Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama, 73234-73237 [2013-29100]

Download as PDF 73234 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 234 / Thursday, December 5, 2013 / Notices ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Township, Cambria County, PA (Docket No. 20110630). 2. Project Sponsor and Facility: Chevron Appalachia, LLC (Highland Sewer and Water Authority), Portage Township, Cambria County, PA (Docket No. 20110631). 3. Project Sponsor and Facility: Clark Trucking, LLC, Northeast Division, Muncy Creek Township, Lycoming County, PA (Docket No. 20111208). Project Applications Approved The Commission approved the following project applications: 1. Project Sponsor and Facility: Borough of Akron, Lancaster County, Pa. Renewal of groundwater withdrawal of up to 0.226 mgd (30-day average) from Well 5A (Docket No. 19811201); renewal of groundwater withdrawal of up to 0.166 mgd (30-day average) from Well 6 (Docket No. 19820101); and renewal of groundwater withdrawal of up to 0.148 mgd (30-day average) from Well 8 (Docket No. 19820101). 2. Project Sponsor and Facility: Bending River Estates (Tioga River), Town of Lindley, Steuben County, N.Y. Surface water withdrawal of up to 0.300 mgd (peak day). 3. Project Sponsor and Facility: Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation (Meshoppen Creek), Lemon Township, Wyoming County, Pa. Increase surface water withdrawal by an additional 0.446 mgd (peak day), for a total of 0.500 mgd (peak day) (Docket No. 20121202). 4. Project Sponsor and Facility: Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation (Meshoppen Creek), Springville Township, Susquehanna County, Pa. Surface water withdrawal of up to 0.500 mgd (peak day). 5. Project Sponsor and Facility: Chesapeake Appalachia, LLC (Chemung River), Athens Township, Bradford County, Pa. Renewal of surface water withdrawal of up to 0.999 mgd (peak day) (Docket No. 20090603). 6. Project Sponsor and Facility: Chesapeake Appalachia, LLC (Sugar Creek), Burlington Township, Bradford County, Pa. Renewal of surface water withdrawal of up to 0.499 mgd (peak day) (Docket No. 20090604). 7. Project Sponsor and Facility: Chesapeake Appalachia, LLC (Susquehanna River), Terry Township, Bradford County, Pa. Renewal of surface water withdrawal of up to 1.440 mgd (peak day) (Docket No. 20090605). 8. Project Sponsor and Facility: Town of Erwin, City of Corning, Steuben County, N.Y. Groundwater withdrawal of up to 0.504 mgd (30-day average) from Well 5R. 9. Project Sponsor and Facility: Global Tungsten & Powders Corp., Towanda VerDate Mar<15>2010 13:57 Dec 04, 2013 Jkt 232001 Borough, Bradford County, Pa. Groundwater withdrawal of up to 4.800 mgd (30-day average) from a Well Field (Wells 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12). 10. Project Sponsor and Facility: Southwestern Energy Production Company (Wyalusing Creek), Wyalusing Township, Bradford County, Pa. Renewal of surface water withdrawal with modification to increase by an additional 0.500 mgd (peak day), for a total of 2.000 mgd (peak day) (Docket No. 20090914). 11. Project Sponsor and Facility: State College Borough Water Authority, Ferguson Township, Centre County, Pa. Renewal of groundwater withdrawal of up to 0.605 mgd (30-day average) from Well 41 (Docket No. 19820501); renewal of groundwater withdrawal of up to 1.480 mgd (30-day average) from Well 43 (Docket No. 19820501); and renewal of groundwater withdrawal of up to 1.520 mgd (30-day average) from Well 53 (Docket No. 19820501). 12. Project Sponsor and Facility: Susquehanna Gas Field Services, L.L.C. (Meshoppen Creek), Meshoppen Borough, Wyoming County, Pa. Renewal of surface water withdrawal of up to 0.145 mgd (peak day) (Docket No. 20090628). 13. Project Sponsor: SWEPI LP (Tioga River), Richmond Township, Tioga County, Pa. Renewal of surface water withdrawal with modification to increase by an additional 0.843 mgd (peak day), for a total of 0.950 mgd (peak day) (Docket No. 20090612). Lancaster County, Pa. Application for renewal of groundwater withdrawal of up to 0.115 mgd (30-day average) from Well 6 (Docket No. 20000203). 4. Project Sponsor and Facility: Houtzdale Municipal Authority, Gulich Township, Clearfield County, Pa. Application for groundwater withdrawal of up to 0.537 mgd (30-day average) from Well 14R. 5. Project Sponsor and Facility: LHP Management, LLC (Fishing Creek— Clinton Country Club), Bald Eagle Township, Clinton County, Pa. Application for renewal of surface water withdrawal of up to 0.999 mgd (peak day) (Docket No. 20090906). 6. Project Sponsor and Facility: Millersburg Area Authority, Upper Paxton Township, Dauphin County, Pa. Application for renewal of groundwater withdrawal of up to 0.173 mgd (30-day average) from Well 10 (Docket No. 19830309). 7. Project Sponsor and Facility: Millersburg Area Authority, Upper Paxton Township, Dauphin County, Pa. Application for renewal of groundwater withdrawal of up to 0.187 mgd (30-day average) from Well 11 (Docket No. 19830309). 8. Project Sponsor and Facility: Winner Water Services, Inc. (Manor #44 Deep Mine), Girard Township, Clearfield County, Pa. Application for surface water withdrawal of up to 0.144 mgd (peak day). Authority: Pub. L. 91–575, 84 Stat. 1509 et seq., 18 CFR Parts 806, 807, and 808. Project Application Approved Involving a Diversion The Commission approved the following project application: 1. Project Sponsor: Winner Water Services, Inc. Project Facility: Sykesville Mine AMD, Borough of Sykesville, Jefferson County, Pa. Into-basin diversion of up to 1.000 mgd from the Ohio River Basin. Dated: November 27, 2013. Stephanie L. Richardson, Secretary to the Commission. Project Applications Tabled The Commission tabled the following project applications: 1. Project Sponsor and Facility: Aqua Infrastructure, LLC (Tioga River), Hamilton Township, Tioga County, Pa. Application for surface water withdrawal of up to 2.500 mgd (peak day). 