Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 65376-65380 [2013-26007]

Download as PDF 65376 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 211 / Thursday, October 31, 2013 / Notices for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Gogebic County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; and the Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan. Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota. VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:21 Oct 30, 2013 Jkt 232001 Hereafter, all tribes listed in this section are referred to as ‘‘The Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains In 1931, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Lake Gogebic site (20GB1) in Gogebic County, MI. Carl E. Guthe of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology excavated the central portion of a burial mound and collected remains from one adult and one child, along with 110 associated funerary objects. The human remains date to the Early Late Woodland Period (500–1000 A.D.) based on diagnostic objects and mortuary treatment. No known individuals were identified. The 110 associated funerary objects present are 2 double-pointed copper awls, 1 hammer stone, 2 lithic scrapers, 1 quartz biface, 103 ceramic sherds, and 1 lot of porcupine bones. Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology Officials of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on cranial morphology, dental traits, accession documentation, and archeological context. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 2 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 110 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects may be to The Tribes. PO 00000 Frm 00113 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu, by December 2, 2013. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: September 16, 2013. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2013–25980 Filed 10–30–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–14033; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the University of Michigan. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\31OCN1.SGM 31OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 211 / Thursday, October 31, 2013 / Notices Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; and the Wyandotte Nation. Hereafter, all tribes listed in this section are referred to as ‘‘The Tribes.’’ Consultation mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Michigan at the address in this notice by December 2, 2013. ADDRESSES: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Genesee, Tuscola, and Washtenaw Counties, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Remains A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; and the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan. On an unknown date prior to 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Otisville site in Genesee County, MI. The remains of one adult were collected during gravel pit operations and donated to the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology (UMMA). A burial mound reportedly once existed in the area. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On December 13, 1933, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were removed from the Flint site (20GS2) in Genesee County, MI. James Griffin of the UMMA excavated the remains of three adults and one juvenile found during gravel pit operations near the Flint River. The site was noted as having been partially destroyed. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:21 Oct 30, 2013 Jkt 232001 PO 00000 Frm 00114 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65377 On an unknown date prior to 1938, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were removed from the Unknown Flint site in Genesee County, MI. The remains of two adults, one sub-adult, and one child were found in the Great Lakes Collection of the UMMA with an associated tag reading ‘‘Flint?’’ which is believed to mean Flint, MI. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date prior to 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were identified among a collection of fossils known as the Hibbard Collection held at the UMMA. In 1965, Claude Hibbard, a Professor of Geology at the University of Michigan, donated to the UMMA a large collection of fossils that he collected over years of geological excavations. The human remains were identified and removed from Hibbard’s collection during museum cataloguing activities. It is believed that Hibbard collected these human remains, which represent three adults and one adolescent, during one of his geological excavations. A note with the human remains indicates that they were found somewhere near the Flint River in Genesee County, MI. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On May 24, 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the James Kirk Farm site (20TU153) in Tuscola County, MI. Emerson Greenman of the UMMA excavated the human remains of one older adult female, one adult, and one infant from a location near Watrousville, MI. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date prior to 1925, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Atkin site (20TU104) in Tuscola County, MI. On December 16, 1925, farmers unearthed the remains of two adults (one of which was possibly male) and one adolescent female while working on their land near the Cass River. The human remains were collected and donated to the UMMA. The human remains date to the Early Late Woodland Period (850–300 B.C.) based on mortuary treatment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date prior to 1936, human remains representing, at E:\FR\FM\31OCN1.SGM 31OCN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 65378 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 211 / Thursday, October 31, 2013 / Notices minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Grant site in Tuscola County, MI. A landowner collected the remains of two adults from a mound and donated them to the UMMA. This site may be the same as the Atkin site (20TU104) also in Tuscola County, MI. The human remains date to the Woodland Period (850 B.C. to 1400 A.D.) based on mortuary treatment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between May 29 and 31, 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, 7 individuals were removed from the Caro site in Tuscola County, MI. M. Titiea collected the remains of two adult females, one adult, one adolescent, one child, one infant, and one neonate as part of an excavation directed by Emerson Greenman of the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Long Sleep site in Tuscola County, MI. The burials were discovered during highway construction activities. A local resident collected the remains of one adult male and one adolescent, and donated them to the UMMA in 1994. