Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 45958-45960 [2013-18323]

Download as PDF 45958 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 146 / Tuesday, July 30, 2013 / Notices pmangrum on DSK3VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES excavation was led by William Duncan Strong and jointly sponsored by Columbia University and the State Historical Society of North Dakota. Strong brought the human remains to the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), where they were placed on ‘‘permanent loan.’’ In January 2002, a detailed assessment of the human remains was made by researchers at Columbia University, and in March 2006, AMNH transferred the human remains to the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University. Seven partial or nearly intact skeletons, representing five adults and two children, and fragmentary remains of three other individuals were identified. These individual have been identified as Native American based on Strong’s documentation and non-invasive assessment of cranial features. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains were found on the site of a contact-period Mandan settlement called On-A-Slant Village (site 32MO26) on the right bank of the Heart River near its confluence with the Missouri River. Lewis and Clark recorded this site in 1804, as ‘‘the remains of a village formerly occupied by the Mandans,’’ which local people reported as having been abandoned around 1780, due to smallpox and warfare with the Sioux. Records indicate that the descendants of this settlement sometimes lived with members of the Hidatsa and Arikara. Today, the Arikara, Hidatsa, and Mandan people are represented by the Three Affiliated Tribes of Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota. Determinations Made by Columbia University, Department of Anthropology Officials of Columbia University, Department of Anthropology, have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of, at minimum, 10 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Three Affiliated Tribes of Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:32 Jul 29, 2013 Jkt 229001 a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Nan Rothschild, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University, 1200 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, telephone (212) 854–4977, email roth@columbia.edu, by August 29, 2013. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Three Affiliated Tribes of Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota, may proceed. The Columbia University, Department of Anthropology, is responsible for notifying the Three Affiliated Tribes of Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota, that this notice has been published. Dated: June 25, 2013. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2013–18274 Filed 7–29–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–13406; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Burke Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Burke Museum at the address in this notice by August 29, 2013. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 35101, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849, email plape@uw.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Burke Museum. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Island County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. ADDRESSES: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by the Burke Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation; Samish Indian Nation (previously listed as the Samish Indian Tribe, Washington); SaukSuiattle Indian Tribe; Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians of Washington (previously listed as Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington); Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation of Washington; Tulalip Tribes of Washington (previously listed as the Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington); and the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains Between 1953 and 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site 45– IS–77 in Island County, WA. The human remains were removed during a University of Washington Department of Anthropology Field Project led by Allan Bryan, and the human remains were accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1966 (Burke Accn. #1966–94). While six burials were excavated, the Burke Museum only holds the remains for E:\FR\FM\30JYN1.SGM 30JYN1 pmangrum on DSK3VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 146 / Tuesday, July 30, 2013 / Notices ‘‘Burial 6’’; the whereabouts of the other human remains is unknown. No known individuals were identified. The 32 associated funerary objects are 2 lots of unmodified wood; 1 wood grave stake; 2 metal objects; 1 pair of scissors; 1 black plastic comb; 2 shells; 1 modified bone fragment; 1 unmodified bone fragment; 1 stone abrader; 1 .22 caliber gun; 3 bags of buttons (glass, porcelain, bone, copper); 8 U.S. coins; 1 porcelain doll head; 1 bag containing metal buckle fragments; and 6 composite artifact bags containing wood, nails, charcoal, pebbles, metal, leather, watch faces, a watch chain, and organic and inorganic materials. Burial methods at the site were varied and included the use of long and short wooden box coffins. The remains were found extended, or in flexed and semiflexed positions, on the back and side. There was also evidence of cremation at the site. The burials appear to be from a contact time period, as evidenced by the transition into European burial customs and the presence of postcontact artifacts. One of the burials was dated to 1876 or later based on the presence of an 1876 coin. In 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from south of site 45–IS–14 in Island County, WA. The remains were removed by Richard Arild Johnson and donated to the Burke Museum in 1962 (Burke Accn. #1963–24). No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is 1 lot/bag of pebbles, dirt and shell fragments. In 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from site 45–IS–13 on Snatelum Point in Island County, WA. The human remains were removed during a University of Washington Department of Anthropology Field Project led by Allan Bryan, and the human remains were accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1966 (Burke Accn. #1966–94). The human remains were loaned to the University of Washington Anthropology Department at an unknown date. The human remains were discovered in the Anthropology Department, stored with the physical anthropology remains in June 2010, and were then returned to the Burke Museum. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from San de Fuca in Island County, WA. The human remains were removed by John Armstrong from a shell mound near the site of old potlatch house and donated to the Burke Museum in 1926 (Burke Accn. #2122). VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:32 Jul 29, 2013 Jkt 229001 No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Careless Bay in Island County, WA. The human remains were removed by Bob Atwell and Emil Gabeline and subsequently donated to the Burke Museum (Burke Accn. #1963– 50). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1941, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Utsalady on Camano Island in Island County, WA. The human remains were removed by Dr. Alfred E. Hudson and University of Washington archeology students. The human remains were accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1941 (Burke Accn. #3361). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. All of the human remains described above were removed from sites in the Penn Cove area on Whidbey Island or on the northwestern shore of Camano Island. Several sites are documented archeological or shell midden sites. The human remains in this notice have been determined to be Native American based on a combination of archaeological, geographic, or physical anthropology evidence. Linguistically, Native American speakers of the Northern dialect of the Lushootseed language claim cultural heritage to the Northern Puget Sound area. Culturally, Native Americans from the Northern Puget Sound area are members of Southern Coast Salish tribes. Historical and anthropological sources (Deur 2009, Mooney 1896, Roberts 1975, Ruby and Brown 1986, Spier 1936, Swanton 1952) indicate that the Kikiallus, Swinomish, Lower Skagit, and Stillaguamish peoples occupied and had village sites in the Penn Cove area and on the northwestern shore of Camano Island. Although the Indian Claims Commission determined that the sites near Penn Cove on Whidbey Island fell within the aboriginal territory of the Lower Skagit, shortly after 1855, anthropologists and historians described this area as a mixed community. Penn Cove was one of the communities Stillaguamish and other tribes were told to move to after being forced to leave their villages on the mainland (Deur 2009, Grady 2012). Today, descendants of Kikiallus are members of the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians of Washington (previously listed as Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington); Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation of Washington; PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 45959 and the Tulalip Tribes of Washington (previously listed as the Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington). Today, the Lower Skagit are primarily members of the Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation of Washington and the Tulalip Tribes of Washington (previously listed as the Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington). Determinations Made by the Burke Museum Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that: • Based on archaeological evidence, the human remains have been determined to be Native American. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of seven individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 33 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians of Washington (previously listed as Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington); Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation of Washington; and the Tulalip Tribes of Washington (previously listed as the Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 35101, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849, email plape@uw.edu, by August 29, 2013. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians of Washington (previously listed as Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington); Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation of Washington; and the Tulalip Tribes of Washington (previously listed as the Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington) may proceed. E:\FR\FM\30JYN1.SGM 30JYN1 45960 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 146 / Tuesday, July 30, 2013 / Notices The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: July 8, 2013. Melanie O’Brien, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2013–18323 Filed 7–29–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–13324; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources at the address in this notice by August 29, 2013. ADDRESSES: Judith Deel, Missouri Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 179, Jefferson City, MO 65101, telephone (573) 751–7862. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory pmangrum on DSK3VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:32 Jul 29, 2013 Jkt 229001 of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO. The human remains were removed from Clarksville, in Pike County, MO. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; and the Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa. History and Description of the Remains Between 1962 and 1996, human remains representing, at minimum, 29 individuals were removed from the Clarksville Mound Group (site 23PI6) in Pike County, MO. The Clarksville Mound Group was originally recorded in 1952 and described as a group of six mounds. In 1962, the site was bulldozed in order to develop a sky-ride and tourist attraction, and five of the six mounds were destroyed. One accretion mound survived, under the sky-ride platform, and was incorporated into the commercial operation. Verbal and newspaper accounts report large numbers of human remains were removed or destroyed at the time, and some human remains were displayed as a part of the tourist attraction. In 1995 and 1996, the City of Clarksville, the owner of the site, contacted the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) for assistance after terminating the lease to the tourist attraction. Human remains were eroding out of the damaged mound, and due to the severity of the erosion problem, the SHPO and the City of Clarksville decided to undertake excavations to remove the threatened burials. The excavations were expanded as more burials were discovered. During the excavation, human remains representing, at minimum, 22 individuals were removed from the site. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are one lot of ancalusa shell beads and one Scallorn point. In 2002, additional human remains representing, at PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 minimum, four individuals were transferred to the SHPO by a local collector who had been on the site in 1962. In 2006, additional human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were transferred to the SHPO by the University of MissouriColumbia. The area of Pike County, MO, was ceded by the Sauk and Fox in a series of treaties with the United States between 1804 and 1816. The Sauk and Fox are represented by the present day Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; and the Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa. Cultural affiliation was determined based on tribal history and the historical association of these tribes to the counties bordering the Mississippi River, including Pike County, MO. Determinations Made by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources Officials of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 29 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the two objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; and the Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Judith Deel, Missouri Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 179, Jefferson City, MO 65101, telephone (573) 751–7862, by August 29, 2013. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects the Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; and the Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa may proceed. E:\FR\FM\30JYN1.SGM 30JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 146 (Tuesday, July 30, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 45958-45960]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-18323]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-13406; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington 
State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University 
of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes 
or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives 
of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in 
this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human 
remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request 
to the Burke Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer 
of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
lineal descendants, Indian tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations 
stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the Burke Museum at the address in this 
notice by August 29, 2013.

