National Plan for Civil Earth Observations; Request for Information, 67418-67420 [2013-26890]

Download as PDF 67418 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 218 / Tuesday, November 12, 2013 / Notices inadvertently placed in the incorrect section of the Biweekly report published on October 29, 2013. The amendment revised Technical Specification (TS) 3.6.9, ‘‘Distributed Ignition System (DIS),’’ to allow Train B of the DIS to be considered operable with two inoperable ignitors. The existing TS defines train operability as having no more than one ignitor inoperable. The amendment also allows one of five specific primary containment regions to have zero ignitors operable. The existing TS requires that at least one ignitor be operable in each region. The proposed TS revision is applicable until the fall 2014 refueling outage, or until the unit enters a mode that allows replacement of the affected ignitors without exposing personnel to significant radiation and safety hazards. Date of issuance: October 9, 2013. Effective date: As of the date of issuance, to be implemented within 1 day. Amendment No.: 321. Renewed Facility Operating License No. DPR–58: Amendment revised the Technical Specifications and License. Public comments requested as to proposed no significant hazards consideration (NSHC): No. The Commission’s related evaluation of the amendment, finding of emergency circumstances, state consultation, and final NSHC determination are contained in a safety evaluation dated October 9, 2013. Attorney for licensee: Robert B. Haemer, Senior Nuclear Counsel, One Cook Place, Bridgman, MI 49106. NRC Branch Chief: Robert D. Carlson. Renewed Facility Operating License No. DPR–40: The amendment revised the facility operating license. Public comments requested as to proposed no significant hazards consideration (NSHC): Yes (OmahaWorld Herald, located in Omaha, Nebraska, from October 9 through October 15, 2013). The notice provided an opportunity to submit comments on the Commission’s proposed NSHC determination. One comment was received and evaluated. The supplemental letters dated October 15, 21, and 22, 2013, and two letters dated October 23, 2013, provided additional information that clarified the application, did not expand the scope of the application as originally noticed, and did not change the staff’s original proposed no significant hazards consideration determination as published in the Omaha-World Herald from October 9 through 15, 2013. The Commission’s related evaluation of the amendment, finding of exigent circumstances, state consultation, and final NSHC determination (including the comment received on the NSHC) are contained in a safety evaluation dated October 25, 2013. Attorney for licensee: David A. Repka, Esq., Winston & Strawn, 1700 K Street, NW., Washington, DC 20006–3817. NRC Branch Chief: Michael T. Markley. Dated at Rockville, Maryland, this 1st day of November 2013. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Michele G. Evans, Director, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. emcdonald on DSK67QTVN1PROD with NOTICES Omaha Public Power District, Docket No. 50–285, Fort Calhoun Station, Unit No. 1, Washington County, Nebraska [FR Doc. 2013–27025 Filed 11–8–13; 8:45 am] Date of amendment request: October 6, 2013, as supplemented by letters dated October 15, 21, and 22, 2013 and two letters dated October 23, 2013. Description of amendment request: The amendment revised the Updated Safety Analysis Report (USAR) for pipe break criteria for high energy piping outside of containment. Specifically, the proposed amendment would allow the use of NRC guidance provided in Branch Technical Position Mechanical Engineering Branch 3–1, Revision 2, which allows for the exemption of specific piping sections from postulated failures if certain criteria are met. Date of issuance: October 25, 2013. Effective date: As of its issuance date and shall be implemented upon approval. Amendment No.: 273. OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:41 Nov 08, 2013 Jkt 232001 BILLING CODE 7590–01–P National Plan for Civil Earth Observations; Request for Information Notice of Request for Information (RFI). ACTION: The purpose of this Request for Information (RFI) is to solicit input from all interested parties regarding recommendations for the development of a National Plan for Civil Earth Observations (‘‘National Plan’’). The public input provided in response to this Notice will inform the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) as it works with Federal agencies and other stakeholders to develop this Plan. DATES: Responses must be received by December 6, 2013 to be considered. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00088 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 You may submit comments by any of the following methods. • Downloadable form/email: To aid in information collection and analysis, OSTP encourages responses to be provided by filling out the downloadable form located at http:// www.whitehouse.gov/administration/ eop/ostp/library/shareyourinput and emailing that form, as an attachment, to: earthobsplan@ostp.gov. Please include ‘‘National Plan for Civil Earth Observations’’ in the subject line of the message. • Fax: (202) 456–6071. • Mail: Office of Science and Technology Policy, 1650 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC, 20504. Information submitted by postal mail should allow ample time for processing by security. Response to this RFI is voluntary. Respondents need not reply to all questions listed; however, they should clearly identify the questions to which they are responding by listing the corresponding number for each question. Each individual or institution is requested to only submit one response. Responses to this RFI, including the names of the authors and their institutional affiliations, if provided, may be posted on line. OSTP therefore requests that no business proprietary information, copyrighted information, or personally-identifiable information be submitted in response to this RFI. Given the public and governmental nature of the National Plan, OSTP deems it unnecessary to receive or to use business proprietary information in its development. Please note that the U.S. Government will not pay for response preparation, or for the use of any information contained in the response. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Timothy Stryker, 202–419–3471, tstryker@ostp.eop.gov, OSTP. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: ADDRESSES: Background The U.S. Government is the world’s largest single provider of civil environmental and Earth-system data. These data are derived from Earth observations collected by numerous Federal agencies and partners in support of their missions and are critical to the protection of human life and property; economic growth; national and homeland security; and scientific research. Because they are provided through public funding, these data are made freely accessible to the greatest extent possible to all users to advance human knowledge, to enable industry to provide value-added services, and for general public use. E:\FR\FM\12NON1.SGM 12NON1 emcdonald on DSK67QTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 218 / Tuesday, November 12, 2013 / Notices Federal investments in Earth observation activities ensure that decision makers, businesses, first responders, farmers, and a wide array of other stakeholders have the information they need about climate and weather; natural hazards; land-use change; ecosystem health; water; natural resources; and other characteristics of the Earth system. Taken together, Earth observations provide the indispensable foundation for meeting the Federal Government’s long-term sustainability objectives and advancing the Nation’s societal, environmental, and economic well-being. As the Nation’s capacity to observe Earth systems has grown, however, so has the complexity of sustaining and coordinating civil Earth observation research, operations, and related activities. In October 2010, Congress charged the Director of OSTP to address this challenge by producing and routinely updating a strategic plan for civil Earth observations (see National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2010, Public Law 111–267, Section 702). Responding to Congress, in April 2013, OSTP released a National Strategy for Civil Earth Observations (‘‘the National Strategy’’, see http:// www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/ microsites/ostp/ nstc_2013_earthobsstrategy.pdf). In April 2013, OSTP also re-chartered the U.S. Group on Earth Observations (USGEO) Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and Sustainability. USGEO will carry out the National Strategy and support the formulation of the National Plan. As requested by Congress, the National Plan is being developed by USGEO to advise Federal agencies on the Strategy’s implementation through their investments in and operation of civil Earth observation systems. The Plan will provide a routine process, on a three-year cycle, for assessing the Nation’s Earth observation investments; improving data management activities; and enhancing related interagency and international coordination. Through this approach, the Plan will seek to facilitate stable, continuous, and coordinated Earth observation capabilities for the benefit of society. Congress also requested that development of the National Plan include a process for collecting external independent advisory input. OSTP is seeking such public advisory input through this RFI. The public input provided in response to this Notice will inform OSTP and USGEO as they work VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:41 Nov 08, 2013 Jkt 232001 67419 with Federal agencies and other stakeholders to develop the Plan. Questions To Inform Development of the National Plan Definitions and Descriptions Through this RFI, OSTP seeks responses to the following questions: 1. Are the 12 SBAs listed above sufficiently comprehensive? a. Should additional SBAs be considered? b. Should any SBA be eliminated? 2. Are there alternative methods for categorizing Earth observations that would help the U.S. Government routinely evaluate the sufficiency of Earth observation systems? 3. What management, procurement, development, and operational approaches should the U.S. Government employ to adequately support sustained observations for services, sustained observations for research, and experimental observations? What is the best ratio of support among these three areas? 