Metconazole; Pesticide Tolerances, 12408-12411 [2014-04865]

Download as PDF 12408 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 43 / Wednesday, March 5, 2014 / Rules and Regulations was to be increased to 0.8 ppm, the U.S. tolerance will be higher than the Canadian MRL of 0.5 ppm. After reexamining the residue data, EPA is confident that the 0.5 ppm level will be high enough to cover residues from maximum use under the pesticide registration, and therefore, in order to remain aligned with Canada, the existing cucurbit vegetable group 9 tolerance will remain at 0.5 ppm. sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with RULES V. Conclusion Therefore, tolerances are established for residues of triflumizole, 1-[1-((4chloro-2-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl)imino)-2propoxyethyl]-1Himidazole, in or on berry, low growing, subgroup 13–07G at 2.0 ppm; fruit, pome, group 11–10 at 0.5 ppm; fruit, small, vine climbing, except fuzzy kiwifruit, subgroup 13–07F at 2.5 ppm; and. tomato at 1.5 ppm. In addition, due to the establishment of these tolerances, the existing tolerances for apple, pear, grape, and strawberry are removed as unnecessary. VI. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews This final rule establishes tolerances under FFDCA section 408(d) in response to a petition submitted to the Agency. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has exempted these types of actions from review under Executive Order 12866, entitled ‘‘Regulatory Planning and Review’’ (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been exempted from review under Executive Order 12866, this final rule is not subject to Executive Order 13211, entitled ‘‘Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use’’ (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001) or Executive Order 13045, entitled ‘‘Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks’’ (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997). This final rule does not contain any information collections subject to OMB approval under the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), nor does it require any special considerations under Executive Order 12898, entitled ‘‘Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations’’ (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994). Since tolerances and exemptions that are established on the basis of a petition under FFDCA section 408(d), such as the tolerance in this final rule, do not require the issuance of a proposed rule, the requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.), do not apply. VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:46 Mar 04, 2014 Jkt 232001 This final rule directly regulates growers, food processors, food handlers, and food retailers, not States or tribes, nor does this action alter the relationships or distribution of power and responsibilities established by Congress in the preemption provisions of FFDCA section 408(n)(4). As such, the Agency has determined that this action will not have a substantial direct effect on States or tribal governments, on the relationship between the national government and the States or tribal governments, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government or between the Federal Government and Indian tribes. Thus, the Agency has determined that Executive Order 13132, entitled ‘‘Federalism’’ (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999) and Executive Order 13175, entitled ‘‘Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments’’ (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000) do not apply to this final rule. In addition, this final rule does not impose any enforceable duty or contain any unfunded mandate as described under Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA) (2 U.S.C. 1501 et seq.). This action does not involve any technical standards that would require Agency consideration of voluntary consensus standards pursuant to section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (NTTAA) (15 U.S.C. 272 note). VII. Congressional Review Act Pursuant to the Congressional Review Act (5 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), EPA will submit a report containing this rule and other required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior to publication of the rule in the Federal Register. This action is not a ‘‘major rule’’ as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 180 Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedure, Agricultural commodities, Pesticides and pests, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Dated: February 25, 2014. Lois Rossi, Director, Registration Division, Office of Pesticide Programs. Therefore, 40 CFR chapter I is amended as follows: 1. The authority citation for part 180 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 21 U.S.C. 321(q), 346a and 371. Frm 00056 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 § 180.476 Triflumizole; tolerances for residues. (a) * * * (1) * * * Parts per million Commodity * * * Berry, low growing, subgroup 13–07G, except cranberry ......................... * * * * Fruit, pome, group 11–10 ... Fruit, small, vine climbing, except fuzzy kiwifruit, subgroup 13–07F ............ * * * * Tomato ................................ * * 1.5 * * * * * * * * * * 2.0 * 0.50 2.5 * [FR Doc. 2014–04862 Filed 3–4–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 [EPA–HQ–OPP–2013–0656; FRL–9906–13] Metconazole; Pesticide Tolerances Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: This regulation amends the current tolerances for residues of metconazole in or on corn, field, stover and corn, pop, stover. BASF Corporation, requested these tolerance amendments under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). DATES: This regulation is effective March 5, 2014. Objections and requests for hearings must be received on or before May 5, 2014, and must be filed in accordance with the instructions provided in 40 CFR part 178 (see also Unit I.C. of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION). SUMMARY: The docket for this action, identified by docket identification (ID) number EPA–HQ–OPP–2013–0656, is available at http://www.regulations.gov or at the Office of Pesticide Programs ADDRESSES: PART 180—[AMENDED] PO 00000 2. In § 180.476: a. Remove the commodities ‘‘Apple,’’ ‘‘Grape,’’ ‘‘Pear,’’ and ‘‘Strawberry’’ from the table in paragraph (a)(1). ■ b. Add alphabetically the following commodities to the table in paragraph (a)(1). The amendments read as follows: ■ ■ E:\FR\FM\05MRR1.SGM 05MRR1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 43 / Wednesday, March 5, 2014 / Rules and Regulations Regulatory Public Docket (OPP Docket) in the Environmental Protection Agency Docket Center (EPA/DC), EPA West Bldg., Rm. 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460–0001. The Public Reading Room is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The telephone number for the Public Reading Room is (202) 566–1744, and the telephone number for the OPP Docket is (703) 305–5805. Please review the visitor instructions and additional information about the docket available at http://www.epa.gov/dockets. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lois Rossi, Registration Division (7505P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460–0001; telephone number: (703) 305–7090; email address: RDFRNotices@epa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. General Information A. Does this action apply to me? You may be potentially affected by this action if you are an agricultural producer, food manufacturer, or pesticide manufacturer. The following list of North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) codes is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a guide to help readers determine whether this document applies to them. Potentially affected entities may include: • Crop production (NAICS code 111). • Animal production (NAICS code 112). • Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311). • Pesticide manufacturing (NAICS code 32532). B. How can I get electronic access to other related information? You may access a frequently updated electronic version of EPA’s tolerance regulations at 40 CFR part 180 through the Government Printing Office’s e-CFR site at http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/textidx?&c=ecfr&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title40/ 40tab_02.tpl. sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with RULES C. How can I file an objection or hearing request? Under FFDCA section 408(g), 21 U.S.C. 346a, any person may file an objection to any aspect of this regulation and may also request a hearing on those objections. You must file your objection or request a hearing on this regulation in accordance with the instructions provided in 40 CFR part 178. To ensure proper receipt by EPA, you must identify docket ID number EPA–HQ– VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:46 Mar 04, 2014 Jkt 232001 OPP–2013–0656 in the subject line on the first page of your submission. All objections and requests for a hearing must be in writing, and must be received by the Hearing Clerk on or before May 5, 2014. Addresses for mail and hand delivery of objections and hearing requests are provided in 40 CFR 178.25(b). In addition to filing an objection or hearing request with the Hearing Clerk as described in 40 CFR part 178, please submit a copy of the filing (excluding any Confidential Business Information (CBI)) for inclusion in the public docket. Information not marked confidential pursuant to 40 CFR part 2 may be disclosed publicly by EPA without prior notice. Submit the non-CBI copy of your objection or hearing request, identified by docket ID number EPA–HQ–OPP– 2013–0656, by one of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. Do not submit electronically any information you consider to be CBI or other information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. • Mail: OPP Docket, Environmental Protection Agency Docket Center (EPA/ DC), (28221T), 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460–0001. • Hand Delivery: To make special arrangements for hand delivery or delivery of boxed information, please follow the instructions at http:// www.epa.gov/dockets/contacts.htm. Additional instructions on commenting or visiting the docket, along with more information about dockets generally, is available at http://www.epa.gov/dockets. II. Summary of Petitioned-For Tolerance In the Federal Register of October 25, 2013 (78 FR 63938) (FRL–9901–96), EPA issued a document pursuant to FFDCA section 408(d)(3), 21 U.S.C. 346a(d)(3), announcing the filing of a pesticide petition (PP 3F8157) by BASF Corporation, 26 Davis Drive, P.O. Box 13528, RTP, NC 27709–3528. The petition requested that 40 CFR 180.617 be amended by increasing tolerances for residues of the fungicide metconazole, in or on corn, field, stover from 4.5 parts per million (ppm) to 30.0 ppm and corn, pop, stover from 4.5 ppm to 30.0 ppm. That document referenced a summary of the petition prepared by BASF Corporation, the registrant, which is available in the docket, http:// www.regulations.gov. There were no comments received in response to the notice of filing. PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 12409 III. Aggregate Risk Assessment and Determination of Safety Section 408(b)(2)(A)(i) of FFDCA allows EPA to establish a tolerance (the legal limit for a pesticide chemical residue in or on a food) only if EPA determines that the tolerance is ‘‘safe.’’ Section 408(b)(2)(A)(ii) of FFDCA defines ‘‘safe’’ to mean that ‘‘there is a reasonable certainty that no harm will result from aggregate exposure to the pesticide chemical residue, including all anticipated dietary exposures and all other exposures for which there is reliable information.’’ This includes exposure through drinking water and in residential settings, but does not include occupational exposure. Section 408(b)(2)(C) of FFDCA requires EPA to give special consideration to exposure of infants and children to the pesticide chemical residue in establishing a tolerance and to ‘‘ensure that there is a reasonable certainty that no harm will result to infants and children from aggregate exposure to the pesticide chemical residue. . . .’’ Consistent with FFDCA section 408(b)(2)(D), and the factors specified in FFDCA section 408(b)(2)(D), EPA has reviewed the available scientific data and other relevant information in support of this action. EPA has sufficient data to assess the hazards of and to make a determination on aggregate exposure for metconazole including exposure resulting from the tolerances established by this action. EPA’s assessment of exposures and risks associated with metconazole follows. Specific information on the studies received and the nature of the effects caused by metconazole can be found in www.regulations.gov, under docket ID number EPA–HQ–OPP–2013–0656– 0004, entitled ‘‘Metconazole. Additional Residue Data on Corn Stover. Summary of Residue Data and within the memo entitled ‘‘Metconazole. Summary of Risk Issues Associated with Increase in Tolerance for Corn Stover’’, under docket ID number EPA–HQ–OPP–2013– 0656–0005. To demonstrate the safety of the increases in these corn stover tolerances, EPA is relying on its most recent tolerance action on metconazole published in the Federal Register on August 17, 2011 (76 FR 50898) (FRL– 8882–7). See also 74 FR 21260, FRL– 8408–6 (May 7, 2009) (initially establishing the corn stover tolerances). In the 2011 tolerance action, EPA concluded that aggregate exposure to metconazole is safe assuming all treated commodities, including both human and animal foods, had metconazole residues at the tolerance level. Because E:\FR\FM\05MRR1.SGM 05MRR1 12410 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 43 / Wednesday, March 5, 2014 / Rules and Regulations EPA assessed metconazole exposure assuming tolerance level residues—a level that is set above the level of residues expected from legal use of a pesticide—unless tolerance levels on human foods increase, the 2011 action remains an up-to-date assessment of metconazole risk. Corn stover is an animal feed. Thus, humans are only exposed to metconazole on animal feed as a result of consuming meat, milk, or egg products from livestock that have eaten commodities containing metconazole residues. After examining the impact of the proposed increase on corn stover tolerances on residue levels in meat, milk, and eggs, EPA has concluded that any residue increases in meat, milk, and eggs will be minor (principally due to the minor role that corn stover plays in the livestock diet), and thus meat, milk, and egg tolerances will not need to be increased. In other words, EPA determined that the proposed increase in tolerance levels in corn stover will not result in metconazole residues exceeding the existing meat, milk, and egg tolerances. Accordingly, because EPA in the 2011 metconazole action assumed tolerance level residues in meat, milk, and eggs in assessing metconazole risk, and the proposed increase in the corn stover tolerances will not necessitate an increase in those tolerances, the 2011 determination of safety applies with equal force to this action. For these reasons, and in reliance on the findings in the August 17, 2011 and May 7, 2009 Federal Register actions, EPA concludes that there is reasonable certainty that no harm will result to the general population, and to infants and children, from aggregate exposure to metconazole residues. sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with RULES IV. Other Considerations A. Analytical Enforcement Methodology An adequate high performance liquid chromatography method with tandem mass spectrometry (Method D0604), entitled ‘‘The Determination of Residues of BAS 555 F and its Metabolites in Corn and Cotton Matrices Using LC/MS/ MS’’), with the German multi-residue method DFG S19 as a confirmatory method, is adequate as an enforcement method. Method D0604 determines metconazole (cis- and trans-isomers), 1,2,4-triazole (T), triazolyalanine (TA), and triazolylacetic acid (TAA). DFG S19 uses gas chromatography/nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC/NPD) or gas chromatography/mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS). The methods may be requested from: Chief, Analytical Chemistry Branch, Environmental VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:46 Mar 04, 2014 Jkt 232001 Science Center, 701 Mapes Rd., Ft. Meade, MD 20755–5350; telephone number: (410) 305–2905; email address: residuemethods@epa.gov. B. International Residue Limits In making its tolerance decisions, EPA seeks to harmonize U.S. tolerances with international standards whenever possible, consistent with U.S. food safety standards and agricultural practices. EPA considers the international maximum residue limits (MRLs) established by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex), as required by FFDCA section 408(b)(4). The Codex Alimentarius is a joint United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization food standards program, and it is recognized as an international food safety standards-setting organization in trade agreements to which the United States is a party. EPA may establish a tolerance that is different from a Codex MRL; however, FFDCA section 408(b)(4) requires that EPA explain the reasons for departing from the Codex level. The Codex has not established a MRL for metconazole on corn, field, stover and corn, pop, stover. V. Conclusion Therefore, tolerances are established for residues of metconazole, measured as the sum of cis- and trans- isomers, in or on corn, field, stover at 30 ppm and corn, pop, stover at 30 ppm. VI. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews This final rule establishes tolerances under FFDCA section 408(d) in response to a petition submitted to the Agency. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has exempted these types of actions from review under Executive Order 12866, entitled ‘‘Regulatory Planning and Review’’ (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been exempted from review under Executive Order 12866, this final rule is not subject to Executive Order 13211, entitled ‘‘Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use’’ (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001) or Executive Order 13045, entitled ‘‘Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks’’ (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997). This final rule does not contain any information collections subject to OMB approval under the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), nor does it require any special considerations under Executive Order 12898, entitled ‘‘Federal Actions to Address PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations’’ (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994). Since tolerances and exemptions that are established on the basis of a petition under FFDCA section 408(d), such as the tolerance in this final rule, do not require the issuance of a proposed rule, the requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.), do not apply. This final rule directly regulates growers, food processors, food handlers, and food retailers, not States or tribes, nor does this action alter the relationships or distribution of power and responsibilities established by Congress in the preemption provisions of FFDCA section 408(n)(4). As such, the Agency has determined that this action will not have a substantial direct effect on States or tribal governments, on the relationship between the national government and the States or tribal governments, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government or between the Federal Government and Indian tribes. Thus, the Agency has determined that Executive Order 13132, entitled ‘‘Federalism’’ (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999) and Executive Order 13175, entitled ‘‘Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments’’ (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000) do not apply to this final rule. In addition, this final rule does not impose any enforceable duty or contain any unfunded mandate as described under Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA) (2 U.S.C. 1501 et seq.). This action does not involve any technical standards that would require Agency consideration of voluntary consensus standards pursuant to section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (NTTAA) (15 U.S.C. 272 note). VII. Congressional Review Act Pursuant to the Congressional Review Act (5 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), EPA will submit a report containing this rule and other required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior to publication of the rule in the Federal Register. This action is not a ‘‘major rule’’ as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 180 Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedure, Agricultural commodities, Pesticides and pests, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. E:\FR\FM\05MRR1.SGM 05MRR1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 43 / Wednesday, March 5, 2014 / Rules and Regulations sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with RULES Dated: February 24, 2014. Lois Rossi, Director, Registration Division, Office of Pesticide Programs. limit (ACL) on March 5, 2014. Therefore, NMFS closes the commercial longline component for golden tilefish in the South Atlantic EEZ on March 5, 2014, and it will remain closed until the Therefore, 40 CFR chapter I is start of the next fishing season, January amended as follows: 1, 2015. This closure is necessary to protect the golden tilefish resource. PART 180—[AMENDED] DATES: This rule is effective 12:01 a.m., local time, March 5, 2014, until 12:01 ■ 1. The authority citation for part 180 a.m., local time, January 1, 2015. continues to read as follows: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Authority: 21 U.S.C. 321(q), 346a and 371. Catherine Hayslip, telephone: 727–824– ■ 2. In § 180.617, paragraph (a), revise the following entries in the table to read 5305, email: Catherine.Hayslip@ noaa.gov. as follows: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The § 180.617 Metconazole; tolerances for snapper-grouper fishery of the South residues. Atlantic includes golden tilefish and is (a) * * * managed under the Fishery Management Plan for the SnapperParts per Commodity Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic million Region (FMP). The FMP was prepared by the South Atlantic Fishery * * * * * Management Council and is Corn, field, stover ................. 