ADDRESSES: Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 
35101, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685-3849, email plape@uw.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Burke Museum. The 
human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Island 
County, WA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by the Burke Museum professional staff in consultation 
with representatives of the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation; 
Samish Indian Nation (previously listed as the Samish Indian Tribe, 
Washington); Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe; Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians 
of Washington (previously listed as Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington); 
Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation of Washington; Tulalip 
Tribes of Washington (previously listed as the Tulalip Tribes of the 
Tulalip Reservation, Washington); and the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe 
(hereafter referred to as ``The Consulted Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    Between 1953 and 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from site 45-IS-77 in Island County, WA. The 
human remains were removed during a University of Washington Department 
of Anthropology Field Project led by Allan Bryan, and the human remains 
were accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1966 (Burke Accn. 
1966-94). While six burials were excavated, the Burke Museum 
only holds the remains for

[[Page 45959]]

``Burial 6''; the whereabouts of the other human remains is unknown. No 
known individuals were identified. The 32 associated funerary objects 
are 2 lots of unmodified wood; 1 wood grave stake; 2 metal objects; 1 
pair of scissors; 1 black plastic comb; 2 shells; 1 modified bone 
fragment; 1 unmodified bone fragment; 1 stone abrader; 1 .22 caliber 
gun; 3 bags of buttons (glass, porcelain, bone, copper); 8 U.S. coins; 
1 porcelain doll head; 1 bag containing metal buckle fragments; and 6 
composite artifact bags containing wood, nails, charcoal, pebbles, 
metal, leather, watch faces, a watch chain, and organic and inorganic 
materials.
    Burial methods at the site were varied and included the use of long 
and short wooden box coffins. The remains were found extended, or in 
flexed and semi-flexed positions, on the back and side. There was also 
evidence of cremation at the site. The burials appear to be from a 
contact time period, as evidenced by the transition into European 
burial customs and the presence of post-contact artifacts. One of the 
burials was dated to 1876 or later based on the presence of an 1876 
coin.
    In 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from south of site 45-IS-14 in Island County, WA. The 
remains were removed by Richard Arild Johnson and donated to the Burke 
Museum in 1962 (Burke Accn. 1963-24). No known individuals 
were identified. The one associated funerary object is 1 lot/bag of 
pebbles, dirt and shell fragments.
    In 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from site 45-IS-13 on Snatelum Point in Island County, WA. 
The human remains were removed during a University of Washington 
Department of Anthropology Field Project led by Allan Bryan, and the 
human remains were accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1966 (Burke Accn. 
1966-94). The human remains were loaned to the University of 
Washington Anthropology Department at an unknown date. The human 
remains were discovered in the Anthropology Department, stored with the 
physical anthropology remains in June 2010, and were then returned to 
the Burke Museum. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from San de Fuca in Island County, WA. The human remains 
were removed by John Armstrong from a shell mound near the site of old 
potlatch house and donated to the Burke Museum in 1926 (Burke Accn. 
2122). No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Careless Bay in Island County, WA. The human remains 