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In May 1930, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Pleasant Lake site (20WA285) in Washtenaw County, MI. A Boy Scout troop from Allen Park, MI, collected the remains of one adult male and one child and donated them to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On April 29, 1931, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Fred Ewald Farm site in Washtenaw County, MI. The remains of one adult female and one child were collected during construction activities near Dexter, MI, and donated to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date prior to 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Dewey site in Washtenaw County, MI. The remains of one adult, one juvenile, and one infant were collected during road construction VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:21 Oct 30, 2013 Jkt 232001 activities near Chelsea, MI, and donated to the UMMA. The individuals were reportedly found buried in a flexed position. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date prior to 1924, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual was removed from the Barr site (20WA70) in Washtenaw County, MI. A local farmer unearthed the cranium of a young adult female while plowing a field near the Saline River. The remains were reportedly found with a brass kettle that was not donated to the UMMA but that suggests the human remains date to the Post-Contact Period. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In April 1945, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Wiley site (20WA2) in Washtenaw County, MI. The remains of two adults, both possibly female, were collected during gravel pit operations near Ford Lake and donated to the UMMA. The human remains are believed to date to the Late Woodland Period (500–1400 A.D.) based on the burials in an ossuary. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Schaffer Gravel Pit site (20WA52) in Washtenaw County, MI. The remains of a young adult female, buried in a flexed position, were found atop a small ridge on property owned by the Schaffer Lumber Company. Police investigated the site and collected the human remains. The police sent the remains to the University of Michigan’s Anatomy Department where they were determined to be Native American. On October 7, 1965, archeologists John Halsey and Richard Wilkinson of the UMMA visited the site and collected more human remains. They were able to identify the burial pit and draw a vertical profile of the pit showing the individual had been buried on an eastwest axis. The human remains collected by the police and the archeologists were donated to the UMMA in 1966. The human remains date to the Pre-Contact Period. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Prior to 1933, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the GL–2022 site (20WA1) in Washtenaw County, MI. A landowner discovered the remains of a young adult female on his property located near Dexter, MI, and gave them PO 00000 Frm 00115 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 to Wilbert Hinsdale of the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On April 18, 1946, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Pong site (20WA13) in Washtenaw County, MI. A landowner collected the remains of two adults (one of them female) while digging a basement, and donated them to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1956, human remains representing, at minimum, 8 individuals were removed from the Ford Lake site (20WA80) in Washtenaw County, MI. The burials were discovered during gravel pit operations near Ford Lake. Emerson Greenman of the UMMA collected the commingled human remains of three adult females, two adult males, one older adult male, one adolescent, and one child. One individual was noted as being buried in a flexed position, while another individual was noted as being buried in an extended position. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On August 11, 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Ellis Road site in Washtenaw County, MI. The remains of one child were discovered during gravel pit operations near Ypsilanti, MI. A Michigan State Police Officer brought the collected human remains to the UMMA, where they were identified as Native American. The landowners subsequently donated the collections to the museum. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between May 24, 1932, and March 5, 1933, human remains representing, at minimum, 22 individuals were removed from the Huron River #1 site (20WA4) in Washtenaw County, MI. The burials were found during gravel pit operations near Ford Lake on land owned by the Ford Motor Company. Amateur archeologists excavated the remains of nine adults (one of whom had been cremated), seven infants/neonates, and six juveniles, along with six associated funerary objects, and donated these collections to the UMMA. The human remains date to the Early Late Woodland Period (500–900 A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts and mortuary E:\FR\FM\31OCN1.SGM 31OCN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 211 / Thursday, October 31, 2013 / Notices treatment. No known individuals were identified. The 6 associated funerary objects present are one ceramic vessel and five projectile points. On July 29, 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 individuals were removed from the Home Depot site (20WA176) in Washtenaw County, MI. The remains of two adults, two juveniles, and one infant were found during land development activities associated with a retail store. Archeologists from Michigan State University excavated the site between July 29 and August 16, 1985. Three of the individuals were noted as being buried in a tightly flexed position, lying on their left sides, and oriented toward either the east or northeast. There were also two small shells found buried in association with the infant. The collection was donated to the UMMA. The human remains date to the Early Late Woodland period (900–1200 A.D.) based on mortuary treatment and diagnostic artifacts. No known individuals were identified. The 2 associated funerary objects present are two small shells. In the summer of 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were removed from the Staebler site (20WA40) in Washtenaw County, MI. Archeologists from Schoolcraft Community College and the UMMA jointly excavated a site near Highway M–14, where human remains had been found on the surface of the ground. Some of the remains had been cremated. The excavation focused on the recovery of archeological remains from the surface and plow zone. The archeologists collected the remains of three adults and one sub-adult, along with one associated funerary object. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period (500–1400 A.D.) based on a projectile point found with the remains. No known individuals were identified. The 1 associated funerary object present is a projectile point. In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Olson site (20WA111) in Washtenaw County, MI. Experts from the UMMA excavated human remains from a site located near the Huron River. An older adult male was found buried in a semi-flexed, slumped position with 47 associated funerary objects. The human remains date to the Early Late Woodland Period (500–900 A.D.) based on diagnostic objects. No known individuals were identified. The 47 funerary objects present are 1 unworked deer scapula, 3 worked animal bones, 1 unworked turkey bone, 5 slate discs, 2 chert cores, 2 chert flakes, 1 chert triangular biface, 2 chert blades, 1 chert VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:21 Oct 30, 2013 Jkt 232001 drill, 1 beaver tooth, 2 stone abraders, 1 mussel shell, 23 ceramic sherds, 1 groundstone pendant, and 1 argillite disc. In July 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Ann Arbor Water Department site (20WA284) in Washtenaw County, MI. City workers engaged in road construction activities unearthed the remains of one adult and contacted the Ann Arbor Police Department. The police collected the human remains and transferred them to the UMMA. After experts at the museum identified the human remains as being Native American, they were donated to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Duke Site (20WA71) in Washtenaw County, MI. Landowners unearthed human remains while digging a basement for their house. They contacted the Washtenaw County Sherriff’s Department. Deputies collected the commingled human remains and sent them to Howard Buettner and Emerson Greenman, at the UMMA, for identification. Greenman determined the remains to be Native American and to represent one middleaged adult female, one cremated adult, and one adolescent. The landowners donated the collections to the UMMA. The human remains date to the Woodland-Late Pre-Contact Period (500–1610 A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts from a non-burial area of the overall site. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On October 4, 1994, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Kuclo site (20WA289) in Washtenaw County, MI. A backhoe operator found the remains in displaced dirt during construction activities associated with a housing development. The Michigan State Police and Washtenaw County Medical Examiner were contacted to investigate the site. They subsequently contacted Russell Nelson of the UMMA, who collected the human remains along with 23 associated funerary objects. The remains of one adult female were identified as Native American. The collection was ultimately donated to the UMMA. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period (900–1400 A.D.) based on diagnostic objects. No known individuals were identified. The 23 associated funerary objects present are 7 deer bone fragments, 13 ceramic sherds, PO 00000 Frm 00116 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65379 2 lithic shatter flakes, and 1 retouched lithic shatter flake. On September 1, 1998, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Brandon Home site (20WA336) in Washtenaw County, MI. The human remains were found during construction activities in a subdivision of Ann Arbor, MI. The remains of a middle-aged female were found inside a stone-lined chamber, with stones stacked and layered to form a roof. The individual was in supine position, with hands folded over the chest and legs drawn upward. Near the left side of the body, 71 associated funerary objects were found. The human remains date to the Early Late Woodland Period (500–1100 A.D.) based on diagnostic objects. No known individuals were identified. The 71 associated funerary objects present are 1 modified animal bone, 1 lot of small animal bones, 3 animal bone fragments, 1 hoe (made from an elk scapula), 1 slate knife, 1 end scraper, 1 quartz flake, 4 retouched flakes, 1 lot of charcoal, 1 shell fragment, and 56 shell fragments (which include aquatic and terrestrial shells). In 1996, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were removed from the Nichols Home site (20WA317) in Washtenaw County, MI. Landowners unearthed human remains while digging a basement for their house. The Washtenaw County Medical Examiner was contacted to investigate the site, and determined the remains were Native American. The Medical Examiner contacted the UMMA to conduct a salvage excavation. A backhoe had removed some of the remains. These were collected from the backfill dirt. Additional remains were also collected from portions of the landowner’s yard and driveway that had been graded. Faunal remains found in association with the human remains are reported as associated funerary objects. The remains collected represent one adult, one adolescent, one infant, and one perinate. The human remains date to the Archaic Period (7500–100 B.C.) based on the presence of red ochre. No known individuals were identified. The 2 associated funerary objects are 2 lots of faunal bones representing the remains of a dog and a woodchuck. Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology Officials of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on cranial morphology, dental traits, accession E:\FR\FM\31OCN1.SGM 31OCN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 65380 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 211 / Thursday, October 31, 2013 / Notices documentation, and archeological context. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 95 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 152 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; ChippewaCree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Match-e-be-nash-shewish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:21 Oct 30, 2013 Jkt 232001 Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota. • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; ChippewaCree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; and the Wyandotte Nation. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and PO 00000 Frm 00117 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 associated funerary objects may be to The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu, by December 2, 2013. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: September 16, 2013. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2013–26007 Filed 10–30–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–14036; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the University of Michigan. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\31OCN1.SGM 31OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 211 (Thursday, October 31, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65376-65380]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-26007]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-14033; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian 
tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian 
tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice 
that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and 
associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the 
University of Michigan. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to