4. How should the U.S. Government ensure the continuity of key Earth observations, and for which data streams (e.g., weather forecasting, land surface change analysis, sea level monitoring, climate-change research)? 5. Are there scientific and technological advances that the U.S. Government should consider integrating into its portfolio of systems that will make Earth observations more efficient, accurate, or economical? If so, please elaborate. 6. How can the U.S. Government improve the spatial and temporal resolution, sample density, and geographic coverage of its Earth observation networks with costeffective, innovative new approaches? 7. Are there management or organizational improvements that the U.S. Government should consider that will make Earth observation more efficient or economical? 8. Can advances in information and data management technologies enable coordinated observing and the integration of observations from multiple U.S. Government Earth observation platforms? 9. What policies and procedures should the U.S. Government consider to ensure that its Earth observation data and information products are fully discoverable, accessible, and useable? 10. Are there policies or technological advances that the U.S. Government should consider to enhance access to Earth observation data while also reducing management redundancies across Federal agencies? 11. What types of public-private partnerships should the U.S. Government consider to address current gaps in Earth observation data coverage The term ‘‘Earth observation’’ refers to data and information products from Earth-observing systems and surveys. ‘‘Observing systems’’ refers to one or more sensing elements that directly or indirectly collect observations of the Earth, measure environmental parameters, or survey biological or other Earth resources (land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans). ‘‘Sensing elements’’ may be deployed as individual sensors or in constellations or networks, and may include instrumentation or human elements. ‘‘Observing system platforms’’ may be mobile or fixed and are space-based, airborne, terrestrial, freshwater, or marine-based. Observing systems increasingly consist of integrated platforms that support remotely sensed, in-situ, and human observations. Assessing the Benefits of U.S. Civil Earth Observation Systems To assist decision-makers at all levels of society, the U.S. Government intends to routinely assess its wide range of civil Earth observation systems according to the ability of those systems to provide relevant data and information about the following Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs): • Agriculture and Forestry • Biodiversity • Climate • Disasters • Ecosystems (Terrestrial and Freshwater) • Energy and Mineral Resources • Human Health • Ocean and Coastal Resources and Ecosystems • Space Weather • Transportation • Water Resources • Weather The U.S. Government also intends to consider how current and future reference measurements (e.g., bathymetry, geodesy, geolocation, topography) can enable improved observations and information delivery. To address measurement needs in the SBAs, the U.S. Government operates a wide range of atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial observing systems. These systems are designed to provide: (a) Sustained observations supporting the delivery of services, (b) sustained observations for research, or (c) experimental observations to address specific scientific questions, further technological innovation, or improve services. PO 00000 Frm 00089 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\12NON1.SGM 12NON1 67420 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 218 / Tuesday, November 12, 2013 / Notices and enhance the full and open exchange of Earth observation data for national and global applications? 12. What types of interagency and international agreements can and should be pursued for these same purposes? Ted Wackler, Deputy Chief of Staff and Assistant Director. [FR Doc. 2013–26890 Filed 11–8–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3170–F4–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION sections A, B and C below, of the most significant aspects of such statements. [Release No. 34–70808; File No. SR–EDGX– 2013–41] A. Self-Regulatory Organization’s Statement of the Purpose of, and the Statutory Basis for, the Proposed Rule Change Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Relating To Amendments to the EDGX Exchange, Inc. Fee Schedule November 5, 2013. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION emcdonald on DSK67QTVN1PROD with NOTICES Notice of Sunshine Act Meeting Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provisions of the Government in the Sunshine Act, Public Law 94–409, that the Securities and Exchange Commission will hold a Closed Meeting on Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Commissioners, Counsel to the Commissioners, the Secretary to the Commission, and recording secretaries will attend the Closed Meeting. Certain staff members who have an interest in the matters also may be present. The General Counsel of the Commission, or her designee, has certified that, in her opinion, one or more of the exemptions set forth in 5 U.S.C. 552b(c)(3), (5), (7), 9(B) and (10) and 17 CFR 200.402(a)(3), (5), (7), 9(ii) and (10), permit consideration of the scheduled matter at the Closed Meeting. Commissioner Aguilar, as duty officer, voted to consider the items listed for the Closed Meeting in a closed session. The subject matter of the Closed Meeting will be: Institution and settlement of injunctive actions; Institution and settlement of administrative proceedings; Adjudicatory matters; and Other matters relating to enforcement proceedings. At times, changes in Commission priorities require alterations in the scheduling of meeting items. For further information and to ascertain what, if any, matters have been added, deleted or postponed, please contact the Office of the Secretary at (202) 551–5400. Dated: November 7, 2013. Elizabeth M. Murphy, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2013–27182 Filed 11–7–13; 11:15 am] BILLING CODE 8011–01–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:41 Nov 08, 2013 Jkt 232001 Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the ‘‘Act’’),1 and Rule 19b–4 thereunder,2 notice is hereby given that on October 31, 2013, EDGX Exchange, Inc. (the ‘‘Exchange’’ or ‘‘EDGX’’) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (‘‘Commission’’) the proposed rule change as described in Items I, II and III below, which items have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is publishing this notice to solicit comments on the proposed rule change from interested persons. I. Self-Regulatory Organization’s Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The Exchange proposes to amend its fees and rebates applicable to Members 3 of the Exchange pursuant to EDGX Rule 15.1(a) and (c) (‘‘Fee Schedule’’) to decrease the rebate to add liquidity under the Market Depth Tier 1 from $0.0033 per share to $0.0032 per share. The text of the proposed rule change is available on the Exchange’s Internet Web site at www.directedge.com, at the Exchange’s principal office, and at the Public Reference Room of the Commission. II. Self-Regulatory Organization’s Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the Proposed Rule Change In its filing with the Commission, the self-regulatory organization included statements concerning the purpose of, and basis for, the proposed rule change and discussed any comments it received on the proposed rule change. The text of these statements may be examined at the places specified in Item IV below. The self-regulatory organization has prepared summaries, set forth in 1 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). CFR 240.19b–4. 3 The term ‘‘Member’’ is defined as ‘‘any registered broker or dealer, or any person associated with a registered broker or dealer, that has been admitted to membership in the Exchange. A Member will have the status of a ‘‘member’’ of the Exchange as that term is defined in Section 3(a)(3) of the Act.’’ See Exchange Rule 1.5(n). 2 17 PO 00000 Frm 00090 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 1. Purpose The Exchange proposes to amend its Fee Schedule to decrease the rebate to add liquidity under the Market Depth Tier 1 from $0.0033 per share to $0.0032 per share. Footnote 1 of the Fee Schedule currently provides that Members may qualify for the Market Depth Tier 1 and receive a rebate of $0.0033 per share for displayed liquidity added on EDGX if they post greater than or equal to 0.50% of the TCV in average daily trading volume (‘‘ADV’’) on EDGX in total, where at least 1,800,000 shares are non-displayed orders that yield Flag HA. The Exchange proposes to amend Footnote 1 of its Fee Schedule to decrease the rebate of the Market Depth Tier 1 from $0.0033 per share to $0.0032 per share. The remainder of the footnote as it pertains to the Market Depth Tier 1 would remain unchanged. Implementation Date The Exchange proposes to implement this amendment to its Fee Schedule on November 1, 2013. 2. Statutory Basis The Exchange believes that the proposed rule change is consistent with the objectives of Section 6 of the Act,4 in general, and furthers the objectives of Section 6(b)(4),5 in particular, as it is designed to provide for the equitable allocation of reasonable dues, fees and other charges among its Members and other persons using its facilities. The Exchange believes that the reduced rebate of $0.0032 per share for adding liquidity on EDGX is an equitable allocation of reasonable dues, fees, and other charges as the additional revenue that results from the lower rebate enables the Exchange to cover increased infrastructure and administrative expenses. The Exchange also believes that the decreased rebate for the Market Depth Tier 1 represents an equitable allocation of reasonable dues, fees, and other charges because the lower rebate is directly correlated with this tier’s criteria. The Exchange recently decreased the ADV requirement of the Market Depth Tier 1 from 2,000,000 shares of ADV to 1,800,000 shares of 4 15 5 15 E:\FR\FM\12NON1.SGM U.S.C. 78f. U.S.C. 78f(b)(4). 12NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 218 (Tuesday, November 12, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 67418-67420]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-26890]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY


National Plan for Civil Earth Observations; Request for 
Information

ACTION: Notice of Request for Information (RFI).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The purpose of this Request for Information (RFI) is to 
solicit input from all interested parties regarding recommendations for 
the development of a National Plan for Civil Earth Observations 
(``National Plan''). The public input provided in response to this 
Notice will inform the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) 
as it works with Federal agencies and other stakeholders to develop 
this Plan.

DATES: Responses must be received by December 6, 2013 to be considered.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by any of the following methods.
     Downloadable form/email: To aid in information collection 
and analysis, OSTP encourages responses to be provided by filling out 
the downloadable form located at http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/library/shareyourinput and emailing that form, 
as an attachment, to: earthobsplan@ostp.gov. Please include ``National 
Plan for Civil Earth Observations'' in the subject line of the message.
     Fax: (202) 456-6071.
     Mail: Office of Science and Technology Policy, 1650 
Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC, 20504. Information submitted 
by postal mail should allow ample time for processing by security.
    Response to this RFI is voluntary. Respondents need not reply to 
all questions listed; however, they should clearly identify the 
questions to which they are responding by listing the corresponding 
number for each question. Each individual or institution is requested 
to only submit one response. Responses to this RFI, including the names 
of the authors and their institutional affiliations, if provided, may 
be posted on line. OSTP therefore requests that no business proprietary 
information, copyrighted information, or personally-identifiable 
information be submitted in response to this RFI. Given the public and 
governmental nature of the National Plan, OSTP deems it unnecessary to 
receive or to use business proprietary information in its development. 
Please note that the U.S. Government will not pay for response 
preparation, or for the use of any information contained in the 
response.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Timothy Stryker, 202-419-3471, 
tstryker@ostp.eop.gov, OSTP.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    The U.S. Government is the world's largest single provider of civil 
environmental and Earth-system data. These data are derived from Earth 
observations collected by numerous Federal agencies and partners in 
support of their missions and are critical to the protection of human 
life and property; economic growth; national and homeland security; and 
scientific research. Because they are provided through public funding, 
these data are made freely accessible to the greatest extent possible 
to all users to advance human knowledge, to enable industry to provide 
value-added services, and for general public use.

[[Page 67419]]

    Federal investments in Earth observation activities ensure that 
decision makers, businesses, first responders, farmers, and a wide 
array of other stakeholders have the information they need about 
climate and weather; natural hazards; land-use change; ecosystem 
health; water; natural resources; and other characteristics of the 
Earth system. Taken together, Earth observations provide the 
indispensable foundation for meeting the Federal Government's long-term 
sustainability objectives and advancing the Nation's societal, 
environmental, and economic well-being.
    As the Nation's capacity to observe Earth systems has grown, 
however, so has the complexity of sustaining and coordinating civil 
Earth observation research, operations, and related activities. In 
October 2010, Congress charged the Director of OSTP to address this 
challenge by producing and routinely updating a strategic plan for 
civil Earth observations (see National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration Authorization Act of 2010, Public Law 111-267, Section 
702).
    Responding to Congress, in April 2013, OSTP released a National 
Strategy for Civil Earth Observations (``the National Strategy'', see 
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/nstc_2013_earthobsstrategy.pdf). In April 2013, OSTP also re-chartered the 
U.S. Group on Earth Observations (USGEO) Subcommittee of the National 
Science and Technology Council's Committee on Environment, Natural 
Resources, and Sustainability. USGEO will carry out the National 
Strategy and support the formulation of the National Plan.
    As requested by Congress, the National Plan is being developed by 
USGEO to advise Federal agencies on the Strategy's implementation 
through their investments in and operation of civil Earth observation 
systems. The Plan will provide a routine process, on a three-year 
cycle, for assessing the Nation's Earth observation investments; 
improving data management activities; and enhancing related interagency 
and international coordination. Through this approach, the Plan will 
seek to facilitate stable, continuous, and coordinated Earth 
observation capabilities for the benefit of society.
    Congress also requested that development of the National Plan 
include a process for collecting external independent advisory input. 
OSTP is seeking such public advisory input through this RFI. The public 
input provided in response to this Notice will inform OSTP and USGEO as 
they work with Federal agencies and other stakeholders to develop the 
Plan.

