Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review, 68074-68075 [2013-27083]

Download as PDF 68074 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 219 / Wednesday, November 13, 2013 / Notices Written comments will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. ET on December 4, 2013. ADDRESSES: Written comments will be accepted via an online public comment database at http://healthypeople.gov/ 2020/about/publicComment.aspx; by mail at Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Attn: Public Comment, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Room LL–100, Rockville, MD 20852; by fax to 240–453–8281; or by email to HP2020@hhs.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Theresa Devine, MPH, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Room LL–100, Rockville, MD 20852, Theresa.Devine@hhs.gov (email), 240– 453–6112 (telephone), 240–453–8281 (fax). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: For three decades, Healthy People has provided a comprehensive set of national 10-year health promotion and disease prevention objectives aimed at improving the health of all Americans. Healthy People 2020 objectives provide a framework by presenting a comprehensive picture of the nation’s health at the beginning of the decade, establishing national goals and targets to be achieved by the year 2020, and monitoring progress over time. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is soliciting the submission of written comments regarding new objectives proposed to be added to Healthy People 2020 since the fall 2012 public comment period. Healthy People 2020 is the product of an extensive collaborative process that relies on input from a diverse array of individuals and organizations, both within and outside the federal government, with a common interest in improving the nation’s health. Public comments were a cornerstone of Healthy People 2020’s development. During the first phase of planning for Healthy People 2020, HHS asked for the public’s comments on the vision, mission, and implementation of Healthy People 2020. Those comments helped set the framework for Healthy People 2020. The public was also invited to submit comments on proposed Healthy People 2020 objectives, which helped shape the final set of Healthy People 2020 objectives. The public is now invited to comment on new objectives proposed to be added to Healthy People 2020. These new objectives were developed by Topic Area workgroups led by various agencies within the federal government. sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES DATES: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:14 Nov 12, 2013 Jkt 232001 They have been reviewed by the Federal Interagency Workgroup on Healthy People 2020 and are presented now for the public’s review and comment. The public is also invited to suggest additional objectives for consideration that address critical public health issues within existing Healthy People 2020 Topic Areas. All proposed new objectives must meet all of the objective selection criteria (see below). Written comments will be accepted at http://healthypeople.gov/2020/about/ publicComment.aspx during a threeweek public comment period beginning in November 2013. The public will also be able to submit written comments via mail, fax, and email (see contact information above). Comments received in response to this notice will be reviewed and considered by the Topic Area workgroups, Federal Interagency Workgroup on Healthy People 2020, and other Healthy People 2020 stakeholders. Objective Selection Criteria The following nine criteria should be taken into consideration when commenting on the proposed or suggesting additional objectives. 1. The result to be achieved should be important and understandable to a broad audience and support the Healthy People 2020 goals. 2. Objectives should be prevention oriented and should address health improvements that can be achieved through population-based and individual actions, and systems-based, environmental, health-service, or policy interventions. 3. Objectives should drive actions that will work toward the achievement of the proposed targets (defined as quantitative values to be achieved by the year 2020). 4. Objectives should be useful and reflect issues of national importance. Federal agencies, states, localities, nongovernmental organizations, and the public and private sectors should be able to use objectives to target efforts in schools, communities, work sites, health practices, and other environments. 5. Objectives should be measurable and should address a range of issues, such as: behavior and health outcomes; availability of, access to, and content of behavioral and health service interventions; socio-environmental conditions; and community capacity— directed toward improving health outcomes and quality of life across the life span. (Community capacity is defined as the ability of a community to plan, implement, and evaluate health strategies.) 6. Continuity and comparability of measured phenomena from year to year are important, thus, when appropriate, PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 retention of objectives from previous Healthy People iterations is encouraged. However, in instances where objectives and/or measures have proven ill-suited to the purpose or are inadequate, new improved objectives should be developed. Whether or not an objective has met its target in a previous Healthy People iteration should not be the sole basis for retaining or archiving an objective. 7. The objectives should be supported by the best available scientific evidence. The objective selection and review processes should be flexible enough to allow revisions to objectives in order to reflect major updates or new knowledge. 