were removed by Bob Atwell and Emil Gabeline and subsequently donated 
to the Burke Museum (Burke Accn. 1963-50). No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1941, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Utsalady on Camano Island in Island County, WA. The 
human remains were removed by Dr. Alfred E. Hudson and University of 
Washington archeology students. The human remains were accessioned by 
the Burke Museum in 1941 (Burke Accn. 3361). No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    All of the human remains described above were removed from sites in 
the Penn Cove area on Whidbey Island or on the northwestern shore of 
Camano Island. Several sites are documented archeological or shell 
midden sites. The human remains in this notice have been determined to 
be Native American based on a combination of archaeological, 
geographic, or physical anthropology evidence.
    Linguistically, Native American speakers of the Northern dialect of 
the Lushootseed language claim cultural heritage to the Northern Puget 
Sound area. Culturally, Native Americans from the Northern Puget Sound 
area are members of Southern Coast Salish tribes. Historical and 
anthropological sources (Deur 2009, Mooney 1896, Roberts 1975, Ruby and 
Brown 1986, Spier 1936, Swanton 1952) indicate that the Kikiallus, 
Swinomish, Lower Skagit, and Stillaguamish peoples occupied and had 
village sites in the Penn Cove area and on the northwestern shore of 
Camano Island. Although the Indian Claims Commission determined that 
the sites near Penn Cove on Whidbey Island fell within the aboriginal 
territory of the Lower Skagit, shortly after 1855, anthropologists and 
historians described this area as a mixed community. Penn Cove was one 
of the communities Stillaguamish and other tribes were told to move to 
after being forced to leave their villages on the mainland (Deur 2009, 
Grady 2012).
    Today, descendants of Kikiallus are members of the Stillaguamish 
Tribe of Indians of Washington (previously listed as Stillaguamish 
Tribe of Washington); Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation of 
Washington; and the Tulalip Tribes of Washington (previously listed as 
the Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington). Today, the 
Lower Skagit are primarily members of the Swinomish Indians of the 
Swinomish Reservation of Washington and the Tulalip Tribes of 
Washington (previously listed as the Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip 
Reservation, Washington).

Determinations Made by the Burke Museum

    Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that:
     Based on archaeological evidence, the human remains have 
been determined to be Native American.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of seven individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 33 objects described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians of 
Washington (previously listed as Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington); 
Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation of Washington; and the 
Tulalip Tribes of Washington (previously listed as the Tulalip Tribes 
of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington).

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of 
Washington, Box 35101, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685-3849, 
email plape@uw.edu, by August 29, 2013. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the Stillaguamish 
Tribe of Indians of Washington (previously listed as Stillaguamish 
Tribe of Washington); Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation of 
Washington; and the Tulalip Tribes of Washington (previously listed as 
the Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington) may proceed.

[[Page 45960]]

    The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 8, 2013.
Melanie O'Brien,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2013-18323 Filed 7-29-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P