[[Page 65377]]

request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the University of Michigan at the address in 
this notice by December 2, 2013.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of 
Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming 
Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone (734) 
647-9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from Genesee, Tuscola, and Washtenaw Counties, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay 
Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky 
Boy's Reservation, Montana; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa 
Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay 
Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, 
Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-
e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; 
Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed 
as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, 
Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; and 
the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan.
    Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Bad River 
Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River 
Reservation, Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota 
Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Fond du 
Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County 
Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota 
Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech 
Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Mille Lacs Band 
of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the Prairie Band 
of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian 
Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, 
Minnesota; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa 
Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North 
Dakota; White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
and the Wyandotte Nation.
    Hereafter, all tribes listed in this section are referred to as 
``The Tribes.''

History and Description of the Remains

    On an unknown date prior to 1936, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Otisville site in Genesee 
County, MI. The remains of one adult were collected during gravel pit 
operations and donated to the University of Michigan Museum of 
Anthropology (UMMA). A burial mound reportedly once existed in the 
area. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    On December 13, 1933, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 
individuals were removed from the Flint site (20GS2) in Genesee County, 
MI. James Griffin of the UMMA excavated the remains of three adults and 
one juvenile found during gravel pit operations near the Flint River. 
The site was noted as having been partially destroyed. No date or time 
period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1938, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 4 individuals were removed from the Unknown Flint site in 
Genesee County, MI. The remains of two adults, one sub-adult, and one 
child were found in the Great Lakes Collection of the UMMA with an 
associated tag reading ``Flint?'' which is believed to mean Flint, MI. 
No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1965, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 4 individuals were identified among a collection of fossils 
known as the Hibbard Collection held at the UMMA. In 1965, Claude 
Hibbard, a Professor of Geology at the University of Michigan, donated 
to the UMMA a large collection of fossils that he collected over years 
of geological excavations. The human remains were identified and 
removed from Hibbard's collection during museum cataloguing activities. 
It is believed that Hibbard collected these human remains, which 
represent three adults and one adolescent, during one of his geological 
excavations. A note with the human remains indicates that they were 
found somewhere near the Flint River in Genesee County, MI. No date or 
time period for the human remains could be established. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On May 24, 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 
individuals were removed from the James Kirk Farm site (20TU153) in 
Tuscola County, MI. Emerson Greenman of the UMMA excavated the human 
remains of one older adult female, one adult, and one infant from a 
location near Watrousville, MI. No date or time period for the human 
remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1925, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Atkin site (20TU104) in 
Tuscola County, MI. On December 16, 1925, farmers unearthed the remains 
of two adults (one of which was possibly male) and one adolescent 
female while working on their land near the Cass River. The human 
remains were collected and donated to the UMMA. The human remains date 
to the Early Late Woodland Period (850-300 B.C.) based on mortuary 
treatment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1936, human remains representing, at