30 implemented under the authority of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery * * * * * Conservation and Management Act by regulations at 50 CFR part 622. Corn, pop, stover .................. 30 On April 23, 2013, NMFS published a final rule for Amendment 18B to the * * * * * FMP (78 FR 23858). Amendment 18B to the FMP established a longline * * * * * endorsement program for the [FR Doc. 2014–04865 Filed 3–4–14; 8:45 am] commercial golden tilefish component BILLING CODE 6560–50–P of the snapper-grouper fishery and allocated the commercial golden tilefish ACL among two gear groups, the DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE longline and hook-and-line components. The commercial ACL (commercial National Oceanic and Atmospheric quota) for the longline component for Administration golden tilefish in the South Atlantic is 405,971 lb (184,145 kg), gutted weight, 50 CFR Part 622 for the current fishing year, January 1 [Docket No. 120404257–3325–02] through December 31, 2014, as specified in 50 CFR 622.190(a)(2)(iii). RIN 0648–XD118 Under 50 CFR 622.193(a)(1)(ii), NMFS is required to close the commercial Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of longline component for golden tilefish Mexico, and South Atlantic; 2014 when the longline component’s Commercial Accountability Measure commercial ACL (commercial quota) and Closure for South Atlantic Golden has been reached, or is projected to be Tilefish Longline Component reached, by filing a notification to that effect with the Office of the Federal AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Register. After the commercial ACL for Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and the longline component is reached or Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), projected to be reached, golden tilefish Commerce. may not be fished for or possessed by ACTION: Temporary rule; closure. a vessel with a golden tilefish longline SUMMARY: NMFS implements endorsement. NMFS has determined accountability measures for the that the commercial ACL (commercial commercial longline component for quota) for the longline component for golden tilefish in the exclusive golden tilefish in the South Atlantic will economic zone (EEZ) of the South have been reached by March 5, 2014. Atlantic. Commercial longline landings Accordingly, the commercial longline for golden tilefish, as estimated by the component for South Atlantic golden Science and Research Director (SRD), tilefish is closed effective 12:01 a.m., are projected to reach the longline local time, March 5, 2014, until 12:01 component’s commercial annual catch a.m., local time, January 1, 2015. VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:53 Mar 04, 2014 Jkt 232001 PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 12411 During the commercial longline closure, golden tilefish may still be harvested commercially using hookand-line gear. However, vessels with golden tilefish longline endorsements are not eligible to fish for golden tilefish using hook-and-line gear under the hook-and-line trip limit, as specified in 50 CFR 622.191(a)(2)(ii). The operator of a vessel with a valid commercial vessel permit for South Atlantic snappergrouper and a valid commercial longline endorsement for golden tilefish having golden tilefish onboard must have landed and bartered, traded, or sold such golden tilefish prior to 12:01 a.m., local time, March 5, 2014. Classification The Regional Administrator, Southeast Region, NMFS, has determined this temporary rule is necessary for the conservation and management of South Atlantic golden tilefish and is consistent with the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the FMP, and other applicable laws. This action is taken under 50 CFR 622.193(a)(1) and is exempt from review under Executive Order 12866. These measures are exempt from the procedures of the Regulatory Flexibility Act because the temporary rule is issued without opportunity for prior notice and comment. This action responds to the best available scientific information recently obtained from the fishery. The Assistant Administrator for Fisheries, NOAA, (AA), finds that the need to immediately implement this action to close the commercial longline component for golden tilefish constitutes good cause to waive the requirements to provide prior notice and opportunity for public comment pursuant to the authority set forth in 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B), as such procedures would be unnecessary and contrary to the public interest. Such procedures would be unnecessary because the rule itself has been subject to notice and comment, and all that remains is to notify the public of the closure. Allowing prior notice and opportunity for public comment is contrary to the public interest because of the need to immediately implement this action to protect golden tilefish since the capacity of the fishing fleet allows for rapid harvest of the commercial ACL (commercial quota) for the longline component. Prior notice and opportunity for public comment would require time and would potentially result in a harvest well in excess of the established commercial ACL (commercial quota) for the longline component. E:\FR\FM\05MRR1.SGM 05MRR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 43 (Wednesday, March 5, 2014)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 12408-12411]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-04865]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 180

[EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0656; FRL-9906-13]


Metconazole; Pesticide Tolerances

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This regulation amends the current tolerances for residues of 
metconazole in or on corn, field, stover and corn, pop, stover. BASF 
Corporation, requested these tolerance amendments under the Federal 
Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA).

DATES: This regulation is effective March 5, 2014. Objections and 
requests for hearings must be received on or before May 5, 2014, and 
must be filed in accordance with the instructions provided in 40 CFR 
part 178 (see also Unit I.C. of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION).

ADDRESSES: The docket for this action, identified by docket 
identification (ID) number EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0656, is available at http://www.regulations.gov or at the Office of Pesticide Programs

[[Page 12409]]

Regulatory Public Docket (OPP Docket) in the Environmental Protection 
Agency Docket Center (EPA/DC), EPA West Bldg., Rm. 3334, 1301 
Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001. The Public Reading 
Room is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
excluding legal holidays. The telephone number for the Public Reading 
Room is (202) 566-1744, and the telephone number for the OPP Docket is 
(703) 305-5805. Please review the visitor instructions and additional 
information about the docket available at http://www.epa.gov/dockets.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lois Rossi, Registration Division 
(7505P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency, 
1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001; telephone 
number: (703) 305-7090; email address: RDFRNotices@epa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. General Information

A. Does this action apply to me?

    You may be potentially affected by this action if you are an 
agricultural producer, food manufacturer, or pesticide manufacturer. 
The following list of North American Industrial Classification System 
(NAICS) codes is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a 
guide to help readers determine whether this document applies to them. 
Potentially affected entities may include:
     Crop production (NAICS code 111).
     Animal production (NAICS code 112).
     Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311).
     Pesticide manufacturing (NAICS code 32532).

B. How can I get electronic access to other related information?

    You may access a frequently updated electronic version of EPA's 
tolerance regulations at 40 CFR part 180 through the Government 
Printing Office's e-CFR site at http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?&c=ecfr&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title40/40tab_02.tpl.

C. How can I file an objection or hearing request?

    Under FFDCA section 408(g), 21 U.S.C. 346a, any person may file an 
objection to any aspect of this regulation and may also request a 
hearing on those objections. You must file your objection or request a 
hearing on this regulation in accordance with the instructions provided 
in 40 CFR part 178. To ensure proper receipt by EPA, you must identify 
docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0656 in the subject line on the first 
page of your submission. All objections and requests for a hearing must 
be in writing, and must be received by the Hearing Clerk on or before 
May 5, 2014. Addresses for mail and hand delivery of objections and 
hearing requests are provided in 40 CFR 178.25(b).
    In addition to filing an objection or hearing request with the 
Hearing Clerk as described in 40 CFR part 178, please submit a copy of 
the filing (excluding any Confidential Business Information (CBI)) for 
inclusion in the public docket. Information not marked confidential 
pursuant to 40 CFR part 2 may be disclosed publicly by EPA without 
prior notice. Submit the non-CBI copy of your objection or hearing 
request, identified by docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0656, by one of 
the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. 
Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. Do not submit 
electronically any information you consider to be CBI or other 
information whose disclosure is restricted by statute.
     Mail: OPP Docket, Environmental Protection Agency Docket 
Center (EPA/DC), (28221T), 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 
20460-0001.
     Hand Delivery: To make special arrangements for hand 
delivery or delivery of boxed information, please follow the 
instructions at http://www.epa.gov/dockets/contacts.htm.
    Additional instructions on commenting or visiting the docket, along 
with more information about dockets generally, is available at http://www.epa.gov/dockets.

II. Summary of Petitioned-For Tolerance

    In the Federal Register of October 25, 2013 (78 FR 63938) (FRL-
9901-96), EPA issued a document pursuant to FFDCA section 408(d)(3), 21 
U.S.C. 346a(d)(3), announcing the filing of a pesticide petition (PP 
3F8157) by BASF Corporation, 26 Davis Drive, P.O. Box 13528, RTP, NC 
27709-3528. The petition requested that 40 CFR 180.617 be amended by 
increasing tolerances for residues of the fungicide metconazole, in or 
on corn, field, stover from 4.5 parts per million (ppm) to 30.0 ppm and 
corn, pop, stover from 4.5 ppm to 30.0 ppm. That document referenced a 
summary of the petition prepared by BASF Corporation, the registrant, 
which is available in the docket, http://www.regulations.gov.
    There were no comments received in response to the notice of 
filing.