2. Project Sponsor and Facility: Chesapeake Appalachia, LLC (Susquehanna River), Athens Township, Bradford County, Pa. Application for renewal of surface water withdrawal of up to 1.440 mgd (peak day) (Docket No. 20080906). 3. Project Sponsor and Facility: DS Waters of America, Inc., Clay Township, Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama PO 00000 Frm 00049 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 [FR Doc. 2013–29049 Filed 12–4–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7040–01–P OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In accordance with relevant provisions of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its determination of the trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\05DEN1.SGM 05DEN1 ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 234 / Thursday, December 5, 2013 / Notices and sugar-containing products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama. As described below, the level of a country’s trade surplus in these goods relates to the quantity of sugar and syrup goods and sugarcontaining products for which the United States grants preferential tariff treatment under (i) the United StatesChile Free Trade Agreement (Chile FTA); (ii) the United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement (Morocco FTA); (iii) the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA–DR); (iv) the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (Peru TPA); (v) the United StatesColombia Trade Promotion Agreement (Colombia TPA); and (vi) the United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement (Panama TPA). DATES: Effective January 1, 2014. ADDRESSES: Inquiries may be mailed or delivered to Ann Heilman-Dahl, Director of Agricultural Affairs, Office of Agricultural Affairs, Office of the United States Trade Representative, 600 17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20508. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ann Heilman-Dahl, Office of Agricultural Affairs, telephone: (202) 395–9582 or facsimile: (202) 395–4579. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Chile: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108–77; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 30, 2003 (68 FR 75789) implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Chile FTA. Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Chile’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in Harmonized System (HS) subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.20, 1702.30, 1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 1806.10, 2101.12, 2101.20, and 2106.90, except that Chile’s imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Chile FTA are not included in the calculation of Chile’s trade surplus. Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in an amount equal to the lesser of Chile’s VerDate Mar<15>2010 13:57 Dec 04, 2013 Jkt 232001 trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.10 through 9911.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Chile’s trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During calendar year (CY) 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, Chile’s imports of sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 517,065 metric tons according to data published by the Servicio Nacional de Aduana (Chile Customs). Based on this data, USTR determines that Chile’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99, goods of Chile are not eligible to enter the United States dutyfree under subheading 9911.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 9911.17.10 through 9911.17.85 in CY 2014. Morocco: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108–302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 76651) implemented the Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Morocco FTA. Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Morocco’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Morocco’s imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Morocco FTA are not included in the calculation of Morocco’s trade surplus. Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount equal to the lesser of Morocco’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of PO 00000 Frm 00050 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 73235 Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Morocco’s trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, Morocco’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 1,002,662 metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR determines that Morocco’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99, goods of Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY 2014. CAFTA–DR: Pursuant to section 201 of the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 109–53; 19 U.S.C. 4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 28, 2006 (71 FR 10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 2006 (71 FR 16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 2006 (71 FR 16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 (71 FR 38509), Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 2007 (72 FR 10025), Presidential Proclamation No. 8331 of December 23, 2008 (73 FR 79585), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8536 of June 12, 2010 (75 FR 34311) implemented the CAFTA–DR on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the CAFTA–DR. Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of each CAFTA–DR country’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that each CAFTA–DR country’s exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, and 1701.99 and its imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the CAFTA–DR are not included in the calculation of that country’s trade surplus. U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup E:\FR\FM\05DEN1.SGM 05DEN1 ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 73236 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 234 / Thursday, December 5, 2013 / Notices goods and sugar-containing products of each CAFTA–DR country entered under subheading 9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that country’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that country and that calendar year. During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, Costa Rica’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 41,312 metric tons according to data published by the Costa Rican Customs Department, Ministry of Finance. Based on this data, USTR determines that Costa Rica’s trade surplus is 41,312 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Costa Rica for CY 2014 is 12,760 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Costa Rica that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014 is 12,760 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Costa Rica’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Costa Rica for CY 2014). During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, the Dominican Republic’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugarcontaining products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 36,360 metric tons according to data published by the Instituto Azucarero Dominicano and the National Statistics Office of the Dominican Republic. Based on this data, USTR determines that the Dominican Republic’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of the Dominican Republic are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014. During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, El Salvador’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 133,154 metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of El Salvador. Based on this data, USTR determines that El Salvador’s trade surplus is 133,154 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for El Salvador for CY 2014 is 31,620 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of El Salvador that may be entered dutyfree under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014 is 31,620 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of El Salvador’s trade surplus and the specific quantity VerDate Mar<15>2010 13:57 Dec 04, 2013 Jkt 232001 set out in that note for El Salvador for CY 2014). During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, Guatemala’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 1,337,435 metric tons according to data published by the Asociacio´n de Azucareros de Guatemala (ASAZGUA). Based on this data, USTR determines that Guatemala’s trade surplus is 1,337,435 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Guatemala for CY 2014 is 42,840 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014 is 42,840 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Guatemala’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Guatemala for CY 2014). During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, Honduras’ exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 48,339 metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of Honduras. Based on this data, USTR determines that Honduras’ trade surplus is 48,339 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Honduras for CY 2014 is 9,280 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Honduras that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014 is 9,280 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Honduras’ trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Honduras for CY 2014). During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, Nicaragua’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 209,946 metric tons according to data published by the Ministry of Development, Industry and Trade (MIFIC). Based on this data, USTR determines that Nicaragua’s trade surplus is 209,946 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Nicaragua for CY 2014 is 25,520 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Nicaragua that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014 is 25,520 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Nicaragua’s trade surplus and the PO 00000 Frm 00051 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 specific quantity set out in that note for Nicaragua for CY 2014). Peru: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 110–138; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8341 of January 16, 2009 (74 FR 4105) implemented the Peru TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Peru TPA. Note 28(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Peru’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Peru’s imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Peru TPA and Peru’s exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Peru’s trade surplus. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Peru entered under subheading 9822.06.10 in an amount equal to the lesser of Peru’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, Peru’s imports of the sugar goods described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 303,225 metric tons according to data published by the Superintendencia Nacional de Administracion Tributaria. Based on this data, USTR determines that Peru’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Peru are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.06.10 in CY 2014. Colombia: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112–42; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8818 of May 14, 2012 (77 FR 29519) implemented the Colombia TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Colombia TPA. Note 32(b) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Colombia’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, E:\FR\FM\05DEN1.SGM 05DEN1 ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 234 / Thursday, December 5, 2013 / Notices except that Colombia’s imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Colombia TPA and Colombia’s exports to the United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Colombia’s trade surplus. Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Colombia entered under subheading 9822.08.01 in an amount equal to the lesser of Colombia’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, Colombia’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 369,367 metric tons according to data published by Global Trade Atlas. Based on this data, USTR determines that Colombia’s trade surplus is 369,367 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for CY 2014 is 51,500 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Colombia that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.08.01 in CY 2014 is 51,500 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Colombia’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Colombia for CY 2014). Panama: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112–43; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8894 of October 29, 2012 (77 FR 66505) implemented the Panama TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Panama TPA. Note 35(a) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Panama’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Panama’s imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Panama TPA and Panama’s exports to the United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Panama’s trade surplus. Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Panama VerDate Mar<15>2010 13:57 Dec 04, 2013 Jkt 232001 entered under subheading 9822.09.17 in an amount equal to the lesser of Panama’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, Panama’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 1,152 metric tons according to data published by National Institute of Statistics and Census, Office of the General Comptroller of Panama. Based on this data, USTR determines that Panama’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Panama are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.09.17. Islam A. Siddiqui, Chief Agricultural Negotiator, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. [FR Doc. 2013–29100 Filed 12–4–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3290–F4–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA–2013–0088] Reports, Forms and Record Keeping Requirements Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), this notice announces that the Information Collection Request (ICR) abstracted below has been forwarded to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The ICR describes the nature of the information collections and their expected burden. The Federal Register Notice with a 60-day comment period was published on September 5, 2013 (78 FR 54722). DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before January 6, 2014. ADDRESSES: Comments should be directed to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, 725–17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20503, Attention NHTSA Desk Officer. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Otto Matheke, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Office of the Chief Counsel (NCC–111), (202) 366– SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 73237 5263, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Title: Confidential Business Information. Type of Request: Extension of a currently approved collection. Form Number: This collection of information uses no standard forms. OMB Control Number: 2127–0025. Frequency: Submission of information pursuant to this regulation will depend on the frequency with which a given entity, such as a manufacturer of motor vehicles or motor vehicle equipment, submits information and a request that the agency hold the information confidential, generally pursuant to Exemption 4 of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4). Affected Public: This collection of information would apply to any person who seeks to have the agency treat as confidential information submitted to the agency either voluntarily or pursuant to a mandatory information request issued by the agency. Thus, the collection of information could apply to any of the entities over which the agency exercises regulatory authority. Recent trends lead the agency to estimate that NHTSA will receive approximately 460 requests for confidential treatment in 2014 and subsequent years. Large manufacturers make the vast majority of requests for confidential treatment. Abstract: NHTSA’s Confidential Business Information (CBI) rule, coupled with case law, has governed the submission of requests for confidential treatment of information for over 20 years. Estimated Annual Burden: Using the above estimate of approximately 460 requests for confidentiality per year, with an estimated eight hours of preparation to collect and provide the information, at an assumed rate of $24.15 per hour, the annual estimated cost of collecting and preparing the information necessary for 460 complete requests for confidential treatment is about $88,872 (8 hours of preparation × 460 requests × $24.15). Adding in a postage cost of $2,576 (460 requests at a cost of $5.60 for postage (priority flat rate envelope from USPS)), we estimate that it will cost $91,448 per year for persons to prepare and submit the information necessary to satisfy the confidential business information provisions of 49 CFR Part 512. Requesters are not required to keep copies of any records or reports E:\FR\FM\05DEN1.SGM 05DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 234 (Thursday, December 5, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 73234-73237]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-29100]


