Termination of Radiotelephone Medium Frequency 2182 kHz Watchkeeping, 2187.5 kHz Digital Selective Calling Channel Guard, and 2670 kHz Broadcasts, 42102-42103 [2013-16801]

Download as PDF 42102 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 135 / Monday, July 15, 2013 / Notices Developing strategies to facilitate the recovery of the MTS after a Transportation Security Incident; Developing and describing the process to continually evaluate overall port security by considering consequences and vulnerabilities, how they may change over time, and what additional mitigation strategies can be applied; and Providing advice to, and assisting the Captain of the Port in developing and maintaining the AMS Plan. The composition of an AMSC, to include the Boston AMSC and its subcommittees, is controlled by 33 CFR 103.305. Accordingly, members may be selected from the Federal, Territorial, or Tribal government; the State government and political subdivisions of the State; local public safety, crisis management, and emergency response agencies; law enforcement and security organizations; maritime industry, including labor; other port stakeholders having a special competence in maritime security; and port stakeholders affected by security practices and policies. Also, members of the Boston AMSC must have at least 5 years of experience related to maritime or port security operations. AMSC Membership The Boston AMSC has 29 members who represent Federal, State, local, and industry stakeholders from Massachusetts. We are seeking to fill 7 positions with this solicitation. Applicants may be required to pass an appropriate security background check prior to appointment to the committee. Members’ terms of office will be for 5 years; however, a member is eligible to serve additional terms of office. Members will not receive any salary or other compensation for their service on an AMSC. tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Request for Applications Those seeking membership are not required to submit formal applications to the local Captain of the Port, however, because we do have an obligation to ensure that a specific number of members have the prerequisite maritime security experience, we encourage the submission of resumes highlighting experience in the maritime and security industries. In support of the USCG policy on gender and ethnic nondiscrimination, we encourage qualified women and men of all racial and ethnic groups to apply. 18:53 Jul 12, 2013 [FR Doc. 2013–16802 Filed 7–12–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–04–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [Docket No. USCG–2013–0521] AMSC Composition VerDate Mar<15>2010 Dated: June 21, 2013. J.C. O’Connor III, Captain, U.S. Coast Guard, Federal Maritime Security Coordinator Boston. Jkt 229001 Termination of Radiotelephone Medium Frequency 2182 kHz Watchkeeping, 2187.5 kHz Digital Selective Calling Channel Guard, and 2670 kHz Broadcasts ACTION: Notice. The United States Coast Guard is announcing that it will no longer maintain a watch on 2182 kHz, will no longer guard the Digital Selective Calling (DSC) channel 2187.5 kHz, and will no longer transmit Marine Information Broadcasts on 2670 kHz. The minimal use of these channels by mariners for distress and safety coupled with antenna site deterioration, costly upkeep, and extensive maintenance required to support the medium frequency (MF) system have led to a Coast Guard decision to terminate the MF services and direct the public mariner to use more modern safety and distress services which can be more reliably received by the Coast Guard. DATES: The termination announced in this notice is effective on August 1, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For questions on this Notice, contact Larry S. Solomon, Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Policy Counsel (Commandant CG–652) telephone: 202– 475–3556; email: larry.s.solomon@uscg.mil. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The frequency 2182 kHz (which is in the frequency band generally referred to as medium frequency (MF)), was designated more than 65 years ago at the International Telecommunications Union Radio Conference (Atlantic City, 1947) as an international radiotelephone distress frequency. Shore stations that operated in this MF band, and ships subject to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea Ch. IV, Reg. 5 (SOLAS) were required to maintain a watch on this frequency. Beginning in 1987, the International Telecommunications Union Radio Regulations and SOLAS were amended to incorporate this MF radiotelephone SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00066 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 watchkeeping requirement within the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS), an internationally agreed-upon set of satellite and terrestrial communications systems used to increase safety and facilitate the location and rescue of distressed ships, boats and aircraft. Under GMDSS, ship and shore exclusive watchkeeping on MF 2182 kHz was no longer a requirement, but instead became only one of several frequencies available for distress communications. No domestic regulations exist requiring the Coast Guard to provide MF distress safety watchkeeping services, although Federal Communications Commission regulations in 47 CFR Part 80 mandate certain carriage requirements in order to communicate in an emergency. SOLAS requires the Coast Guard to provide, as it deems practical and necessary, appropriate shore-based facilities for GMDSS services including those in the 1.6–4 MHz range (SOLAS). The Coast Guard, in cooperation with other agencies and organizations, provides each of the other five services listed in SOLAS regulations, including satellite communications, support for 406 MHz satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs), VHF communications through Rescue 21, high frequency radiocommunications, and NAVTEX 1 broadcasts of maritime safety information. While many countries terminated 2182 kHz watchkeeping from shore when GMDSS was implemented in 1999, the Coast Guard continued its watch on this frequency to support smaller vessels not subject to SOLAS that operate between approximately 20 and 100 miles from shore. Advancements in satellite, digital, very high frequency (VHF), and high frequency (HF) radio communication equipment, including satellite service provider competition, have improved service and reduced costs of this equipment causing MF radiotelephone to become obsolete. In addition, a detailed review of several Coast Guard MF sites revealed significant antenna ground deterioration and infrastructure support degradation, leaving the Coast Guard at risk for not being able to receive or respond to maritime distress calls on 2182 kHz or 2187.5 kHz, and not being able to transmit effectively on 2670 kHz. Early