Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama, 74726-74729 [2012-30249]

Download as PDF 74726 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 242 / Monday, December 17, 2012 / Notices 2100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Room 3030, Washington, DC 20037. You must include the DS form number (if applicable), information collection title, and the OMB control number in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Direct requests for additional information regarding the collection listed in this notice, including requests for copies of the proposed collection instrument and supporting documents, to PPT Forms Officer, U.S. Department of State, 2100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Room 3030, Washington, DC 20037, who may be reached on (202) 663–2457 or at PPTFormsOfficer@state.gov. srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: • Title of Information Collection: Statement of Exigent/Special Family Circumstances for Issuance of a U.S. Passport to a Minor under Age 16. • OMB Control Number: None. • Type of Request: New Collection. • Originating Office: Bureau of Consular Affairs, Passport Services, Office of Program Management and Operational Support, Program Coordination Division (CA/PPT/PMO/ PC). • Form Number: DS–5525. • Respondents: Individuals or Households. • Estimated Number of Respondents: 327,600 respondents per year. • Estimated Number of Responses: 327,600 responses per year. • Average Time per Response: 30 minutes . • Total Estimated Burden Time: 163,800 hours per year. • Frequency: On occasion. • Obligation to Respond: Required to Obtain or Retain a Benefit. We are soliciting public comments to permit the Department to: • Evaluate whether the proposed information collection is necessary for the proper functions of the Department. • Evaluate the accuracy of our estimate of the time and cost burden for this proposed collection, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used. • Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected. • Minimize the reporting burden on those who are to respond, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Please note that comments submitted in response to this Notice are public record. Before including any detailed personal information, you should be aware that your comments as submitted, VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:21 Dec 14, 2012 Jkt 229001 including your personal information, will be available for public review. OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Abstract of Proposed Collection Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama The information collected on the DS– 5525, ‘‘Statement of Exigent/Special Family Circumstances for Issuance of a U.S. Passport to a Minor under Age 16’’, is used in conjunction with the DS–11, ‘‘Application for a U.S. Passport’’. The DS–5525 can serve as the statement describing exigent or special family circumstances, which is required if written consent of the non-applying parent or guardian cannot be obtained when the passport application is executed for a minor under age 16. The statement must explain the reason for the request. The legal authority permitting this information assists the Department of State to administer the regulations in 22 CFR 51.27 requiring that both parents and/or any guardian consent to the issuance of a passport to a minor under age 16, except where one parent has sole custody. This regulation was mandated by Section 236 of the Admiral James W. Nance and Meg Donovan Foreign Relations authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2000 and 2001 (enacted by Public Law 106–113, Div. B, Section 1000(a)(7)), and helps to prevent international child abduction. Methodology Passport Services collects information from U.S. citizens and non-citizen nationals when they complete and submit the DS–5525, ‘‘Statement of Exigent/Special Family Circumstances for Issuance of a U.S. Passport to a Minor under Age 16’’. Passport applicants can either download the DS– 5525 from the Internet or obtain the form from an Acceptance Facility/ Passport Agency. The form must be completed, signed, and submitted along with the applicant’s DS–11, ‘‘Application for a U.S. Passport’’. Dated: November 28, 2012. Brenda S. Sprague, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Passport Services, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Department of State. [FR Doc. 2012–30346 Filed 12–14–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4710–06–P PO 00000 Frm 00094 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In accordance with relevant provisions of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its determination of the trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, and Panama. As described below, the level of a country’s trade surplus in these goods relates to the quantity of sugar and syrup goods and sugarcontaining products for which the United States grants preferential tariff treatment under (i) the United StatesChile Free Trade Agreement (Chile FTA); (ii) the United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement (Morocco FTA); (iii) the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA–DR); (iv) the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (Peru TPA); (v) the United StatesColombia Trade Promotion Agreement (Colombia TPA), and (vi) the United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement (Panama TPA). DATES: Effective Date: January 1, 2013. ADDRESSES: Inquiries may be mailed or delivered to Ann Heilman-Dahl, Director of Agricultural Affairs, Office of Agricultural Affairs, Office of the United States Trade Representative, 600 17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20508. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ann Heilman-Dahl, Office of Agricultural Affairs, telephone: (202) 395–6127 or facsimile: (202) 395–4579. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Chile: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108–77; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 30, 2003 (68 FR 75789) implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Chile FTA. Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR is SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\17DEN1.SGM 17DEN1 srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 242 / Monday, December 17, 2012 / Notices required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Chile’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in Harmonized System (HS) subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.20, 1702.30, 1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 1806.10, 2101.12, 2101.20, and 2106.90, except that Chile’s imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Chile FTA are not included in the calculation of Chile’s trade surplus. Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in an amount equal to the lesser of Chile’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.10 through 9911.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Chile’s trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During calendar year (CY) 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, Chile’s imports of sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 528,124 metric tons according to data published by the Ministro de Agricultura de Chile. Based on this data, USTR determines that Chile’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99, goods of Chile are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9911.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 9911.17.10 through 9911.17.85 in CY 2013. Morocco: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108–302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 76651) implemented in Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Morocco FTA. Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register determination of the amount of Morocco’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Morocco’s imports of U.S. goods VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:21 Dec 14, 2012 Jkt 229001 classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Morocco FTA are not included in the calculation of Morocco’s trade surplus. Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount equal to the lesser of Morocco’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Morocco’s trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, Morocco’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 880,867 metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR determines that Morocco’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99, goods of Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY 2013. CAFTA–DR: Pursuant to section 201 of the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 109–53; 19 U.S.C. 4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 28, 2006 (71 FR 10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 2006 (71 FR 16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 2006 (71 FR 16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 (71 FR 38509), Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 2007 (72 FR 10025), Presidential Proclamation No. 8331 of December 23, 2008 (73 FR 79585), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8536 of June 12, 2010 (75 FR 34311) implemented the CAFTA–DR on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the CAFTA–DR. Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the PO 00000 Frm 00095 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 74727 amount of each CAFTA–DR country’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that each CAFTA–DR country’s exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, and 1701.99 and its imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the CAFTA–DR are not included in the calculation of that country’s trade surplus. U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of each CAFTA–DR country entered under subheading 9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that country’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that country and that calendar year. During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, Costa Rica’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 17,670 metric tons according to data published by the Costa Rican Customs Department, Ministry of Finance. Based on this data, USTR determines that Costa Rica’s trade surplus is 17,670 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Costa Rica for CY 2013 is 12,540 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Costa Rica that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 12,540 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Costa Rica’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Costa Rica for CY 2013). During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, the Dominican Republic’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugarcontaining products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 3,066 metric tons according to data published by the National Statistics Office of the Dominican Republic. Based on this data, USTR determines that the Dominican Republic’s trade surplus is 3,066 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for the Dominican Republic for CY 2013 is 11,400 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of the Dominican Republic that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 3,066 metric tons (i.e., the E:\FR\FM\17DEN1.SGM 17DEN1 srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with 74728 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 242 / Monday, December 17, 2012 / Notices amount that is the lesser of the Dominican Republic’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for the Dominican Republic for CY 2013). During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, El Salvador’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 198,359 metric tons according to data published by the Ministro de Economia de El Salvador. Based on this data, USTR determines that El Salvador’s trade surplus is 198,359 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for El Salvador for CY 2013 is 31,000 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of El Salvador that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 31,000 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of El Salvador’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for El Salvador for CY 2013). During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, Guatemala’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 1,311,620 metric tons according to data published by the Asociacio´n de Azucareros de Guatemala. Based on this data, USTR determines that Guatemala’s trade surplus is 1,311,620 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Guatemala for CY 2013 is 42,000 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 42,000 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Guatemala’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Guatemala for CY 2013). During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, Honduras’ exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 52,492 metric tons according to data published by the Honduran Executive Directorate of Revenue (DEI). Based on this data, USTR determines that Honduras’ trade surplus is 52,492 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Honduras for CY 2013 is 9,120 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Honduras that may VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:21 Dec 14, 2012 Jkt 229001 be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 9,120 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Honduras’ trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Honduras for CY 2013). During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, Nicaragua’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 206,806 metric tons according to data published by the Ministry of Development, Industry and Trade (MIFIC). Based on this data, USTR determines that Nicaragua’s trade surplus is 206,806 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for Nicaragua for CY 2013 is 25,080 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Nicaragua that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 25,080 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Nicaragua’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Nicaragua for CY 2013). Peru: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 110–138; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8341 of January 16, 2009 (74 FR 4105) implemented the Peru TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Peru TPA. Note 28(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Peru’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Peru’s imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Peru TPA and Peru’s exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Peru’s trade surplus. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Peru entered under subheading 9822.06.10 in an amount equal to the lesser of Peru’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, Peru’s imports of the sugar goods described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 212,217 metric tons according to data published by the PO 00000 Frm 00096 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Superintendencia Nacional de Administracion Tributaria. Based on this data, USTR determines that Peru’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Peru are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.06.10 in CY 2013. Colombia: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112–42; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8818 of May 14, 2012 (77 FR 29519) implemented the Colombia TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Colombia TPA. Note 32(b) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Colombia’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Colombia’s imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Colombia TPA and Colombia’s exports to the United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Colombia’s trade surplus. Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Colombia entered under subheading 9822.08.01 in an amount equal to the lesser of Colombia’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, Colombia’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 621,365 metric tons according to data published by USDA Global Trade Atlas. Based on this data, USTR determines that Colombia’s trade surplus is 621,365 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for CY 2013 is 50,750 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Colombia that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.08.01 in CY 2013 is 50,750 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Colombia’s trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Colombia for CY 2013). Panama: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation E:\FR\FM\17DEN1.SGM 17DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 242 / Monday, December 17, 2012 / Notices Act (Pub. L. 112–43; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8894 of October 29, 2012 (77 FR 66505) implemented the Panama TPA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the Panama TPA. Note 35(a) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Panama’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Panama’s imports of U.S. goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the Panama TPA and Panama’s exports to the United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of Panama’s trade surplus. Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar goods of Panama entered under subheading 9822.09.17 in an amount equal to the lesser of Panama’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, Panama’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 531 metric tons according to data published by National Institute of Statistics and Census, Office of the General Comptroller of Panama. Based on this data, USTR determines that Panama’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Panama are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.09.17. Islam A. Siddiqui, Chief Agricultural Negotiator, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. [FR Doc. 2012–30249 Filed 12–14–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3290–F3–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with Office of the Secretary Guidance on Review and Approval of Public Charter Prospectuses: Extension of Effective Date to January 14, 2013 Office of the Secretary, Department of Transportation. ACTION: Guidance on Review and Approval of Public Charter AGENCY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:21 Dec 14, 2012 Jkt 229001 Prospectuses: Extension of Effective Date to January 14, 2013. The Department is publishing the following notice extending the effective date of a prior notice, dated November 13, 2012, on policies affecting the review and approval of public charter filings under 14 CFR part 380. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Nicholas Lowry, Attorney, Office of Aviation Enforcement and Proceedings (C–70), 1200 New Jersey Ave. SE., Washington, DC 20590, (202) 366–9349. SUMMARY: Guidance on Review and Approval of Public Charter Prospectuses: Extension of Effective Date to January 14, 2013 On November 13, 2012, the Department of Transportation’s Office of International Aviation and the Office of Aviation Enforcement and Proceedings issued a notice providing guidance on the review and approval of public charter prospectuses. 77 FR 69692 (2012). The notice was to have taken effect on December 12, 2012. By this addendum, we are deferring the implementation date until January 14, 2013. The notice was issued in light of the bankruptcy of Southern Sky Air & Tours, LLC d/b/a Direct Air. Our investigation of Direct Air revealed noncompliance with a number of existing regulatory requirements designed to protect consumers. Based on the Direct Air experience, we determined that by clarifying certain elements of our public charter regulations (14 CFR Part 380) we could promote more effective compliance with those regulations and thereby enhance consumer protection. We have received a number of comments and questions from members of the public regarding the November notice. While we are firmly committed to enhancing consumer protection and preventing a recurrence of the type of problems encountered in the Direct Air situation, we want to be sure that interested parties with questions or comments about the notice have been afforded a reasonable opportunity to be heard, and that we have had the opportunity to consider their views fully. Therefore, we have decided to defer the effective date of our notice for 30 days, until January 14, 2013. Questions and comments regarding our November notice may be addressed to the Office of Aviation Enforcement and Proceedings (C–70), U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. An electronic version of this document is available at http:// www.regulations.gov. PO 00000 Frm 00097 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 74729 Dated: December 11, 2012. Paul L. Gretch, Director, Office of International Aviation. Samuel Podberesky, Assistant General Counsel for Aviation Enforcement and Proceedings. [FR Doc. 2012–30293 Filed 12–14–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–9X–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice To Rescind a Notice of Intent and Draft Environmental Impact Statement: I–10 Corridor Improvement Study; Maricopa County, AZ Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice to rescind a Notice of Intent and Draft Environmental Impact Statement. AGENCY: The FHWA is issuing this notice to advise the public that we are rescinding the Notice of Intent (NOI) and Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for proposed freeway improvements along Interstate 10 (I–10) from State Route (SR) 51 to the Santan Freeway within Maricopa County, Arizona. A NOI to prepare an EIS for the I–10 Corridor Improvement Study was published in the Federal Register on February 4, 2002, with a subsequent correction to the project limits published in the Federal Register on May 14, 2002. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Alan Hansen, Major Projects Manager, Federal Highway Administration, 4000 North Central Avenue, Suite 1500, Phoenix, AZ 85012–3500, Telephone: (602) 382–8964, Email: alan.hansen@dot.gov. The FHWA Arizona Division Office’s normal business hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Mountain Standard Time). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On February 4, 2002, the FHWA, in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT), issued an NOI to prepare an EIS for proposed freeway improvements along I–10 from SR 51 to the Santan Freeway in Maricopa County, Arizona. The I–10 Corridor is in or adjacent to the cities of Phoenix, Tempe, and Chandler, as well as the Town of Guadalupe. In May 2002, the FWHA issued a revised NOI to correct the project limits. The study area limits for the EIS consisted of approximately 15 miles of I–10 and segments of I–17, SR 143, and US Highway (US) 60. The study area primarily extended south along I–10 from the I–10/SR51/SR202L System SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\17DEN1.SGM 17DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 242 (Monday, December 17, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 74726-74729]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-30249]