[[Page 65378]]

minimum, 2 individuals were removed from the Grant site in Tuscola 
County, MI. A landowner collected the remains of two adults from a 
mound and donated them to the UMMA. This site may be the same as the 
Atkin site (20TU104) also in Tuscola County, MI. The human remains date 
to the Woodland Period (850 B.C. to 1400 A.D.) based on mortuary 
treatment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Between May 29 and 31, 1936, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 7 individuals were removed from the Caro site in Tuscola 
County, MI. M. Titiea collected the remains of two adult females, one 
adult, one adolescent, one child, one infant, and one neonate as part 
of an excavation directed by Emerson Greenman of the UMMA. No date or 
time period for the human remains could be established. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were removed from the Long Sleep site in Tuscola County, 
MI. The burials were discovered during highway construction activities. 
A local resident collected the remains of one adult male and one 
adolescent, and donated them to the UMMA in 1994. No date or time 
period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In May 1930, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 individuals 
were removed from the Pleasant Lake site (20WA285) in Washtenaw County, 
MI. A Boy Scout troop from Allen Park, MI, collected the remains of one 
adult male and one child and donated them to the UMMA. No date or time 
period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On April 29, 1931, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were removed from the Fred Ewald Farm site in Washtenaw 
County, MI. The remains of one adult female and one child were 
collected during construction activities near Dexter, MI, and donated 
to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1951, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 3 individuals were removed from the Dewey site in Washtenaw 
County, MI. The remains of one adult, one juvenile, and one infant were 
collected during road construction activities near Chelsea, MI, and 
donated to the UMMA. The individuals were reportedly found buried in a 
flexed position. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1924, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual was removed from the Barr site (20WA70) in 
Washtenaw County, MI. A local farmer unearthed the cranium of a young 
adult female while plowing a field near the Saline River. The remains 
were reportedly found with a brass kettle that was not donated to the 
UMMA but that suggests the human remains date to the Post-Contact 
Period. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In April 1945, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were removed from the Wiley site (20WA2) in Washtenaw 
County, MI. The remains of two adults, both possibly female, were 
collected during gravel pit operations near Ford Lake and donated to 
the UMMA. The human remains are believed to date to the Late Woodland 
Period (500-1400 A.D.) based on the burials in an ossuary. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Schaffer Gravel Pit site (20WA52) in Washtenaw County, 
MI. The remains of a young adult female, buried in a flexed position, 
were found atop a small ridge on property owned by the Schaffer Lumber 
Company. Police investigated the site and collected the human remains. 
The police sent the remains to the University of Michigan's Anatomy 
Department where they were determined to be Native American. On October 
7, 1965, archeologists John Halsey and Richard Wilkinson of the UMMA 
visited the site and collected more human remains. They were able to 
identify the burial pit and draw a vertical profile of the pit showing 
the individual had been buried on an east-west axis. The human remains 
collected by the police and the archeologists were donated to the UMMA 
in 1966. The human remains date to the Pre-Contact Period. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Prior to 1933, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual 
were removed from the GL-2022 site (20WA1) in Washtenaw County, MI. A 
landowner discovered the remains of a young adult female on his 
property located near Dexter, MI, and gave them to Wilbert Hinsdale of 
the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    On April 18, 1946, human remains representing, at minimum, 2 
individuals were removed from the Pong site (20WA13) in Washtenaw 
County, MI. A landowner collected the remains of two adults (one of 
them female) while digging a basement, and donated them to the UMMA. No 
date or time period for the human remains could be established. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1956, human remains representing, at minimum, 8 individuals were 
removed from the Ford Lake site (20WA80) in Washtenaw County, MI. The 
burials were discovered during gravel pit operations near Ford Lake. 
Emerson Greenman of the UMMA collected the commingled human remains of 
three adult females, two adult males, one older adult male, one 
adolescent, and one child. One individual was noted as being buried in 
a flexed position, while another individual was noted as being buried 
in an extended position. No date or time period for the human remains 
could be established. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On August 11, 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Ellis Road site in Washtenaw County, 
MI. The remains of one child were discovered during gravel pit 
operations near Ypsilanti, MI. A Michigan State Police Officer brought 
the collected human remains to the UMMA, where they were identified as 
Native American. The landowners subsequently donated the collections to 
the museum. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    Between May 24, 1932, and March 5, 1933, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 22 individuals were removed from the Huron 
River 1 site (20WA4) in Washtenaw County, MI. The burials were 
found during gravel pit operations near Ford Lake on land owned by the 
Ford Motor Company. Amateur archeologists excavated the remains of nine 
adults (one of whom had been cremated), seven infants/neonates, and six 
juveniles, along with six associated funerary objects, and donated 
these collections to the UMMA. The human remains date to the Early Late 
Woodland Period (500-900 A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts and 
mortuary