last year, as a result of physical site surveys, the Coast Guard confirmed the 1 NAVTEX is a broadcast warning system that delivers navigational warnings, meteorological warnings and forecasts, and other marine safety information. E:\FR\FM\15JYN1.SGM 15JYN1 tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 135 / Monday, July 15, 2013 / Notices significant site deterioration and, therefore, the unreliability of receiving MF distress transmissions at many locations. The Coast Guard provided notifications of the situation to mariners using Local Notice to Mariners and radio broadcasts. The Coast Guard did not receive any adverse reaction to those notifications. The site deterioration, costly upkeep, and extensive maintenance required to support this legacy MF system, as well as the relatively minimal use by mariners, has led the Coast Guard to decide to discontinue support of the MF system. The Coast Guard will discontinue all watchkeeping and transmissions on MF channels, namely the 2182 kHz voice channel, the 2187.5 kHz Digital Selective Calling (DSC) channel and Marine Information Broadcasts (MIBs) on 2670 kHz. Mariners have several increasingly low cost and commonly available alternatives to using MF distress and non-distress channels. Instead of relying on 2182 kHz voice and 2187.5 kHz DSC, mariners can tune their existing HF radios to other GMDSS radiotelephone distress voice frequencies the Coast Guard monitors (i.e., 4125, 6215, 8291, or 12290 kHz voice), use satellite-based communication for EPIRB and voice communications, or use HF radios equipped with DSC. The information in the 2670 kHz broadcasts (weather forecasts and warnings, Notice to Mariners, and urgent marine information broadcasts) will continue to be available from other broadcast sources (e.g., SafetyNet 2, NAVTEX, VHF) and online. The Coast Guard urges mariners to use these other alternatives to the MF channels for distress calls, DSC calls, and information broadcasts. Mariners should not need to purchase any new equipment to make this change from 2182 kHz to other GMDSS distress frequencies. Most radiocommunications equipment carried by vessels is able to operate in the 2–27.5 MHz range in addition to the VHF radiotelephone also carried by ships. While some older radios may not tune to other frequencies, these radios are no longer sold, parts are not available for repairing them and they are not typically found on vessels. Therefore, the overwhelming majority of vessels simply need to tune their radios from 2182 kHz to another GMDSS distress frequency (such as 4125, 6215, 8291, or 12290 kHz). Because VHF frequencies may not be reliable more than 20 nautical miles 2 SafetyNET is a satellite-based broadcast warning system that delivers high seas navigational warnings, meteorological warnings and forecasts, ice reports, and other marine safety information. VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:53 Jul 12, 2013 Jkt 229001 from shore, any vessel that operates more than 20 nautical miles from the coast should carry radiocommunications equipment capable of tuning to distress frequencies other than VHF to ensure the vessel is able to make a distress call when needed. All vessel owners and operators are strongly advised to check their communication equipment regularly to ensure it is properly installed, operating and tuned to the most reliable distress channels. For more information visit the Coast Guard’s Navigation Center Web site at www.navcen.uscg.gov. Authority This notice is issued under authority of 14 U.S.C. 93(a)(16) and 5 U.S.C. 552(a). Dated: July 9, 2013. Alfredo Mistichelli, U.S. Coast Guard, Acting Chief, Office of Information Assurance and Spectrum Policy, Commandant (CG–65). [FR Doc. 2013–16801 Filed 7–12–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–04–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: African Growth and Opportunity Act Certificate of Origin U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day notice and request for comments; Extension of an existing information collection: 1651–0082. AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: African Growth and Opportunity Act Certificate of Origin (AGOA). This is a proposed extension of an information collection that was previously approved. CBP is proposing that this information collection be extended with a change to the burden hours. This document is published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. This information collection was previously published in the Federal Register (78 FR 26650) on May 7, 2013, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice allows for an additional 30 days for public comments. This process is conducted in accordance with 5 CFR 1320.10. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00067 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 42103 Written comments should be received on or before August 14, 2013 to be assured of consideration. ADDRESSES: Interested persons are invited to submit written comments on this information collection to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to the OMB Desk Officer for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security, and sent via electronic mail to oira_submission@omb.eop.gov or faxed to (202) 395–5806. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maria Lloyd, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Regulations and Rulings, Office of International Trade, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20229–1177, at 202–325–0369. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: CBP invites the general public and affected Federal agencies to submit written comments and suggestions on proposed and/or continuing information collection requests pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–13). Your comments should address one of the following four points: (1) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency/component, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) Evaluate the accuracy of the agencies/components estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Minimize the burden of the collections of information on those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological techniques or other forms of information. Title: African Growth and Opportunity Act Certificate of Origin. OMB Number: 1651–0082. Form Number: None. Abstract: The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) was adopted by the United States with the enactment of the Trade and Development Act of 2000 (Pub. L. 106–200). The objectives of AGOA are (1) to provide for extension of duty-free treatment under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) to import sensitive articles normally excluded from GSP duty treatment, and (2) to provide for the entry of specific textile and apparel articles free of duty and free of any DATES: E:\FR\FM\15JYN1.SGM 15JYN1