Definitions and Descriptions

    The term ``Earth observation'' refers to data and information 
products from Earth-observing systems and surveys.
    ``Observing systems'' refers to one or more sensing elements that 
directly or indirectly collect observations of the Earth, measure 
environmental parameters, or survey biological or other Earth resources 
(land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans).
    ``Sensing elements'' may be deployed as individual sensors or in 
constellations or networks, and may include instrumentation or human 
elements.
    ``Observing system platforms'' may be mobile or fixed and are 
space-based, airborne, terrestrial, freshwater, or marine-based. 
Observing systems increasingly consist of integrated platforms that 
support remotely sensed, in-situ, and human observations.

Assessing the Benefits of U.S. Civil Earth Observation Systems

    To assist decision-makers at all levels of society, the U.S. 
Government intends to routinely assess its wide range of civil Earth 
observation systems according to the ability of those systems to 
provide relevant data and information about the following Societal 
Benefit Areas (SBAs):
     Agriculture and Forestry
     Biodiversity
     Climate
     Disasters
     Ecosystems (Terrestrial and Freshwater)
     Energy and Mineral Resources
     Human Health
     Ocean and Coastal Resources and Ecosystems
     Space Weather
     Transportation
     Water Resources
     Weather
    The U.S. Government also intends to consider how current and future 
reference measurements (e.g., bathymetry, geodesy, geolocation, 
topography) can enable improved observations and information delivery.
    To address measurement needs in the SBAs, the U.S. Government 
operates a wide range of atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial 
observing systems. These systems are designed to provide: (a) Sustained 
observations supporting the delivery of services, (b) sustained 
observations for research, or (c) experimental observations to address 
specific scientific questions, further technological innovation, or 
improve services.

Questions To Inform Development of the National Plan

    Through this RFI, OSTP seeks responses to the following questions:
    1. Are the 12 SBAs listed above sufficiently comprehensive?
    a. Should additional SBAs be considered?
    b. Should any SBA be eliminated?
    2. Are there alternative methods for categorizing Earth 
observations that would help the U.S. Government routinely evaluate the 
sufficiency of Earth observation systems?
    3. What management, procurement, development, and operational 
approaches should the U.S. Government employ to adequately support 
sustained observations for services, sustained observations for 
research, and experimental observations? What is the best ratio of 
support among these three areas?
    4. How should the U.S. Government ensure the continuity of key 
Earth observations, and for which data streams (e.g., weather 
forecasting, land surface change analysis, sea level monitoring, 
climate-change research)?
    5. Are there scientific and technological advances that the U.S. 
Government should consider integrating into its portfolio of systems 
that will make Earth observations more efficient, accurate, or 
economical? If so, please elaborate.
    6. How can the U.S. Government improve the spatial and temporal 
resolution, sample density, and geographic coverage of its Earth 
observation networks with cost-effective, innovative new approaches?
    7. Are there management or organizational improvements that the 
U.S. Government should consider that will make Earth observation more 
efficient or economical?
    8. Can advances in information and data management technologies 
enable coordinated observing and the integration of observations from 
multiple U.S. Government Earth observation platforms?
    9. What policies and procedures should the U.S. Government consider 
to ensure that its Earth observation data and information products are 
fully discoverable, accessible, and useable?
    10. Are there policies or technological advances that the U.S. 
Government should consider to enhance access to Earth observation data 
while also reducing management redundancies across Federal agencies?
    11. What types of public-private partnerships should the U.S. 
Government consider to address current gaps in Earth observation data 
coverage

[[Page 67420]]

and enhance the full and open exchange of Earth observation data for 
national and global applications?
    12. What types of interagency and international agreements can and 
should be pursued for these same purposes?

Ted Wackler,
Deputy Chief of Staff and Assistant Director.
[FR Doc. 2013-26890 Filed 11-8-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3170-F4-P