Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations, 68450-68451 [2013-27274]

Download as PDF 68450 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 220 / Thursday, November 14, 2013 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Notice of Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board Membership The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) announces the appointment of members to the AHRQ Senior Executive Service (SES) Performance Review Board (PRB). This action is being taken in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 4314(c)(4), which requires notice of appointment of members to performance review boards to be published in the Federal Register. Members of the PRB are appointed in a manner that will ensure consistency, stability and objectivity in the SES performance appraisals. The function of the PRB is to make recommendations to the Director, AHRQ, relating to the performance of senior executives in the Agency. The following persons will serve on the AHRQ SES Performance Review Board: Irene Fraser; Stephen B. Cohen; William Munier; David Meyers; Michael Fitzmaurice; Phyllis Zucker; Mark Handelman; Jean Slutsky; For further information about the AHRQ Performance Review Board, contact Ms. Alison Reinheimer, Office of Management Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 540 Gaither Road, Suite 4010, Rockville, Maryland 20850. Dated: November 5, 2013. Richard Kronick, AHRQ Director. [FR Doc. 2013–27169 Filed 11–13–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4160–90–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–14–13QQ] TKELleY on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. To request more information on the VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:20 Nov 13, 2013 Jkt 232001 proposed projects or to obtain a copy of the data collection plans and instruments, call 404–639–7570 and send comments to Kimberly S. Lane, 1600 Clifton Road, MS–D74, Atlanta, GA 30333 or send an email to omb@ cdc.gov. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. Proposed Project Older Adult Safe Mobility Assessment Tool—NEW—National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description In 2010, there were 40 million adults aged 65 or older in the U.S., representing 13% of the U.S. population. By 2030, this segment of the population will increase to an estimated 72 million or 20%. People now aged 65 are expected to live well into their 80s with the vast majority preferring to ‘‘age in place’’ (i.e., grow old in their current homes). With most adults aging in place, rather than in retirement or nursing homes, it is absolutely critical to better prepare communities and older Americans for what is on the horizon. There is widespread agreement that older adults in the U.S. do not adequately plan for their future mobility needs, nor are most aware of existing mobility resources in their communities. Thus, when an individual’s mobility becomes impaired they are ill prepared to adapt their lifestyle to their changing needs. A process of mobility assessment would begin to address this situation and aid older adults in meeting their changing mobility needs. At present there are numerous mobility-related assessments actively used throughout the U.S. Most are designed to collect information from just one particular mobility silo, such as assessments that focus on fall prevention. None of these existing tools cut across mobility silos while focusing PO 00000 Frm 00041 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 on older adults. None create a national picture of older adult safe mobility that captures an individual’s physical and emotional health, their social network, or the ease of mobility in their home, transportation, their neighborhood, their city, and beyond. And no existing older adult tools are both mobility holistic and empowerment driven selfadministered assessments. The data collected in this project will allow CDC to develop a Tool that can help older adults both assess and improve their complete mobility. This project involves developing, refining and validating a Safe Mobility Assessment Tool that allows older adults to assess their current mobility situation, learn about mobility challenges that may affect them in the future, and receive actionable feedback on how to improve and protect their mobility. The information collected in this project will be used to refine and improve the Tool, as well as to conduct feasibility and audience acceptability analysis of the Tool. This information will allow CDC to create the most useful Safe Mobility Assessment Tool possible for U.S. older adults. CDC requests OMB approval for one year to collect both qualitative and quantitative data in order to develop and refine the Tool, and assess feasibility and audience acceptability. Qualitative data collection will include key informant interviews, focus groups, and intercepts in urban and rural communities. In brief, these methods will include key informant interviews of community stakeholders (three stakeholder interviews in two states for a total of six key informant interviews); older adult consumer focus groups (two focus groups in two states with seven people each for a total of fourteen participants); and older adult consumer intercepts (thirty intercepts in two rural locations and ten intercepts in two urban locations for a total of forty intercepts). The qualitative data collection will be used to help inform a quantitative stage of work to include a national sample of geographically and socio-demographically diverse older adults (N = 1,000) who will be recruited and interviewed by telephone. The key informant interviews, focus groups, intercepts and telephone survey data collection will allow us to gain information about the feasibility and usefulness of the Older Adult Safe Mobility Tool; about what impacts the Tool may have on older adults (e.g., motivation to change/behavior intent, and changes in knowledge, attitude, and awareness); about which mobility domains are most valuable to include in the Tool (e.g., which are of greatest E:\FR\FM\14NON1.SGM 14NON1 68451 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 220 / Thursday, November 14, 2013 / Notices interest and can be improved