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OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE


Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods 
and Sugar-Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the 
Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, 
Colombia, and Panama

AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with relevant provisions of the Harmonized 
Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), the Office of the United 
States Trade Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its 
determination of the trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Chile, Morocco, Costa Rica, the Dominican 
Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, Colombia, 
and Panama. As described below, the level of a country's trade surplus 
in these goods relates to the quantity of sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products for which the United States grants 
preferential tariff treatment under (i) the United States-Chile Free 
Trade Agreement (Chile FTA); (ii) the United States-Morocco Free Trade 
Agreement (Morocco FTA); (iii) the Dominican Republic-Central America-
United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR); (iv) the United States-
Peru Trade Promotion Agreement (Peru TPA); (v) the United States-
Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement (Colombia TPA), and (vi) the United 
States-Panama Trade Promotion Agreement (Panama TPA).

DATES: Effective Date: January 1, 2013.

ADDRESSES: Inquiries may be mailed or delivered to Ann Heilman-Dahl, 
Director of Agricultural Affairs, Office of Agricultural Affairs, 
Office of the United States Trade Representative, 600 17th Street NW., 
Washington, DC 20508.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ann Heilman-Dahl, Office of 
Agricultural Affairs, telephone: (202) 395-6127 or facsimile: (202) 
395-4579.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    Chile: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Chile Free 
Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108-77; 19 U.S.C. 3805 
note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 30, 2003 (68 FR 
75789) implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Chile FTA.
    Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR is

[[Page 74727]]