8. Objectives should address population disparities. These include populations categorized by race/ ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, disability status, sexual orientation, and geographic location. For particular health issues, additional special populations should be addressed, based on an examination of the available evidence on vulnerability, health status, and disparate care. 9. Healthy People 2020, like past versions, is heavily data driven. Valid, reliable, nationally representative data and data systems should be used for Healthy People 2020 objectives. Each objective must have (1) A data source, or potential data source, identified, (2) baseline data and (3) assurance of at least one additional data point throughout the decade. Dated: November 7, 2013. Don Wright, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. [FR Doc. 2013–27126 Filed 11–12–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4150–32–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30 Day–13–13ZZ] Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a list of information collection requests under review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these requests, call (404) 639–7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Send written comments to CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. E:\FR\FM\13NON1.SGM 13NON1 68075 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 219 / Wednesday, November 13, 2013 / Notices Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. Proposed Project Evaluation of the SAMHSA PDMP Electronic Health Record (EHR) Integration and Interoperability Expansion Program—New—National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description In 2009, drug overdose deaths became the leading cause of injury death in the United States (U.S.), exceeding motor vehicle traffic crash deaths for the first time, a trend that continued in 2010. Prescription drugs, particularly opioid pain relievers, have been identified as the main driver of this increase. The number of overdose deaths per year involving opioid pain relievers increased more than four-fold from 1999 to 2010 (from 4,030 to 16,651), outnumbering overdose deaths involving all illicit drugs combined. Morbidity associated with opioid pain reliever abuse increased in parallel. The rate of emergency department visits associated with the misuse or abuse use of opioid pain relievers increased 153% from 2004 to 2011, while rates for illicit drugs remained largely stable. This project involves an evaluation of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Electronic Health Record (EHR) Integration and Interoperability Expansion Program (PEHRIIE) which has funded projects in nine states via cooperative agreements. Under these cooperative agreements, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is responsible for conducting a comprehensive process and outcomes evaluation of the PEHRIIE program. The primary goals of the qualitative evaluation component of this work are: 1. To understand the processes, challenges, and successes in implementing and sustaining integration of PDMP data with Health Information Technology (HIT) systems and interoperability of PDMP systems across states; and 2. To understand the experiences of clinical end users with the systems being upgraded under the PEHRIIE program and to capture their recommendations, if any, for how the goals of the PEHRIIE could have been better accomplished. In order to achieve these evaluation goals, CDC requests OMB approval for 24 months in order for the CDC evaluation team to conduct qualitative interviews with those individuals involved in the planning and implementation of the PEHRIIE projects (i.e., key project staff and stakeholders) as well as with the clinical end users (i.e., prescribers and pharmacists) of the PDMPs in the states where these projects are taking place. Through this evaluation, CDC will better understand the impact of PDMP integration and interoperability in the funded states. The total annual estimated burden hours for the planned qualitative information collection are 119 hours. Total burden time includes the time to conduct interviews with key project staff/stakeholders and clinical end users, and the time spent by recruiters at the PEHRIIE implementation sites to identify potential clinical end user interviewees. Staff/stakeholder interviews will be conducted with key project staff members/stakeholders across the nine PEHRIIE-funded states. Interviews will also be conducted with key project staff/ stakeholders representing companies working with multiples states involved in the PEHRIIE program. End user interviews will be conducted at implementation sites distributed across all nine PEHRIIE states. The CDC will work with one recruiter per implementation site to complete these tasks. There are no costs to respondents other than their time. The total estimated annual burden hours are 119 hours. ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Type of respondent Form name Key Project Staff/Stakeholders Key Project Staff/Stakeholders Interview Guide End Users Interview Guide N/A ................................................................. Clinical End Users Clinical End User Recruiters Kimberly S. Lane, Deputy Director, Office of Science Integrity, Office of the Associate Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [FR Doc. 2013–27083 Filed 11–12–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4163–18–P sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:14 Nov 12, 2013 Number of respondents Jkt 232001 Number of responses per respondent Average burden per response (in hrs) 53 1 45/60 59 20 1 1 1 1 amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of the following meeting. The meeting will be closed to the public in accordance with the provisions set forth in sections 552b(c)(4) and 552b(c)(6), Title 5 U.S.C., as amended. The grant applications and the discussions could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant applications, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Date: December 3, 2013. Time: 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852, (Telephone Conference Call). Contact Person: Rebecca C Steiner, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Extramural Activities, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive Blvd., Room 6149, MSC 9608, Bethesda, MD 20892–9608, 301–443–4525, steinerr@mail.nih.gov. Name of Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel Review of Eating Disorders Dimensional Research (R01). (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program No. 93.242, Mental Health Research Grants, National Institutes of Health, HHS) PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\13NON1.SGM 13NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 219 (Wednesday, November 13, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 68074-68075]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-27083]


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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[30 Day-13-13ZZ]


Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a 
list of information collection requests under review by the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction 
Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these requests, call 
(404) 639-7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Send written comments 
to CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 
20503 or by fax to (202) 395-5806.