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[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 135 (Monday, July 15, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 42102-42103]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-16801]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Coast Guard

[Docket No. USCG-2013-0521]


Termination of Radiotelephone Medium Frequency 2182 kHz 
Watchkeeping, 2187.5 kHz Digital Selective Calling Channel Guard, and 
2670 kHz Broadcasts

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The United States Coast Guard is announcing that it will no 
longer maintain a watch on 2182 kHz, will no longer guard the Digital 
Selective Calling (DSC) channel 2187.5 kHz, and will no longer transmit 
Marine Information Broadcasts on 2670 kHz. The minimal use of these 
channels by mariners for distress and safety coupled with antenna site 
deterioration, costly upkeep, and extensive maintenance required to 
support the medium frequency (MF) system have led to a Coast Guard 
decision to terminate the MF services and direct the public mariner to 
use more modern safety and distress services which can be more reliably 
received by the Coast Guard.

DATES: The termination announced in this notice is effective on August 
1, 2013.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For questions on this Notice, contact 
Larry S. Solomon, Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Policy 
Counsel (Commandant CG-652) telephone: 202-475-3556; email: 
larry.s.solomon@uscg.mil.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The frequency 2182 kHz (which is in the 
frequency band generally referred to as medium frequency (MF)), was 
designated more than 65 years ago at the International 
Telecommunications Union Radio Conference (Atlantic City, 1947) as an 
international radiotelephone distress frequency. Shore stations that 
operated in this MF band, and ships subject to the International 
Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea Ch. IV, Reg. 5 (SOLAS) were 
required to maintain a watch on this frequency.
    Beginning in 1987, the International Telecommunications Union Radio 
Regulations and SOLAS were amended to incorporate this MF 
radiotelephone watchkeeping requirement within the Global Maritime 
Distress and Safety System (GMDSS), an internationally agreed-upon set 
of satellite and terrestrial communications systems used to increase 
safety and facilitate the location and rescue of distressed ships, 
boats and aircraft. Under GMDSS, ship and shore exclusive watchkeeping 
on MF 2182 kHz was no longer a requirement, but instead became only one 
of several frequencies available for distress communications.
    No domestic regulations exist requiring the Coast Guard to provide 
MF distress safety watchkeeping services, although Federal 
Communications Commission regulations in 47 CFR Part 80 mandate certain 
carriage requirements in order to communicate in an emergency. SOLAS 
requires the Coast Guard to provide, as it deems practical and 
necessary, appropriate shore-based facilities for GMDSS services 
including those in the 1.6-4 MHz range (SOLAS). The Coast Guard, in 
cooperation with other agencies and organizations, provides each of the 
other five services listed in SOLAS regulations, including satellite 
communications, support for 406 MHz satellite emergency position-
indicating radio beacons (EPIRBs), VHF communications through Rescue 
21, high frequency radiocommunications, and NAVTEX \1\ broadcasts of 
maritime safety information.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ NAVTEX is a broadcast warning system that delivers 
navigational warnings, meteorological warnings and forecasts, and 
other marine safety information.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    While many countries terminated 2182 kHz watchkeeping from shore 
when GMDSS was implemented in 1999, the Coast Guard continued its watch 
on this frequency to support smaller vessels not subject to SOLAS that 
operate between approximately 20 and 100 miles from shore. Advancements 
in satellite, digital, very high frequency (VHF), and high frequency 
(HF) radio communication equipment, including satellite service 
provider competition, have improved service and reduced costs of this 
equipment causing MF radiotelephone to become obsolete.
    In addition, a detailed review of several Coast Guard MF sites 
revealed significant antenna ground deterioration and infrastructure 
support degradation, leaving the Coast Guard at risk for not being able 
to receive or respond to maritime distress calls on 2182 kHz or 2187.5 
kHz, and not being able to transmit effectively on 2670 kHz. Early last 
year, as a result of physical site surveys, the Coast Guard confirmed 
the

