Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Proposal of Future Early Restoration Projects and Environmental Reviews, 26319-26323 [2013-10693]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 87 / Monday, May 6, 2013 / Notices information collection should be sent within 30 days of publication of this notice to Brian Harris-Kojetin, OMB Desk Officer either by fax (202–395– 7245) or email (bharrisk@omb.eop.gov). Dated: May 1, 2013. Glenna Mickelson, Management Analyst, Office of the Chief Information Officer. [FR Doc. 2013–10650 Filed 5–3–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–07–P Rescission of Review DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A–533–813] Certain Preserved Mushrooms From India: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2012—2013 Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Katherine Johnson or Terre Keaton Stefanova, Import Administration, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20230; telephone: (202) 482–4929 or (202) 482–1280, respectively. AGENCY: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Background On February 1, 2013, the Department of Commerce (the Department) published in the Federal Register a notice of ‘‘Opportunity to Request Administrative Review’’ of the antidumping duty order on certain preserved mushrooms from India for the period of review (POR) of February 1, 2012, through January 31, 2013.1 On February 28, 2013, in accordance with section 751(a) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (the Act), and 19 CFR 351.213(b), the Department received a timely request from Monterey Mushrooms, Inc. (the petitioner), a domestic interested party, to conduct an administrative review of the sales of Agro Dutch Industries Limited (Agro Dutch), Himalya International Ltd. (Himalya), Hindustan Lever Ltd. (formerly Ponds India, Ltd.) (Hindustan), Transchem Ltd. (Transchem), and Weikfield Foods Pvt. Ltd (Weikfield). The petitioner was the only party to request this administrative review. 1 See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Opportunity to Request Administrative Review, 78 FR 7397 (February 1, 2013). VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:06 May 03, 2013 On March 29, 2012, the Department published in the Federal Register a notice of initiation of an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain preserved mushrooms from India with respect to the above-named companies.2 On April 19, 2013, the petitioner timely withdrew its request for a review of all five companies. Jkt 229001 Pursuant to 19 CFR 351.213(d)(1), the Department will rescind an administrative review, in whole or in part, if the parties that requested a review withdraw the request within 90 days of the date of publication of notice of initiation of the requested review. The petitioner withdrew its request for review before the 90-day deadline, and no other party requested an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain preserved mushrooms from India for the POR. Therefore, in response to the petitioner’s withdrawal of its request for review of Agro Dutch, Himalya, Hindustan, Transchem and Weikfield and pursuant to 19 CFR 351.213(d)(1), we are fully rescinding this review. Assessment The Department will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to assess antidumping duties on all appropriate entries. Antidumping duties shall be assessed at rates equal to the cash deposit of estimated antidumping duties required at the time of entry, or withdrawal from warehouse, for consumption, in accordance with 19 CFR 351.212(c)(1)(i). The Department intends to issue appropriate assessment instructions directly to CBP 15 days after the date of publication of this notice in the Federal Register. Notification to Importers 26319 Notification Regarding Administrative Protective Order This notice serves as the only reminder to parties subject to administrative protective order (APO) of their responsibility concerning the disposition of proprietary information disclosed under APO in accordance with 19 CFR 351.305(a)(3). Timely written notification of return/ destruction of APO materials or conversion to judicial protective order is hereby requested. Failure to comply with the regulations and the terms of an APO is a sanctionable violation. This notice is published in accordance with section 751 of the Act and 19 CFR 351.213(d)(4). Dated: April 29, 2013. Christian Marsh, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Operations. [FR Doc. 2013–10691 Filed 5–3–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DS–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [Docket No.: 130501428–3428–01] Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Proposal of Future Early Restoration Projects and Environmental Reviews National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The federal and state natural resource trustees for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (Trustees) intend to propose the additional early restoration projects described below to continue the process of using early restoration funding to restore natural resources, ecological services, and human use services injured or lost as a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster. All early restoration projects will be selected and implemented in accordance with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA), the Framework Agreement for Early Restoration Addressing Injuries Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (Framework Agreement), and all applicable legal requirements, including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: This notice serves as the only reminder to importers of their responsibility, under 19 CFR 351.402(f)(2), to file a certificate regarding the reimbursement of antidumping duties prior to liquidation of the relevant entries during this review period. Failure to comply with this requirement could result in the Secretary’s presumption that reimbursement of antidumping duties occurred and the subsequent assessment of double antidumping duties. Introduction 2 See Initiation of Antidumping Duty Administrative Reviews, Request for Revocation in Part, and Deferral of Administrative Review, 77 FR 19179 (March 29, 2013). On or about April 20, 2010, the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, which was being used to drill a well for BP Exploration and PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\06MYN1.SGM 06MYN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 26320 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 87 / Monday, May 6, 2013 / Notices Production, Inc. (BP), in the Macondo prospect (Mississippi Canyon 252– MC252), exploded, caught fire and subsequently sank in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in an unprecedented volume of oil and other discharges from the rig and from the wellhead on the seabed. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill is the largest oil spill in U.S. history due to the millions of barrels of oil discharged over a period of 87 days. In addition, well over one million gallons of dispersants were applied to the waters of the spill area in an attempt to disperse the spilled oil. An undetermined amount of natural gas was also released to the environment as a result of the spill. Affected natural resources include ecologically, recreationally, and commercially important species and their nearshore and offshore habitats in the Gulf of Mexico and along the coastal areas of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. The state and federal natural resource trustees (Trustees) are conducting the natural resource damage assessment (NRDA) for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill under the Oil Pollution Act 1990 (OPA; 33 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.). Pursuant to OPA, federal and state agencies act as trustees on behalf of the public to assess natural resource injuries and losses and to determine the actions required to compensate the public for those injuries and losses. OPA further instructs the designated trustees to develop and implement a plan for the restoration, rehabilitation, replacement, or acquisition of the equivalent of the injured natural resources under their trusteeship, including the loss of use and services from those resources from the time of injury until the time they are restored. Pursuant to the process articulated in the Framework Agreement, the Trustees have previously selected, and BP has agreed to fund, a total of ten early restoration projects, expected to cost a total of approximately $71 million, through the Phase I and Phase II Early Restoration Plans. The Trustees are: • U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), as represented by the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bureau of Land Management; • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Commerce; • U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:06 May 03, 2013 Jkt 229001 • U.S. Department of