SafetyAlert: Safety Alert: Risks Associated With Liquid Petroleum (LP) Gas Odor Fade, 42818-42819 [2013-17120]

Download as PDF 42818 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 137 / Wednesday, July 17, 2013 / Notices Michigan 48021, Telephone (586) 775– 7229, to arrange for the return of these empty cylinders. PHMSA determined that North American Coil and Beverage Group improperly filled various types of high pressure US DOT and special permit cylinders with compressed gases without verifying that they met the appropriate safety requirements for continued use. The DOT 3A 1800 cylinder that failed was manufactured by Morcar in 1973 and had not been requalified since May, 1996. DOT 3A 1800 cylinders used in carbon dioxide service must be successfully requalified through a visual inspection and a pressure test at least once every 5 years. Cylinders that are not properly and routinely inspected and requalified as required may not possess the structural integrity to safely contain their contents under pressure during normal transportation and use. Extensive property damage, serious personal injury, or death could result from a rupture of a cylinder. Because North American Coil and Beverage Group did not have their cylinders requalified prior to filling them and the fact that one catastrophically failed, PHMSA questions the condition of all of the cylinders owned and filled by North American Coil and Beverage. These cylinders should be considered unsafe and unauthorized for the filling of hazardous material unless and until they are first tested properly by an individual or company authorized by DOT to requalify DOT specification cylinders. Anyone who had their carbonated beverage service cylinders filled and provided by North American Coil and Beverage Group is advised to remove these cylinders from service immediately and contact a cylinder filler to have the cylinders depressurized. North American Coil and Beverage Group will contact their customers with further instructions on returning the empty cylinders. ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Issued in Washington, DC, on July 12, 2013. Magdy El-Sibaie, Associate Administrator for Hazardous Materials Safety, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. [FR Doc. 2013–17121 Filed 7–16–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:23 Jul 16, 2013 Jkt 229001 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA–2013–0157, [Notice No. 13–10]] SafetyAlert: Safety Alert: Risks Associated With Liquid Petroleum (LP) Gas Odor Fade Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Safety Alert Notice. AGENCY: PHMSA is issuing this safety alert to notify the public of the risks associated with the under-odorization of Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG). LPG is an odorless and colorless gas that under certain conditions is required to be odorized for leak detection. The purpose of this alert is to advise shippers and carriers of the recommended procedures to ensure that LPG is properly odorized by all modes of transportation. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Charles Betts, Director, (email: charles.betts@dot.gov) or Delmer Billings, Senior Regulatory Advisor (email: delmer.billings@dot.gov), Standards and Rulemaking Division, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington DC 20590. Telephone: (202) 366–8553, Fax: (202) 366–7435. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PHMSA is aware of several incidents possibly attributed to either the underodorization or odorant fade of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most notable of these incidents is one that happened in Norfolk, MA on July 30, 2010 where an explosion occurred at a residential condominium complex that was under construction. Emergency responders from 21 cities/towns deployed personnel to the accident site. The accident resulted in seven injuries and one fatality. The subsequent investigation raised questions as to whether there was a sufficient level of odorant in the LPG contained in the on-site storage tanks. In accordance with Federal and State laws and regulations, LPG intended for use by non-industrial entities is generally required to be odorized, or stenched, to enable the detection of any unintended release or leak of the gas. LPG is highly flammable and dangerous to inhale in large quantities. The added odorant is a safety precaution that helps warn those in the area that a release of gas has occurred. In the Norfolk incident, there SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00072 