[[Page 68075]]

Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice.

Proposed Project

    Evaluation of the SAMHSA PDMP Electronic Health Record (EHR) 
Integration and Interoperability Expansion Program--New--National 
Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention (CDC).

Background and Brief Description

    In 2009, drug overdose deaths became the leading cause of injury 
death in the United States (U.S.), exceeding motor vehicle traffic 
crash deaths for the first time, a trend that continued in 2010. 
Prescription drugs, particularly opioid pain relievers, have been 
identified as the main driver of this increase. The number of overdose 
deaths per year involving opioid pain relievers increased more than 
four-fold from 1999 to 2010 (from 4,030 to 16,651), outnumbering 
overdose deaths involving all illicit drugs combined. Morbidity 
associated with opioid pain reliever abuse increased in parallel. The 
rate of emergency department visits associated with the misuse or abuse 
use of opioid pain relievers increased 153% from 2004 to 2011, while 
rates for illicit drugs remained largely stable.
    This project involves an evaluation of the Substance Abuse and 
Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) Prescription Drug Monitoring Program 
(PDMP) Electronic Health Record (EHR) Integration and Interoperability 
Expansion Program (PEHRIIE) which has funded projects in nine states 
via cooperative agreements.
    Under these cooperative agreements, the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention (CDC) is responsible for conducting a comprehensive 
process and outcomes evaluation of the PEHRIIE program. The primary 
goals of the qualitative evaluation component of this work are:
    1. To understand the processes, challenges, and successes in 
implementing and sustaining integration of PDMP data with Health 
Information Technology (HIT) systems and interoperability of PDMP 
systems across states; and
    2. To understand the experiences of clinical end users with the 
systems being upgraded under the PEHRIIE program and to capture their 
recommendations, if any, for how the goals of the PEHRIIE could have 
been better accomplished.
    In order to achieve these evaluation goals, CDC requests OMB 
approval for 24 months in order for the CDC evaluation team to conduct 
qualitative interviews with those individuals involved in the planning 
and implementation of the PEHRIIE projects (i.e., key project staff and 
stakeholders) as well as with the clinical end users (i.e., prescribers 
and pharmacists) of the PDMPs in the states where these projects are 
taking place. Through this evaluation, CDC will better understand the 
impact of PDMP integration and interoperability in the funded states.
    The total annual estimated burden hours for the planned qualitative 
information collection are 119 hours. Total burden time includes the 
time to conduct interviews with key project staff/stakeholders and 
clinical end users, and the time spent by recruiters at the PEHRIIE 
implementation sites to identify potential clinical end user 
interviewees.
    Staff/stakeholder interviews will be conducted with key project 
staff members/stakeholders across the nine PEHRIIE-funded states. 
Interviews will also be conducted with key project staff/stakeholders 
representing companies working with multiples states involved in the 
PEHRIIE program.
    End user interviews will be conducted at implementation sites 
distributed across all nine PEHRIIE states. The CDC will work with one 
recruiter per implementation site to complete these tasks.
    There are no costs to respondents other than their time. The total 
estimated annual burden hours are 119 hours.

                                        Estimated Annualized Burden Hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                      Average
                                                                     Number of       Number of      burden  per
          Type of respondent                    Form name           respondents    responses per   response  (in
                                                                                    respondent         hrs)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Key Project Staff/Stakeholders          Key Project Staff/                    53               1           45/60
                                         Stakeholders Interview
                                         Guide
Clinical End Users                      End Users Interview                   59               1               1
                                         Guide
Clinical End User Recruiters            N/A.....................              20               1               1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Kimberly S. Lane,
Deputy Director, Office of Science Integrity, Office of the Associate 
Director for Science, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention.
[FR Doc. 2013-27083 Filed 11-12-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4163-18-P