required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of 
the amount of Chile's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for 
goods in Harmonized System (HS) subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 
1701.99, 1702.20, 1702.30, 1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 1806.10, 2101.12, 
2101.20, and 2106.90, except that Chile's imports of goods classified 
under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential 
tariff treatment under the Chile FTA are not included in the 
calculation of Chile's trade surplus.
    Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in an amount 
equal to the lesser of Chile's trade surplus or the specific quantity 
set out in that note for that calendar year.
    U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides 
preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.10 
through 9911.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Chile's 
trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for 
that calendar year.
    During calendar year (CY) 2011, the most recent year for which data 
is available, Chile's imports of sugar and syrup goods and sugar-
containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods 
by 528,124 metric tons according to data published by the Ministro de 
Agricultura de Chile. Based on this data, USTR determines that Chile's 
trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 
12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99, goods of 
Chile are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under 
subheading 9911.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 
9911.17.10 through 9911.17.85 in CY 2013.
    Morocco: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Morocco Free 
Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108-302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 
note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 
76651) implemented in Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Morocco FTA.
    Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR 
is required to publish annually in the Federal Register determination 
of the amount of Morocco's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources 
for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 
1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Morocco's imports of U.S. goods 
classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for 
preferential tariff treatment under the Morocco FTA are not included in 
the calculation of Morocco's trade surplus.
    Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount 
equal to the lesser of Morocco's trade surplus or the specific quantity 
set out in that note for that calendar year.
    Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides 
preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 
9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which 
Morocco's trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that 
note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Morocco's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 880,867 
metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the 
Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR determines that Morocco's 
trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 
12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99, goods of 
Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under 
subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 
9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY 2013.
    CAFTA-DR: Pursuant to section 201 of the Dominican Republic-Central 
America-United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 
109-53; 19 U.S.C. 4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 
28, 2006 (71 FR 10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 
2006 (71 FR 16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 
2006 (71 FR 16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 
(71 FR 38509), Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 2007 
(72 FR 10025), Presidential Proclamation No. 8331 of December 23, 2008 
(73 FR 79585), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8536 of June 12, 2010 
(75 FR 34311) implemented the CAFTA-DR on behalf of the United States 
and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in 
the CAFTA-DR.
    Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that 
USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a 
determination of the amount of each CAFTA-DR country's trade surplus, 
by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 
1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that each 
CAFTA-DR country's exports to the United States of goods classified 
under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, and 1701.99 and its 
imports of goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 
that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the CAFTA-DR are 
not included in the calculation of that country's trade surplus.
    U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides 
duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-
containing products of each CAFTA-DR country entered under subheading 
9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that country's trade 
surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that country 
and that calendar year.
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Costa Rica's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 17,670 
metric tons according to data published by the Costa Rican Customs 
Department, Ministry of Finance. Based on this data, USTR determines 
that Costa Rica's trade surplus is 17,670 metric tons. The specific 
quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS 
chapter 98 for Costa Rica for CY 2013 is 12,540 metric tons. Therefore, 
in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Costa 
Rica that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 
2013 is 12,540 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of 
Costa Rica's trade surplus and the specific quantity set out in that 
note for Costa Rica for CY 2013).
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
the Dominican Republic's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those 
goods by 3,066 metric tons according to data published by the National 
Statistics Office of the Dominican Republic. Based on this data, USTR 
determines that the Dominican Republic's trade surplus is 3,066 metric 
tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to 
subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for the Dominican Republic for CY 
2013 is 11,400 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, 
the aggregate quantity of goods of the Dominican Republic that may be 
entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 3,066 
metric tons (i.e., the

[[Page 74728]]

