Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for the Black-Footed Ferret, 77485-77486 [2013-30481]

Download as PDF tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 246 / Monday, December 23, 2013 / Notices Rulings, Office of International Trade, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC. 20229–1177. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information should be directed to Tracey Denning, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Regulations and Rulings, Office of International Trade, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC. 20229– 1177, at 202–325–0265. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: CBP invites the general public and other Federal agencies to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–13; 44 U.S.C. 3507). The comments should address: (a) Whether the collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimates of the burden of the collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) ways to minimize the burden including the use of automated collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology; and (e) the annual costs burden to respondents or record keepers from the collection of information (a total capital/startup costs and operations and maintenance costs). The comments that are submitted will be summarized and included in the CBP request for Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval. All comments will become a matter of public record. In this document CBP is soliciting comments concerning the following information collection: Title: Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft OMB Number: 1651–0058 Form Number: None Abstract: In accordance with 19 CFR 122.27, a commander of a private aircraft arriving in the U.S. must present several documents to CBP officers for inspection. These documents include: 1) a pilot certificate/license; 2) a medical certificate; and 3) a certificate of registration, which is also called a ‘‘pink slip’’ and is a duplicate copy of the Aircraft Registration Application (FAA Form AC 8050–1). The information on these documents is used by CBP officers as an essential part of the inspection process for private aircraft arriving from a foreign country. These requirements are authorized by 19 U.S.C. 1433, as amended by Public Law 99–570. Current Actions: CBP proposes to extend the expiration date of this VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:12 Dec 20, 2013 Jkt 232001 information collection with no change to the burden hours. Type of Review: Extension (with change) Affected Public: Individuals Estimated Number of Respondents: 120,000 Estimated Number of Annual Responses: 120,000 Estimated Time per Response: 1 minute Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 1,992 Dated: December 18, 2013. Tracey Denning, Agency Clearance Officer, U.S. Customs and Border Protection. [FR Doc. 2013–30475 Filed 12–20–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–14–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R6–ES–2013–N216; FXES11130600000–145–FF06E00000] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for the Black-Footed Ferret Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document availability. AGENCY: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announces the availability of a revised recovery plan for the black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes). This species is federally listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). ADDRESSES: Electronic copies of the recovery plan are available online at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/ species/recovery-plans.html. Paper copies of the revised recovery plan are available by request from the National Black-footed Ferret Conservation Center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, P.O. Box 190, Wellington, CO 80549; telephone 970–897–2730. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Pete Gober, National Black-footed Ferret Recovery Coordinator, at the above address or telephone (see ADDRESSES). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: Background Recovering an endangered or threatened animal or plant to the point where it is again a secure, sustainable member of its ecosystem is a primary goal of the Service’s endangered species program. To help guide the recovery effort, the Service prepares recovery plans for the federally listed species native to the United States where a plan PO 00000 Frm 00069 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 77485 will promote the conservation of the species. Recovery plans describe sitespecific actions necessary for the conservation of the species; establish objective, measurable criteria which, when met, would result in a determination that the species no longer needs the protection of the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.); and provide estimates of the time and cost for implementing the needed recovery measures. The Act requires recovery plans for listed species unless such a plan would not promote the conservation of a particular species. Section 4(f)(4) of the Act requires that public notice and opportunity for public review and comment be provided during recovery plan development. We made the draft recovery plan available for public comment and peer review from April 23, 2013, to June 24, 2013 (78 FR 23948). We have considered all information received during the public comment and peer review period in the preparation of the final revised recovery plan for the black-footed ferret. The Service and other Federal agencies will take these comments and reviews into consideration in the course of implementing the final approved recovery plan for the black-footed ferret. In this final revised plan, we have summarized and responded to the issues raised by both the public and the requested peer reviewers in an appendix to the plan, and incorporated changes to the plan as appropriate. The black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) was historically found throughout the Great Plains, mountain basins, and semi-arid grasslands of North America wherever prairie dogs occurred. The species was listed as endangered in 1967 (32 FR 4001, March 11, 1967) under the Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966 and again in 1970 under the Endangered Species Conservation Act of 1969 (35 FR 8491, June 2, 1970). On January 4, 1974, the black-footed ferret was listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (39 FR 1171). The ferret’s close association with prairie dogs was an important factor in the ferret’s decline. From the late 1800s to approximately the 1960s, prairie dog-occupied habitat and prairie dog numbers were dramatically reduced by the effects of both temporal and permanent habitat loss caused by conversion of native grasslands to cropland, poisoning, and disease. The ferret population declined precipitously as a result. The recovery of the black-footed ferret will be achieved by establishing a number of ferret populations where appropriate habitat exists and by E:\FR\FM\23DEN1.SGM 23DEN1 77486 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 246 / Monday, December 23, 2013 / Notices ameliorating threats impacting the species so as to allow the ferret’s persistence. Although ferret habitat has been dramatically reduced from historical times, a sufficient amount