[[Page 65379]]

treatment. No known individuals were identified. The 6 associated 
funerary objects present are one ceramic vessel and five projectile 
points.
    On July 29, 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 
individuals were removed from the Home Depot site (20WA176) in 
Washtenaw County, MI. The remains of two adults, two juveniles, and one 
infant were found during land development activities associated with a 
retail store. Archeologists from Michigan State University excavated 
the site between July 29 and August 16, 1985. Three of the individuals 
were noted as being buried in a tightly flexed position, lying on their 
left sides, and oriented toward either the east or northeast. There 
were also two small shells found buried in association with the infant. 
The collection was donated to the UMMA. The human remains date to the 
Early Late Woodland period (900-1200 A.D.) based on mortuary treatment 
and diagnostic artifacts. No known individuals were identified. The 2 
associated funerary objects present are two small shells.
    In the summer of 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 
individuals were removed from the Staebler site (20WA40) in Washtenaw 
County, MI. Archeologists from Schoolcraft Community College and the 
UMMA jointly excavated a site near Highway M-14, where human remains 
had been found on the surface of the ground. Some of the remains had 
been cremated. The excavation focused on the recovery of archeological 
remains from the surface and plow zone. The archeologists collected the 
remains of three adults and one sub-adult, along with one associated 
funerary object. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period 
(500-1400 A.D.) based on a projectile point found with the remains. No 
known individuals were identified. The 1 associated funerary object 
present is a projectile point.
    In 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Olson site (20WA111) in Washtenaw County, MI. Experts 
from the UMMA excavated human remains from a site located near the 
Huron River. An older adult male was found buried in a semi-flexed, 
slumped position with 47 associated funerary objects. The human remains 
date to the Early Late Woodland Period (500-900 A.D.) based on 
diagnostic objects. No known individuals were identified. The 47 
funerary objects present are 1 unworked deer scapula, 3 worked animal 
bones, 1 unworked turkey bone, 5 slate discs, 2 chert cores, 2 chert 
flakes, 1 chert triangular biface, 2 chert blades, 1 chert drill, 1 
beaver tooth, 2 stone abraders, 1 mussel shell, 23 ceramic sherds, 1 
groundstone pendant, and 1 argillite disc.
    In July 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual 
were removed from the Ann Arbor Water Department site (20WA284) in 
Washtenaw County, MI. City workers engaged in road construction 
activities unearthed the remains of one adult and contacted the Ann 
Arbor Police Department. The police collected the human remains and 
transferred them to the UMMA. After experts at the museum identified 
the human remains as being Native American, they were donated to the 
UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be 
established. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, 3 individuals were 
removed from the Duke Site (20WA71) in Washtenaw County, MI. Landowners 
unearthed human remains while digging a basement for their house. They 
contacted the Washtenaw County Sherriff's Department. Deputies 
collected the commingled human remains and sent them to Howard Buettner 
and Emerson Greenman, at the UMMA, for identification. Greenman 
determined the remains to be Native American and to represent one 
middle-aged adult female, one cremated adult, and one adolescent. The 
landowners donated the collections to the UMMA. The human remains date 
to the Woodland-Late Pre-Contact Period (500-1610 A.D.) based on 
diagnostic artifacts from a non-burial area of the overall site. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On October 4, 1994, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Kuclo site (20WA289) in Washtenaw 
County, MI. A backhoe operator found the remains in displaced dirt 
during construction activities associated with a housing development. 
The Michigan State Police and Washtenaw County Medical Examiner were 
contacted to investigate the site. They subsequently contacted Russell 
Nelson of the UMMA, who collected the human remains along with 23 
associated funerary objects. The remains of one adult female were 
identified as Native American. The collection was ultimately donated to 
the UMMA. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period (900-1400 
A.D.) based on diagnostic objects. No known individuals were 
identified. The 23 associated funerary objects present are 7 deer bone 
fragments, 13 ceramic sherds, 2 lithic shatter flakes, and 1 retouched 
lithic shatter flake.
    On September 1, 1998, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 
individual were removed from the Brandon Home site (20WA336) in 
Washtenaw County, MI. The human remains were found during construction 
activities in a subdivision of Ann Arbor, MI. The remains of a middle-
aged female were found inside a stone-lined chamber, with stones 
stacked and layered to form a roof. The individual was in supine 
position, with hands folded over the chest and legs drawn upward. Near 
the left side of the body, 71 associated funerary objects were found. 
The human remains date to the Early Late Woodland Period (500-1100 
A.D.) based on diagnostic objects. No known individuals were 
