Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations, 14092-14094 [2013-04896]

Download as PDF 14092 ACTION: Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 42 / Monday, March 4, 2013 / Notices Notice and request for comment. In accordance with requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), the FDIC may not conduct or sponsor, and the respondent is not required to respond to, an information collection unless it displays a currently valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number. The FDIC, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, invites the general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on renewal of an existing information, as required by the PRA. On December 19, 2012 (77 FR 75160), the FDIC solicited public comment for a 60-day period on renewal without change of its ‘‘Foreign Banks’’ information collection (OMB No. 3064– SUMMARY: 0114). No comments were received. Therefore, the FDIC hereby gives notice of submission of its request for renewal to OMB for review. DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before April 3, 2013. ADDRESSES: Interested parties are invited to submit written comments. All comments should refer to the name of the collection. Comments may be submitted by any of the following methods: • http://www.FDIC.gov/regulations/ laws/federal/notices.html. • Email: comments@fdic.gov. • Mail: Leneta G. Gregorie (202.898.3719), Counsel, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Room NYA–5050, 550 17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20429. • Hand Delivery: Comments may be hand-delivered to the guard station at Hours per response FDIC collection Application to move a branch ........................................................................ Application for consent to operate a noninsured branch .............................. Application to conduct activities .................................................................... Recordkeeping ............................................................................................... Pledge of assets: Records .................................................................................................. Reports ................................................................................................... Total Burden .................................................................................... General Description of Collection: The collection involves information obtained in connection with applications for consent to move an insured state-licensed branch of a foreign bank (12 CFR 303.184); applications to operate as a noninsured state-licensed branch of a foreign bank (12 CFR 303.186); applications from an insured state-licensed branch of a foreign bank to conduct activities which are not permissible for a federallylicensed branch (12 CFR 303.187); internal recordkeeping requirements for such branches (12 CFR 347.209(e)(4)); and reporting and recordkeeping requirements relating to the pledge of assets by such branches (12 CFR 347.209(e)(4) and (e)(6)). Current Action: The FDIC is proposing to renew the existing information collection without change. sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Request for Comment Comments are invited on: (a) Whether this collections of information is necessary for the proper performance of the FDIC’s functions, including whether the information has practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the estimate of the burden of the information collection, including the validity of the VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:15 Mar 01, 2013 Jkt 229001 Burden hours 1 1 1 1 8 8 8 1,200 0.25 2 10 10 4 4 10 80 .......................... ........................ ........................ 1,314 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Robert E. Feldman, Executive Secretary. [FR Doc. 2013–04833 Filed 3–1–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6714–01–P Fmt 4703 Times per year 1 1 1 10 Dated at Washington, DC, this 26th day of February, 2013. Frm 00022 Number of respondents 8 8 8 120 methodology and assumptions used; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the information collection on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. At the end of the comment period, the comments and recommendations received will be analyzed to determine the extent to which the collection should be modified prior to submission to OMB for review and approval. Comments submitted in response to this notice also will be summarized or included in the FDIC’s request to OMB for renewal of the information collection. All comments will become a matter of public record. PO 00000 the rear of the 550 17th Street Building (located on F Street), on business days between 7:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. A copy of the comments may also be submitted to the FDIC Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information about the revisions discussed in this notice, please contact Leneta G. Gregorie, by telephone at (202) 898–3719 or by mail at the address identified above. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FDIC is proposing to renew, without change, the following information collection. Title: Foreign Banks. Estimated Number of Respondents and Burden Hours: Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [60Day–13–13KZ] Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. To request more information on the proposed projects or to obtain a copy of the data collection plans and instruments, call 404–639–7570 or send comments to Ron Otten, at 1600 Clifton Road, MS D74, Atlanta, GA 30333 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the E:\FR\FM\04MRN1.SGM 04MRN1 14093 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 42 / Monday, March 4, 2013 / Notices proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Written comments should be received within 60 days of this notice. Proposed Project Salt Sources Study—New—National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description Stroke and coronary heart disease are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and account for billions of dollars in annual health care costs and productivity. Stroke and heart disease are directly related to high blood pressure, a condition that affects about 67 million Americans (31 percent of U.S. adults). Sodium intake directly and progressively increases blood pressure and subsequently increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. Recent evidence also indicates excess sodium can damage the heart, vessels, and kidneys without increasing blood pressure. It has been estimated that an average reduction of as little as 400 mg of sodium daily, or about 11% of average U.S. sodium intake, would prevent more than 28,000 deaths and save 7 billion health care dollars annually. The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2010) has recommended phased reductions in the sodium content of packaged foods and menu items, and voluntary actions by industry to reduce the sodium content of food. Public comments on these strategies have been solicited by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In addition, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has designated reduction in sodium intake as one of CDC’s Winnable Battles, as a component subgroup of 150 of these participants (50 per site). One study center will serve as a study coordinating center and will transmit de-identified information to CDC through a secure Web site. CDC is authorized to conduct this information collection under section 301 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 241). For the observational study component, CDC estimates that each study site will enroll 75 participants per year. After completing a screening process, each participant will complete a personal questionnaire, a tap water questionnaire, four 24-hour dietary recalls, and four qualitative food records. In addition, height and weight information on each participant will be collected, and each participant will provide samples of their cooking/table salt for independent analysis. Fifteen participants at each site will also provide water samples that will be analyzed to produce estimates of the amount of sodium in private sources of tap water. The Salt Sources Study will include a sub-study to help determine the accuracy of estimates of total sodium intake and discretionary salt intake. We will ask participants to use a Study Salt for 11 days instead of their own household salt. The Study Salt contains a very small amount of lithium, a metal found in trace amounts in all plants and animals. Seventy-five respondents who are participating in the observational study (approximately 25 respondents from each study site) will provide additional information based on four 24hour urine collections, four follow-up urine collection questionnaires, and three follow-up questionnaires on Study Salt use. Results from the Salt Sources Study will be used to inform public health strategies to reduce sodium intake, determine if substantial variability in sources of sodium intake exists by socio-demographic subgroups, and better inform estimates of salt added at the table used in Healthy People 2020 objectives related to sodium reduction. Participation in the Salt Sources Study is voluntary. There are no costs to participants other than their time. of the Million HeartsTM initiative, and as a Healthy People 2020 objective. There is a critical need for current, accurate information about the sources of sodium intake among diverse groups of adults living in the United States. A study conducted in 1991 (N=62) estimated that 77% of sodium consumed was from sodium added to packaged and restaurant foods during commercial processing, about 11% came from salt added at the table or during cooking, and 12% was naturally occurring (inherent) in food and beverages. Results from this study have been used to inform and prioritize efforts to reduce sodium in U.S. packaged and restaurant foods. For example, the data have been used to inform estimation equations for discretionary sodium intake (salt added at the table) and to estimate average total sodium intake. However, the study was not designed to produce estimates for population subgroups. Since 1991, the U.S. has undergone demographic shifts in age, race, and ethnicity, changes in food consumption patterns, and changes in the geographic distribution of the population. CDC therefore plans to conduct a new Salt Sources Study to obtain updated information about the amount of sodium consumed from various sources (including sodium from processed and restaurant foods, sodium inherent in foods, and salt added at the table and during cooking) and to examine variability across population subgroups. Data collection will include an observational component as well as a sub-study designed to refine the accuracy of estimates of total sodium intake and discretionary sodium intake. The Salt Sources Study will include participants in three distinct geographic regions: (1) Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, (2) Birmingham, Alabama, and (3) Palo Alto, California. Over a two-year period, a study center in each location will recruit 150 participants (total N=450) with the aim of selecting an equal number of adults ages 18–74 years by approximately 10-year age groups in each sex-race group, including whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Asians. A sub-study will be conducted among a sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of respondents Type of respondents Form name Adults aged 18–74 years .................. Telephone Recruitment and Screening. Participant Questionnaire ................. VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:15 Mar 01, 2013 Jkt 229001 PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Number of responses per respondent Average burden per response (in hr) Total burden (in hr) 225 1 10/60 38 225 1 10/60 38 E:\FR\FM\04MRN1.SGM 04MRN1 14094 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 42 / Monday, March 4, 2013 / Notices ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS—Continued Type of respondents Discretionary Salt Use Questions from NHANES 2009. Height and Weight ........................... Study Orientation and Scheduling ... Tap Water Questionnaire ................. 