Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 65382-65384 [2013-25983]

Download as PDF mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 65382 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 211 / Thursday, October 31, 2013 / Notices Newaygo County, MI. Amateur archeologists excavated three mounds, located on private land, near the backwater of Croton Dam. The remains of nine adults, two children, and two cremated individuals were collected. The first mound showed signs of extensive looting and contained one adult female, buried in a semi-flexed position. The second mound contained two burial pits with a total five individuals, including two adult males, one adult, possibly female, and two cremated individuals. One of the burial pits contained a celt, but it was not donated to the UMMA. The third mound contained the commingled remains of at least four individuals, including three adults and one cremated individual. Additionally, the commingled remains of three individuals were collected from the site, including one adult female, partially burned, and two children, but the particular burial mound from which they were removed is unknown. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period (800–1400 A.D.) based on mortuary treatment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the summer of 2004, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Cut River Mounds site (20RO01) in Roscommon County, MI. Meghan Howey of the UMMA excavated a multicomponent site comprised of two mounds near the Cut River and Houghton Lake. The remains of one adult were found in four different excavation trenches made near a mound. The overall site spanned the Middle Woodland to the Late Late Woodland Periods (380–1600 A.D.). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date prior to 1964, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Houghton Police Department site in Roscommon County, MI. The Houghton Police Department sent the remains of one adult to the UMMA for identification. The museum concluded that the remains were Native American, and the human remains were subsequently donated to the UMMA in 1964. The remains have no provenience and are believed to be from the Houghton Lake area where other Native American burials have been identified. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date prior to 1924, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:21 Oct 30, 2013 Jkt 232001 from the Cadillac site in Wexford County, MI. The Wexford County Coroner collected the remains of one middle-aged female from an unspecified mound near Cadillac, MI. He donated them to the UMMA in 1924. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Dated: September 16, 2013. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. Determinations made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology Officials of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on cranial morphology, dental traits, accession documentation, and archeological context. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 30 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains may be to The Tribes. [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–14040; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu, by December 2, 2013. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. PO 00000 Frm 00119 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 [FR Doc. 2013–25999 Filed 10–30–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the University of Michigan. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Michigan at the address in this notice by December 2, 2013. ADDRESSES: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains were removed from Saginaw County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\31OCN1.SGM 31OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 211 / Thursday, October 31, 2013 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; and the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan. Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota. Hereafter, all tribes listed in this section are referred to as ‘‘The Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, 5 individuals were removed from the Green Point site (20SA1) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:21 Oct 30, 2013 Jkt 232001 commingled remains of five adults from the surface of the ground and donated them to the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology (UMMA). One cranium shows evidence of cradle boarding. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date in the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Vogelaar site (20SA330) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the remains of an infant from the surface of the ground as part of an archeological survey in a plowed agricultural field. He donated the human remains to the UMMA in 1978. During the 1960s, archaeologists from the UMMA conducted excavations in the area of this site and found evidence of a Native American habitation area, but no human remains were discovered. The infant’s remains are believed to be associated with the habitation area. The human remains are believed to date to the Middle-to-Late Woodland Period (300 B.C.–1400 A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts collected from the associated habitation area. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Cavanaugh site (20SA19) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the remains of one adult from the surface of the ground near Gratiot Road and donated them to the UMMA in 1957. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual, were removed from the Mound Hill site (20SA26) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected an adult foot phalanx from the surface of the ground. On an unknown date between 1950 and November 13, 1990, these human remains were donated to the UMMA. The human remains date to the Pre-Contact Period (9150 B.C.-1640 A.D.) based on documentation of a mound at the site. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date prior to 1941, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Fisher site (20SA29) in Saginaw County, MI. A local resident collected the remains of one adult from PO 00000 Frm 00120 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65383 the surface at a location in Bridgeport Township. The human remains were given to an amateur archeologist in 1950, who subsequently donated them to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1913, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Huron Valley Cemetery site (20SA36) in Saginaw County, MI. A local farmer and his sons collected the remains of a middle-aged female from the surface of the ground in one of their agricultural fields somewhere near the Cass River. They gave the human remains to an amateur archeologist who subsequently donated them to the UMMA in 1932. A projectile point was found embedded on the anterior blade of the female’s right ilium. The projectile point is still present and will be kept with the human remains, but it is not believed to be an associated funerary object. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period (500– 1400 A.D.) based on the projectile point. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Letterman site (20SA41) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archaeologist collected the remains of one adult from the surface of the ground near the Cass River and donated them to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Sand Ridge site (20SA69) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the remains of one adult (probably female) from the surface of the ground near the Pere Marquette Railroad and donated them to the UMMA. Grave looters were known to have visited the area frequently. The human remains date to the Pre-Contact Period (9150 B.C.–1400 A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts that are not in the UMMA’s collections, but are known to have come from the site. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date in the 1920s, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual was removed from the Dead Creek site (20SA34) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the remains of E:\FR\FM\31OCN1.SGM 31OCN1 65384 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 211 / Thursday, October 31, 2013 / Notices one adult on the surface near Dead Creek in Frankenmuth Township and donated them to the UMMA in 1932. He reported finding evidence of a Native American village in the vicinity, also located near Dead Creek. Researcher H.I. Smith also reported a Pre-Contact Period cemetery, designated as the Simons Cemetery, located in the vicinity. The human remains date to the Pre-Contact Period (8500 B.C.–1400 A.D.) based on the Smith reference. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 individuals were removed from Near Saginaw site in Saginaw County, MI. The remains were found among the UMMA’s collections in 1993 during NAGPRA compliance activities. The remains of two adults, one adolescent, and one child were determined to be Native American based on cranial morphology. No date or time period could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date in the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Nason Hill site (20SA121) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the human remains, found among a mixture of surface assemblages with no archeological contexts, and donated them to the UMMA in 1978. No date or time period for the human remains could be established. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology Officials of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on cranial morphology, dental traits, accession documentation, and archeological context. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 18 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:21 Oct 30, 2013 Jkt 232001 the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains may be to The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu, by December 2, 2013. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed. The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: September 16, 2013. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2013–25983 Filed 10–30–13; 8:45 am] penalty of $475,000. The Decree further requires that ConAgra implement a formal tank integrity testing program in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute’s (‘‘API’’) formal standard 653. ConAgra will be required to submit a report annually to EPA summarizing the status of the tank testing and identifying which tanks were inspected during the previous calendar year and which will be inspected in the current year. The Decree provides for stipulated penalties in the event the Defendants fail to comply with the Decree’s requirements. The publication of this notice opens a period for public comment on the Consent Decree. Comments should be addressed to the Assistant Attorney General, Environment and Natural Resources Division, and should refer to United States v. ConAgra Foods, Inc., and ConAgra Grocery Products, LLC, Civil Action No. 2:13–cv–02756, D.J. Ref. No. 90–5–1–1–10403. All comments must be submitted no later than thirty (30) days after the publication date of this notice. Comments may be submitted either by email or by mail: To submit comments: Send them to: By email ....... pubcomment-ees.enrd@ usdoj.gov. Assistant Attorney General, U.S. DOJ—ENRD, P.O. Box 7611, Washington, DC 20044–7611. By mail ......... BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act On September 30, 2013, the Department of Justice lodged a proposed Consent Decree (‘‘Decree’’) in the United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee in the lawsuit entitled United States of America v. ConAgra Foods, Inc., and ConAgra Grocery Products, LLC, Civil Action No. 2:13–cv–02756. This is a revised notice from the one that was published on October 22, 2013, Vol. 78, No. 204, pages 62661–62662. This Decree represents a settlement of claims against the Defendants ConAgra Foods, Inc., and ConAgra Grocery Products, LLC (‘‘Defendants’’ or ‘‘ConAgra’’) for violations of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1321, and Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure (‘‘SPCC’’) and Facility Response Plan (‘‘FRP’’) regulations found at 40 CFR Part 112. The Decree requires that the Defendants pay a civil PO 00000 Frm 00121 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 9990 During the public comment period, the Consent Decree may be examined and downloaded at this Justice Department Web site: https:// www.usdoj.gov/enrd/Consent_ Decrees.html. We will provide a paper copy of the Consent Decree upon written request and payment of reproduction costs. Please mail your request and payment to: Consent Decree Library, U.S. DOJ—ENRD, P.O. Box 7611, Washington, DC 20044–7611. Please enclose a check or money order for $6.25 (25 cents per page reproduction cost) payable to the United States Treasury for the Consent Decree. Henry S. Friedman, Assistant Section Chief, Environmental Enforcement Section, Environment and Natural Resources Division. [FR Doc. 2013–25856 Filed 10–30–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–15–P E:\FR\FM\31OCN1.SGM 31OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 211 (Thursday, October 31, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65382-65384]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-25983]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-14040; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human 
remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural 
affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian tribes 
or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian tribe 
or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish 
to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request to the University of Michigan. If no additional 
requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to 
the Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this 
notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written 
request with information in support of the request to the University of 
Michigan at the address in this notice by December 2, 2013.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of 
Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming 
Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone (734) 
647-9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human 
remains were removed from Saginaw County, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d).