III. Aggregate Risk Assessment and Determination of Safety

    Section 408(b)(2)(A)(i) of FFDCA allows EPA to establish a 
tolerance (the legal limit for a pesticide chemical residue in or on a 
food) only if EPA determines that the tolerance is ``safe.'' Section 
408(b)(2)(A)(ii) of FFDCA defines ``safe'' to mean that ``there is a 
reasonable certainty that no harm will result from aggregate exposure 
to the pesticide chemical residue, including all anticipated dietary 
exposures and all other exposures for which there is reliable 
information.'' This includes exposure through drinking water and in 
residential settings, but does not include occupational exposure. 
Section 408(b)(2)(C) of FFDCA requires EPA to give special 
consideration to exposure of infants and children to the pesticide 
chemical residue in establishing a tolerance and to ``ensure that there 
is a reasonable certainty that no harm will result to infants and 
children from aggregate exposure to the pesticide chemical residue. . . 
.''
    Consistent with FFDCA section 408(b)(2)(D), and the factors 
specified in FFDCA section 408(b)(2)(D), EPA has reviewed the available 
scientific data and other relevant information in support of this 
action. EPA has sufficient data to assess the hazards of and to make a 
determination on aggregate exposure for metconazole including exposure 
resulting from the tolerances established by this action. EPA's 
assessment of exposures and risks associated with metconazole follows. 
Specific information on the studies received and the nature of the 
effects caused by metconazole can be found in www.regulations.gov, 
under docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0656-0004, entitled 
``Metconazole. Additional Residue Data on Corn Stover. Summary of 
Residue Data and within the memo entitled ``Metconazole. Summary of 
Risk Issues Associated with Increase in Tolerance for Corn Stover'', 
under docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0656-0005.
    To demonstrate the safety of the increases in these corn stover 
tolerances, EPA is relying on its most recent tolerance action on 
metconazole published in the Federal Register on August 17, 2011 (76 FR 
50898) (FRL-8882-7). See also 74 FR 21260, FRL-8408-6 (May 7, 2009) 
(initially establishing the corn stover tolerances). In the 2011 
tolerance action, EPA concluded that aggregate exposure to metconazole 
is safe assuming all treated commodities, including both human and 
animal foods, had metconazole residues at the tolerance level. Because

[[Page 12410]]

EPA assessed metconazole exposure assuming tolerance level residues--a 
level that is set above the level of residues expected from legal use 
of a pesticide--unless tolerance levels on human foods increase, the 
2011 action remains an up-to-date assessment of metconazole risk.
    Corn stover is an animal feed. Thus, humans are only exposed to 
metconazole on animal feed as a result of consuming meat, milk, or egg 
products from livestock that have eaten commodities containing 
metconazole residues. After examining the impact of the proposed 
increase on corn stover tolerances on residue levels in meat, milk, and 
eggs, EPA has concluded that any residue increases in meat, milk, and 
eggs will be minor (principally due to the minor role that corn stover 
plays in the livestock diet), and thus meat, milk, and egg tolerances 
will not need to be increased. In other words, EPA determined that the 
proposed increase in tolerance levels in corn stover will not result in 
metconazole residues exceeding the existing meat, milk, and egg 
tolerances.
    Accordingly, because EPA in the 2011 metconazole action assumed 
tolerance level residues in meat, milk, and eggs in assessing 
metconazole risk, and the proposed increase in the corn stover 
tolerances will not necessitate an increase in those tolerances, the 
2011 determination of safety applies with equal force to this action. 
For these reasons, and in reliance on the findings in the August 17, 
2011 and May 7, 2009 Federal Register actions, EPA concludes that there 
is reasonable certainty that no harm will result to the general 
population, and to infants and children, from aggregate exposure to 
metconazole residues.

IV. Other Considerations

A. Analytical Enforcement Methodology

    An adequate high performance liquid chromatography method with 
tandem mass spectrometry (Method D0604), entitled ``The Determination 
of Residues of BAS 555 F and its Metabolites in Corn and Cotton 
Matrices Using LC/MS/MS''), with the German multi-residue method DFG 
S19 as a confirmatory method, is adequate as an enforcement method. 
Method D0604 determines metconazole (cis- and trans-isomers), 1,2,4-
triazole (T), triazolyalanine (TA), and triazolylacetic acid (TAA). DFG 
S19 uses gas chromatography/nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC/NPD) or 
gas chromatography/mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS). The methods 
may be requested from: Chief, Analytical Chemistry Branch, 
Environmental Science Center, 701 Mapes Rd., Ft. Meade, MD 20755-5350; 
telephone number: (410) 305-2905; email address: 
residuemethods@epa.gov.

