Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review, 4411-4412 [2013-01163]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 14 / Tuesday, January 22, 2013 / Notices tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with Streets NW.) between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on weekdays. Additionally, commenters may send a copy of their comments to the OMB Desk Officer—Shagufta Ahmed —Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235 725 17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–6974. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A copy of the PRA OMB submission, including the proposed reporting form and instructions, supporting statement, and other documentation will be placed into OMB’s public docket files, once approved. These documents will also be made available on the Federal Reserve Board’s public Web site at: http:// www.federalreserve.gov/apps/ reportforms/review.aspx or may be requested from the agency clearance officer, whose name appears below. Federal Reserve Board Clearance Officer —Cynthia Ayouch—Division of Research and Statistics, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, DC 20551 (202) 452–3829. Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) users may contact (202) 263–4869, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, DC 20551. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Request for Comment on Information Collection Proposals The following information collections, which are being handled under this delegated authority, have received initial Board approval and are hereby published for comment. At the end of the comment period, the proposed information collections, along with an analysis of comments and recommendations received, will be submitted to the Board for final approval under OMB delegated authority. Comments are invited on the following: a. Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the Federal Reserve’s functions; including whether the information has practical utility; b. The accuracy of the Federal Reserve’s estimate of the burden of the proposed information collection, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; c. Ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; d. Ways to minimize the burden of information collection on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology; and VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:11 Jan 18, 2013 Jkt 229001 e. Estimates of capital or start up costs and costs of operation, maintenance, and purchase of services to provide information. Proposal To Approve Under OMB Delegated Authority the Extension for Three Years, Without Revision, of the Following Reports 1. Report title: Notice of Branch Closure. Agency form number: FR 4031. OMB control number: 7100–0264. Frequency: On occasion. Reporters: State member banks. Estimated annual reporting hours: 224 hours. Estimated average hours per response: Reporting requirements, 2 hours; Disclosure requirements, customer mailing, 0.75 hours and posted notice, 0.25 hours; and Recordkeeping requirements, 8 hours. Number of respondents: Reporting requirements, 72; Disclosure requirements, customer mailing, 72 and posted notice, 72; and Recordkeeping requirements, 1. General description of report: This information collection is mandatory pursuant to Section 42(a)(1) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (FDI Act) (12 U.S.C. 1831r–l(a)(1)). The Federal Reserve does not consider individual respondent data to be confidential. However, a state member bank may request confidential treatment pursuant to exemption b(4) of the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C.552(b)(4)). Abstract: The mandatory reporting, recordkeeping, and disclosure requirements regarding the closing of any branch of an insured depository institution are imposed by section 228 of the FDI Act of 1991. There is no reporting form associated with the reporting portion of this information collection; state member banks notify the Federal Reserve by letter prior to closing a branch. The Federal Reserve uses the information to fulfill its statutory obligation to supervise state member banks 2. Report title: Reports Related to Securities Issued by State Member Banks as Required by Regulation H. Agency form number: Reg H–1. OMB control number: 7100–0091. Frequency: Annually, Quarterly, and on occasion. Reporters: State member banks. Estimated annual reporting hours: 352 hours. Estimated average hours per response: 5.17 hours. Number of respondents: 4. General description of report: This information collection is mandatory pursuant to sections 12(i) and 23(a)(1) of PO 00000 Frm 00035 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 4411 the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 781(i) and 78w (a)(1)) and Regulation H (12 CFR 208.36). The information collected is not given confidential treatment. However, a state member bank make request that a report or document not be disclosed to the public and be held confidential by the Federal Reserve, (12 CFR 208.36(d). All such requests for confidential treatment will be determined on an ad hoc basis. Abstract: The Federal Reserve’s Regulation H requires certain state member banks to submit information relating to their securities to the Federal Reserve on the same forms that bank holding companies and nonbank entities use to submit similar information to the Securities and Exchange Commission. The information is primarily used for public disclosure and is available to the public upon request. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, January 15, 2013. Robert deV. Frierson, Secretary of the Board. [FR Doc. 2013–01072 Filed 1–18–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6210–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–13–12RP] Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a list of information collection requests under review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. chapter 35). To request a copy of these requests, call (404) 639–7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Send written comments to CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. Proposed Project Assessment of the Psychosocial Impact of Newborn Screening for Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection—New—National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) and National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). E:\FR\FM\22JAN1.SGM 22JAN1 4412 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 14 / Tuesday, January 22, 2013 / Notices Background and Brief Description Each year in the United States, more than 30,000 children are born with congenital CMV infection. Approximately 80% develop normally, while the remaining 20% are born with or subsequently develop disabilities such as hearing loss or mental retardation. A similar number of children are affected by serious CMVrelated disabilities than by several better-known childhood conditions, including Down Syndrome and Spina Bifida. The birth prevalence of congenital CMV infection is several times higher than the combined birth prevalence of all metabolic or endocrine disorders in the core U.S. newborn screening panel. Because newborn CMV screening is rarely performed, and because a definitive diagnosis of congenital CMV requires access to urine, saliva, or blood collected soon after birth, most infected children are never diagnosed. Newborn CMV screening offers some clear potential benefits, but few studies have assessed the potential for harm (e.g., increased parental anxiety, ‘‘fragile child syndrome’’). CDC is requesting OMB approval for one year to collect information about newborn CMV screening. The purpose of this information collection is to understand the psychosocial impact of newborn screening on parents whose infants underwent CMV screening as part of a routine infant CMV screening program in Houston, Texas. The potential study population includes approximately 70 CMV-infected children who were symptomatic at birth, 100 CMV-infected children who were asymptomatic at birth (20 of whom developed sequelae), and 50 controls that were CMV-uninfected. The goals of this information collection are to: (1) Document the positive and negative psychosocial impacts of newborn CMV screening on parents and their children; (2) identify modifiable factors that might increase positive psychosocial impacts and decrease negative psychosocial impacts of newborn CMV screening; (3) use what is learned about psychosocial impacts to identify key messages that parents need relative to newborn CMV screening and follow-up; and (4) to learn what challenges are associated with obtaining a congenital CMV diagnosis in the absence of CMV newborn screening. Much of the potential study population is unique in that their children experienced newborn CMV screening as part of a previous research study. Universal CMV screening has not been recommended by medical associations or state or federal governments and as a result newborn CMV screening is not typically performed. The parents’ experience with CMV screening and follow-up will help inform decisions about whether newborn CMV screening would be good public health policy. This study represents the first assessment of the experiences of parents whose children were screened for CMV at birth. Respondents fall into four categories depending on the past experiences of their child who was screened for CMV: • Parent Group 1 (PG1)—Child screened positive for congenital CMV at birth, asymptomatic at birth, but did not develop sequelae • Parent Group 2 (PG2)—Child screened positive for congenital CMV at birth, asymptomatic at birth, but did subsequently develop sequelae (e.g., hearing loss) • Parent Group 3 (PG3)—Child was diagnosed with congenital CMV and had symptoms at birth • Parent Group 4 (PG4)—Child screened negative for congenital CMV at birth Information will be collected from PG1 via focus groups, from PG2 and PG3 via interviews, and from all four parent groups via a mail survey. The focus group, interview and survey respondents will be asked to participate only once. It is estimated that 71 parents will participate in either individual interviews or focus groups and that 230 will participate in the mail survey. The interviews are planned to take 60 minutes while the focus groups will be held for 90 minutes. The survey is estimated to take 10 minutes per respondent to complete and mail based on previous administrations reported in the literature. Reading and responding to the focus group and interview recruitment letters is estimated to take 5 minutes each. There is no cost to respondents other than their time. The annualized estimated burden hours are 135. ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of respondents Type of respondent Form name Parent Group 1 ............................................... Focus Group Guide ........................................ Focus group recruitment letter ....................... Interviewer guide ............................................ Interview recruitment letter ............................. Survey ............................................................ Parent Groups 2 and 3 ................................... Parent Groups 1,2,3, and 4 ............................ DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES [FR Doc. 2013–01163 Filed 1–18–13; 8:45 am] [Document Identifier: CMS–10191] BILLING CODE P tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with Dated: January 14, 2013. Ron A. Otten, Director, Office of Scientific Integrity (OSI), Office of the Associate Director for Science (OADS), Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, HHS. AGENCY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:11 Jan 18, 2013 Jkt 229001 PO 00000 Frm 00036 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 36 50 35 50 230 Average burden per response (in hours) Responses per respondent 1 1 1 1 1 1.5 5/60 1 5/60 10/60 In compliance with the requirement of section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is publishing the following summary of proposed collections for public comment. Interested persons are invited to send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including any of the following subjects: (1) The necessity and utility of the proposed E:\FR\FM\22JAN1.SGM 22JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 14 (Tuesday, January 22, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 4411-4412]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-01163]