Defense (DOD); 1 • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA); • State of Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, Oil Spill Coordinator’s Office, Department of Environmental Quality, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, and Department of Natural Resources; • State of Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality; • State of Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and Geological Survey of Alabama; • State of Florida Department of Environmental Protection and Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; and • For the State of Texas: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Texas General Land Office, and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Background on Early Restoration On April 20, 2011, BP agreed to provide up to $1 billion to fund early restoration projects in the Gulf of Mexico to begin addressing injuries to natural resources caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The Framework Agreement represents a preliminary step toward the restoration of injured natural resources and the lost use of, and services from, those resources. The Framework Agreement is intended to expedite the start of restoration in the Gulf in advance of the completion of the injury assessment process. The Framework Agreement provides a mechanism through which the Trustees and BP can work together ‘‘to commence implementation of early restoration projects that will provide meaningful benefits to accelerate restoration in the Gulf as quickly as practicable’’ prior to the resolution of the Trustees’ natural resource damages claim. The Trustees actively solicited public input on restoration project ideas through a variety of mechanisms, including public meetings, electronic communication, and creation of a Trustee-wide public Web site and database to share information and receive public project submissions. The Trustees’ key objective in pursuing early restoration is to secure tangible recovery of natural resources and natural resource services for the public’s benefit while the longer-term process of fully assessing injury and damages is underway. As the first step in this accelerated process, the Trustees 1 Although a trustee under OPA by virtue of the proximity of its facilities to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, DOD is not a member of the Trustee Council and does not participate in Trustee decision-making. PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 released, after public review of a draft, a Phase I Early Restoration Plan/ Environmental Assessment (Phase I ERP) in April 2012. In December 2012, after public review of a draft, the Trustees released a Phase II Early Restoration Plan/Environmental Review (Phase II ERP). Collectively, the Phase I and Phase II ERPs include a total of ten projects that were selected by the Trustees and, after negotiations in accordance with the terms of the Framework Agreement, agreed to by BP. Those restoration actions include nine separate projects that are ready for implementation, and one project that the Trustees have selected for completion for project design and final NEPA review. The Trustees have begun implementing many of the projects selected in the Phase I and Phase II ERPs. In continuation of the early restoration process, following lengthy negotiations with BP to secure funding under the Framework Agreement, the Trustees intend to propose the additional early restoration projects described herein to partially restore injured natural resources and lost natural resource services caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. If selected, these projects collectively would represent close to $600 million in funding (in addition to the $71 million previously committed) to support early restoration. The Trustees anticipate seeking formal public comment on these projects in accordance with the OPA regulations, 15 C.F.R. 990 et seq. The Trustees intend to evaluate proposed restoration alternatives in accordance with all applicable law and regulations, including, without limitation, OPA and its implementing regulations, the National Environmental Policy Act, 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq., the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. §§ 5131 et seq., the National Historic Preservation Act, 16 U.S.C. 470 et seq., the Coastal Zone Management Act, 16 U.S.C. 1451 et seq., the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, 16 U.S.C. 1801 et seq., and any applicable permitting requirements. The Trustees will also evaluate the proposed alternatives pursuant to the criteria included in the Framework Agreement. In addition to the early restoration projects identified below, the Trustees will continue to identify potential additional early restoration projects. Those projects will be subject to early restoration planning. Ultimately, all early restoration plans will be incorporated into a single, comprehensive OPA Restoration Plan/ Environmental Impact Statement, which will address natural resource damages E:\FR\FM\06MYN1.SGM 06MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 87 / Monday, May 6, 2013 / Notices resulting from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The additional early restoration projects that the Trustees presently intend to propose are described below. Alabama • Gulf State Park Enhancements (Baldwin County, Alabama). This project would restore lost recreational use services and lost dune habitat services through the following five primary elements: 1) Construction of a coastal ecosystems interpretive center, 2) construction of an environmental research and education facility to benefit Alabama students, 3) trail construction and enhancement in the park, 4) dune restoration along the park’s extensive undeveloped beachfront and 5) contribute to the construction of a lodge and meeting facility to facilitate the enhanced visitor experience. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $85.5 million. • Oyster Reef Restoration in Mobile County (Mobile County, Alabama). This project would restore approximately 319 acres of oyster reef in the estuarine waters of the State of Alabama. The project would utilize oyster shell cultch to restore non-producing oyster reefs in Mobile County, Alabama, an area impacted by the DWH spill. These restored reefs would be in proximity to other reefs that are currently managed by the state and will be within the historic footprint of oyster reefs in the area. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $3.2 million. • Swift Tract Living Shoreline (Baldwin County, Alabama). This project would construct an oyster breakwater/living shoreline to stabilize and protect 1.6 miles of shoreline from erosion by dampening wave energy while also providing substrate for oyster colonization. The purpose is to reduce coastal marsh loss from shoreline erosion and reestablish substrate for shellfish colonization. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $5 million. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Florida • Perdido Key Dune Restoration (Escambia County, Florida). The project would consist of planting 20 acres of appropriate dune vegetation (e.g., sea oats, panic grasses, cord grasses, sea purslane, and beach elder) approximately 40′ seaward of the existing primary dune over a length of approximately 4 miles of frontage. The purpose would be to provide a buffer which would lead to enhanced dune habitats. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $600,000. VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:06 May 03, 2013 Jkt 229001 • Pensacola Bay Living Shoreline (Escambia County, Florida). By constructing breakwaters, this project would stabilize shorelines at Sanders Beach and Project Greenshores Site II areas within Pensacola Bay. The purpose would be to protect the embayment and create salt marsh habitat by reducing wave energy and providing substrate for oyster larvae, which would help restore benthic secondary productivity. Also included would be the creation of salt marsh habitat, which would help to restore important habitat for many species of fish and birds. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $11 million. • Florida Bay Seagrass Recovery Project (Gulf, Franklin and Bay counties Florida). This project would provide for the restoration of seagrass beds by stabilizing propeller scars over approximately two acres in three Aquatic Preserves within Alligator Harbor, St. Joseph Bay and St. Andrew Bay. Also included would be boater outreach educational information and Shallow Seagrass Area signage. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $2.7 million. • Florida Cat Point Living Shoreline Project (Franklin County, Florida): By constructing a breakwater, this project would stabilize shoreline in St. George Sound. The purpose would be to protect the embayment and create salt marsh habitat by reducing wave energy and providing substrate for oyster larvae, which would help restore benthic secondary productivity. Also included would be the creation of salt marsh habitat, which would help to restore important habitat for many species of fish and birds. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $800,000. • Florida Oyster Reef Restoration (Escambia, Santa Rosa, Bay and Franklin Counties, Florida). This project would involve placing cultch material over approximately 210 acres for the settling of oyster larvae and oyster colonization in the Pensacola Bay system in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties, the St. Andrew Bay system in Bay County, and in the Apalachicola Bay system in Franklin County. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $5.4 million. • Florida Gulf Coast Marine Fisheries Hatchery/Enhancement Center (Escambia County, Florida). This project would provide for the construction and operation of a saltwater sportfish hatchery. Lost recreational fishing opportunities would be restored by providing hatchery production and eventual release of sportfish species such as red snapper, red drum, and spotted seatrout. The estimated cost of PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 26321 this project is approximately $20 million. • Scallop Enhancement for Increased Recreational Fishing Opportunity in the Florida Panhandle (Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties, Florida). This project would enhance naturally occurring bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) populations in Florida’s panhandle bays to support expanded recreational fishing opportunities. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $3 million. • Florida Artificial Reef Creation and Restoration (Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, and Bay counties, Florida). This project would provide for enhancement at different depths, both nearshore and offshore, of various permitted artificial reef areas off the western panhandle counties. The purpose is to restore lost recreational use through improved fishing and diving opportunities. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $11.4 million. • Beach Enhancement Project at Gulf Island National Seashore (Escambia County, Florida). This project involves removing tens of thousands of cubic yards of asphalt fragments and road base material that has been scattered over hundreds of acres and approximately 11 miles of the Fort Pickens and the Santa Rosa areas of Gulf Island National Seashore. The purpose is to help restore lost recreational opportunities to the Gulf. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $11 million. • Big Lagoon State Park Boat Ramp Improvement (Escambia County, Florida). This project would include adding an additional lane to the boat ramp, expanding boat trailer parking, improving traffic circulation at the boat ramp and providing a new restroom facility. The purpose is to enhance visitors’ access to coastal natural resources and help restore lost recreational opportunities. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $1.5 million. • Bob Sikes Pier Restoration (Escambia County, Florida). This project would improve access to and add amenities of the existing Bob Sikes Fishing Pier and parking area. Historically, the Bob Sikes fishing pier has provided an opportunity for the general public to access the Gulf of Mexico for fishing and site-seeing. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $1 million. • Ferry Boat Access to Ft. Pickens, Gulf Island National Seashore (Escambia County, Florida). This project would provide for the purchase of two ferry boats for use in a new ferry service. The purpose is to help restore lost E:\FR\FM\06MYN1.SGM 06MYN1 26322 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 87 / Monday, May 6, 2013 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES recreational opportunities by improving visitor access to the Gulf Island National Seashore. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $4 million. • Perdido Key Boardwalk Improvements (Escambia County, Florida). The project would replace the six boardwalks leading to the beach, thus restoring lost recreational use services by improving visitor access. The project includes two beach access areas with three boardwalks at each location. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $600,000. • Shell Point Beach Nourishment (Wakulla County, Florida). The project would provide for beach nourishment to improve public recreational opportunities by placing approximately 15,000 cubic yards of dredged sand from an approved upland borrow area on about one mile of Shell Point Beach. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $880,000. Louisiana • Louisiana Outer Coast Restoration (Plaquemines Parish and Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana). Barrier island restoration would restore beach, dune, and back-barrier marsh habitat and will take place at the following locations: Caillou Lake Headlands (also known as Whiskey Island), Cheniere Ronquille, Shell Island (East and West Lobes), and North Breton Island. The restoration work at each island involves placement of appropriately-sized sediments to create beach, dune, and back-barrier marsh areas; installation of sand fencing to trap and retain wind-blown sediments and foster dune development; and revegetation of appropriate native species. Louisiana barrier islands provide important habitat for a wide variety of fish, shellfish, birds, and other wildlife; they also were among the first terrestrial habitats to be oiled during the Spill because of their position along the outer coast. The estimated cost is approximately $320 million. • Louisiana Marine Fisheries Enhancement, Research and Science Center (Calcasieu Parish and Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana). This project would involve the development of two sites in Louisiana, one in Calcasieu Parish and one in Plaquemines Parish, into facilities that will assist with research and enhancement of marine fisheries. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $22 million. Mississippi • Hancock County Marsh Living Shoreline (Hancock County, Mississippi). This project would construct an approximately six mile VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:06 May 03, 2013 Jkt 229001 Living Shoreline to reduce shoreline erosion, re-establish oyster habitat, and enhance fisheries resources and marsh habitat. Approximately 46 acres of marsh would be constructed to protect and restore marsh and 46 acres of subtidal oyster reef would be created in Heron Bay to protect the shallow embayment and to increase oyster production in the area. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $50 million. • Restoration Initiatives at the INFINITY Science Center (Hancock County, Mississippi). INFINITY is a state-of-the-art interactive science research, education, and interpretive center located in Hancock County. This project would provide for the construction of wetland walkways, viewing structures, piers and interpretive centers. Additional components would include indoor exhibits and a greenhouse/nursery for growing native wetland species. The purpose would be to replace lost recreational opportunities through enhanced visitors’ access to coastal natural resources. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $10.4 million. • Popp’s Ferry Causeway Park (Harrison County, Mississippi). The project would provide for construction of an interpretive center with trails and boardwalks, and other recreational enhancements. This project would replace lost recreational opportunities by enhancing existing amenities for visitors to be able to fish, crab, walk and observe nature. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $4.7 million. • Pascagoula Beach Front Promenade (Jackson County, Mississippi). The project would provide a two-mile, 10foot wide lighted concrete pathway complete with benches, shower stations, fire pits, sculptures, fishing areas and a playground. The purpose would be to restore the loss of shoreline recreational opportunities by enhancing access to the Mississippi Sound and its natural resources. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $3.8 million. Texas • Texas Artificial Reef (mid/upper coast; Jefferson or Nueces County). This project would provide artificial reef structure along the Texas coast. Artificial reefs would be placed offshore if the necessary large-scale materials are available or nearshore using constructed stable and clean materials. The artificial reefs would be developed in existing permitted reef sites. Artificial reefs are used by fishermen and scuba divers as recreational areas due to the aquatic PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 community that develops in reef habitat. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $1.8 million. • Development of Nearshore Artificial Reefs in the Texas Waters of the Gulf of Mexico (Brazoria County, Texas). This project would provide for the enhancement of a nearshore reef site off Freeport, Texas. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $2 million. • Enhancement of the Matagorda Nearshore Artificial Reefs in the Texas Waters of the Gulf of Mexico (Matagorda County, Texas). This project would include the construction of a new nearshore artificial reef site off of Matagorda, Texas. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $3.5 million. • Sea Rim State Park Amenities (Jefferson County, Texas). The project would provide for construction of facilities that provide enhanced recreation within Sea Rim State Park, including a fish cleaning station, restroom facility, and two wildlife viewing blinds. The purpose would be to allow for enhanced fishing experiences, observation, and interpretive opportunities. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $210,000. • Galveston Island State Park Beach Re-development (Galveston County, Texas). This project would provide for the construction of multi-use campsites, tent campsites, an equestrian trail head, beach access via dune walk-over boardwalks and other recreational enhancements on the Gulf side of Galveston Island State Park. The purpose would be to restore the loss of recreational opportunities by enhancing access to the Gulf. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $10.7 million. Next Steps In the coming months the Trustees will provide more information about the proposed projects and will at that time invite public review and comment in accordance with the OPA regulations, 15 CFR §§ 990 et seq. Administrative Record The documents comprising the Administrative Record can be viewed electronically at the following location: http://www.doi.gov/deepwaterhorizon. Authority The authority of this action is the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (33 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.) and the implementing Natural Resource Damage Assessment regulations found at 15 CFR part 990. E:\FR\FM\06MYN1.SGM 06MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 87 / Monday, May 6, 2013 / Notices Dated: May 1, 2013. Lois J. Schiffer, NOAA General Counsel. [FR Doc. 2013–10693 Filed 5–3–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–12–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648–XC078 Endangered Species; File No. 17183 National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Issuance of permit. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given that Raymond Carthy, Ph.D., University of Florida, Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, 117 NewinsZiegler Hall, P.O. Box 110450, Gainesville, FL 32611, has been issued a permit to take green (Chelonia mydas), loggerhead (Caretta caretta), hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata), and Kemp’s ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) sea turtles for purposes of scientific research. ADDRESSES: The permit and related documents are available for review upon written request or by appointment in the following offices: Permits and Conservation Division, Office of Protected Resources, NMFS, 1315 East-West Highway, Room 13705, Silver Spring, MD 20910; phone (301) 427–8401; fax (301) 713–0376; and Southeast Region, NMFS, 263 13th Ave South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701; phone (727) 824–5312; fax (727) 824– 5309. SUMMARY: mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colette Cairns or Amy Hapeman, (301) 427–8401. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On July 2, 2012, notice was published in the Federal Register (77 FR 39220) that a request for a scientific research permit to take green, loggerhead, hawksbill, and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles had been submitted by the above-named individual. The requested permit has been issued under the authority of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) and the regulations governing the taking, importing, and exporting of endangered and threatened species (50 CFR parts 222–226). Dr. Carthy has been issued a five-year permit to continue long-term research on the demographics and movements of green, loggerhead, hawksbill, and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles off the VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:06 May 03, 2013 Jkt 229001 northwest coast of Florida. Researchers are authorized to capture sea turtles annually by strike net, tangle net, dip net or hand capture. Captured sea turtles may be measured, weighed, passive integrated transponder tagged, flipper tagged, epibiota sampled, tissue sampled, blood sampled, gastric lavaged, carapace marked, photographed, and released. A subset of sea turtles may be fitted with telemetry tags—either a satellite tag or an acoustic tag with an accelerometer. Issuance of this permit, as required by the ESA, was based on a finding that such permit (1) Was applied for in good faith, (2) will not operate to the disadvantage of such endangered or threatened species, and (3) is consistent with the purposes and policies set forth in section 2 of the ESA. Dated: April 30, 2013. P. Michael Payne, Chief, Permits and Conservation Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. 2013–10540 Filed 5–3–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–22–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Special Meeting National Telecommunications and Information Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting of the First Responder Network Authority. AGENCY: The Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) will hold a Special Meeting via telephone conference (teleconference) on May 8, 2013. DATES: The Special Meeting will be held on Wednesday, May 8, 2013, from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. ADDRESSES: The Special Meeting will be conducted via teleconference. Members of the public may listen to the meeting by dialing toll-free 1 (888) 469–1931 and entering passcode 9056016. Due to the limited number of ports, attendance via teleconference will be on a first-come, first-served basis. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Uzoma Onyeije, Secretary, FirstNet, U.S. Department of Commerce, 1401 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20230: telephone (202) 482–0016; email uzoma@firstnet.gov. Please direct media inquiries to NTIA’s Office of Public Affairs, (202) 482–7002. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 9990 26323 Background: The Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 (Act), Public Law 112–96, 126 Stat. 156 (2012), created FirstNet as an independent authority within the NTIA. The Act directs FirstNet to establish a single nationwide, interoperable public safety broadband network. The FirstNet Board is responsible for making strategic decisions regarding FirstNet’s operations. As provided in section 4.08 of the FirstNet Bylaws, the Board through this Notice provides at least two days’ notice of a Special Meeting of the Board to be held on May 8, 2013. The Board may, by a majority vote, close a portion of the Special Meeting as necessary to preserve the confidentiality of commercial or financial information that is privileged or confidential, to discuss personnel matters, or to discuss legal matters affecting FirstNet, including pending or potential litigation. See 47 U.S.C. 1424(e)(2). Matters to Be Considered: NTIA will post an agenda for the Special Meeting on its Web site, http:// www.ntia.doc.gov/category/firstnet prior to the meeting. The agenda topics are subject to change. Time and Date: The Special Meeting will be held on May 8, 2013, from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. The times and dates are subject to change. Please refer to NTIA’s Web site, http://www.ntia.doc.gov/category/ firstnet for the most up-to-date information. Other Information: The teleconference for the Special Meeting is open to the public. On the date and time of the Special Meeting, members of the public may call toll-free 1 (888) 469–1931 and enter passcode 9056016 to listen to the meeting. If you experience technical difficulty, please contact Helen Shaw by telephone (202) 482–1157; or via email hshaw@ntia.doc.gov. Public access will be limited to listen-only. Due to the limited number of ports, attendance via teleconference will be on a first-come, first-served basis. The Special Meeting is accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodations are asked to notify Mr. Onyeije, by telephone (202) 482–0016 or email uzoma@firstnet.gov, at least two days (2) business days before the meeting. Records: NTIA maintains records of all Board proceedings. Board minutes will be available at http:// www.ntia.doc.gov/category/firstnet. Dated: May 1, 2013. Kathy D. Smith, Chief Counsel. [FR Doc. 2013–10663 Filed 5–3–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–60–P E:\FR\FM\06MYN1.SGM 06MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 87 (Monday, May 6, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 26319-26323]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-10693]


