Final Environmental Impact Statement for Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, North Cascades National Park Service Complex, Chelan County, WA, 61631-61632 [2012-24924]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 196 / Wednesday, October 10, 2012 / Notices lease to any other interest affecting the lands. lease to any other interest affecting the lands. Julie L. Weaver, Chief, Branch of Fluid Minerals Adjudication. Julie L. Weaver, Chief, Branch of Fluid Minerals Adjudication. [FR Doc. 2012–24904 Filed 10–9–12; 8:45 am] [FR Doc. 2012–24903 Filed 10–9–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–22–P BILLING CODE 4310–22–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management National Park Service [NPS–PWR–PWRO–10631; 9475–0764–422] [WY–923–1310–FI; WYW145583] Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease WYW145583, Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: ACTION: Under the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement from CEP–M Purchase, LLC, for competitive oil and gas lease WYW145583 for land in Campbell County, Wyoming. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the rentals due since the date the lease terminated under the law. SUMMARY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Land Management, Julie L. Weaver, Chief, Fluid Minerals Adjudication, at 307–775–6176. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1– 800–877–8339 to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. The lessee has agreed to the amended lease terms for rentals and royalties at rates of $10 per acre or fraction thereof, per year and 16–2/3 percent, respectively. The lessee has paid the required $500 administrative fee and $159 to reimburse the Department for the cost of this Federal Register notice. The lessee has met all the requirements for reinstatement of the lease as set out in Sections 31(d) and (e) of the Mineral Lands Leasing Act of 1920 (30 U.S.C. 188), and the BLM is proposing to reinstate lease WYW145583 effective July 1, 2011, under the original terms and conditions of the lease and the increased rental and royalty rates cited above. The BLM has not issued a valid SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES National Park Service, Interior. Notice of availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area. AGENCY: Notice. VerDate Mar<15>2010 Final Environmental Impact Statement for Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, North Cascades National Park Service Complex, Chelan County, WA 15:15 Oct 09, 2012 Jkt 229001 The National Park Service, in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration, has prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan (SRCIP) and Lake Chelan National Recreation Area Land Protection Plan (LPP). The SRCIP/FEIS identifies and analyzes five alternatives for sustainable management of park facilities (e.g., roads, bridges, trails, maintenance yard) in response to increased flooding and erosion issues in the lower Stehekin River watershed. When approved, the SCRIP will implement several actions called for in the 1995 General Management Plan (GMP), including removal of park maintenance and residential facilities from floodplain areas, construction of recreational facilities and relocation of segments of the primary eastern access road to the adjoining North Cascades National Park, and protection of water quality and scenery along the lower Stehekin River. The updated Lake Chelan National Recreation Area LPP revises acquisition priorities and is intended to accommodate willing sellers of threatened private property. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Recent major floods and resultant channel changes on the lower Stehekin River have intensified flood and erosion threats to NPS facilities and are impacting natural resources within Lake Chelan NRA. The three largest recorded Stehekin River floods have occurred within the past 16 years, and in response, the NPS has spent more than $3 million to protect public roads and SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00063 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61631 facilities and to repair flood damage. Roads, visitor facilities and private development once thought to be safe from the river are now threatened. Because of the current impacts and future risks associated with these unprecedented conditions, the primary purposes of the actions proposed within the SRCIP are to: (1) Sustainably operate and maintain NPS administrative facilities, public access (roads and trails), and campgrounds; (2) protect water quality, scenic values, habitat, and natural processes of the Stehekin River; and (3) partner with the Stehekin Community to provide services, facilities and experiences for visitors. The SRCIP is needed to (1) respond to the increased magnitude and frequency of flooding, (2) implement and clarify 1995 GMP guidance, (3) sustain public facilities while protecting natural resources, (4) manage limited funding, and to (5) respond to private landowners. The SRCIP/FEIS describes and analyzes five management alternatives, including continuation of current management actions. This includes a new Alternative 5, which is derived from modifications to Alternative 2 as presented in the Draft EIS (which evaluated four alternatives), based on responses to public comments. All five alternatives have in common certain actions previously identified in the 1995 GMP, including relocation of the NPS maintenance area and some housing