amount that is the lesser of the Dominican Republic's trade surplus and 
the specific quantity set out in that note for the Dominican Republic 
for CY 2013).
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
El Salvador's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 198,359 
metric tons according to data published by the Ministro de Economia de 
El Salvador. Based on this data, USTR determines that El Salvador's 
trade surplus is 198,359 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in 
U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for El 
Salvador for CY 2013 is 31,000 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance 
with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of El Salvador that may 
be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 31,000 
metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of El Salvador's trade 
surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for El Salvador 
for CY 2013).
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Guatemala's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 
1,311,620 metric tons according to data published by the 
Asociacio[acute]n de Azucareros de Guatemala. Based on this data, USTR 
determines that Guatemala's trade surplus is 1,311,620 metric tons. The 
specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of 
HTS chapter 98 for Guatemala for CY 2013 is 42,000 metric tons. 
Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate quantity of 
goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 42,000 metric tons (i.e., the amount that is 
the lesser of Guatemala's trade surplus and the specific quantity set 
out in that note for Guatemala for CY 2013).
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Honduras' exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 52,492 
metric tons according to data published by the Honduran Executive 
Directorate of Revenue (DEI). Based on this data, USTR determines that 
Honduras' trade surplus is 52,492 metric tons. The specific quantity 
set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for 
Honduras for CY 2013 is 9,120 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance 
with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Honduras that may be 
entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 9,120 
metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Honduras' trade 
surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Honduras for 
CY 2013).
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Nicaragua's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 206,806 
metric tons according to data published by the Ministry of Development, 
Industry and Trade (MIFIC). Based on this data, USTR determines that 
Nicaragua's trade surplus is 206,806 metric tons. The specific quantity 
set out in U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for 
Nicaragua for CY 2013 is 25,080 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance 
with that note, the aggregate quantity of goods of Nicaragua that may 
be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY 2013 is 25,080 
metric tons (i.e., the amount that is the lesser of Nicaragua's trade 
surplus and the specific quantity set out in that note for Nicaragua 
for CY 2013).
    Peru: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Peru Trade 
Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 110-138; 19 U.S.C. 3805 
note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8341 of January 16, 2009 (74 FR 
4105) implemented the Peru TPA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Peru TPA.
    Note 28(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR 
is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination 
of the amount of Peru's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for 
goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, 
and 1702.60, except that Peru's imports of U.S. goods classified under 
HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are originating goods under the 
Peru TPA and Peru's exports to the United States of goods classified 
under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, and 1701.99 are not 
included in the calculation of Peru's trade surplus.
    Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar goods of Peru entered under subheading 
9822.06.10 in an amount equal to the lesser of Peru's trade surplus or 
the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Peru's imports of the sugar goods described above exceeded its exports 
of those goods by 212,217 metric tons according to data published by 
the Superintendencia Nacional de Administracion Tributaria. Based on 
this data, USTR determines that Peru's trade surplus is negative. 
Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 28(d) to subchapter XXII of HTS 
chapter 98, goods of Peru are not eligible to enter the United States 
duty-free under subheading 9822.06.10 in CY 2013.
    Colombia: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Colombia 
Trade Promotion Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 112-42; 19 U.S.C. 
3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 8818 of May 14, 2012 (77 FR 
29519) implemented the Colombia TPA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff treatment provided for in the 
Colombia TPA.
    Note 32(b) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR 
is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination 
of the amount of Colombia's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources 
for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 
1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Colombia's imports of U.S. 
goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are 
originating goods under the Colombia TPA and Colombia's exports to the 
United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 
1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of 
Colombia's trade surplus.
    Note 32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-
free treatment for certain sugar goods of Colombia entered under 
subheading 9822.08.01 in an amount equal to the lesser of Colombia's 
trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that 
calendar year.
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Colombia's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 621,365 
metric tons according to data published by USDA Global Trade Atlas. 
Based on this data, USTR determines that Colombia's trade surplus is 
621,365 metric tons. The specific quantity set out in U.S. Note 
32(c)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 for CY 2013 is 50,750 
metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with that note, the aggregate 
quantity of goods of Colombia that may be entered duty-free under 
subheading 9822.08.01 in CY 2013 is 50,750 metric tons (i.e., the 
amount that is the lesser of Colombia's trade surplus and the specific 
quantity set out in that note for Colombia for CY 2013).
    Panama: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Panama Trade 
Promotion Agreement Implementation

[[Page 74729]]

Act (Pub. L. 112-43; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation 
No. 8894 of October 29, 2012 (77 FR 66505) implemented the Panama TPA 
on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the 
tariff treatment provided for in the Panama TPA.
    Note 35(a) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR 
is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination 
of the amount of Panama's trade surplus, by volume, with all sources 
for goods in HS subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 1701.14, 1701.91, 
1701.99, 1702.40 and 1702.60, except that Panama's imports of U.S. 
goods classified under subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that are 
originating goods under the Panama TPA and Panama's exports to the 
United States of goods classified under subheadings 1701.12, 1701.13, 
1701.14, 1701.91 and 1701.99 are not included in the calculation of 
Panama's trade surplus.
    Note 35(c) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free 
treatment for certain sugar goods of Panama entered under subheading 
9822.09.17 in an amount equal to the lesser of Panama's trade surplus 
or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year.
    During CY 2011, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Panama's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 531 
metric tons according to data published by National Institute of 
Statistics and Census, Office of the General Comptroller of Panama. 
Based on this data, USTR determines that Panama's trade surplus is 
negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 35(c) to subchapter 
XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of Panama are not eligible to enter the 
United States duty-free under subheading 9822.09.17.

Islam A. Siddiqui,
Chief Agricultural Negotiator, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.
[FR Doc. 2012-30249 Filed 12-14-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3290-F3-P