individuals and are not official site designations. In 1932, 16 ceramic vessels were removed from # 1 Ruin. In 1937, two ceramic vessels were removed from Two Hills. In 1938, one ceramic vessel was removed from Stuck in Cinders. In 1938, three ceramic vessels were removed from Big Apple. In 1941, one ceramic vessel was removed from Kelhem # 1 and four ceramic vessels were removed from Two Hills. In 1942, one ceramic vessel was removed from Lousey. In 1947, one ceramic vessel was removed from an unnamed site and three ceramic vessels were removed from Backache. In 1949, two ceramic vessels were removed from Sheep Fence. In 1953, three ceramic vessels were removed from Birthday. Also in 1953, seven ceramic vessels, one shell bead, and one shell bracelet were removed from Birthday. The unassociated funerary objects listed in this notice were removed from sites related to the Northern Sinagua archeological culture. The Museum of Northern Arizona is using the cultural affiliation study completed by the USDA Forest Service in 1996 for prehistoric archeological remains in the Coconino County, AZ, region, including lands directly adjacent to the sites listed above. Based on evidence relevant to archeological, anthropological, biological, geographical, oral traditions/ folklore and kinship, the USDA Forest Service established that the Northern Sinagua were most closely affiliated with the modern Hopi Tribe of Arizona. In reviewing the 1996 USDA cultural affiliation study, as well as pertinent literature in the site records at the Museum of Northern Arizona and study of the unassociated funerary objects, the Museum of Northern Arizona concurs that the objects are more closely affiliated with the modern Hopi Tribe of Arizona. VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:10 Mar 28, 2014 Jkt 232001 Determinations Made by the Museum of Northern Arizona Officials of the Museum of Northern Arizona have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 46 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Elaine Hughes, Collection Manager, Museum of Northern Arizona, 3103 North Fort Valley Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, telephone (928) 774–5211 email ehughes@mna.mus.az.us, by April 30, 2014. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may proceed. The Museum of Northern Arizona is responsible for notifying the Havasupai Tribe of the Havasupai Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Hualapai Indian Tribe of the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona; Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah; Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, that this notice has been published. Dated: March 6, 2014. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2014–07144 Filed 3–28–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 731–TA–1224–1225 (Final)] Ferrosilicon From Russia and Venezuela; Scheduling of the Final Phase of Antidumping Investigations United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 18065 The Commission hereby gives notice of the scheduling of the final phase of antidumping investigation Nos. 731–TA–1224–1225 (Final) under section 735(b) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1673d(b)) (the Act) to determine whether an industry in the United States is materially injured or threatened with material injury, or the establishment of an industry in the United States is materially retarded, by reason of less-than-fair-value imports from Russia and Venezuela of ferrosilicon, provided for in subheadings 7202.21.10, 7202.21.50, 7202.21.75, 7202.21.90, and 7202.29.00 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States.1 For further information concerning the conduct of this phase of the investigations, hearing procedures, and rules of general application, consult the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure, part 201, subparts A through E (19 CFR part 201), and part 207, subparts A and C (19 CFR part 207). DATES: Effective Date: March 11, 2014. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christopher J. Cassise (202–708–5408), Office of Investigations, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436. Hearing-impaired persons can obtain information on this matter by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on 202– 205–1810. Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of the Secretary at 202–205–2000. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its internet server (http:// www.usitc.gov). The public record for these investigations may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background. The final phase of these investigations is being scheduled as a result of an affirmative preliminary determination by the Department of Commerce that imports of ferrosilicon from Venezuela are being sold in the United States at less than fair value within the meaning of section 733 of the Act (19 U.S.C. 1673b). The investigation SUMMARY: 1 For purposes of these investigations, the Department of Commerce has defined the subject merchandise as ‘‘all forms and sizes of ferrosilicon, regardless of grade, including ferrosilicon briquettes. Ferrosilicon is a ferroalloy containing by weight four percent or more iron, more than eight percent but not more than 96 percent silicon, three percent or less phosphorus, 30 percent or less manganese, less than three percent magnesium, and 10 percent or less any other element. The merchandise covered also includes product described as slag, if the product meets these specifications.’’ E:\FR\FM\31MRN1.SGM 31MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 61 (Monday, March 31, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 18064-18065]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-07144]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-15187; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Museum of Northern 
Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Museum of Northern Arizona, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items 
listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary 
objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the 
Museum of Northern Arizona. If no additional claimants come forward, 
transfer of control of the cultural items to the Indian tribes stated 
in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim these cultural items should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to the Museum of Northern Arizona 
at the address in this notice by April 30, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Elaine Hughes, Collection Manager, Museum of Northern 
Arizona, 3103 North Fort Valley Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, telephone 
(928) 774-5211 email ehughes@mna.mus.az.us.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the 
control of the Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ, that meet the 
definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    All of the cultural objects described below were removed from 
private or state-owned lands in Coconino County,