[[Page 42103]]

significant site deterioration and, therefore, the unreliability of 
receiving MF distress transmissions at many locations. The Coast Guard 
provided notifications of the situation to mariners using Local Notice 
to Mariners and radio broadcasts. The Coast Guard did not receive any 
adverse reaction to those notifications.
    The site deterioration, costly upkeep, and extensive maintenance 
required to support this legacy MF system, as well as the relatively 
minimal use by mariners, has led the Coast Guard to decide to 
discontinue support of the MF system. The Coast Guard will discontinue 
all watchkeeping and transmissions on MF channels, namely the 2182 kHz 
voice channel, the 2187.5 kHz Digital Selective Calling (DSC) channel 
and Marine Information Broadcasts (MIBs) on 2670 kHz.
    Mariners have several increasingly low cost and commonly available 
alternatives to using MF distress and non-distress channels. Instead of 
relying on 2182 kHz voice and 2187.5 kHz DSC, mariners can tune their 
existing HF radios to other GMDSS radiotelephone distress voice 
frequencies the Coast Guard monitors (i.e., 4125, 6215, 8291, or 12290 
kHz voice), use satellite-based communication for EPIRB and voice 
communications, or use HF radios equipped with DSC. The information in 
the 2670 kHz broadcasts (weather forecasts and warnings, Notice to 
Mariners, and urgent marine information broadcasts) will continue to be 
available from other broadcast sources (e.g., SafetyNet \2\, NAVTEX, 
VHF) and online. The Coast Guard urges mariners to use these other 
alternatives to the MF channels for distress calls, DSC calls, and 
information broadcasts.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ SafetyNET is a satellite-based broadcast warning system that 
delivers high seas navigational warnings, meteorological warnings 
and forecasts, ice reports, and other marine safety information.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Mariners should not need to purchase any new equipment to make this 
change from 2182 kHz to other GMDSS distress frequencies. Most 
radiocommunications equipment carried by vessels is able to operate in 
the 2-27.5 MHz range in addition to the VHF radiotelephone also carried 
by ships. While some older radios may not tune to other frequencies, 
these radios are no longer sold, parts are not available for repairing 
them and they are not typically found on vessels. Therefore, the 
overwhelming majority of vessels simply need to tune their radios from 
2182 kHz to another GMDSS distress frequency (such as 4125, 6215, 8291, 
or 12290 kHz). Because VHF frequencies may not be reliable more than 20 
nautical miles from shore, any vessel that operates more than 20 
nautical miles from the coast should carry radiocommunications 
equipment capable of tuning to distress frequencies other than VHF to 
ensure the vessel is able to make a distress call when needed.
    All vessel owners and operators are strongly advised to check their 
communication equipment regularly to ensure it is properly installed, 
operating and tuned to the most reliable distress channels. For more 
information visit the Coast Guard's Navigation Center Web site at 
www.navcen.uscg.gov.

Authority

    This notice is issued under authority of 14 U.S.C. 93(a)(16) and 5 
U.S.C. 552(a).

    Dated: July 9, 2013.
Alfredo Mistichelli,
U.S. Coast Guard, Acting Chief, Office of Information Assurance and 
Spectrum Policy, Commandant (CG-65).
[FR Doc. 2013-16801 Filed 7-12-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9110-04-P