out of the channel migration zone; resurfacing of the road from Stehekin Landing to Milepost 9.2 (just above Stehekin Valley Ranch), including paving from Harlequin Bridge to Milepost 9.2; and construction of the Lower Valley Trail. Alternatives 2–5 would also add new campsites at different locations to supplement sites at Harlequin Bridge that are seasonally flooded. Alternative 1 (continue current management) and Alternative 4 would retain the Stehekin Valley Road access through McGregor Meadows. To protect the road from flood damage and to provide access to private residences, about 5,600 cubic yards of fill would be placed in the floodplain. Under both alternatives, new rock structures (barbs) could be placed along the river. Alternatives 2 and 3 would relocate 1.9 and 1.75 miles, respectively, of the Stehekin Valley Road from the floodplain in McGregor Meadows, while retaining private access to the area via a 0.75-mile-long reduced maintenance road. Alternatives 2, 3 and 5 differ in where the reroute rejoins to the existing road, with the Alternative 2 and 5 alignments outside of the channel E:\FR\FM\10OCN1.SGM 10OCN1 61632 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 196 / Wednesday, October 10, 2012 / Notices migration zone and Alternative 3 partially within it near the Lower Field. Because of the reroute, implementation of Alternatives 2 or 5 would close the shooting range near the Lower Field. Alternatives 2, 3 and 5 would install roughly half as many rock structures (barbs) compared to Alternatives 1 and 4. Alternatives 2–5 would revise the Lake Chelan NRA Land Protection Plan. Alternatives 2, 3 and 5 would focus more on exchange and acquisition of properties threatened by the river (provided there are willing sellers), and would cluster future development in areas outside of the channel migration zone. The 1995 LPP placed a higher value on scenic resources along the Stehekin Valley Road. In Alternative 4, less emphasis would be placed on exchange and acquisition priorities in the floodplain, and therefore far fewer private parcels would be high priority for purchase or exchange. Alternative 5 focuses on exchange/acquisition in the most vulnerable areas threatened by the river and introduces two new criteria for prioritizing potential exchange/ acquisition lands, including scenic resources and threats within debris flow hazard zones. Decision Process: Not sooner than 30 days from the date of publication in the Federal Register by the Environmental Protection Agency of its notice of filing of the Final EIS, a Record of Decision for the selected SRCIP alternative will be prepared. Because this is a delegated EIS, the official responsible for the final decision is the Regional Director, Pacific West Region; subsequently the official responsible for implementation of the approved Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan is the Superintendent, North Cascades National Park Service Complex. Dated: September 26, 2012. Patricia L. Neubacher, Acting Regional Director, Pacific West Region. [FR Doc. 2012–24924 Filed 10–9–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–T6–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES [NPS–PWR–PWRO–10630; 9530–1000–SZM] Final Environmental Impact Statement for Cattle Point Road Relocation, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan County, Washington National Park Service, Interior. Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: ACTION: VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:15 Oct 09, 2012 Jkt 229001 for Cattle Point Road Relocation, San Juan Island National Historical Park. Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (Pub. L. 91–190, as amended), and the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR parts 1500–1508), the National Park Service (NPS) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in cooperation with San Juan County, Washington and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, have prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) for alternatives designed to respond to coastal bluff erosion that threatens a segment of the Cattle Point Road located in San Juan Island National Historical Park (Park), Washington. The Final EIS identifies and analyzes three action alternatives for realignment of the road through the park for use by residents and visitors traveling to the east end of the Cattle Point peninsula. The potential environmental consequences of these alternatives (and a no-action alternative which would continue current road management), and appropriate measures to minimize or avoid harm, are identified and analyzed. Background: A 500-foot long segment of the Cattle Point Road, which terminates on the southeastern tip of San Juan Island, is threatened by coastal erosion at the base of the slope traversed by the road. This road passes through the Park and serves residences on a peninsular area of the island known as Cattle Point, as well as providing public access to the Cattle Point Natural Resource Conservation Area, managed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). If erosion continues unabated, the roadway eventually may fail, disrupting vehicular access to these areas. The road is currently maintained by San Juan County (County); the project area of potential effect is primarily within the Park. The entire Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a National Historic Landmark. A Notice of Intent to begin the conservation planning and environmental impact analysis for the project