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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

[Docket No.: 130501428-3428-01]


Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Proposal of Future Early Restoration 
Projects and Environmental Reviews

AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Commerce.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The federal and state natural resource trustees for the 
Deepwater Horizon oil spill (Trustees) intend to propose the additional 
early restoration projects described below to continue the process of 
using early restoration funding to restore natural resources, 
ecological services, and human use services injured or lost as a result 
of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster. All early restoration 
projects will be selected and implemented in accordance with the Oil 
Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA), the Framework Agreement for Early 
Restoration Addressing Injuries Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon 
Oil Spill (Framework Agreement), and all applicable legal requirements, 
including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Introduction

    On or about April 20, 2010, the mobile offshore drilling unit 
Deepwater Horizon, which was being used to drill a well for BP 
Exploration and

[[Page 26320]]

Production, Inc. (BP), in the Macondo prospect (Mississippi Canyon 252-
MC252), exploded, caught fire and subsequently sank in the Gulf of 
Mexico, resulting in an unprecedented volume of oil and other 
discharges from the rig and from the wellhead on the seabed. The 
Deepwater Horizon oil spill is the largest oil spill in U.S. history 
due to the millions of barrels of oil discharged over a period of 87 
days. In addition, well over one million gallons of dispersants were 
applied to the waters of the spill area in an attempt to disperse the 
spilled oil. An undetermined amount of natural gas was also released to 
the environment as a result of the spill. Affected natural resources 
include ecologically, recreationally, and commercially important 
species and their nearshore and offshore habitats in the Gulf of Mexico 
and along the coastal areas of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, 
Mississippi, and Texas.
    The state and federal natural resource trustees (Trustees) are 
conducting the natural resource damage assessment (NRDA) for the 
Deepwater Horizon oil spill under the Oil Pollution Act 1990 (OPA; 33 
U.S.C. 2701 et seq.). Pursuant to OPA, federal and state agencies act 
as trustees on behalf of the public to assess natural resource injuries 
and losses and to determine the actions required to compensate the 
public for those injuries and losses. OPA further instructs the 
designated trustees to develop and implement a plan for the 
restoration, rehabilitation, replacement, or acquisition of the 
equivalent of the injured natural resources under their trusteeship, 
including the loss of use and services from those resources from the 
time of injury until the time they are restored. Pursuant to the 
process articulated in the Framework Agreement, the Trustees have 
previously selected, and BP has agreed to fund, a total of ten early 
restoration projects, expected to cost a total of approximately $71 
million, through the Phase I and Phase II Early Restoration Plans.
    The Trustees are:
     U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), as represented by 
the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bureau 
of Land Management;
     National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), on 
behalf of the U.S. Department of Commerce;
     U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA);
     U.S. Department of Defense (DOD); \1\
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    \1\ Although a trustee under OPA by virtue of the proximity of 
its facilities to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, DOD is not a 
member of the Trustee Council and does not participate in Trustee 
decision-making.
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     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA);
     State of Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration 
Authority, Oil Spill Coordinator's Office, Department of Environmental 
Quality, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, and Department of 
Natural Resources;
     State of Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality;
     State of Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural 
Resources and Geological Survey of Alabama;
     State of Florida Department of Environmental Protection 
and Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; and
     For the State of Texas: Texas Parks and Wildlife 
Department, Texas General Land Office, and Texas Commission on 
Environmental Quality.