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 appeared to be no warning, i.e. odorant smell, prior to the explosion, that the on-site LPG storage tank was leaking. PHMSA has consulted with stakeholders from industry, fire fighter associations, and other regulatory agencies in order to better understand the root cause of incidents like the one in Norfolk. Although additional research may be necessary in order to come to more definitive conclusions, PHMSA has identified situations in which the risks of under-odorization or odor fade are more likely to occur. These situations are outlined below along with recommendations to mitigate potential risk factors that might lead to preventable outcomes. Injection Process: On December 13, 2012, PHMSA met with representatives from the National Propane Gas Association (NPGA) to gain a better understanding of the LPG odorization process. During this meeting, representatives from the NPGA stated that the most common method for the odorization of LPG is through an automated system. However, the NPGA also noted there are situations where the odorization process is manually performed. Preliminary investigations into the Norfolk, MA incident suggest that the lack of sufficient odorization rendered the LPG undetectable when the on-site storage tank began to leak. In situations where the injection process is not fully automated, the potential for human error may increase the possibility of under-odorization. We believe that the insufficient level of odorant in the LPG contained in the onsite storage tank involved in the Norfolk, MA incident was likely a major contributing factor in restricting the ability of on-site personnel to readily detect the leak. Therefore, in this safety alert, PHMSA recommends that when the odorization of LPG is being accomplished by a manual injection process, quality control checks should be conducted to ensure that the requisite amount of odorant is being injected. Additionally, PHMSA recommends that when odorization of LPG is automatically injected, equipment calibration checks should be periodically performed to ensure consistent injection levels of the required odorant. New Tanks or Freshly Cleaned Tanks: During our meetings with various stakeholders, several indicated that a phenomenon known as ‘‘odor fade’’ may be a problem when new or recently cleaned tanks are used. New or recently cleaned tanks may absorb the odorant into the metal shell of these tanks, thus limiting the effectiveness of the remaining odorant in the LPG. Based on E:\FR\FM\17JYN1.SGM 17JYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 137 / Wednesday, July 17, 2013 / Notices this belief, we recommend that persons who receive new or recently cleaned tanks be notified of this fact and that persons filling these tanks implement appropriate quality control measures to ensure that potential odorant fade is adequately addressed. Such quality control measures will ensure that when delivered to end users, the LPG has sufficient odorant to be detected should a leak occur. Odorization Standards: The odorization of LPG is addressed by a myriad of Federal and State laws and regulations, as well as, by accepted industry standards and practices. When offered and transported in commerce, the HMR specifies that all LPG in cargo and portable tanks be effectively odorized using either 1.0 pound of ethyl mercaptan, 1.0 pound of thiopane, or 1.4 pounds of amyl mercaptan per 10,000 gallons of LPG, in the event of an unintended release or leak to indicate the presence of gas. The HMR do not, however, require LPG to be ordorized if odorization would be harmful in the use or further processing of the LPG, or if odorization will serve no useful purpose as a warning agent in such use or further processing. Essentially, this exception applies to LPG being transported to industrial endusers. Although the HMR requires odorization of LPG in cargo tanks and portable tanks, there are no such requirements in the HMR for rail tank car tanks and cylinders. Therefore, in this safety alert, PHMSA recommends that all LPG transported in rail tank car tanks or cylinders be odorized in accordance with the requirements of § 173.315(b)(1), of the HMR, unless odorization would be harmful in the use or further processing of the LPG, or if odorization will serve no useful purpose as a warning agent in such use or further processing. Issued in Washington, DC on July 12, 2013. Magdy El-Sibaie, Associate Administrator for Hazardous Materials Safety, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. [FR Doc. 2013–17120 Filed 7–16–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–60–P ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Office of Foreign Assets Control Supplemental Identification Information for One Individual Designated Pursuant to Executive Order 13573 Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. AGENCY: 14:23 Jul 16, 2013 Notice. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY The Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (‘‘OFAC’’) is publishing supplemental information for the name of one individual whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to Executive Order 13573 of May 18, 2011, ‘‘Blocking Property of Senior Officials of the Government of Syria.’’ Internal Revenue Service The publishing of updated information by the Director of OFAC of the individual in this notice is effective on July 11, 2013. SUMMARY: SUMMARY: DATES: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Assistant Director, Sanctions Compliance & Evaluation, Office of Foreign Assets Control, Department of the Treasury, 1500 Pennsylvania Avenue NW. (Treasury Annex), Washington, DC 20220, Tel.: 202/622– 2490. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Electronic and Facsimile Availability This document and additional information concerning OFAC are available from OFAC’s Web site (www.treas.gov/ofac) or via facsimile through a 24-hour fax-on-demand service, Tel.: 202/622–0077. Background On July 18, 2012, the Director of OFAC, in consultation with the Department of State, designated Adib MAYALEH pursuant to one or more of the criteria set forth in subsection 1(b) of Executive Order 13573 of May 18, 2011, ‘‘Blocking Property of Senior Officials of the Government of Syria.’’ The notice of this action was published in the Federal Register on July 25, 2012, at 77 FR 43658. On July 11, 2013, the Director of OFAC supplemented the identification information for this individual. The listing for this individual on OFAC’s list of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons, which includes the additional identification information, appears as follows: Individual DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY VerDate Mar<15>2010 ACTION: Jkt 229001 42819 1. MAYALEH, Adib (a.k.a. MIYAL, Andre; a.k.a. MAYALA, Adib); DOB 1955; POB Daraa, Syria; Governor of Central Bank of Syria (individual) [SYRIA]. Dated: July 11, 2013. Adam Szubin, Director, Office of Foreign Assets Control. [FR Doc. 2013–17134 Filed 7–16–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4810–AL–P PO 00000 Frm 00073 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 709 Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: The Department of the Treasury, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, invites the general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104–13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Form 709, United States Gift (and GenerationSkipping Transfer) Tax Return. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before September 16, 2013 to be assured of consideration. ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to Yvette Lawrence, Internal Revenue Service, Room 6129, 1111 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20224. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional copies of the form and instructions should be directed to Martha R. Brinson, (202) 622–3869, or at Internal Revenue Service, Room 6129, 1111 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20224, or through the internet, at Martha.R.Brinson@irs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return. OMB Number: 1545–0020. Form Number: 709. Abstract: Form 709 is used by individuals to report transfers subject to the gift and generation-skipping transfer taxes and to compute these taxes. The IRS uses the information to collect and enforce these taxes, to verify that the taxes are properly computed, and to compute the tax base for the estate tax. Current Actions: There are no changes being made to Form 709 at this time. Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection. Affected Public: Individuals or households. Estimated Number of Respondents: 278,500. Estimated Time per Respondent: 5 hours, 47 minutes. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 1,609,730. E:\FR\FM\17JYN1.SGM 17JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 137 (Wednesday, July 17, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 42818-42819]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-17120]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