by older adults), and about what other areas of the Tool could be refined and improved. This information will allow us to create a final version of the Safe Mobility Assessment Tool that can be used by older adults across the U.S. to protect and enhance their mobility. CDC anticipates that data collection will begin in December 2013 and that all data collection will be completed by July 2014. CDC estimates the following burden for one-time respondents: Key informant interviews will be administered to 6 individuals and will take approximately 30 minutes to complete for a total burden of 3 hours, focus groups will be conducted for 14 older adults requiring up to 15 minutes per participant to review the consent form and screener and 120 minutes to participate in the focus group for a total burden of 32 hours, intercept interviews will be administered to 40 older adults requiring up to 15 minutes to review the consent and screener form and 30 minutes to participate in the interview for a total burden of 30 hours, and the telephone survey will survey 1000 older adults involving an on-your-own review of materials (approximately 15 minutes) and a pre-scheduled telephone survey (approximately 27 minutes) for a total burden of 700 hours. Key informant interviews and the quantitative survey will be conducted by telephone. As telephone survey participants are recruited, they may elect to receive stimulus material (i.e., a draft version of the Tool) prior to the survey either by mail or electronically via email, whichever they prefer. In addition, focus group participants may receive communications (confirmation and reminder notices) via email or mail. Email communication will be used with key informant, focus group and telephone survey respondents, however each will be given the option of mail rather than email as their preferred communication method. Email will be provided not only as a courtesy to respondents, for those respondents that prefer email rather than mail, but also, it will allow more open and swift communication between CDC and the study participants. Additionally, recruitment/screening for the focus groups and telephone surveys, as well as administration of the telephone surveys will use Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) systems for data collection, which are designed to reduce the burden to respondents. There are no costs to respondents other than their time. The total estimated annual burden hours are 765. ESTIMATE ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of respondents Type of respondent Form name Key informant interview respondents ............. Focus group respondents ............................... Interview guide ............................................... Respondent Consent & Screener .................. Moderator guide ............................................. Respondent Consent & Screener .................. Intercept script ................................................ Respondent Consent & Screener .................. Survey ............................................................ Intercept respondents ..................................... Telephone survey respondents ...................... Kimberly S. Lane, Deputy Director, Office of Science Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. [FR Doc. 2013–27274 Filed 11–13–13; 8:45 am] Generic Clearance for the Collection of Qualitative Feedback on Agency Service Delivery—NEW—Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Office of the Associate Director for Communication (OADC). As part of a Federal Government-wide effort to streamline the process to see feedback from the public on service delivery, the CDC has submitted a Generic Information Collection Request (Generic ICR): ‘‘Generic Clearance for the Collection of Qualitative Feedback on Agency Service Delivery’’ to OMB for approval under the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501 et. Seq.). To request additional information, please contact Kimberly S. Lane, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, MS–D74, Atlanta, GA 30333 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Proposed Project BILLING CODE 4163–18–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30-Day 14–14BX] TKELleY on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a list of information collection requests under review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these requests, call (404) 639–7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Send written comments to CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:20 Nov 13, 2013 Jkt 232001 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00042 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 6 14 14 40 40 1000 1,000 Number of responses per respondent Response burden (in hours) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 30/60 15/60 2 15/60 30/60 15/60 27/60 Title: Generic Clearance for the Collection of Qualitative Feedback on Agency Service Delivery. Abstract: The information collection activity will garner qualitative customer and stakeholder feedback in an efficient, timely manner, in accordance with the Administration’s commitment to improving service delivery. By qualitative feedback we mean information that provides useful insights on perceptions and opinions, but are not statistical surveys that yield quantitative results that can be generalized to the population of study. This feedback will provide insights into customer or stakeholder perceptions, experiences and expectations, provide an early warning of issues with service, or focus attention on areas where communication, training or changes in operations might improve delivery of products or services. These collections will allow for ongoing, collaborative and actionable communications between the Agency and its customers and stakeholders. It will also allow feedback to contribute directly to the improvement of program management. Feedback collected under this generic E:\FR\FM\14NON1.SGM 14NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 220 (Thursday, November 14, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 68450-68451]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-27274]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[30Day-14-13QQ]


Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and 
Recommendations

    In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the 
Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 for opportunity for public comment on 
proposed data collection projects, the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. 
To request more information on the proposed projects or to obtain a 
copy of the data collection plans and instruments, call 404-639-7570 
and send comments to Kimberly S. Lane, 1600 Clifton Road, MS-D74, 
Atlanta, GA 30333 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov.
    Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of 
information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of 
the agency, including whether the information shall have practical 
utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, 
utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways 
to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, 
including through the use of automated collection techniques or other 
forms of information technology. Written comments should be received 
within 30 days of this notice.

Proposed Project

    Older Adult Safe Mobility Assessment Tool--NEW--National Center for 
Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC).

Background and Brief Description

    In 2010, there were 40 million adults aged 65 or older in the U.S., 
representing 13% of the U.S. population. By 2030, this segment of the 
population will increase to an estimated 72 million or 20%. People now 
aged 65 are expected to live well into their 80s with the vast majority 
preferring to ``age in place'' (i.e., grow old in their current homes). 
With most adults aging in place, rather than in retirement or nursing 
homes, it is absolutely critical to better prepare communities and 
older Americans for what is on the horizon.
    There is widespread agreement that older adults in the U.S. do not 
adequately plan for their future mobility needs, nor are most aware of 
existing mobility resources in their communities. Thus, when an 
individual's mobility becomes impaired they are ill prepared to adapt 
their lifestyle to their changing needs. A process of mobility 
assessment would begin to address this situation and aid older adults 
in meeting their changing mobility needs.
    At present there are numerous mobility-related assessments actively 
used throughout the U.S. Most are designed to collect information from 
just one particular mobility silo, such as assessments that focus on 
fall prevention. None of these existing tools cut across mobility silos 
while focusing on older adults. None create a national picture of older 
adult safe mobility that captures an individual's physical and 
emotional health, their social network, or the ease of mobility in 
their home, transportation, their neighborhood, their city, and beyond. 
And no existing older adult tools are both mobility holistic and 
empowerment driven self-administered assessments. The data collected in 
this project will allow CDC to develop a Tool that can help older 
adults both assess and improve their complete mobility.
    This project involves developing, refining and validating a Safe 
Mobility Assessment Tool that allows older adults to assess their 
current mobility situation, learn about mobility challenges that may 
affect them in the future, and receive actionable feedback on how to 
improve and protect their mobility. The information collected in this 
project will be used to refine and improve the Tool, as well as to 
conduct feasibility and audience acceptability analysis of the Tool. 
This information will allow CDC to create the most useful Safe Mobility 
Assessment Tool possible for U.S. older adults.
    CDC requests OMB approval for one year to collect both qualitative 
and quantitative data in order to develop and refine the Tool, and 
assess feasibility and audience acceptability. Qualitative data 
collection will include key informant interviews, focus groups, and 
intercepts in urban and rural communities. In brief, these methods will 
include key informant interviews of community stakeholders (three 
stakeholder interviews in two states for a total of six key informant 
interviews); older adult consumer focus groups (two focus groups in two 
states with seven people each for a total of fourteen participants); 
and older adult consumer intercepts (thirty intercepts in two rural 
locations and ten intercepts in two urban locations for a total of 
forty intercepts). The qualitative data collection will be used to help 
inform a quantitative stage of work to include a national sample of 
geographically and socio-demographically diverse older adults (N = 
1,000) who will be recruited and interviewed by telephone. The key 
informant interviews, focus groups, intercepts and telephone survey 
data collection will allow us to gain information about the feasibility 
and usefulness of the Older Adult Safe Mobility Tool; about what 
impacts the Tool may have on older adults (e.g., motivation to change/
behavior intent, and changes in knowledge, attitude, and awareness); 
about which mobility domains are most valuable to include in the Tool 
(e.g., which are of greatest

[[Page 68451]]

interest and can be improved by older adults), and about what other 
areas of the Tool could be refined and improved. This information will 
allow us to create a final version of the Safe Mobility Assessment Tool 
that can be used by older adults across the U.S. to protect and enhance 
their mobility.
    CDC anticipates that data collection will begin in December 2013 
and that all data collection will be completed by July 2014. CDC 
estimates the following burden for one-time respondents: Key informant 
interviews will be administered to 6 individuals and will take 
approximately 30 minutes to complete for a total burden of 3 hours, 
focus groups will be conducted for 14 older adults requiring up to 15 
minutes per participant to review the consent form and screener and 120 
minutes to participate in the focus group for a total burden of 32 
hours, intercept interviews will be administered to 40 older adults 
requiring up to 15 minutes to review the consent and screener form and 
30 minutes to participate in the interview for a total burden of 30 
hours, and the telephone survey will survey 1000 older adults involving 
an on-your-own review of materials (approximately 15 minutes) and a 
pre-scheduled telephone survey (approximately 27 minutes) for a total 
burden of 700 hours.
    Key informant interviews and the quantitative survey will be 
conducted by telephone. As telephone survey participants are recruited, 
they may elect to receive stimulus material (i.e., a draft version of 
the Tool) prior to the survey either by mail or electronically via 
email, whichever they prefer. In addition, focus group participants may 
receive communications (confirmation and reminder notices) via email or 
mail. Email communication will be used with key informant, focus group 
and telephone survey respondents, however each will be given the option 
of mail rather than email as their preferred communication method. 
Email will be provided not only as a courtesy to respondents, for those 
respondents that prefer email rather than mail, but also, it will allow 
more open and swift communication between CDC and the study 
participants. Additionally, recruitment/screening for the focus groups 
and telephone surveys, as well as administration of the telephone 
surveys will use Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) systems 
for data collection, which are designed to reduce the burden to 
respondents.
    There are no costs to respondents other than their time. The total 
estimated annual burden hours are 765.

                                        Estimate Annualized Burden Hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Number of       Response
          Type of respondent                    Form name            Number of    responses  per    burden  (in
                                                                    respondents      respondent       hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Key informant interview respondents...  Interview guide.........               6               1           30/60
Focus group respondents...............  Respondent Consent &                  14               1           15/60
                                         Screener.
                                        Moderator guide.........              14               1               2
Intercept respondents.................  Respondent Consent &                  40               1           15/60
                                         Screener.
                                        Intercept script........              40               1           30/60
Telephone survey respondents..........  Respondent Consent &                1000               1           15/60
                                         Screener.
                                        Survey..................           1,000               1           27/60
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Kimberly S. Lane,
Deputy Director, Office of Science Integrity, Office of the Associate 
Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention.
[FR Doc. 2013-27274 Filed 11-13-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4163-18-P