was published in the Federal Register on February 6, 2004. Public engagement was initiated through a newsletter and news release, followed by two public meetings held February 18, 2004, on San Juan Island. Project team members presented information and gathered feedback and ideas on preliminary alternatives and potential environmental issues. Approximately 30 public comments were received during the scoping period ending March 19, 2004. A Scoping Report was prepared SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00064 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 which described the range of potential alternatives identified for more detailed analysis, as well as alternatives dismissed from further consideration (including armoring the base of the slope in lieu of road realignment options). The Scoping Report included comments and agency responses as appendices. On June 17, 2004, the Scoping Report was issued, and a notice posted on the Park Web site announced availability of the document. Throughout 2005–2006 newsletters and press releases summarizing progress on preparation of the EIS were distributed, and the County and other agencies were periodically updated. The Washington State Historic Preservation Officer provided concurrence with a determination of No Adverse Effect on June 23, 2009. The Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS was published in the Federal Register on September 7, 2010. Public engagement was initiated through wide distribution of a newsletter. An article regarding pending release of the Draft EIS was published September 1, 2010, in the Journal of the San Juan Islands. A public open house was hosted by the Park in the town of Friday Harbor on October 26, 2010 (approximately three dozen persons attended). During the 60 day public comment period, 40 comment letters were received (23 by mail and 17 were submitted at the open house); of this total, seven were from agencies and organizations, and the remainder were received from individuals. No substantially new information was received. Proposal and Alternatives: Alternative A: No Action—The existing use, maintenance, and management associated with the road would continue without change. This alternative provides a baseline of current conditions to aid comparison and analysis of the action alternatives. Unless current management changes, erosion eventually could cause the road to fail, disrupting vehicular access to residential properties in the Cattle Point Estates and Cape San Juan neighborhoods and to public lands east of the eroding bluff. Since measurements began in 2002, erosion has moved approximately 14 feet closer to the guard rail and is currently 32 feet from the guard rail at its closest point. The continued life span of the road is difficult to predict, however large storm events could potentially make the road unsafe in a few years. Life expectancy (relative to coastal erosion) of each of the three action alternatives is estimated at approximately 100 years. Alternative C: Long Tunnel on Minor Realignment E:\FR\FM\10OCN1.SGM 10OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 196 (Wednesday, October 10, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 61631-61632]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-24924]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-PWR-PWRO-10631; 9475-0764-422]


Final Environmental Impact Statement for Stehekin River Corridor 
Implementation Plan, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, North 
Cascades National Park Service Complex, Chelan County, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of availability of the Final Environmental Impact 
Statement for Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan, Lake Chelan 
National Recreation Area.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The National Park Service, in cooperation with the Federal 
Highway Administration, has prepared a Final Environmental Impact 
Statement (FEIS) for the Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan 
(SRCIP) and Lake Chelan National Recreation Area Land Protection Plan 
(LPP). The SRCIP/FEIS identifies and analyzes five alternatives for 
sustainable management of park facilities (e.g., roads, bridges, 
trails, maintenance yard) in response to increased flooding and erosion 
issues in the lower Stehekin River watershed. When approved, the SCRIP 
will implement several actions called for in the 1995 General 
Management Plan (GMP), including removal of park maintenance and 
residential facilities from floodplain areas, construction of 
recreational facilities and relocation of segments of the primary 
eastern access road to the adjoining North Cascades National Park, and 
protection of water quality and scenery along the lower Stehekin River. 
The updated Lake Chelan National Recreation Area LPP revises 
acquisition priorities and is intended to accommodate willing sellers 
of threatened private property.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Recent major floods and resultant channel 
changes on the lower Stehekin River have intensified flood and erosion 
threats to NPS facilities and are impacting natural resources within 
Lake Chelan NRA. The three largest recorded Stehekin River floods have 
occurred within the past 16 years, and in response, the NPS has spent 
more than $3 million to protect public roads and facilities and to 
repair flood damage. Roads, visitor facilities and private development 
once thought to be safe from the river are now threatened.
