Proposed Fee Schedule for Commercial Filming and Still Photography Permits, 52209-52211 [2013-20440]

Download as PDF tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 163 / Thursday, August 22, 2013 / Notices Recipients of HUD funding that is subject to the requirements of Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 are required, to the greatest extent feasible, to meet the minimum numerical goals for employment and contracting set forth in the Section 3 regulation at 24 CFR 135.30. In November 2011, HUD launched the Section 3 Business Registry Pilot program in five metropolitan areas— Detroit, New Orleans, Los Angeles, Miami, and Washington, DC as a resource to help agencies that receive certain HUD funds to meet their Section 3 obligations at 24 CFR part 135 (OMB Approval 2529–0052). HUD’s Section 3 Business Registry is based on similar federal business registries maintained by the Small Business Administration (SBA) and the Veterans Administration. It allows firms that meet one of the three regulatory definitions of a Section 3 Business to self-certify their eligibility with HUD. Once registered, these firms are placed into a searchable online database of Section 3 Businesses that interested parties such as public housing authorities, local government agencies, contractors, and others can use to notify these entities about the availability of certain HUD-funded contracts. This information collection consists of two surveys that assess the overall effectiveness of the Section 3 Business Registry. The first survey measures the outcomes of the pilot program for Section 3 Businesses that have registered with HUD. The second survey, evaluates feedback from recipients of HUD funding in the five pilot locations on the usefulness of the Section 3 Business Registry. Both surveys will be issued via web-based survey sites such as www.Surveymonkey.com and will produce information that may be useful to HUD for developing policies regarding the Section 3 Business Registry. Responding to these surveys is voluntary. On April 16, 2013, HUD was granted six-month emergency approval for this information collection by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB approval 2529–0053). At this time, HUD is requesting 3-year approval pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. HUD solicits comment in the following areas outlined in Section A on the information collection described in Section B. A. Solicitation of Public Comment This notice is soliciting comments from members of the public and affected parties concerning the collection of VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:07 Aug 21, 2013 Jkt 229001 information described in Section B on the following: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) The accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (3) Ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond; including through the use of appropriate automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. HUD encourages interested parties to submit comment in response to these questions. B. Overview of Information Collection Title of Proposal: Section 3 Business Registry Surveys Office: Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity OMB Control Number: 2529–0053 Description of the need for the information and proposed use: This information collection contains two surveys that will provide insights into the effectiveness of the Section 3 Business Registry and assess potential outcomes. This information may be useful to HUD for developing policies regarding the Section 3 Business Registry. This information collection will be limited to businesses that have selfcertified their Section 3 eligibility to HUD and recipients of HUD funding (i.e., Public Housing Authorities and local government agencies). The surveys will be sent electronically to all certified businesses in the Section 3 Business Registry database and HUD funding recipients in an effort to produce the greatest amount of responses. Random sampling will not be used to identify potential respondents. Respondents will have a minimum of 60 days to respond to the surveys. Responding to these surveys is voluntary. Agency form numbers, if applicable: Form HUD 968 and Form HUD 969 Members of affected public: Businesses that are either owned by, or substantially employ, low- or very lowincome persons; low-income persons; developers; members of the general public; public housing agencies; and State and local governments. Estimation of the total numbers of hours needed to prepare the information collection including number of respondents, frequency of response, and PO 00000 Frm 00083 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52209 hours of response: At this time, there are approximately 800 businesses in the five pilot locations that have selfcertified their eligibility with HUD and 150 HUD-funding recipients in the five pilot areas may complete the Section 3 surveys. It is estimated that each survey will take approximately 30 minutes to complete for a total of 475 hours. Status of the proposed information collection: Active Authority: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35, as amended. Dated: August 13, 2013. Bryan Greene, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity. [FR Doc. 2013–20520 Filed 8–21–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4210–67–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service National Park Service [NPS–WASO–VRP–09328; PXXVPADO515] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Proposed Fee Schedule for Commercial Filming and Still Photography Permits Office of the Secretary, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Interior; Forest Service, Agriculture. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for public comment. AGENCY: The Department of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture propose to adopt a fee schedule for commercial filming and still photography conducted on public lands under their jurisdiction. The proposed fee schedule would establish land-use fees for commercial filming and still photography that are consistent for the National Park Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service. The fees would be based on sound business management principles and would provide a fair return to the United States, as required in the law. DATES: Written comments will be accepted until September 23, 2013. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by any of the following methods: • Email: location_fee_notice_2013@ nps.gov; put ‘‘Commercial Filming Fee Schedule’’ in the subject line. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\22AUN1.SGM 22AUN1 tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 52210 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 163 / Thursday, August 22, 2013 / Notices • Mail: Lee Dickinson, Special Park Uses Program Manager, National Park Service, 1849 C Street NW., ORG CODE 2460, Washington, DC 20240. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lee Dickinson, National Park Service at 202–513–7092 or by email at lee_ dickinson@nps.gov. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1–800–877–8339 to contact the above named individual during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Public Law 106–206 (16 U.S.C. 460l–6d) directs the Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture to establish a reasonable land-use fee for commercial filming and still photography conducted on lands under their jurisdiction. The law also directs the agencies to recover all costs incurred in connection with commercial filming activity. The Department of the Interior (DOI) is publishing in today’s Federal Register regulations that implement these requirements of the law. The fee schedule that we are proposing in this notice would establish the amounts of the fees charged by DOI agencies under 43 CFR 5.8(a) and would provide a fair return to the United States for the use of federal lands. The fee does not recover administrative costs, which are collected separately. Public Law 106–206 states that fees must be based on several criteria, including: 1. The number of days the commercial filming or still photography takes place on federal land. 2. The size of the film crew present on federal land. 3. The amount and type of equipment present on federal land. As used in this notice, the term commercial filming means the film, electronic, magnetic, digital or other recording of a moving image by a person, business, or other entity for a market audience with the intent of generating income. Examples include, but are not limited to feature film, video, television broadcast, documentary, or similar projects. Commercial filming may include the advertisement of a product or service and/or the use of actors, models, sets, or props. Still photography conducted on lands managed by the Department of the Interior (DOI) or the Forest Service (USFS) requires a permit when it involves models or props that are not a part of the site’s natural or cultural VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:07 Aug 21, 2013 Jkt 229001 resources or administrative facilities, or when it takes place at a location where members of the public generally are not allowed, or where additional administrative costs are likely. The land-use fee for still photography would apply only to still photography that requires a permit. Background On December 14, 2000, the National Park Service (NPS) published a notice in the Federal Register (65 FR 78186) requesting public comments on a proposed land-use fee schedule for commercial filming and still photography for all units of the National Park System. The NPS received 34 comments from the public on the proposed fee schedule. In general, respondents stated that charging a fee for each person was confusing and that the proposed fees were too high. There were additional comments on the proposed implementation of the schedule. Respondents proposed charging less for still photography than for commercial filming and proposed charging only one fee per day, regardless of how many different sites were used, rather than a fee per day per location, as proposed by the NPS. Shortly after the public comment period closed, DOI decided to develop a regulation establishing a single landuse fee schedule for commercial filming and still photography for all DOI agencies. DOI created a task force to develop the fee schedule that included personnel from the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the NPS. Representatives from DOI’s Office of the Solicitor and the Forest Service also served on the task force. To enhance consistency in management of federal lands, DOI and the Forest Service both anticipated that the Forest Service would adopt the same land-use fee schedule for commercial filming and still photography. The task force used the proposed NPS land-use fee schedule as a starting point for the Departmental fee schedule for commercial filming and still photography and considered the comments received on the NPS proposed fee schedule. Task force members requested information from state, local, and tribal land management agencies and privately owned cultural institutions about land-use fees they charge for commercial filming and still photography. A task force member attended the Association of Film Commissioners International Location ‘‘Expo’’ to discuss with state and location film commissioners the land use fees they charge for commercial PO 00000 Frm 00084 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 filming and still photography. A task force member also spoke with representatives of the film and photography industry about their experience with land use fees. The task force developed separate land-use fee schedules for commercial filming and still photography permits. The task force modified the NPS proposed land-use fee schedule to establish different fee categories for each schedule based on the number of people engaging in commercial filming or still photography at a specific site and, in the case of the category for 1 to 2 people, the amount and type of equipment used. A DOI economist conducted costbenefit and Unfunded Mandates Act analyses and a Regulatory Flexibility Act analysis of the NPS proposed fee schedule that the task force used in creating the proposed fee schedules. These analyses are available on-lineat http://www.nps.gov/applications/digest/ NPS_Filming_Fees_BCA_FINAL.pdf or by contacting Lee Dickinson, NPS Special Park Uses Program Manager, at lee_dickinson@nps.gov or 202–513– 7092. Proposed Fee Schedules Commercial filming land-use fee schedule Number of people 1–3, camera and tripod only .... 1–5, more than a camera and tripod. 6–10 .......................................... 11–30 ........................................ 31–50 ........................................ 51–70 ........................................ over 70 ..................................... Fee $10/day or $250/ month 75/day 150/day 350/day 650/day 1,000/day 1,500/day Still photography land-use fee schedule Number of people 1–3, camera and tripod only .... 1–5, more than a camera and tripod. 6–10 .......................................... 11–20 ........................................ 21–30 ........................................ over 30 ..................................... Fee $10/day or $250/ month 50/day 100/day 200/day 300/day 450/day The land-use fee schedule would be adjusted annually using the July 12month, unadjusted Consumer Price Index-Urban (CPI–U), which measures the average change over time in the prices paid by urban consumers for the 12-month period ending July 31 each year. Changes to the fee schedule would be rounded to the nearest dollar. E:\FR\FM\22AUN1.SGM 22AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 163 / Thursday, August 22, 2013 / Notices No annual adjustment to the fee schedule would exceed five percent. When the annual change to the CPI–U results in an annual adjustment of more than five percent, we would add the portion of the adjustment exceeding five percent to the following year’s schedule. Each year we would publish the revised land-use fee schedule in the Federal Register by October 1, and the adjustments would become effective the following January 1. Jonathan B. Jarvis, Director, National Park Service. David Cottingham, Acting Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Mike Pool, Acting Director, Bureau of Land Management. Thomas L. Tidwell, Chief, U.S. Forest Service. [FR Doc. 2013–20440 Filed 8–21–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–EJ–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337–TA–878] Certain Electronic Devices Having Placeshifting or Display Replication and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination Finding the Sole Remaining Respondent To Be in Default; Request for Written Submissions on Remedy, the Public Interest, and Bonding U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has determined not to review an initial determination (‘‘ID’’) (Order No. 11) issued by the presiding administrative law judge (‘‘ALJ’’) on July 29, 2013, finding the last remaining respondent in this investigation to be in default. Accordingly, the Commission requests written submissions, under the schedule set forth below, on remedy, public interest, and bonding. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Needham, Office of the General Counsel, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 708–5468. Copies of non-confidential documents filed in connection with this investigation are or will be available for inspection during official business hours (8:45 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.) in the Office of the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:07 Aug 21, 2013 Jkt 229001 Street SW., Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 205–2000. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its Internet server (http://www.usitc.gov). The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at http:// edis.usitc.gov. Hearing-impaired persons are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on (202) 205–1810. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Commission instituted this investigation on April 17, 2013, based on a complaint filed by Sling Media, Inc. (‘‘Sling’’). 78 FR 22899–900. The complaint alleges violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337 (‘‘section 337’’), in the importation into the United States, the sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices having placeshifting or display replication functionality, and products containing same, by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent Nos. 7,725,912; 7,877,776; 8,051,454; 8,060,909; 8,266,657; and 8,365,236. The complaint further alleges the existence of a domestic industry. The Commission’s notice of investigation named as respondents Belkin International, Inc. (‘‘Belkin’’); Monsoon Multimedia, Inc. (‘‘Monsoon’’); and C2 Microsystems, Inc. (‘‘C2’’). 78 FR 22899–900 (Apr. 17, 2013). The Office of Unfair Import Investigations is not participating in this investigation. Id. The Commission terminated the investigation with respect to Belkin based on a settlement agreement, and terminated the investigation with respect to Monsoon based upon default. See Order No. 4 (June 5, 2013), not reviewed July 5, 2013; see Order No. 7 (July 8, 2013), not reviewed Aug. 7, 2013. On June 26, 2013, Sling moved for an order directing C2 to show cause why it should not be found in default for failure to respond to the Complaint and Notice of Investigation, and, upon failure to show cause, for the issuance of an initial determination finding C2 in default. On July 11, 2013, the ALJ ordered C2 to show cause why it should not be found in default. See Order No. 9. No response to Order No. 9 was filed. On July 29, 2013, the ALJ issued the subject ID finding C2 in default under Commission Rule 210.16(a)(1). See Order No. 11. No petitions for review of the ID were filed. The Commission has determined not to review the subject ID. C2 is the sole remaining respondent in this investigation. Section 337(g)(1) PO 00000 Frm 00085 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52211 and Commission Rule 210.16(c) authorize the Commission to order relief against a respondent found in default, unless, after considering the public interest, it finds that such relief should not issue. Sling did not file a declaration stating that it was seeking a general exclusion order as provided in Commission Rule 210.16(c)(2). In connection with the final disposition of this investigation, the Commission may: (1) Issue an order that could result in the exclusion of articles manufactured or imported by the defaulting respondents; and/or (2) issue a cease and desist order that could result in the defaulting respondents being required to cease and desist from engaging in unfair acts in the importation and sale of such articles. Accordingly, the Commission is interested in receiving written submissions that address the form of remedy, if any, that should be ordered. If a party seeks exclusion of an article from entry into the United States for purposes other than entry for consumption, the party should so indicate and provide information establishing that activities involving other types of entry either are adversely affecting it or likely to do so. For background, see Certain Devices for Connecting Computers via Telephone Lines, Inv. No. 337–TA–360, USITC Pub. No. 2843, Comm’n Op. at 7–10 (December 1994). If the Commission contemplates some form of remedy, it must consider the effects of that remedy upon the public interest. The factors that the Commission will consider include the effect that the exclusion order and/or cease and desists orders would have on (1) the public health and welfare, (2) competitive conditions in the U.S. economy, (3) U.S. production of articles that are like or directly competitive with those that are subject to investigation, and (4) U.S. consumers. The Commission is therefore interested in receiving written submissions that address the aforementioned public interest factors in the context of this investigation. If the Commission orders some form of remedy, the U.S. Trade Representative, as delegated by the President, has 60 days to approve or disapprove the Commission’s action. See Presidential Memorandum of July 21, 2005, 70 FR 43251 (July 26, 2005). During this period, the subject articles would be entitled to enter the United States under bond, in an amount determined by the Commission and prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury. The Commission is therefore interested in receiving submissions E:\FR\FM\22AUN1.SGM 22AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 163 (Thursday, August 22, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52209-52211]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-20440]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Bureau of Land Management,