Background on Early Restoration

    On April 20, 2011, BP agreed to provide up to $1 billion to fund 
early restoration projects in the Gulf of Mexico to begin addressing 
injuries to natural resources caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil 
spill. The Framework Agreement represents a preliminary step toward the 
restoration of injured natural resources and the lost use of, and 
services from, those resources. The Framework Agreement is intended to 
expedite the start of restoration in the Gulf in advance of the 
completion of the injury assessment process. The Framework Agreement 
provides a mechanism through which the Trustees and BP can work 
together ``to commence implementation of early restoration projects 
that will provide meaningful benefits to accelerate restoration in the 
Gulf as quickly as practicable'' prior to the resolution of the 
Trustees' natural resource damages claim.
    The Trustees actively solicited public input on restoration project 
ideas through a variety of mechanisms, including public meetings, 
electronic communication, and creation of a Trustee-wide public Web 
site and database to share information and receive public project 
submissions. The Trustees' key objective in pursuing early restoration 
is to secure tangible recovery of natural resources and natural 
resource services for the public's benefit while the longer-term 
process of fully assessing injury and damages is underway. As the first 
step in this accelerated process, the Trustees released, after public 
review of a draft, a Phase I Early Restoration Plan/Environmental 
Assessment (Phase I ERP) in April 2012. In December 2012, after public 
review of a draft, the Trustees released a Phase II Early Restoration 
Plan/Environmental Review (Phase II ERP). Collectively, the Phase I and 
Phase II ERPs include a total of ten projects that were selected by the 
Trustees and, after negotiations in accordance with the terms of the 
Framework Agreement, agreed to by BP. Those restoration actions include 
nine separate projects that are ready for implementation, and one 
project that the Trustees have selected for completion for project 
design and final NEPA review. The Trustees have begun implementing many 
of the projects selected in the Phase I and Phase II ERPs.
    In continuation of the early restoration process, following lengthy 
negotiations with BP to secure funding under the Framework Agreement, 
the Trustees intend to propose the additional early restoration 
projects described herein to partially restore injured natural 
resources and lost natural resource services caused by the Deepwater 
Horizon oil spill. If selected, these projects collectively would 
represent close to $600 million in funding (in addition to the $71 
million previously committed) to support early restoration. The 
Trustees anticipate seeking formal public comment on these projects in 
accordance with the OPA regulations, 15 C.F.R. 990 et seq. The Trustees 
intend to evaluate proposed restoration alternatives in accordance with 
all applicable law and regulations, including, without limitation, OPA 
and its implementing regulations, the National Environmental Policy 
Act, 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq., the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 
Sec. Sec.  5131 et seq., the National Historic Preservation Act, 16 
U.S.C. 470 et seq., the Coastal Zone Management Act, 16 U.S.C. 1451 et 
seq., the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, 16 
U.S.C. 1801 et seq., and any applicable permitting requirements. The 
Trustees will also evaluate the proposed alternatives pursuant to the 
criteria included in the Framework Agreement.
    In addition to the early restoration projects identified below, the 
Trustees will continue to identify potential additional early 
restoration projects. Those projects will be subject to early 
restoration planning. Ultimately, all early restoration plans will be 
incorporated into a single, comprehensive OPA Restoration Plan/
Environmental Impact Statement, which will address natural resource 
damages

[[Page 26321]]

resulting from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.
    The additional early restoration projects that the Trustees 
presently intend to propose are described below.

Alabama

     Gulf State Park Enhancements (Baldwin County, Alabama). 
This project would restore lost recreational use services and lost dune 
habitat services through the following five primary elements: 1) 
Construction of a coastal ecosystems interpretive center, 2) 
construction of an environmental research and education facility to 
benefit Alabama students, 3) trail construction and enhancement in the 
park, 4) dune restoration along the park's extensive undeveloped 
beachfront and 5) contribute to the construction of a lodge and meeting 
facility to facilitate the enhanced visitor experience. The estimated 
cost of this project is approximately $85.5 million.
     Oyster Reef Restoration in Mobile County (Mobile County, 
Alabama). This project would restore approximately 319 acres of oyster 
reef in the estuarine waters of the State of Alabama. The project would 
utilize oyster shell cultch to restore non[hyphen]producing oyster 
reefs in Mobile County, Alabama, an area impacted by the DWH spill. 
These restored reefs would be in proximity to other reefs that are 
currently managed by the state and will be within the historic 
footprint of oyster reefs in the area. The estimated cost of this 
project is approximately $3.2 million.
     Swift Tract Living Shoreline (Baldwin County, Alabama). 
This project would construct an oyster breakwater/living shoreline to 
stabilize and protect 1.6 miles of shoreline from erosion by dampening 
wave energy while also providing substrate for oyster colonization. The 
purpose is to reduce coastal marsh loss from shoreline erosion and 
reestablish substrate for shellfish colonization. The estimated cost of 
this project is approximately $5 million.