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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[30Day-13-12RP]


Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a 
list of information collection requests under review by the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction 
Act (44 U.S.C. chapter 35). To request a copy of these requests, call 
(404) 639-7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Send written comments 
to CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 
20503 or by fax to (202) 395-5806. Written comments should be received 
within 30 days of this notice.

Proposed Project

    Assessment of the Psychosocial Impact of Newborn Screening for 
Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection--New--National Center for 
Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) and National Center on 
Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

[[Page 4412]]

Background and Brief Description

    Each year in the United States, more than 30,000 children are born 
with congenital CMV infection. Approximately 80% develop normally, 
while the remaining 20% are born with or subsequently develop 
disabilities such as hearing loss or mental retardation. A similar 
number of children are affected by serious CMV-related disabilities 
than by several better-known childhood conditions, including Down 
Syndrome and Spina Bifida.
    The birth prevalence of congenital CMV infection is several times 
higher than the combined birth prevalence of all metabolic or endocrine 
disorders in the core U.S. newborn screening panel. Because newborn CMV 
screening is rarely performed, and because a definitive diagnosis of 
congenital CMV requires access to urine, saliva, or blood collected 
soon after birth, most infected children are never diagnosed. Newborn 
CMV screening offers some clear potential benefits, but few studies 
have assessed the potential for harm (e.g., increased parental anxiety, 
``fragile child syndrome'').
    CDC is requesting OMB approval for one year to collect information 
about newborn CMV screening. The purpose of this information collection 
is to understand the psychosocial impact of newborn screening on 
parents whose infants underwent CMV screening as part of a routine 
infant CMV screening program in Houston, Texas. The potential study 
population includes approximately 70 CMV-infected children who were 
symptomatic at birth, 100 CMV-infected children who were asymptomatic 
at birth (20 of whom developed sequelae), and 50 controls that were 
CMV-uninfected. The goals of this information collection are to: (1) 
Document the positive and negative psychosocial impacts of newborn CMV 
screening on parents and their children; (2) identify modifiable 
factors that might increase positive psychosocial impacts and decrease 
negative psychosocial impacts of newborn CMV screening; (3) use what is 
learned about psychosocial impacts to identify key messages that 
parents need relative to newborn CMV screening and follow-up; and (4) 
to learn what challenges are associated with obtaining a congenital CMV 
diagnosis in the absence of CMV newborn screening.
    Much of the potential study population is unique in that their 
children experienced newborn CMV screening as part of a previous 
research study. Universal CMV screening has not been recommended by 
medical associations or state or federal governments and as a result 
newborn CMV screening is not typically performed. The parents' 
experience with CMV screening and follow-up will help inform decisions 
about whether newborn CMV screening would be good public health policy. 
This study represents the first assessment of the experiences of 
parents whose children were screened for CMV at birth.
    Respondents fall into four categories depending on the past 
experiences of their child who was screened for CMV:
     Parent Group 1 (PG1)--Child screened positive for 
congenital CMV at birth, asymptomatic at birth, but did not develop 
sequelae
     Parent Group 2 (PG2)--Child screened positive for 
congenital CMV at birth, asymptomatic at birth, but did subsequently 
develop sequelae (e.g., hearing loss)
     Parent Group 3 (PG3)--Child was diagnosed with congenital 
CMV and had symptoms at birth
     Parent Group 4 (PG4)--Child screened negative for 
congenital CMV at birth
    Information will be collected from PG1 via focus groups, from PG2 
and PG3 via interviews, and from all four parent groups via a mail 
survey. The focus group, interview and survey respondents will be asked 
to participate only once. It is estimated that 71 parents will 
participate in either individual interviews or focus groups and that 
230 will participate in the mail survey. The interviews are planned to 
take 60 minutes while the focus groups will be held for 90 minutes. The 
survey is estimated to take 10 minutes per respondent to complete and 
mail based on previous administrations reported in the literature. 
Reading and responding to the focus group and interview recruitment 
letters is estimated to take 5 minutes each. There is no cost to 
respondents other than their time. The annualized estimated burden 
hours are 135.

                                        Estimated Annualized Burden Hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                  Average burden
          Type of respondent                    Form name            Number of     Responses per   per response
                                                                    respondents     respondent      (in hours)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Parent Group 1........................  Focus Group Guide.......              36               1             1.5
                                        Focus group recruitment               50               1            5/60
                                         letter.
Parent Groups 2 and 3.................  Interviewer guide.......              35               1               1
                                        Interview recruitment                 50               1            5/60
                                         letter.
Parent Groups 1,2,3, and 4............  Survey..................             230               1           10/60
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Dated: January 14, 2013.
Ron A. Otten,
Director, Office of Scientific Integrity (OSI), Office of the Associate 
Director for Science (OADS), Office of the Director, Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention.
[FR Doc. 2013-01163 Filed 1-18-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P