remains if its quality and configuration is appropriately managed. This management, for the most part, is likely to be conducted by State, Tribal, and Federal fish and wildlife and land management agencies. Additionally, private parties, including landowners and conservation organizations, are key for ferret recovery. Many partners contributing to ferret recovery in many places will help minimize the risk of a significant loss of wild populations. Specifically, recovery of black-footed ferrets will depend upon: (1) Continued efforts of captive breeding facilities to provide suitable animals for release into the wild; (2) conservation of prairie dog habitat adequate to sustain ferrets in several populations distributed throughout their historical range; and (3) management of sylvatic plague. The single, most feasible action that would benefit black-footed ferret recovery is to improve prairie dog conservation. If efforts are undertaken to more proactively manage existing prairie dog habitat for ferret recovery, all other threats to the species will be substantially less difficult to address. Downlisting of the black-footed ferret could be accomplished in approximately 10 years if conservation actions continue at existing reintroduction sites and if additional reintroduction sites are established. Delisting will be possible if more intensive reintroduction efforts are conducted. Authority The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f). Dated: November 8, 2013. Matt Hogan, Acting Regional Director, Denver, CO. [FR Doc. 2013–30481 Filed 12–20–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES [145A2100DD.AADD001000.A0E501010. 999900] Renewal of Agency Information Collection for No Child Left Behind Act Implementation Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request for comments. AGENCY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:12 Dec 20, 2013 Jkt 232001 In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) is seeking comments on the renewal of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for the collection of information for the No Child Left Behind Act authorized by OMB Control Number 1076–0163. This information collection expires March 31, 2014. DATES: Submit comments on or before February 21, 2014. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments on the information collection to Jeffrey Hamley, Bureau of Indian Education, Division of Performance and Accountability, 1011 Indian School Road, NW., Suite 332, Albuquerque, NM 87104; facsimile: (505) 563–5281; email: Jeffrey.Hamley@bie.edu. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeffrey Hamley, telephone: (505) 563– 5255. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: I. Abstract The BIE is seeking renewal of the approval for the information collection conducted under 25 CFR parts 30, 37, 39, 42, 44, and 47 under OMB Control Number 1076–0163. This information collection is necessary to implement Public Law 107–110, No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). The NCLB requires all schools, including Bureaufunded and operated schools, to ensure that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a highquality education and reach, at a minimum, proficiency on challenging academic achievement standards and assessments. The BIE has promulgated several regulations implementing the NCLB Act. This OMB Control Number addresses the following regulations. • 25 CFR part 30—Adequately Yearly Progress (AYP). Tribes/school boards may request an alternative to the established AYP definition or standards. Tribes/school boards may provide evidence that BIE made an error in identifying the school for improvement. Achievement, attendance and graduation rates are collected from schools to facilitate yearly calculation of AYP. • 25 CFR part 37—Geographic Boundaries. This part establishes procedures for confirming, establishing, or revising attendance areas for each Bureau-funded and operated school. Tribes and school boards must submit certain information to BIE to propose a change in geographic boundaries. • 25 CFR part 39—Indian School Equalization Program (ISEP). This part provides for the uniform direct funding of Bureau-operated and tribally operated PO 00000 Frm 00070 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 day schools, boarding schools, and dormitories. Auditors of schools, to ensure accountability in student counts and student transportation, must certify that they meet certain qualifications and have conducted a conflict of interest check. Schools must submit information to BIE to apply for funds in the event of an emergency or unforeseen contingency. • 25 CFR part 42—Student Rights. The purpose of this part is to govern student rights and due process procedures in disciplinary proceedings in all Bureau-funded and operated schools. This part requires all the school to provide notice of disciplinary charges, provide a copy of the hearing of record, and provide a student handbook. • 25 CFR part 44—Grants under the Tribally Controlled Schools Act. The purpose of this part is to establish who is eligible for a grant and requires tribes to submit information to BIE to retrocede a program to the Secretary. • 25 CFR part 47—Uniform Direct Funding and Support for Bureauoperated Schools. This part contains the requirements for developing local educational financial plans in order to receive direct funding from the Bureau. This part requires school supervisors to submit quarterly reports to school boards; submit a notice of appeal to the BIE for a decision where agencies disagree over expenditures; make certain certifications in financial plans; and send the plan and documentation to the BIE or submit a notice of appeal. There are no forms associated with collection. No third party notification or public disclosure burden is associated with this collection. II. Request for Comments The BIE requests your comments on this collection concerning: (a) The necessity of this information collection for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) The accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden (hours and cost) of the collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) Ways we could enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) Ways we could minimize the burden of the collection of the information on the respondents. Please note that an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and an individual need not respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB Control Number. It is our policy to make all comments available to the public for review at the E:\FR\FM\23DEN1.SGM 23DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 246 (Monday, December 23, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 77485-77486]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-30481]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R6-ES-2013-N216; FXES11130600000-145-FF06E00000]


Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery 
Plan for the Black-Footed Ferret

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of document availability.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announces the 
availability of a revised recovery plan for the black-footed ferret 
(Mustela nigripes). This species is federally listed as endangered 
under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act).