[Docket No. PHMSA-2013-0157, [Notice No. 13-10]]


SafetyAlert: Safety Alert: Risks Associated With Liquid Petroleum 
(LP) Gas Odor Fade

AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), 
DOT.

ACTION: Safety Alert Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: PHMSA is issuing this safety alert to notify the public of the 
risks associated with the under-odorization of Liquefied Petroleum 
Gases (LPG). LPG is an odorless and colorless gas that under certain 
conditions is required to be odorized for leak detection. The purpose 
of this alert is to advise shippers and carriers of the recommended 
procedures to ensure that LPG is properly odorized by all modes of 
transportation.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Charles Betts, Director, (email: 
charles.betts@dot.gov) or Delmer Billings, Senior Regulatory Advisor 
(email: delmer.billings@dot.gov), Standards and Rulemaking Division, 
Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department 
of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington DC 20590. 
Telephone: (202) 366-8553, Fax: (202) 366-7435.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PHMSA is aware of several incidents possibly 
attributed to either the under-odorization or odorant fade of liquefied 
petroleum gas (LPG). Most notable of these incidents is one that 
happened in Norfolk, MA on July 30, 2010 where an explosion occurred at 
a residential condominium complex that was under construction. 
Emergency responders from 21 cities/towns deployed personnel to the 
accident site. The accident resulted in seven injuries and one 
fatality.
    The subsequent investigation raised questions as to whether there 
was a sufficient level of odorant in the LPG contained in the on-site 
storage tanks. In accordance with Federal and State laws and 
regulations, LPG intended for use by non-industrial entities is 
generally required to be odorized, or stenched, to enable the detection 
of any unintended release or leak of the gas. LPG is highly flammable 
and dangerous to inhale in large quantities. The added odorant is a 
safety precaution that helps warn those in the area that a release of 
gas has occurred. In the Norfolk incident, there appeared to be no 
warning, i.e. odorant smell, prior to the explosion, that the on-site 
LPG storage tank was leaking. PHMSA has consulted with stakeholders 
from industry, fire fighter associations, and other regulatory agencies 
in order to better understand the root cause of incidents like the one 
in Norfolk. Although additional research may be necessary in order to 
come to more definitive conclusions, PHMSA has identified situations in 
which the risks of under-odorization or odor fade are more likely to 
occur. These situations are outlined below along with recommendations 
to mitigate potential risk factors that might lead to preventable 
outcomes.
    Injection Process: On December 13, 2012, PHMSA met with 
representatives from the National Propane Gas Association (NPGA) to 
gain a better understanding of the LPG odorization process. During this 
meeting, representatives from the NPGA stated that the most common 
method for the odorization of LPG is through an automated system. 
However, the NPGA also noted there are situations where the odorization 
process is manually performed. Preliminary investigations into the 
Norfolk, MA incident suggest that the lack of sufficient odorization 
rendered the LPG undetectable when the on-site storage tank began to 
leak. In situations where the injection process is not fully automated, 
the potential for human error may increase the possibility of under-
odorization. We believe that the insufficient level of odorant in the 
LPG contained in the on-site storage tank involved in the Norfolk, MA 
incident was likely a major contributing factor in restricting the 
ability of on-site personnel to readily detect the leak. Therefore, in 
this safety alert, PHMSA recommends that when the odorization of LPG is 
being accomplished by a manual injection process, quality control 
checks should be conducted to ensure that the requisite amount of 
odorant is being injected. Additionally, PHMSA recommends that when 
odorization of LPG is automatically injected, equipment calibration 
checks should be periodically performed to ensure consistent injection 
levels of the required odorant.
    New Tanks or Freshly Cleaned Tanks: During our meetings with 
various stakeholders, several indicated that a phenomenon known as 
``odor fade'' may be a problem when new or recently cleaned tanks are 
used. New or recently cleaned tanks may absorb the odorant into the 
metal shell of these tanks, thus limiting the effectiveness of the 
remaining odorant in the LPG. Based on

[[Page 42819]]

this belief, we recommend that persons who receive new or recently 
cleaned tanks be notified of this fact and that persons filling these 
tanks implement appropriate quality control measures to ensure that 
potential odorant fade is adequately addressed. Such quality control 
measures will ensure that when delivered to end users, the LPG has 
sufficient odorant to be detected should a leak occur.
    Odorization Standards: The odorization of LPG is addressed by a 
myriad of Federal and State laws and regulations, as well as, by 
accepted industry standards and practices. When offered and transported 
in commerce, the HMR specifies that all LPG in cargo and portable tanks 
be effectively odorized using either 1.0 pound of ethyl mercaptan, 1.0 
pound of thiopane, or 1.4 pounds of amyl mercaptan per 10,000 gallons 
of LPG, in the event of an unintended release or leak to indicate the 
presence of gas. The HMR do not, however, require LPG to be ordorized 
if odorization would be harmful in the use or further processing of the 
LPG, or if odorization will serve no useful purpose as a warning agent 
in such use or further processing. Essentially, this exception applies 
to LPG being transported to industrial end-users.
    Although the HMR requires odorization of LPG in cargo tanks and 
portable tanks, there are no such requirements in the HMR for rail tank 
car tanks and cylinders. Therefore, in this safety alert, PHMSA 
recommends that all LPG transported in rail tank car tanks or cylinders 
be odorized in accordance with the requirements of Sec.  173.315(b)(1), 
of the HMR, unless odorization would be harmful in the use or further 
processing of the LPG, or if odorization will serve no useful purpose 
as a warning agent in such use or further processing.

    Issued in Washington, DC on July 12, 2013.
Magdy El-Sibaie,
Associate Administrator for Hazardous Materials Safety, Pipeline and 
Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.
[FR Doc. 2013-17120 Filed 7-16-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-60-P