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OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE


Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods 
and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the 
Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, 
Colombia, and Panama

AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with relevant provisions of the Harmonized 
Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), the Office of the United 
States Trade Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its 
determination of the trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods

[[Page 73235]]

and sugar-containing products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the 
Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, 
Colombia, and Panama. As described below, the level of a country's 
trade surplus in these goods relates to the quantity of sugar and syrup 
goods and sugar-containing products for which the United States grants 
preferential tariff treatment under (i) the United States-Chile Free 
Trade Agreement (Chile FTA); (ii) the United States-Morocco Free Trade 
Agreement (Morocco FTA); (iii) the Dominican Republic-Central America-
United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR); (iv) the United States-
Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (Peru TPA); (v) the United States-
Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement (Colombia TPA); and (vi) the United 
States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement (Panama TPA).

DATES: Effective January 1, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Inquiries may be mailed or delivered to Ann Heilman-Dahl, 
Director of Agricultural Affairs, Office of Agricultural Affairs, 
Office of the United States Trade Representative, 600 17th Street NW., 
Washington, DC 20508.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ann Heilman-Dahl, Office of 
Agricultural Affairs, telephone: (202) 395-9582 or facsimile: (202) 
395-4579.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    Chile: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Chile Free 
Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108-77; 19 U.S.C. 3805 
note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 30, 2003 (68 FR 
75789) implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Chile FTA.
    Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR is 
required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of 
the amount of Chile's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for 
goods in Harmonized System (HS) subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.13, 
1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.20, 1702.30, 1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 
1806.10, 2101.12, 2101.20, and 2106.90, except that Chile's imports of 
goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify 
for preferential tariff treatment under the Chile FTA are not included 
in the calculation of Chile's trade surplus.
    Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in an amount 
equal to the lesser of Chile's trade surplus or the specific quantity 
set out in that note for that calendar year.
    U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides 
preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.10 
through 9911.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Chile's 
trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for 
that calendar year.
    During calendar year (CY) 2012, the most recent year for which data 
is available, Chile's imports of sugar and syrup goods and sugar-
containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods 
by 517,065 metric tons according to data published by the Servicio 
Nacional de Aduana (Chile Customs). Based on this data, USTR determines 
that Chile's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with 
U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99, 
goods of Chile are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free 
under subheading 9911.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under 
subheading 9911.17.10 through 9911.17.85 in CY 2014.
    Morocco: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Morocco Free 
Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108-302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 
note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 
76651) implemented the Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Morocco FTA.
    Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR 
is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination 
of the amount of Morocco's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources 
for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 
1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Morocco's imports 
of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that 
qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Morocco FTA are not 
included in the calculation of Morocco's trade surplus.
    Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount 
equal to the lesser of Morocco's trade surplus or the specific quantity 
set out in that note for that calendar year.
    Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides 
preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 
9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which 
Morocco's trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that 
note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Morocco's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 
1,002,662 metric tons according to data published by its customs 
authority, the Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR determines 
that Morocco's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with 
U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 
99, goods of Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-
free under subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under 
subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY 2014.
    CAFTA-DR: Pursuant to section 201 of the Dominican Republic-Central 
America-United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 
109-53; 19 U.S.C. 4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 
28, 2006 (71 FR 10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 
2006 (71 FR 16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 
2006 (71 FR 16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 
(71 FR 38509), Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 2007 
(72 FR 10025), Presidential Proclamation No. 8331 of December 23, 2008 
(73 FR 79585), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8536 of June 12, 2010 
(75 FR 34311) implemented the CAFTA-DR on behalf of the United States 
and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in 
the CAFTA-DR.
    Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that 
USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a 
determination of the amount of each CAFTA-DR country's trade surplus, 
by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 
1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that each 
CAFTA-DR country's exports to the United States of goods classified 
under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, and 
1701.99 and its imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 
1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment 
under the CAFTA-DR are not included in the calculation of that 
country's trade surplus.
    U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides 
duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup

[[Page 73236]]