[[Page 18065]]

AZ, between 1932 and 1953. These objects were collected by private 
individuals without permission or knowledge of the landowners. Records 
kept by the individuals provide substantive evidence that the objects 
were recovered in association with human remains from prehistoric 
archeological sites. The human remains were not collected, so these 
items are considered unassociated funerary objects. In 1981, these 
objects were donated to the Museum of Northern Arizona, where they are 
currently housed. Due to the interspersed nature of the private and 
state land parcels and the casual nature of the excavation records, it 
is not possible to accurately establish the location of the sites from 
which the objects were removed. The site names listed below were used 
by the private individuals and are not official site designations.
    In 1932, 16 ceramic vessels were removed from  1 Ruin. In 
1937, two ceramic vessels were removed from Two Hills. In 1938, one 
ceramic vessel was removed from Stuck in Cinders. In 1938, three 
ceramic vessels were removed from Big Apple. In 1941, one ceramic 
vessel was removed from Kelhem  1 and four ceramic vessels 
were removed from Two Hills. In 1942, one ceramic vessel was removed 
from Lousey. In 1947, one ceramic vessel was removed from an unnamed 
site and three ceramic vessels were removed from Backache. In 1949, two 
ceramic vessels were removed from Sheep Fence. In 1953, three ceramic 
vessels were removed from Birthday. Also in 1953, seven ceramic 
vessels, one shell bead, and one shell bracelet were removed from 
Birthday.
    The unassociated funerary objects listed in this notice were 
removed from sites related to the Northern Sinagua archeological 
culture. The Museum of Northern Arizona is using the cultural 
affiliation study completed by the USDA Forest Service in 1996 for 
prehistoric archeological remains in the Coconino County, AZ, region, 
including lands directly adjacent to the sites listed above. Based on 
evidence relevant to archeological, anthropological, biological, 
geographical, oral traditions/folklore and kinship, the USDA Forest 
Service established that the Northern Sinagua were most closely 
affiliated with the modern Hopi Tribe of Arizona. In reviewing the 1996 
USDA cultural affiliation study, as well as pertinent literature in the 
site records at the Museum of Northern Arizona and study of the 
unassociated funerary objects, the Museum of Northern Arizona concurs 
that the objects are more closely affiliated with the modern Hopi Tribe 
of Arizona.

Determinations Made by the Museum of Northern Arizona

    Officials of the Museum of Northern Arizona have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 46 cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
these cultural items should submit a written request with information 
in support of the claim to Elaine Hughes, Collection Manager, Museum of 
Northern Arizona, 3103 North Fort Valley Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, 
telephone (928) 774-5211 email ehughes@mna.mus.az.us, by April 30, 
2014. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, 
transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the Hopi 
Tribe of Arizona may proceed.
    The Museum of Northern Arizona is responsible for notifying the 
Havasupai Tribe of the Havasupai Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; Hualapai Indian Tribe of the Hualapai Indian Reservation, 
Arizona; Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah; Yavapai-
Prescott Indian Tribe; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New 
Mexico, that this notice has been published.

    Dated: March 6, 2014.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2014-07144 Filed 3-28-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P