Fish and Wildlife Service

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-VRP-09328; PXXVPADO515]

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Forest Service


Proposed Fee Schedule for Commercial Filming and Still 
Photography Permits

AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Interior; Forest Service, 
Agriculture.

ACTION: Notice of availability; request for public comment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Department of the Interior and the Department of 
Agriculture propose to adopt a fee schedule for commercial filming and 
still photography conducted on public lands under their jurisdiction. 
The proposed fee schedule would establish land-use fees for commercial 
filming and still photography that are consistent for the National Park 
Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land 
Management and U.S. Forest Service. The fees would be based on sound 
business management principles and would provide a fair return to the 
United States, as required in the law.

DATES: Written comments will be accepted until September 23, 2013.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by any of the following methods:
     Email: location_fee_notice_2013@nps.gov; put 
``Commercial Filming Fee Schedule'' in the subject line.

[[Page 52210]]

     Mail: Lee Dickinson, Special Park Uses Program Manager, 
National Park Service, 1849 C Street NW., ORG CODE 2460, Washington, DC 
20240.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lee Dickinson, National Park Service 
at 202-513-7092 or by email at lee_dickinson@nps.gov. Individuals who 
use telecommunication devices for the deaf may call the Federal 
Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 to contact the above 
named individual during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 
hours a day, 7 days a week. You will receive a reply during normal 
business hours.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Public Law 106-206 (16 U.S.C. 460l-6d) 
directs the Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture to establish a 
reasonable land-use fee for commercial filming and still photography 
conducted on lands under their jurisdiction. The law also directs the 
agencies to recover all costs incurred in connection with commercial 
filming activity. The Department of the Interior (DOI) is publishing in 
today's Federal Register regulations that implement these requirements 
of the law. The fee schedule that we are proposing in this notice would 
establish the amounts of the fees charged by DOI agencies under 43 CFR 
5.8(a) and would provide a fair return to the United States for the use 
of federal lands. The fee does not recover administrative costs, which 
are collected separately.
    Public Law 106-206 states that fees must be based on several 
criteria, including:
    1. The number of days the commercial filming or still photography 
takes place on federal land.
    2. The size of the film crew present on federal land.
    3. The amount and type of equipment present on federal land.
    As used in this notice, the term commercial filming means the film, 
electronic, magnetic, digital or other recording of a moving image by a 
person, business, or other entity for a market audience with the intent 
of generating income. Examples include, but are not limited to feature 
film, video, television broadcast, documentary, or similar projects. 
Commercial filming may include the advertisement of a product or 
service and/or the use of actors, models, sets, or props.
    Still photography conducted on lands managed by the Department of 
the Interior (DOI) or the Forest Service (USFS) requires a permit when 
it involves models or props that are not a part of the site's natural 
or cultural resources or administrative facilities, or when it takes 
place at a location where members of the public generally are not 
allowed, or where additional administrative costs are likely. The land-
use fee for still photography would apply only to still photography 
that requires a permit.