identified. The 71 associated funerary objects present are 1 modified 
animal bone, 1 lot of small animal bones, 3 animal bone fragments, 1 
hoe (made from an elk scapula), 1 slate knife, 1 end scraper, 1 quartz 
flake, 4 retouched flakes, 1 lot of charcoal, 1 shell fragment, and 56 
shell fragments (which include aquatic and terrestrial shells).
    In 1996, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were 
removed from the Nichols Home site (20WA317) in Washtenaw County, MI. 
Landowners unearthed human remains while digging a basement for their 
house. The Washtenaw County Medical Examiner was contacted to 
investigate the site, and determined the remains were Native American. 
The Medical Examiner contacted the UMMA to conduct a salvage 
excavation. A backhoe had removed some of the remains. These were 
collected from the backfill dirt. Additional remains were also 
collected from portions of the landowner's yard and driveway that had 
been graded. Faunal remains found in association with the human remains 
are reported as associated funerary objects. The remains collected 
represent one adult, one adolescent, one infant, and one perinate. The 
human remains date to the Archaic Period (7500-100 B.C.) based on the 
presence of red ochre. No known individuals were identified. The 2 
associated funerary objects are 2 lots of faunal bones representing the 
remains of a dog and a woodchuck.

Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Museum of 
Anthropology

    Officials of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on cranial morphology, dental 
traits, accession

[[Page 65380]]

documentation, and archeological context.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 95 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 152 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Indian tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed is the aboriginal land of the Bad River Band of the Lake 
Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, 
Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett 
Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Chippewa-Cree Indians 
of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, 
Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of 
the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa 
and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; 
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of 
Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of 
Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of 
Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Mille 
Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi 
Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron 
Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and 
Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as the 
Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Quechan Tribe of the Fort 
Yuma Indian Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa 
Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault 
Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa 
Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle 
Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the White Earth 
Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota.
     Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate 
that the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of Bad 
River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad 
River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; 
Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana; Citizen 
Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa 
Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand 
Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse 
Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian 
Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac 
Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; 
Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du 
Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota 
Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, 
Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-
e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Mille Lacs 
Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi Huron 
Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron 
Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi 
Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation 
(previously listed as the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); 
Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California & 
Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; 
Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian 
Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, 
Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa 
Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North 
Dakota; White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
and the Wyandotte Nation.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects may be to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Ben 
Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the 
Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., 
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone (734) 647-9085, email 
bsecunda@umich.edu, by December 2, 2013. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may 
proceed.
    The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 16, 2013.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2013-26007 Filed 10-30-13; 8:45 am]
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