Final Environmental Impact Statement for Cattle Point Road Relocation, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan County, Washington, 61632-61633 [2012-24923]

Download as PDF 61632 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 196 / Wednesday, October 10, 2012 / Notices migration zone and Alternative 3 partially within it near the Lower Field. Because of the reroute, implementation of Alternatives 2 or 5 would close the shooting range near the Lower Field. Alternatives 2, 3 and 5 would install roughly half as many rock structures (barbs) compared to Alternatives 1 and 4. Alternatives 2–5 would revise the Lake Chelan NRA Land Protection Plan. Alternatives 2, 3 and 5 would focus more on exchange and acquisition of properties threatened by the river (provided there are willing sellers), and would cluster future development in areas outside of the channel migration zone. The 1995 LPP placed a higher value on scenic resources along the Stehekin Valley Road. In Alternative 4, less emphasis would be placed on exchange and acquisition priorities in the floodplain, and therefore far fewer private parcels would be high priority for purchase or exchange. Alternative 5 focuses on exchange/acquisition in the most vulnerable areas threatened by the river and introduces two new criteria for prioritizing potential exchange/ acquisition lands, including scenic resources and threats within debris flow hazard zones. Decision Process: Not sooner than 30 days from the date of publication in the Federal Register by the Environmental Protection Agency of its notice of filing of the Final EIS, a Record of Decision for the selected SRCIP alternative will be prepared. Because this is a delegated EIS, the official responsible for the final decision is the Regional Director, Pacific West Region; subsequently the official responsible for implementation of the approved Stehekin River Corridor Implementation Plan is the Superintendent, North Cascades National Park Service Complex. Dated: September 26, 2012. Patricia L. Neubacher, Acting Regional Director, Pacific West Region. [FR Doc. 2012–24924 Filed 10–9–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–T6–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES [NPS–PWR–PWRO–10630; 9530–1000–SZM] Final Environmental Impact Statement for Cattle Point Road Relocation, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan County, Washington National Park Service, Interior. Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: ACTION: VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:15 Oct 09, 2012 Jkt 229001 for Cattle Point Road Relocation, San Juan Island National Historical Park. Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (Pub. L. 91–190, as amended), and the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR parts 1500–1508), the National Park Service (NPS) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in cooperation with San Juan County, Washington and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, have prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) for alternatives designed to respond to coastal bluff erosion that threatens a segment of the Cattle Point Road located in San Juan Island National Historical Park (Park), Washington. The Final EIS identifies and analyzes three action alternatives for realignment of the road through the park for use by residents and visitors traveling to the east end of the Cattle Point peninsula. The potential environmental consequences of these alternatives (and a no-action alternative which would continue current road management), and appropriate measures to minimize or avoid harm, are identified and analyzed. Background: A 500-foot long segment of the Cattle Point Road, which terminates on the southeastern tip of San Juan Island, is threatened by coastal erosion at the base of the slope traversed by the road. This road passes through the Park and serves residences on a peninsular area of the island known as Cattle Point, as well as providing public access to the Cattle Point Natural Resource Conservation Area, managed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). If erosion continues unabated, the roadway eventually may fail, disrupting vehicular access to these areas. The road is currently maintained by San Juan County (County); the project area of potential effect is primarily within the Park. The entire Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a National Historic Landmark. A Notice of Intent to begin the conservation planning and environmental impact analysis for the project was published in the Federal Register on February 6, 2004. Public engagement was initiated through a newsletter and news release, followed by two public meetings held February 18, 2004, on San Juan Island. Project team members presented information and gathered feedback and ideas on preliminary alternatives and potential environmental issues. Approximately 30 public comments were received during the scoping period ending March 19, 2004. A Scoping Report was prepared SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00064 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 which described the range of potential alternatives identified for more detailed analysis, as well as alternatives dismissed from further consideration (including armoring the base of the slope in lieu of road realignment options). The Scoping Report included comments and agency responses as appendices. On June 17, 2004, the Scoping Report was issued, and a notice posted on the Park Web site announced