Background

    On December 14, 2000, the National Park Service (NPS) published a 
notice in the Federal Register (65 FR 78186) requesting public comments 
on a proposed land-use fee schedule for commercial filming and still 
photography for all units of the National Park System. The NPS received 
34 comments from the public on the proposed fee schedule.
    In general, respondents stated that charging a fee for each person 
was confusing and that the proposed fees were too high. There were 
additional comments on the proposed implementation of the schedule. 
Respondents proposed charging less for still photography than for 
commercial filming and proposed charging only one fee per day, 
regardless of how many different sites were used, rather than a fee per 
day per location, as proposed by the NPS.
    Shortly after the public comment period closed, DOI decided to 
develop a regulation establishing a single land-use fee schedule for 
commercial filming and still photography for all DOI agencies. DOI 
created a task force to develop the fee schedule that included 
personnel from the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, and the NPS. Representatives from DOI's Office of the 
Solicitor and the Forest Service also served on the task force. To 
enhance consistency in management of federal lands, DOI and the Forest 
Service both anticipated that the Forest Service would adopt the same 
land-use fee schedule for commercial filming and still photography.
    The task force used the proposed NPS land-use fee schedule as a 
starting point for the Departmental fee schedule for commercial filming 
and still photography and considered the comments received on the NPS 
proposed fee schedule. Task force members requested information from 
state, local, and tribal land management agencies and privately owned 
cultural institutions about land-use fees they charge for commercial 
filming and still photography. A task force member attended the 
Association of Film Commissioners International Location ``Expo'' to 
discuss with state and location film commissioners the land use fees 
they charge for commercial filming and still photography. A task force 
member also spoke with representatives of the film and photography 
industry about their experience with land use fees.
    The task force developed separate land-use fee schedules for 
commercial filming and still photography permits. The task force 
modified the NPS proposed land-use fee schedule to establish different 
fee categories for each schedule based on the number of people engaging 
in commercial filming or still photography at a specific site and, in 
the case of the category for 1 to 2 people, the amount and type of 
equipment used.
    A DOI economist conducted cost-benefit and Unfunded Mandates Act 
analyses and a Regulatory Flexibility Act analysis of the NPS proposed 
fee schedule that the task force used in creating the proposed fee 
schedules. These analyses are available on-lineat http://www.nps.gov/applications/digest/NPS_Filming_Fees_BCA_FINAL.pdf or by contacting 
Lee Dickinson, NPS Special Park Uses Program Manager, at lee_dickinson@nps.gov or 202-513-7092.

Proposed Fee Schedules

Commercial filming land-use fee schedule

------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Number of people                            Fee
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1-3, camera and tripod only...............  $10/day or $250/month
1-5, more than a camera and tripod........  75/day
6-10......................................  150/day
11-30.....................................  350/day
31-50.....................................  650/day
51-70.....................................  1,000/day
over 70...................................  1,500/day
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Still photography land-use fee schedule

------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Number of people                            Fee
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1-3, camera and tripod only...............  $10/day or $250/month
1-5, more than a camera and tripod........  50/day
6-10......................................  100/day
11-20.....................................  200/day
21-30.....................................  300/day
over 30...................................  450/day
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The land-use fee schedule would be adjusted annually using the July 
12-month, unadjusted Consumer Price Index-Urban (CPI-U), which measures 
the average change over time in the prices paid by urban consumers for 
the 12-month period ending July 31 each year. Changes to the fee 
schedule would be rounded to the nearest dollar.

[[Page 52211]]

    No annual adjustment to the fee schedule would exceed five percent. 
When the annual change to the CPI-U results in an annual adjustment of 
more than five percent, we would add the portion of the adjustment 
exceeding five percent to the following year's schedule.
    Each year we would publish the revised land-use fee schedule in the 
Federal Register by October 1, and the adjustments would become 
effective the following January 1.

Jonathan B. Jarvis,
Director, National Park Service.
David Cottingham,
Acting Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Mike Pool,
Acting Director, Bureau of Land Management.
Thomas L. Tidwell,
Chief, U.S. Forest Service.
[FR Doc. 2013-20440 Filed 8-21-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-EJ-P