B. International Residue Limits

    In making its tolerance decisions, EPA seeks to harmonize U.S. 
tolerances with international standards whenever possible, consistent 
with U.S. food safety standards and agricultural practices. EPA 
considers the international maximum residue limits (MRLs) established 
by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex), as required by FFDCA 
section 408(b)(4). The Codex Alimentarius is a joint United Nations 
Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization food 
standards program, and it is recognized as an international food safety 
standards-setting organization in trade agreements to which the United 
States is a party. EPA may establish a tolerance that is different from 
a Codex MRL; however, FFDCA section 408(b)(4) requires that EPA explain 
the reasons for departing from the Codex level.
    The Codex has not established a MRL for metconazole on corn, field, 
stover and corn, pop, stover.

V. Conclusion

    Therefore, tolerances are established for residues of metconazole, 
measured as the sum of cis- and trans- isomers, in or on corn, field, 
stover at 30 ppm and corn, pop, stover at 30 ppm.

VI. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

    This final rule establishes tolerances under FFDCA section 408(d) 
in response to a petition submitted to the Agency. The Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) has exempted these types of actions from 
review under Executive Order 12866, entitled ``Regulatory Planning and 
Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has 
been exempted from review under Executive Order 12866, this final rule 
is not subject to Executive Order 13211, entitled ``Actions Concerning 
Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or 
Use'' (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001) or Executive Order 13045, entitled 
``Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety 
Risks'' (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997). This final rule does not contain 
any information collections subject to OMB approval under the Paperwork 
Reduction Act (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), nor does it require any 
special considerations under Executive Order 12898, entitled ``Federal 
Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and 
Low-Income Populations'' (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994).
    Since tolerances and exemptions that are established on the basis 
of a petition under FFDCA section 408(d), such as the tolerance in this 
final rule, do not require the issuance of a proposed rule, the 
requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) (5 U.S.C. 601 et 
seq.), do not apply.
    This final rule directly regulates growers, food processors, food 
handlers, and food retailers, not States or tribes, nor does this 
action alter the relationships or distribution of power and 
responsibilities established by Congress in the preemption provisions 
of FFDCA section 408(n)(4). As such, the Agency has determined that 
this action will not have a substantial direct effect on States or 
tribal governments, on the relationship between the national government 
and the States or tribal governments, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government or between 
the Federal Government and Indian tribes. Thus, the Agency has 
determined that Executive Order 13132, entitled ``Federalism'' (64 FR 
43255, August 10, 1999) and Executive Order 13175, entitled 
``Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments'' (65 FR 
67249, November 9, 2000) do not apply to this final rule. In addition, 
this final rule does not impose any enforceable duty or contain any 
unfunded mandate as described under Title II of the Unfunded Mandates 
Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA) (2 U.S.C. 1501 et seq.).
    This action does not involve any technical standards that would 
require Agency consideration of voluntary consensus standards pursuant 
to section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement 
Act of 1995 (NTTAA) (15 U.S.C. 272 note).

VII. Congressional Review Act

    Pursuant to the Congressional Review Act (5 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), 
EPA will submit a report containing this rule and other required 
information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and 
the Comptroller General of the United States prior to publication of 
the rule in the Federal Register. This action is not a ``major rule'' 
as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2).

 List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 180

    Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedure, 
Agricultural commodities, Pesticides and pests, Reporting and 
recordkeeping requirements.


[[Page 12411]]


    Dated: February 24, 2014.
Lois Rossi,
Director, Registration Division, Office of Pesticide Programs.

    Therefore, 40 CFR chapter I is amended as follows:

PART 180--[AMENDED]

0
1. The authority citation for part 180 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  21 U.S.C. 321(q), 346a and 371.
0
2. In Sec.  180.617, paragraph (a), revise the following entries in the 
table to read as follows:


Sec.  180.617  Metconazole; tolerances for residues.

    (a) * * *

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Parts per
                        Commodity                             million
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                * * * * *
 
Corn, field, stover.....................................              30
 
                                * * * * *
 
Corn, pop, stover.......................................              30
 
                                * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------

* * * * *
[FR Doc. 2014-04865 Filed 3-4-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6560-50-P