Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT, 19305-19306 [2013-07352]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 61 / Friday, March 29, 2013 / Notices Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural item should contact The Colorado College at the address below by April 29, 2013. ADDRESSES: Jermyn Davis, Chief of Staff, President’s Office, Colorado College, Armstrong Hall, Room 201, 14 E. Cache La Poudre, Colorado Springs, CO 80903, telephone (719) 389–6201. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the control of The Colorado College that meets the definition of unassociated funerary object under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. DATES: mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES History and Description of the Cultural Items The unassociated funerary object is a corrugated ceramic cooking vessel (Lang-Bixby 318). Between 1897 and 1898, human remains, associated and unassociated funerary objects, as well as other cultural items were removed from a cliff ruin in a canyon tributary of Comb Wash, San Juan County, UT, under the auspices of the Lang Expedition of 1897–1898. Prior to 1900, General William Jackson Palmer acquired what became known as the Lang-Bixby Collection, which he subsequently transferred to The Colorado College. Beginning in the late 1960s, the Lang-Bixby Collection was transferred, along with other collections from The Colorado College Museum, through long-term loans to the Fine Arts Center (formerly known as the Taylor Museum and the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center) and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (formerly known as the Denver Museum of Natural History). In 1993, the Fine Arts Center included the unassociated funerary objects from the Lang-Bixby Collection in its NAGPRA summary. The unassociated funerary object is ancestral Puebloan based on type and style. The human remains and associated funerary objects from this collection were described in two Notices of Inventory Completion (NICs) published in the Federal Register (69 FR 19232–19233, April 12, 2004, VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:34 Mar 28, 2013 Jkt 229001 corrected by 74 FR 42105–42106, August 20, 2009). The other 36 unassociated funerary objects from this same location were described in a Notice of Intent to Repatriate (NIR) published in the Federal Register (77 FR 15798, March 16, 2012). The human remains and funerary objects were determined to be Ancestral Puebloan. A relationship of shared group identity can reasonably be traced between ancestral Puebloan peoples and modern Puebloan peoples based on oral tradition and scientific studies. The human remains, associated funerary objects, and unassociated funerary objects described in the notices above have been repatriated to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. A preponderance of the evidence supports cultural affiliation of the unassociated funerary object in this notice to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Determinations Made by The Colorado College Officials of The Colorado College have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the cultural item described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary object and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary object should contact Jermyn Davis, Chief of Staff, President’s Office, Colorado College, Armstrong Hall, Room 201, 14 E. Cache La Poudre, Colorado Springs, CO 80903, telephone (719) 389–6201, before April 29, 2013. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary object to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Colorado College is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona that this notice has been published. Dated: February 28, 2013. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2013–07359 Filed 3–28–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P PO 00000 Frm 00127 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 19305 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–12450; PCU00RP14.R50000–PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: SUMMARY: The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects, and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History at the address below by April 29, 2013. ADDRESSES: Professor Derek E.G. Briggs, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520–8118, telephone (203) 432–3752. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History that meets the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. DATES: History and Description of the Cultural Items In 1871, three unassociated funerary objects were recovered from Memaloose Island, OR, by the Yale College Scientific Expedition. The objects were transferred to the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History in 1873 by Oscar Harger, a student of the Expedition. These objects include a wooden bowl, a stone mortar, and a wooden comb. E:\FR\FM\29MRN1.SGM 29MRN1 19306 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 61 / Friday, March 29, 2013 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Catalog records and historic documentation indicate the objects were recovered from Native American graves and therefore meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. The objects were recovered within the traditional territory of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Sometime prior to 1902, two unassociated funerary objects were removed from The Dalles, Wasco County, OR, by an unknown person. The objects were transferred to the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History in 1902 by Mr. and Mrs. William H. Moseley of New Haven, CT. Catalog records indicate the two objects, a string of rolled metal tube beads and a string of shell beads, were recovered from Native American graves and therefore meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. The objects were recovered within the traditional territory of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Based on museum catalog records of the objects, the geographic origin of the objects, and the description of traditional territory of the tribes, these objects are believed to be culturally affiliated with the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Determinations Made by the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History Officials of the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the five cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Professor Derek E.G. Briggs, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:34 Mar 28, 2013 Jkt 229001 208118, New Haven, CT 06520–8118, telephone (203) 432–3752 before April 29, 2013. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon that this notice has been published. Dated: February 26, 2013. Melanie O’Brien, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2013–07352 Filed 3–28–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–12405; PCU00RP14.R50000–PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that a cultural item meets the definition of unassociated funerary object and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural item may contact Natchez Trace Parkway. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural item should contact Natchez Trace Parkway at the address below by April 29, 2013. ADDRESSES: Dale Wilkerson, Acting Superintendent, Natchez Trace Parkway, 2680 Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS, 38803, telephone (662) 680–4005. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace PO 00000 Frm 00128 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Parkway, Tupelo, MS that meets the definition of unassociated funerary object under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the Superintendent, Natchez Trace Parkway. History and Description of the Cultural Item In 1972, a funerary object was removed from the Emerald Mound site in Adams County, MS, during legally authorized excavation projects. The whereabouts of the human remains are unknown, and it is not clear from excavation documentation if the remains were excavated. The one unassociated funerary object is an Addis Plain vessel. The Emerald Mound site consists of two mounds and a plaza area. On the basis of artifacts recovered during excavation, the site was occupied during the late precontact phase of the Mississippian period (A.D. 1200–1650, or later). Ceramic types that have been historically associated with the Natchez Indians were found throughout the site. Mound construction and burial practices at the site were also consistent with those of the Natchez Indians. Historical evidence indicates the dispersal of the Natchez Indians into Cherokee, Chickasaw, and Creek tribal groups. In 1542, Hernando de Soto’s expedition heard of, and later encountered hostile Indians along the lower Mississippi River believed to have been the Natchez and their allies. In 1682, the de La Salle expedition specifically identified the Natchez as living along the banks of the lower Mississippi River. Following an unsuccessful rebellion against the French in 1729, the Natchez were dispersed. About 400 individuals surrendered to the French and were sent to the West Indies as slaves. The remaining Natchez withdrew among the Chickasaw and ultimately separated into two main bands, one settling among the Upper Creeks and the other uniting with the Cherokee. The Natchez language was still spoken by some in the Creek Nation until the early 20th century and by some among the Cherokee until the 1940s. Given territorial proximity and complexities of modern Cherokee tribal alignments in Oklahoma, both the Cherokee Nation and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians are likely to include tribal members of Natchez descent. E:\FR\FM\29MRN1.SGM 29MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 61 (Friday, March 29, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 19305-19306]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-07352]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-12450; PCU00RP14.R50000-PPWOCRADN0]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody 
Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, in consultation 
with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural 
items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects, and 
repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no 
additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe 
that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural 
items may contact the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the Yale 
Peabody Museum of Natural History at the address below by April 29, 
2013.