Florida

     Perdido Key Dune Restoration (Escambia County, Florida). 
The project would consist of planting 20 acres of appropriate dune 
vegetation (e.g., sea oats, panic grasses, cord grasses, sea purslane, 
and beach elder) approximately 40' seaward of the existing primary dune 
over a length of approximately 4 miles of frontage. The purpose would 
be to provide a buffer which would lead to enhanced dune habitats. The 
estimated cost of this project is approximately $600,000.
     Pensacola Bay Living Shoreline (Escambia County, Florida). 
By constructing breakwaters, this project would stabilize shorelines at 
Sanders Beach and Project Greenshores Site II areas within Pensacola 
Bay. The purpose would be to protect the embayment and create salt 
marsh habitat by reducing wave energy and providing substrate for 
oyster larvae, which would help restore benthic secondary productivity. 
Also included would be the creation of salt marsh habitat, which would 
help to restore important habitat for many species of fish and birds. 
The estimated cost of this project is approximately $11 million.
     Florida Bay Seagrass Recovery Project (Gulf, Franklin and 
Bay counties Florida). This project would provide for the restoration 
of seagrass beds by stabilizing propeller scars over approximately two 
acres in three Aquatic Preserves within Alligator Harbor, St. Joseph 
Bay and St. Andrew Bay. Also included would be boater outreach 
educational information and Shallow Seagrass Area signage. The 
estimated cost of this project is approximately $2.7 million.
     Florida Cat Point Living Shoreline Project (Franklin 
County, Florida): By constructing a breakwater, this project would 
stabilize shoreline in St. George Sound. The purpose would be to 
protect the embayment and create salt marsh habitat by reducing wave 
energy and providing substrate for oyster larvae, which would help 
restore benthic secondary productivity. Also included would be the 
creation of salt marsh habitat, which would help to restore important 
habitat for many species of fish and birds. The estimated cost of this 
project is approximately $800,000.
     Florida Oyster Reef Restoration (Escambia, Santa Rosa, Bay 
and Franklin Counties, Florida). This project would involve placing 
cultch material over approximately 210 acres for the settling of oyster 
larvae and oyster colonization in the Pensacola Bay system in Escambia 
and Santa Rosa Counties, the St. Andrew Bay system in Bay County, and 
in the Apalachicola Bay system in Franklin County. The estimated cost 
of this project is approximately $5.4 million.
     Florida Gulf Coast Marine Fisheries Hatchery/Enhancement 
Center (Escambia County, Florida). This project would provide for the 
construction and operation of a saltwater sportfish hatchery. Lost 
recreational fishing opportunities would be restored by providing 
hatchery production and eventual release of sportfish species such as 
red snapper, red drum, and spotted seatrout. The estimated cost of this 
project is approximately $20 million.
     Scallop Enhancement for Increased Recreational Fishing 
Opportunity in the Florida Panhandle (Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, 
Walton, Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties, Florida). This project would 
enhance naturally occurring bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) 
populations in Florida's panhandle bays to support expanded 
recreational fishing opportunities. The estimated cost of this project 
is approximately $3 million.
     Florida Artificial Reef Creation and Restoration 
(Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, and Bay counties, Florida). 
This project would provide for enhancement at different depths, both 
nearshore and offshore, of various permitted artificial reef areas off 
the western panhandle counties. The purpose is to restore lost 
recreational use through improved fishing and diving opportunities. The 
estimated cost of this project is approximately $11.4 million.
     Beach Enhancement Project at Gulf Island National Seashore 
(Escambia County, Florida). This project involves removing tens of 
thousands of cubic yards of asphalt fragments and road base material 
that has been scattered over hundreds of acres and approximately 11 
miles of the Fort Pickens and the Santa Rosa areas of Gulf Island 
National Seashore. The purpose is to help restore lost recreational 
opportunities to the Gulf. The estimated cost of this project is 
approximately $11 million.
     Big Lagoon State Park Boat Ramp Improvement (Escambia 
County, Florida). This project would include adding an additional lane 
to the boat ramp, expanding boat trailer parking, improving traffic 
circulation at the boat ramp and providing a new restroom facility. The 
purpose is to enhance visitors' access to coastal natural resources and 
help restore lost recreational opportunities. The estimated cost of 
this project is approximately $1.5 million.
     Bob Sikes Pier Restoration (Escambia County, Florida). 
This project would improve access to and add amenities of the existing 
Bob Sikes Fishing Pier and parking area. Historically, the Bob Sikes 
fishing pier has provided an opportunity for the general public to 
access the Gulf of Mexico for fishing and site-seeing. The estimated 
cost of this project is approximately $1 million.
     Ferry Boat Access to Ft. Pickens, Gulf Island National 
Seashore (Escambia County, Florida). This project would provide for the 
purchase of two ferry boats for use in a new ferry service. The purpose 
is to help restore lost

[[Page 26322]]

recreational opportunities by improving visitor access to the Gulf 
Island National Seashore. The estimated cost of this project is 
approximately $4 million.
     Perdido Key Boardwalk Improvements (Escambia County, 
Florida). The project would replace the six boardwalks leading to the 
beach, thus restoring lost recreational use services by improving 
visitor access. The project includes two beach access areas with three 
boardwalks at each location. The estimated cost of this project is 
approximately $600,000.
     Shell Point Beach Nourishment (Wakulla County, Florida). 
The project would provide for beach nourishment to improve public 
recreational opportunities by placing approximately 15,000 cubic yards 
of dredged sand from an approved upland borrow area on about one mile 
of Shell Point Beach. The estimated cost of this project is 
approximately $880,000.