[[Page 65383]]

The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills Indian Community, 
Michigan; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, 
Montana; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; 
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of 
Michigan; and the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan.
    Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Bad River 
Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River 
Reservation, Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota 
Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa 
Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, 
Minnesota; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of 
Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech Lake Band of the 
Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota 
Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa 
Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sac 
& Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, 
Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Sokaogon Chippewa 
Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle 
Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the White Earth 
Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota.
    Hereafter, all tribes listed in this section are referred to as 
``The Tribes.''

History and Description of the Remains

    On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 5 individuals were removed from the Green 
Point site (20SA1) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist 
collected the commingled remains of five adults from the surface of the 
ground and donated them to the University of Michigan Museum of 
Anthropology (UMMA). One cranium shows evidence of cradle boarding. No 
date or time period for the human remains could be established. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date in the 1930s, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Vogelaar site (20SA330) in 
Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the remains of an 
infant from the surface of the ground as part of an archeological 
survey in a plowed agricultural field. He donated the human remains to 
the UMMA in 1978. During the 1960s, archaeologists from the UMMA 
conducted excavations in the area of this site and found evidence of a 
Native American habitation area, but no human remains were discovered. 
The infant's remains are believed to be associated with the habitation 
area. The human remains are believed to date to the Middle-to-Late 
Woodland Period (300 B.C.-1400 A.D.) based on diagnostic artifacts 
collected from the associated habitation area. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Cavanaugh 
site (20SA19) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected 
the remains of one adult from the surface of the ground near Gratiot 
Road and donated them to the UMMA in 1957. No date or time period for 
the human remains could be established. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 1 individual, were removed from the Mound 
Hill site (20SA26) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist 
collected an adult foot phalanx from the surface of the ground. On an 
unknown date between 1950 and November 13, 1990, these human remains 
were donated to the UMMA. The human remains date to the Pre-Contact 
Period (9150 B.C.-1640 A.D.) based on documentation of a mound at the 
site. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    On an unknown date prior to 1941, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Fisher site (20SA29) in 
Saginaw County, MI. A local resident collected the remains of one adult 
from the surface at a location in Bridgeport Township. The human 
remains were given to an amateur archeologist in 1950, who subsequently 
donated them to the UMMA. No date or time period for the human remains 
could be established. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1913, human remains representing, at minimum, 1 individual were 
removed from the Huron Valley Cemetery site (20SA36) in Saginaw County, 
MI. A local farmer and his sons collected the remains of a middle-aged 
female from the surface of the ground in one of their agricultural 
fields somewhere near the Cass River. They gave the human remains to an 
amateur archeologist who subsequently donated them to the UMMA in 1932. 
A projectile point was found embedded on the anterior blade of the 
female's right ilium. The projectile point is still present and will be 
kept with the human remains, but it is not believed to be an associated 
funerary object. The human remains date to the Late Woodland Period 
(500-1400 A.D.) based on the projectile point. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Letterman 
site (20SA41) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archaeologist collected 
the remains of one adult from the surface of the ground near the Cass 
River and donated them to the UMMA. No date or time period for the 
human remains could be established. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date between 1915 and 1950, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Sand Ridge 
site (20SA69) in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected 
the remains of one adult (probably female) from the surface of the 
ground near the Pere Marquette Railroad and donated them to the UMMA. 
Grave looters were known to have visited the area frequently. The human 
remains date to the Pre-Contact Period (9150 B.C.-1400 A.D.) based on 
diagnostic artifacts that are not in the UMMA's collections, but are 
known to have come from the site. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date in the 1920s, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual was removed from the Dead Creek site (20SA34) in 
Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the remains of

[[Page 65384]]

one adult on the surface near Dead Creek in Frankenmuth Township and 
donated them to the UMMA in 1932. He reported finding evidence of a 
Native American village in the vicinity, also located near Dead Creek. 
Researcher H.I. Smith also reported a Pre-Contact Period cemetery, 
designated as the Simons Cemetery, located in the vicinity. The human 
remains date to the Pre-Contact Period (8500 B.C.-1400 A.D.) based on 
the Smith reference. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 4 
individuals were removed from Near Saginaw site in Saginaw County, MI. 
The remains were found among the UMMA's collections in 1993 during 
NAGPRA compliance activities. The remains of two adults, one 
adolescent, and one child were determined to be Native American based 
on cranial morphology. No date or time period could be established. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date in the 1930s, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 1 individual were removed from the Nason Hill site (20SA121) 
in Saginaw County, MI. An amateur archeologist collected the human 
remains, found among a mixture of surface assemblages with no 
archeological contexts, and donated them to the UMMA in 1978. No date 
or time period for the human remains could be established. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.

Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Museum of 
Anthropology

    Officials of the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on cranial morphology, dental 
traits, accession documentation, and archeological context.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 18 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and any present-day Indian tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of 
the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan.
     Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate 
that the land from which the Native American human remains were removed 
is the aboriginal land of The Tribes.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains may be to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains should submit a written request with information 
in support of the request to Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, 
University of Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 
Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone 
(734) 647-9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu, by December 2, 2013. After 
that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed.
    The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 16, 2013.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2013-25983 Filed 10-30-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P