goods and sugar-containing products of each CAFTA-DR country entered 
under subheading 9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that 
country's trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note 
for that country and that calendar year.
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Costa Rica's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 41,312 
metric tons according to data published by the Costa Rican Customs 
Department, Ministry of Finance. Based on this data, USTR determines 
that Costa Rica's trade surplus is 41,312 metric tons. The specific 
quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS 
chapter 98 for Costa Rica for CY 2014 is 12,760 metric tons. Therefore, 
in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Costa 
Rica that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 
2014 is 12,760 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of 
Costa Rica's trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that 
note for Costa Rica for CY 2014).
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
the Dominican Republic's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those 
goods by 36,360 metric tons according to data published by the 
Instituto Azucarero Dominicano and the National Statistics Office of 
the Dominican Republic. Based on this data, USTR determines that the 
Dominican Republic's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in 
accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 
98, goods of the Dominican Republic are not eligible to enter the 
United States duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014.
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
El Salvador's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 133,154 
metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of El 
Salvador. Based on this data, USTR determines that El Salvador's trade 
surplus is 133,154 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. 
Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for El Salvador for 
CY 2014 is 31,620 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, 
the aggregate quantity of goods of El Salvador that may be entered 
duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014 is 31,620 metric tons 
(i.e., the amount that is the lesser of El Salvador's trade surplus and 
the specific quantity set out in that note for El Salvador for CY 
2014).
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Guatemala's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 
1,337,435 metric tons according to data published by the 
Asociacio[acute]n de Azucareros de Guatemala (ASAZGUA). Based on this 
data, USTR determines that Guatemala's trade surplus is 1,337,435 
metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to 
subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Guatemala for CY 2014 is 42,840 
metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate 
quantity of goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under 
subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014 is 42,840 metric tons (i.e., the 
amount that is the lesser of Guatemala's trade surplus and the specific 
quantity set out in that note for Guatemala for CY 2014).
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Honduras' exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 48,339 
metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of 
Honduras. Based on this data, USTR determines that Honduras' trade 
surplus is 48,339 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. 
Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Honduras for CY 
2014 is 9,280 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the 
aggregate quantity of goods of Honduras that may be entered duty-free 
under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014 is 9,280 metric tons (i.e., the 
amount that is the lesser of Honduras' trade surplus and the specific 
quantity set out in that note for Honduras for CY 2014).
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Nicaragua's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 209,946 
metric tons according to data published by the Ministry of Development, 
Industry and Trade (MIFIC). Based on this data, USTR determines that 
Nicaragua's trade surplus is 209,946 metric tons. The specific quantity 
set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for 
Nicaragua for CY 2014 is 25,520 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance 
with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Nicaragua that may 
be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2014 is 25,520 
metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Nicaragua's trade 
surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Nicaragua 
for CY 2014).
    Peru: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Peru Trade 
Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 110-138; 19 U.S.C. 3805 
note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8341 of January 16, 2009 (74 FR 
4105) implemented the Peru TPA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Peru TPA.
    Note 28(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR 
is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination 
of the amount of Peru's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for 
goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 
1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Peru's imports of U.S. goods 
classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are 
originating goods under the Peru TPA and Peru's exports to the United 
States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 
1701.91, and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Peru's 
trade surplus.
    Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar goods of Peru entered under subheading 
9822.06.10 in an amount equal to the lesser of Peru's trade surplus or 
the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Peru's imports of the sugar goods described above exceeded its exports 
of those goods by 303,225 metric tons according to data published by 
the Superintendencia Nacional de Administracion Tributaria. Based on 
this data, USTR determines that Peru's trade surplus is negative. 
Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS 
chapter 98, goods of Peru are not eligible to enter the United States 
duty-free under subheading 9822.06.10 in CY 2014.
    Colombia: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Colombia 
Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112-42; 19 U.S.C. 
3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8818 of May 14, 2012 (77 FR 
29519) implemented the Colombia TPA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Colombia TPA.
    Note 32(b) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR 
is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination 
of the amount of Colombia's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources 
for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 
1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60,

[[Page 73237]]

except that Colombia's imports of U.S. goods classified under 
subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the 
Colombia TPA and Colombia's exports to the United States of goods 
classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 
1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Colombia's trade 
surplus.
    Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-
free treatment for certain sugar goods of Colombia entered under 
subheading 9822.08.01 in an amount equal to the lesser of Colombia's 
trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that 
calendar year.
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Colombia's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 369,367 
metric tons according to data published by Global Trade Atlas. Based on 
this data, USTR determines that Colombia's trade surplus is 369,367 
metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 32(c)(i) to 
subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for CY 2014 is 51,500 metric tons. 
Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of 
goods of Colombia that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.08.01 in CY 2014 is 51,500 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is 
the lesser of Colombia's trade surplus and the specific quantity set 
out in that note for Colombia for CY 2014).
    Panama: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Panama Trade 
Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112-43; 19 U.S.C. 3805 
note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8894 of October 29, 2012 (77 FR 
66505) implemented the Panama TPA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Panama TPA.
    Note 35(a) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR 
is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination 
of the amount of Panama's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources 
for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 
1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Panama's imports of U.S. 
goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are 
originating goods under the Panama TPA and Panama's exports to the 
United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 
1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of 
Panama's trade surplus.
    Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar goods of Panama entered under subheading 
9822.09.17 in an amount equal to the lesser of Panama's trade surplus 
or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Panama's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 1,152 
metric tons according to data published by National Institute of 
Statistics and Census, Office of the General Comptroller of Panama. 
Based on this data, USTR determines that Panama's trade surplus is 
negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 35(c) to subchapter 
XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Panama are not eligible to enter the 
United States duty-free under subheading 9822.09.17.

Islam A. Siddiqui,
Chief Agricultural Negotiator, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.
[FR Doc. 2013-29100 Filed 12-4-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3290-F4-P