availability of the document. Throughout 2005–2006 newsletters and press releases summarizing progress on preparation of the EIS were distributed, and the County and other agencies were periodically updated. The Washington State Historic Preservation Officer provided concurrence with a determination of No Adverse Effect on June 23, 2009. The Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS was published in the Federal Register on September 7, 2010. Public engagement was initiated through wide distribution of a newsletter. An article regarding pending release of the Draft EIS was published September 1, 2010, in the Journal of the San Juan Islands. A public open house was hosted by the Park in the town of Friday Harbor on October 26, 2010 (approximately three dozen persons attended). During the 60 day public comment period, 40 comment letters were received (23 by mail and 17 were submitted at the open house); of this total, seven were from agencies and organizations, and the remainder were received from individuals. No substantially new information was received. Proposal and Alternatives: Alternative A: No Action—The existing use, maintenance, and management associated with the road would continue without change. This alternative provides a baseline of current conditions to aid comparison and analysis of the action alternatives. Unless current management changes, erosion eventually could cause the road to fail, disrupting vehicular access to residential properties in the Cattle Point Estates and Cape San Juan neighborhoods and to public lands east of the eroding bluff. Since measurements began in 2002, erosion has moved approximately 14 feet closer to the guard rail and is currently 32 feet from the guard rail at its closest point. The continued life span of the road is difficult to predict, however large storm events could potentially make the road unsafe in a few years. Life expectancy (relative to coastal erosion) of each of the three action alternatives is estimated at approximately 100 years. Alternative C: Long Tunnel on Minor Realignment E:\FR\FM\10OCN1.SGM 10OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 196 / Wednesday, October 10, 2012 / Notices involves a short realignment (2,830 feet) relatively low on the slope of Mt. Finlayson. Sixteen hundred feet of the realignment would be within a bored tunnel. Maximum slope would be 7% gradient. Alternative D: Mid-Slope Alignment with Short Tunnel involves mid-slope realignment to the north of the existing road, utilizing a short tunnel near the ridge line of Mt. Finlayson. Realignment length would be 4,700 feet, 775 feet of which would be within the tunnel. Maximum slope would be 8% gradient. The ‘‘agency preferred’’ alternative is Alternative B: Hybrid Mid-Slope Realignment. This involves mid-slope realignment to the north of the existing road, traversing the south-facing slope of Mt. Finlayson. At its highest point, this alignment curves slightly south of the Mt. Finlayson summit. The approximately 4,950 foot long realignment would be entirely on the surface (no tunnel), with a short slope of 10.5% gradient on the eastern end. This also is deemed to be the ‘‘environmentally preferred’’ course of action. Not sooner than 30 days after publication by the Environmental Protection Agency of its notice of filing of the Final EIS in the Federal Register, a Record of Decision will be prepared. Because this is a delegated EIS, the official responsible for the NPS decision is the Regional Director, Pacific West Region. Subsequently the official responsible for implementation of the approved road relocation project is the Superintendent, San Juan Island National Historical Park. Dated: September 26, 2012. Patricia L. Neubacher, Acting Regional Director, Pacific West Region. [FR Doc. 2012–24923 Filed 10–9–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–MS–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management [OMB Control Number 1010–0176] Information Collection: Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf; Proposed Collection for OMB Review; Comment Request rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES ACTION: 60-day notice. To comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:15 Oct 09, 2012 Jkt 229001 (PRA), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is inviting comments on a collection of information that we will submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. The information collection request (ICR) concerns the paperwork requirements in the regulations under ‘‘Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf.’’ DATES: Submit written comments by December 10, 2012. ADDRESSES: Please send your comments on this ICR to the BOEM Information Collection Clearance Officer, Arlene Bajusz, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 381 Elden Street, HM– 3127, Herndon, Virginia 20170 (mail); or arlene.bajusz@boem.gov (email); or 703–787–1209 (fax). Please reference ICR 1010–0176 in your comment and include your name and return address. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Arlene Bajusz, Office of Policy, Regulations, and Analysis at (703) 787– 1025 to request additional information about this ICR or copies of the referenced forms. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Control Number: 1010–0176. Title: 30 CFR Part 585, Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf. Forms: BOEM–0002, BOEM–0003, BOEM–0004, BOEM–0005, BOEM– 0006. Abstract: The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lands Act, as amended (43 U.S.C. 1331 et seq. and 43 U.S.C. 1801 et seq.), authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to issue leases, easements, or rights-ofway on the OCS for activities that produce or support production, transportation, or transmission of energy from sources other than oil and gas (renewable energy). Specifically, subsection 8(p) of the OCS Lands Act, as amended by section 388 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. 109–58), directs the Secretary of the Interior to issue any necessary regulations to carry out the OCS renewable energy program. The Secretary delegated this authority to the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). The BOEM has issued regulations for OCS renewable energy activities at 30 CFR Part 585; this notice concerns the reporting and recordkeeping elements required by these regulations. PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61633 Respondents operate commercial and noncommercial technology projects that include installation, construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning of offshore facilities, as well as possible onshore support facilities. The BOEM must ensure that these activities and operations on the OCS are performed in a safe and pollution-free manner, do not interfere with the rights of other users on the OCS, and balance the protection and development of OCS resources. Therefore, BOEM needs information concerning the proposed activities, facilities, safety equipment, inspections and tests, and natural and manmade hazards near the site, as well as assurance of fiscal responsibility. The BOEM uses forms to collect some information to ensure proper and efficient administration of OCS renewable energy leases and grants and to document the financial responsibility of lessees and grantees. Forms BOEM– 0002, BOEM–0003, BOEM–0004, and BOEM–0006 are used by renewable energy entities on the OCS to designate an operator and to assign or relinquish a lease or grant. Form BOEM–0005 is used to procure and submit a bond for the purpose of meeting financial assurance requirements as set forth in the regulations. The BOEM maintains the submitted forms as official lease and grant records pertaining to operating responsibilities, ownership, and financial responsibility. We will protect information considered proprietary under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552) and its implementing regulations (43 CFR part 2) and under regulations at 30 CFR 585.113, addressing disclosure of data and information to be made available to the public and others. No items of a sensitive nature are collected. Responses are mandatory or required to obtain a benefit. Frequency: On occasion or annually. Description of Respondents: Companies interested in renewable energy-related uses on the OCS and holders of leases and grants under 30 CFR Part 585. Estimated Reporting and Recordkeeping Hour Burden: The currently approved annual reporting burden for this collection is 31,124 hours. The following table details the individual components and respective hour burden estimates of this ICR. E:\FR\FM\10OCN1.SGM 10OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 196 (Wednesday, October 10, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 61632-61633]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-24923]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-PWR-PWRO-10630; 9530-1000-SZM]


Final Environmental Impact Statement for Cattle Point Road 
Relocation, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan County, 
Washington

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact 
Statement for Cattle Point Road Relocation, San Juan Island National 
Historical Park.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 
(Pub. L. 91-190, as amended), and the Council on Environmental Quality 
Regulations (40 CFR parts 1500-1508), the National Park Service (NPS) 
and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in cooperation with San 
Juan County, Washington and the Washington State Department of Natural 
Resources, have prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final 
EIS) for alternatives designed to respond to coastal bluff erosion that 
threatens a segment of the Cattle Point Road located in San Juan Island 
National Historical Park (Park), Washington. The Final EIS identifies 
and analyzes three action alternatives for realignment of the road 
through the park for use by residents and visitors traveling to the 
east end of the Cattle Point peninsula. The potential environmental 
consequences of these alternatives (and a no-action alternative which 
would continue current road management), and appropriate measures to 
minimize or avoid harm, are identified and analyzed.
    Background: A 500-foot long segment of the Cattle Point Road, which 
terminates on the southeastern tip of San Juan Island, is threatened by 
coastal erosion at the base of the slope traversed by the road. This 
road passes through the Park and serves residences on a peninsular area 
of the island known as Cattle Point, as well as providing public access 
to the Cattle Point Natural Resource Conservation Area, managed by the 
Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). If erosion continues 
unabated, the roadway eventually may fail, disrupting vehicular access 
to these areas. The road is currently maintained by San Juan County 
(County); the project area of potential effect is primarily within the 
Park. The entire Park is listed on the National Register of Historic 
Places as a National Historic Landmark.