    Because of the current impacts and future risks associated with 
these unprecedented conditions, the primary purposes of the actions 
proposed within the SRCIP are to: (1) Sustainably operate and maintain 
NPS administrative facilities, public access (roads and trails), and 
campgrounds; (2) protect water quality, scenic values, habitat, and 
natural processes of the Stehekin River; and (3) partner with the 
Stehekin Community to provide services, facilities and experiences for 
visitors. The SRCIP is needed to (1) respond to the increased magnitude 
and frequency of flooding, (2) implement and clarify 1995 GMP guidance, 
(3) sustain public facilities while protecting natural resources, (4) 
manage limited funding, and to (5) respond to private landowners.
    The SRCIP/FEIS describes and analyzes five management alternatives, 
including continuation of current management actions. This includes a 
new Alternative 5, which is derived from modifications to Alternative 2 
as presented in the Draft EIS (which evaluated four alternatives), 
based on responses to public comments. All five alternatives have in 
common certain actions previously identified in the 1995 GMP, including 
relocation of the NPS maintenance area and some housing out of the 
channel migration zone; resurfacing of the road from Stehekin Landing 
to Milepost 9.2 (just above Stehekin Valley Ranch), including paving 
from Harlequin Bridge to Milepost 9.2; and construction of the Lower 
Valley Trail. Alternatives 2-5 would also add new campsites at 
different locations to supplement sites at Harlequin Bridge that are 
seasonally flooded.
    Alternative 1 (continue current management) and Alternative 4 would 
retain the Stehekin Valley Road access through McGregor Meadows. To 
protect the road from flood damage and to provide access to private 
residences, about 5,600 cubic yards of fill would be placed in the 
floodplain. Under both alternatives, new rock structures (barbs) could 
be placed along the river.
    Alternatives 2 and 3 would relocate 1.9 and 1.75 miles, 
respectively, of the Stehekin Valley Road from the floodplain in 
McGregor Meadows, while retaining private access to the area via a 
0.75-mile-long reduced maintenance road. Alternatives 2, 3 and 5 differ 
in where the reroute rejoins to the existing road, with the Alternative 
2 and 5 alignments outside of the channel

[[Page 61632]]

migration zone and Alternative 3 partially within it near the Lower 
Field. Because of the reroute, implementation of Alternatives 2 or 5 
would close the shooting range near the Lower Field. Alternatives 2, 3 
and 5 would install roughly half as many rock structures (barbs) 
compared to Alternatives 1 and 4.
    Alternatives 2-5 would revise the Lake Chelan NRA Land Protection 
Plan. Alternatives 2, 3 and 5 would focus more on exchange and 
acquisition of properties threatened by the river (provided there are 
willing sellers), and would cluster future development in areas outside 
of the channel migration zone. The 1995 LPP placed a higher value on 
scenic resources along the Stehekin Valley Road. In Alternative 4, less 
emphasis would be placed on exchange and acquisition priorities in the 
floodplain, and therefore far fewer private parcels would be high 
priority for purchase or exchange. Alternative 5 focuses on exchange/
acquisition in the most vulnerable areas threatened by the river and 
introduces two new criteria for prioritizing potential exchange/
acquisition lands, including scenic resources and threats within debris 
flow hazard zones.
    Decision Process: Not sooner than 30 days from the date of 
publication in the Federal Register by the Environmental Protection 
Agency of its notice of filing of the Final EIS, a Record of Decision 
for the selected SRCIP alternative will be prepared. Because this is a 
delegated EIS, the official responsible for the final decision is the 
Regional Director, Pacific West Region; subsequently the official 
responsible for implementation of the approved Stehekin River Corridor 
Implementation Plan is the Superintendent, North Cascades National Park 
Service Complex.

    Dated: September 26, 2012.
Patricia L. Neubacher,
Acting Regional Director, Pacific West Region.
[FR Doc. 2012-24924 Filed 10-9-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-T6-P