ADDRESSES: Professor Derek E.G. Briggs, Director, Yale Peabody Museum 
of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520-8118, 
telephone (203) 432-3752.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the 
possession of the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History that meets the 
definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    In 1871, three unassociated funerary objects were recovered from 
Memaloose Island, OR, by the Yale College Scientific Expedition. The 
objects were transferred to the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History 
in 1873 by Oscar Harger, a student of the Expedition. These objects 
include a wooden bowl, a stone mortar, and a wooden comb.

[[Page 19306]]

Catalog records and historic documentation indicate the objects were 
recovered from Native American graves and therefore meet the definition 
of unassociated funerary objects. The objects were recovered within the 
traditional territory of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the 
Yakama Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs 
Reservation of Oregon.
    Sometime prior to 1902, two unassociated funerary objects were 
removed from The Dalles, Wasco County, OR, by an unknown person. The 
objects were transferred to the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History 
in 1902 by Mr. and Mrs. William H. Moseley of New Haven, CT. Catalog 
records indicate the two objects, a string of rolled metal tube beads 
and a string of shell beads, were recovered from Native American graves 
and therefore meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. The 
objects were recovered within the traditional territory of the 
Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the Confederated 
Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon.
    Based on museum catalog records of the objects, the geographic 
origin of the objects, and the description of traditional territory of 
the tribes, these objects are believed to be culturally affiliated with 
the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and the 
Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon.

Determinations Made by the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History

    Officials of the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the five cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of 
the Yakama Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs 
Reservation of Oregon.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact Professor Derek E.G. Briggs, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of 
Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520-8118, telephone 
(203) 432-3752 before April 29, 2013. Repatriation of the unassociated 
funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama 
Nation and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of 
Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History is responsible for 
notifying the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and 
the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon that 
this notice has been published.

    Dated: February 26, 2013.
Melanie O'Brien,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2013-07352 Filed 3-28-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P