24-Hour Dietary Recall ..................... Food Record .................................... Duplicate Salt Sample Collection ..... Water Collection Form and Instructions. 24-hour Urine Collection .................. Follow-up Urine Collection Questionnaire. Study Salt Supplement Questionnaire. Total ........................................... ........................................................... Dated: February 26, 2013. Ron A. Otten, Director, Office of Scientific Integrity (OSI), Office of the Associate Director for Science (OADS), Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163–18–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–13–0850] Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a list of information collection requests under review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these requests, call (404) 639–7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Send written comments to CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. Proposed Project Laboratory Response Network (LRN)—0920–0850–Extension (expiration 5/31/13)—National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infections (NCEZID), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:15 Mar 01, 2013 Jkt 229001 1 5/60 19 225 225 225 225 225 225 15 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 10/60 20/60 5/60 30/60 15/60 10/60 5/60 38 75 19 450 225 150 1 75 75 4 4 50/60 10/60 250 50 75 3 5/60 19 ........................ ........................ ........................ 1,372 The Laboratory Response Network (LRN) was established by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in accordance with Presidential Decision Directive 39, which outlined national anti-terrorism policies and assigned specific missions to Federal departments and agencies. The LRN’s mission is to maintain an integrated national and international network of laboratories that can respond to suspected acts of biological, chemical, or radiological threats and other public health emergencies. When Federal, State and local public health laboratories voluntarily join the LRN, they assume specific responsibilities and are required to provide information to the LRN Program Office at CDC. Each laboratory must submit and maintain complete information regarding the testing capabilities of the laboratory. Biennually, laboratories are required to review, verify and update their testing capability information. Complete testing capability information is required in order for the LRN Program Office to determine the ability of the Network to respond to a biological or chemical threat event. The sensitivity of all information associated with the LRN requires the LRN Program Office to obtain personal information about all individuals accessing the LRN Web site. In addition, the LRN Program Office must be able to contact all laboratory personnel during an event so each laboratory staff member that obtains access to the restricted LRN Web site PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4703 Total burden (in hr) 225 Background and Brief Description [FR Doc. 2013–04896 Filed 3–1–13; 8:45 am] Average burden per response (in hr) Number of responses per respondent Number of respondents Form name Sfmt 4703 must provide his or her contact information to the LRN Program Office. As a requirement of membership, LRN Laboratories must report all biological and chemical testing results to the LRN Program at CDC using a CDC developed software tool called the LRN Results Messenger. This information is essential for surveillance of anomalies, to support response to an event that may involve multiple agencies and to manage limited resources. LRN Laboratories must also participate in and report results for Proficiency Testing Challenges or Validation Studies. LRN Laboratories participate in multiple Proficiency Testing Challenges, Exercises and/or Validation Studies every year consisting of five to 500 simulated samples provided by the LRN Program Office. It is necessary to conduct such challenges in order to verify the testing capability of the LRN Laboratories. The rarity of biological or chemical agents perceived to be of bioterrorism concern prevents some LRN Laboratories from maintaining proficiency as a result of day-to-day testing. Simulated samples are therefore distributed to ensure proficiency across the LRN. The results obtained from testing these simulated samples must also be entered into Results Messenger for evaluation by the LRN Program Office. During a surge event resulting from a bioterrorism or chemical terrorism attack, LRN Laboratories are also required to submit all testing results using LRN Results Messenger. The LRN Program Office requires these results in order to track the progression of a bioterrorism event and respond in the most efficient and effective way possible and for data sharing with other Federal partners E:\FR\FM\04MRN1.SGM 04MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 42 (Monday, March 4, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 14092-14094]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-04896]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[60Day-13-13KZ]


Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and 
Recommendations

    In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the 
Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 for opportunity for public comment on 
proposed data collection projects, the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. 
To request more information on the proposed projects or to obtain a 
copy of the data collection plans and instruments, call 404-639-7570 or 
send comments to Ron Otten, at 1600 Clifton Road, MS D74, Atlanta, GA 
30333 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov.
    Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of 
information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of 
the agency, including whether the information shall have practical 
utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the

[[Page 14093]]

proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, 
utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways 
to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, 
including through the use of automated collection techniques or other 
forms of information technology. Written comments should be received 
within 60 days of this notice.

Proposed Project

    Salt Sources Study--New--National Center for Chronic Disease 
Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention (CDC).

Background and Brief Description

    Stroke and coronary heart disease are the leading causes of 
morbidity and mortality in the United States, and account for billions 
of dollars in annual health care costs and productivity. Stroke and 
heart disease are directly related to high blood pressure, a condition 
that affects about 67 million Americans (31 percent of U.S. adults). 
Sodium intake directly and progressively increases blood pressure and 
subsequently increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. Recent 
evidence also indicates excess sodium can damage the heart, vessels, 
and kidneys without increasing blood pressure. It has been estimated 
that an average reduction of as little as 400 mg of sodium daily, or 
about 11% of average U.S. sodium intake, would prevent more than 28,000 
deaths and save 7 billion health care dollars annually.
    The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2010) has recommended phased 
reductions in the sodium content of packaged foods and menu items, and 
voluntary actions by industry to reduce the sodium content of food. 
Public comments on these strategies have been solicited by the Food and 
Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
(USDA). In addition, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 
(HHS) has designated reduction in sodium intake as one of CDC's 
Winnable Battles, as a component of the Million HeartsTM 
initiative, and as a Healthy People 2020 objective.
    There is a critical need for current, accurate information about 
the sources of sodium intake among diverse groups of adults living in 
the United States. A study conducted in 1991 (N=62) estimated that 77% 
of sodium consumed was from sodium added to packaged and restaurant 
foods during commercial processing, about 11% came from salt added at 
the table or during cooking, and 12% was naturally occurring (inherent) 
in food and beverages. Results from this study have been used to inform 
and prioritize efforts to reduce sodium in U.S. packaged and restaurant 
foods. For example, the data have been used to inform estimation 
equations for discretionary sodium intake (salt added at the table) and 
to estimate average total sodium intake. However, the study was not 
designed to produce estimates for population subgroups.
    Since 1991, the U.S. has undergone demographic shifts in age, race, 
and ethnicity, changes in food consumption patterns, and changes in the 
geographic distribution of the population. CDC therefore plans to 
conduct a new Salt Sources Study to obtain updated information about 
the amount of sodium consumed from various sources (including sodium 
from processed and restaurant foods, sodium inherent in foods, and salt 
added at the table and during cooking) and to examine variability 
across population subgroups. Data collection will include an 
observational component as well as a sub-study designed to refine the 
accuracy of estimates of total sodium intake and discretionary sodium 
intake.
    The Salt Sources Study will include participants in three distinct 
geographic regions: (1) Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, (2) 
Birmingham, Alabama, and (3) Palo Alto, California. Over a two-year 
period, a study center in each location will recruit 150 participants 
(total N=450) with the aim of selecting an equal number of adults ages 
18-74 years by approximately 10-year age groups in each sex-race group, 
including whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Asians. A sub-study will be 
conducted among a subgroup of 150 of these participants (50 per site). 
One study center will serve as a study coordinating center and will 
transmit de-identified information to CDC through a secure Web site. 
CDC is authorized to conduct this information collection under section 
301 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 241).
    For the observational study component, CDC estimates that each 
study site will enroll 75 participants per year. After completing a 
screening process, each participant will complete a personal 
questionnaire, a tap water questionnaire, four 24-hour dietary recalls, 
and four qualitative food records. In addition, height and weight 
information on each participant will be collected, and each participant 
will provide samples of their cooking/table salt for independent 
analysis. Fifteen participants at each site will also provide water 
samples that will be analyzed to produce estimates of the amount of 
sodium in private sources of tap water.
    The Salt Sources Study will include a sub-study to help determine 
the accuracy of estimates of total sodium intake and discretionary salt 
intake. We will ask participants to use a Study Salt for 11 days 
instead of their own household salt. The Study Salt contains a very 
small amount of lithium, a metal found in trace amounts in all plants 
and animals. Seventy-five respondents who are participating in the 
observational study (approximately 25 respondents from each study site) 
will provide additional information based on four 24-hour urine 
collections, four follow-up urine collection questionnaires, and three 
follow-up questionnaires on Study Salt use.
    Results from the Salt Sources Study will be used to inform public 
health strategies to reduce sodium intake, determine if substantial 
variability in sources of sodium intake exists by socio-demographic 
subgroups, and better inform estimates of salt added at the table used 
in Healthy People 2020 objectives related to sodium reduction.
    Participation in the Salt Sources Study is voluntary. There are no 
costs to participants other than their time.

                                        Estimated Annualized Burden Hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      Average
                                                     Number of       Number of      burden per     Total burden
      Type of respondents           Form name       respondents    responses per   response  (in      (in hr)
                                                                    respondent          hr)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adults aged 18-74 years.......  Telephone                    225               1           10/60              38
                                 Recruitment and
                                 Screening.
                                Participant                  225               1           10/60              38
                                 Questionnaire.

[[Page 14094]]

 
                                Discretionary                225               1            5/60              19
                                 Salt Use
                                 Questions from
                                 NHANES 2009.
                                Height and                   225               1           10/60              38
                                 Weight.
                                Study                        225               1           20/60              75
                                 Orientation and
                                 Scheduling.
                                Tap Water                    225               1            5/60              19
                                 Questionnaire.
                                24-Hour Dietary              225               4           30/60             450
                                 Recall.
                                Food Record.....             225               4           15/60             225
                                Duplicate Salt               225               4           10/60             150
                                 Sample
                                 Collection.
                                Water Collection              15               1            5/60               1
                                 Form and
                                 Instructions.
                                24-hour Urine                 75               4           50/60             250
                                 Collection.
                                Follow-up Urine               75               4           10/60              50
                                 Collection
                                 Questionnaire.
                                Study Salt                    75               3            5/60              19
                                 Supplement
                                 Questionnaire.
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Total.....................  ................  ..............  ..............  ..............           1,372
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Dated: February 26, 2013.
Ron A. Otten,
Director, Office of Scientific Integrity (OSI), Office of the Associate 
Director for Science (OADS), Office of the Director, Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention.
[FR Doc. 2013-04896 Filed 3-1-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4163-18-P