    A Notice of Intent to begin the conservation planning and 
environmental impact analysis for the project was published in the 
Federal Register on February 6, 2004. Public engagement was initiated 
through a newsletter and news release, followed by two public meetings 
held February 18, 2004, on San Juan Island. Project team members 
presented information and gathered feedback and ideas on preliminary 
alternatives and potential environmental issues. Approximately 30 
public comments were received during the scoping period ending March 
19, 2004. A Scoping Report was prepared which described the range of 
potential alternatives identified for more detailed analysis, as well 
as alternatives dismissed from further consideration (including 
armoring the base of the slope in lieu of road realignment options). 
The Scoping Report included comments and agency responses as 
appendices. On June 17, 2004, the Scoping Report was issued, and a 
notice posted on the Park Web site announced availability of the 
document. Throughout 2005-2006 newsletters and press releases 
summarizing progress on preparation of the EIS were distributed, and 
the County and other agencies were periodically updated. The Washington 
State Historic Preservation Officer provided concurrence with a 
determination of No Adverse Effect on June 23, 2009.
    The Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS was published in the 
Federal Register on September 7, 2010. Public engagement was initiated 
through wide distribution of a newsletter. An article regarding pending 
release of the Draft EIS was published September 1, 2010, in the 
Journal of the San Juan Islands. A public open house was hosted by the 
Park in the town of Friday Harbor on October 26, 2010 (approximately 
three dozen persons attended). During the 60 day public comment period, 
40 comment letters were received (23 by mail and 17 were submitted at 
the open house); of this total, seven were from agencies and 
organizations, and the remainder were received from individuals. No 
substantially new information was received.
    Proposal and Alternatives: Alternative A: No Action--The existing 
use, maintenance, and management associated with the road would 
continue without change. This alternative provides a baseline of 
current conditions to aid comparison and analysis of the action 
alternatives. Unless current management changes, erosion eventually 
could cause the road to fail, disrupting vehicular access to 
residential properties in the Cattle Point Estates and Cape San Juan 
neighborhoods and to public lands east of the eroding bluff. Since 
measurements began in 2002, erosion has moved approximately 14 feet 
closer to the guard rail and is currently 32 feet from the guard rail 
at its closest point. The continued life span of the road is difficult 
to predict, however large storm events could potentially make the road 
unsafe in a few years.
    Life expectancy (relative to coastal erosion) of each of the three 
action alternatives is estimated at approximately 100 years. 
Alternative C: Long Tunnel on Minor Realignment

[[Page 61633]]

involves a short realignment (2,830 feet) relatively low on the slope 
of Mt. Finlayson. Sixteen hundred feet of the realignment would be 
within a bored tunnel. Maximum slope would be 7% gradient. Alternative 
D: Mid-Slope Alignment with Short Tunnel involves mid-slope realignment 
to the north of the existing road, utilizing a short tunnel near the 
ridge line of Mt. Finlayson. Realignment length would be 4,700 feet, 
775 feet of which would be within the tunnel. Maximum slope would be 8% 
gradient.
    The ``agency preferred'' alternative is Alternative B: Hybrid Mid-
Slope Realignment. This involves mid-slope realignment to the north of 
the existing road, traversing the south-facing slope of Mt. Finlayson. 
At its highest point, this alignment curves slightly south of the Mt. 
Finlayson summit. The approximately 4,950 foot long realignment would 
be entirely on the surface (no tunnel), with a short slope of 10.5% 
gradient on the eastern end. This also is deemed to be the 
``environmentally preferred'' course of action.
    Not sooner than 30 days after publication by the Environmental 
Protection Agency of its notice of filing of the Final EIS in the 
Federal Register, a Record of Decision will be prepared. Because this 
is a delegated EIS, the official responsible for the NPS decision is 
the Regional Director, Pacific West Region. Subsequently the official 
responsible for implementation of the approved road relocation project 
is the Superintendent, San Juan Island National Historical Park.

    Dated: September 26, 2012.
Patricia L. Neubacher,
Acting Regional Director, Pacific West Region.
[FR Doc. 2012-24923 Filed 10-9-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-MS-P