Louisiana

     Louisiana Outer Coast Restoration (Plaquemines Parish and 
Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana). Barrier island restoration would restore 
beach, dune, and back-barrier marsh habitat and will take place at the 
following locations: Caillou Lake Headlands (also known as Whiskey 
Island), Cheniere Ronquille, Shell Island (East and West Lobes), and 
North Breton Island. The restoration work at each island involves 
placement of appropriately-sized sediments to create beach, dune, and 
back-barrier marsh areas; installation of sand fencing to trap and 
retain wind-blown sediments and foster dune development; and 
revegetation of appropriate native species. Louisiana barrier islands 
provide important habitat for a wide variety of fish, shellfish, birds, 
and other wildlife; they also were among the first terrestrial habitats 
to be oiled during the Spill because of their position along the outer 
coast. The estimated cost is approximately $320 million.
     Louisiana Marine Fisheries Enhancement, Research and 
Science Center (Calcasieu Parish and Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana). 
This project would involve the development of two sites in Louisiana, 
one in Calcasieu Parish and one in Plaquemines Parish, into facilities 
that will assist with research and enhancement of marine fisheries. The 
estimated cost of this project is approximately $22 million.

Mississippi

     Hancock County Marsh Living Shoreline (Hancock County, 
Mississippi). This project would construct an approximately six mile 
Living Shoreline to reduce shoreline erosion, re-establish oyster 
habitat, and enhance fisheries resources and marsh habitat. 
Approximately 46 acres of marsh would be constructed to protect and 
restore marsh and 46 acres of sub-tidal oyster reef would be created in 
Heron Bay to protect the shallow embayment and to increase oyster 
production in the area. The estimated cost of this project is 
approximately $50 million.
     Restoration Initiatives at the INFINITY Science Center 
(Hancock County, Mississippi). INFINITY is a state-of-the-art 
interactive science research, education, and interpretive center 
located in Hancock County. This project would provide for the 
construction of wetland walkways, viewing structures, piers and 
interpretive centers. Additional components would include indoor 
exhibits and a greenhouse/nursery for growing native wetland species. 
The purpose would be to replace lost recreational opportunities through 
enhanced visitors' access to coastal natural resources. The estimated 
cost of this project is approximately $10.4 million.
     Popp's Ferry Causeway Park (Harrison County, Mississippi). 
The project would provide for construction of an interpretive center 
with trails and boardwalks, and other recreational enhancements. This 
project would replace lost recreational opportunities by enhancing 
existing amenities for visitors to be able to fish, crab, walk and 
observe nature. The estimated cost of this project is approximately 
$4.7 million.
     Pascagoula Beach Front Promenade (Jackson County, 
Mississippi). The project would provide a two-mile, 10-foot wide 
lighted concrete pathway complete with benches, shower stations, fire 
pits, sculptures, fishing areas and a playground. The purpose would be 
to restore the loss of shoreline recreational opportunities by 
enhancing access to the Mississippi Sound and its natural resources. 
The estimated cost of this project is approximately $3.8 million.

Texas

     Texas Artificial Reef (mid/upper coast; Jefferson or 
Nueces County). This project would provide artificial reef structure 
along the Texas coast. Artificial reefs would be placed offshore if the 
necessary large-scale materials are available or nearshore using 
constructed stable and clean materials. The artificial reefs would be 
developed in existing permitted reef sites. Artificial reefs are used 
by fishermen and scuba divers as recreational areas due to the aquatic 
community that develops in reef habitat. The estimated cost of this 
project is approximately $1.8 million.
     Development of Nearshore Artificial Reefs in the Texas 
Waters of the Gulf of Mexico (Brazoria County, Texas). This project 
would provide for the enhancement of a nearshore reef site off 
Freeport, Texas. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $2 
million.
     Enhancement of the Matagorda Nearshore Artificial Reefs in 
the Texas Waters of the Gulf of Mexico (Matagorda County, Texas). This 
project would include the construction of a new nearshore artificial 
reef site off of Matagorda, Texas. The estimated cost of this project 
is approximately $3.5 million.
     Sea Rim State Park Amenities (Jefferson County, Texas). 
The project would provide for construction of facilities that provide 
enhanced recreation within Sea Rim State Park, including a fish 
cleaning station, restroom facility, and two wildlife viewing blinds. 
The purpose would be to allow for enhanced fishing experiences, 
observation, and interpretive opportunities. The estimated cost of this 
project is approximately $210,000.
     Galveston Island State Park Beach Re-development 
(Galveston County, Texas). This project would provide for the 
construction of multi-use campsites, tent campsites, an equestrian 
trail head, beach access via dune walk-over boardwalks and other 
recreational enhancements on the Gulf side of Galveston Island State 
Park. The purpose would be to restore the loss of recreational 
opportunities by enhancing access to the Gulf. The estimated cost of 
this project is approximately $10.7 million.

Next Steps

    In the coming months the Trustees will provide more information 
about the proposed projects and will at that time invite public review 
and comment in accordance with the OPA regulations, 15 CFR Sec. Sec.  
990 et seq.

Administrative Record

    The documents comprising the Administrative Record can be viewed 
electronically at the following location: http://www.doi.gov/deepwaterhorizon.

Authority

    The authority of this action is the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (33 
U.S.C. 2701 et seq.) and the implementing Natural Resource Damage 
Assessment regulations found at 15 CFR part 990.


[[Page 26323]]


    Dated: May 1, 2013.
Lois J. Schiffer,
NOAA General Counsel.
[FR Doc. 2013-10693 Filed 5-3-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3510-12-P