ADDRESSES: Electronic copies of the recovery plan are available online 
at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/recovery-plans.html. Paper 
copies of the revised recovery plan are available by request from the 
National Black-footed Ferret Conservation Center, U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, P.O. Box 190, Wellington, CO 80549; telephone 970-
897-2730.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Pete Gober, National Black-footed 
Ferret Recovery Coordinator, at the above address or telephone (see 
ADDRESSES).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

    Recovering an endangered or threatened animal or plant to the point 
where it is again a secure, sustainable member of its ecosystem is a 
primary goal of the Service's endangered species program. To help guide 
the recovery effort, the Service prepares recovery plans for the 
federally listed species native to the United States where a plan will 
promote the conservation of the species. Recovery plans describe site-
specific actions necessary for the conservation of the species; 
establish objective, measurable criteria which, when met, would result 
in a determination that the species no longer needs the protection of 
the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.); and provide estimates of the time and 
cost for implementing the needed recovery measures.
    The Act requires recovery plans for listed species unless such a 
plan would not promote the conservation of a particular species. 
Section 4(f)(4) of the Act requires that public notice and opportunity 
for public review and comment be provided during recovery plan 
development. We made the draft recovery plan available for public 
comment and peer review from April 23, 2013, to June 24, 2013 (78 FR 
23948). We have considered all information received during the public 
comment and peer review period in the preparation of the final revised 
recovery plan for the black-footed ferret. The Service and other 
Federal agencies will take these comments and reviews into 
consideration in the course of implementing the final approved recovery 
plan for the black-footed ferret. In this final revised plan, we have 
summarized and responded to the issues raised by both the public and 
the requested peer reviewers in an appendix to the plan, and 
incorporated changes to the plan as appropriate.
    The black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) was historically found 
throughout the Great Plains, mountain basins, and semi-arid grasslands 
of North America wherever prairie dogs occurred. The species was listed 
as endangered in 1967 (32 FR 4001, March 11, 1967) under the Endangered 
Species Preservation Act of 1966 and again in 1970 under the Endangered 
Species Conservation Act of 1969 (35 FR 8491, June 2, 1970). On January 
4, 1974, the black-footed ferret was listed under the Endangered 
Species Act of 1973 (39 FR 1171). The ferret's close association with 
prairie dogs was an important factor in the ferret's decline. From the 
late 1800s to approximately the 1960s, prairie dog-occupied habitat and 
prairie dog numbers were dramatically reduced by the effects of both 
temporal and permanent habitat loss caused by conversion of native 
grasslands to cropland, poisoning, and disease. The ferret population 
declined precipitously as a result.
    The recovery of the black-footed ferret will be achieved by 
establishing a number of ferret populations where appropriate habitat 
exists and by

[[Page 77486]]

ameliorating threats impacting the species so as to allow the ferret's 
persistence. Although ferret habitat has been dramatically reduced from 
historical times, a sufficient amount remains if its quality and 
configuration is appropriately managed. This management, for the most 
part, is likely to be conducted by State, Tribal, and Federal fish and 
wildlife and land management agencies. Additionally, private parties, 
including landowners and conservation organizations, are key for ferret 
recovery. Many partners contributing to ferret recovery in many places 
will help minimize the risk of a significant loss of wild populations.
    Specifically, recovery of black-footed ferrets will depend upon: 
(1) Continued efforts of captive breeding facilities to provide 
suitable animals for release into the wild; (2) conservation of prairie 
dog habitat adequate to sustain ferrets in several populations 
distributed throughout their historical range; and (3) management of 
sylvatic plague. The single, most feasible action that would benefit 
black-footed ferret recovery is to improve prairie dog conservation. If 
efforts are undertaken to more proactively manage existing prairie dog 
habitat for ferret recovery, all other threats to the species will be 
substantially less difficult to address. Downlisting of the black-
footed ferret could be accomplished in approximately 10 years if 
conservation actions continue at existing reintroduction sites and if 
additional reintroduction sites are established. Delisting will be 
possible if more intensive reintroduction efforts are conducted.

Authority

    The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered 
Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f).

    Dated: November 8, 2013.
Matt Hogan,
Acting Regional Director, Denver, CO.
[FR Doc. 2013-30481 Filed 12-20-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P